La Salle University Professor Jillian Baker Selected as a “2015 Black History Month Gamechanger” for Her “Ground-Breaking Research” in HIV/AIDS Prevention

 

La Salle University professor Jillian Lucas Baker, DrPH, was named a “2015 Black History Month Gamechanger” by KYW Newsradio and CBSPhilly for her “ground-breaking work in HIV/AIDS research.”

“I am truly honored that I was even nominated for this, let alone to have been selected,” said Baker. “I hope that it will bring attention for the continual need for HIV prevention programs in our community.”

Baker, who is an Assistant Professor of Public Health in the department of Urban Public Health & Nutrition at La Salle’s School of Nursing and Health Sciences, is in the last year of a Diversity Investigator Supplement Award funded by the National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development. The goal of this supplement award is to foster Baker’s independent research abilities in HIV/STI prevention research.

“My research has assessed the feasibility of developing and implementing a sexual risk communication intervention program for African American fathers or father figures and adolescent sons,” she said. “For the elicitation research phase of my project, six focus groups were conducted with thirty African American father-son pairs. Participants were recruited from referrals via barbershops, community based organizations, and clinics.” All focus groups were held at a barbershop in West Philadelphia.

“The groups provided a deeper understanding of the factors that facilitated or hindered father-son sexual risk communication and how this communication influences sexual beliefs and behaviors of male youth,” said Baker.  “I’m now analyzing the data from those focus groups.”

Baker holds her doctorate in Public Health from Drexel University with a concentration in Community Health and Prevention. She is also a trained community mental health counselor with a B.A. degree from the University of Pennsylvania and a M.Ed. from Temple University. She completed one year of postdoctoral training at the National Center on Fathers and Families at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania.

La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order, which St. La Salle founded in 1680. La Salle is an educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

Opening their Home and Hearts to a Teen from Liberia

 

La Salle University Receives 2014 Community Engagement Classification from Carnegie Foundation

 

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In recognition of La Salle University’s successful partnership with the local and global communities, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has selected La Salle for its 2014 Community Engagement Classification.

La Salle was selected because of its ability to demonstrate a mission, culture, leadership, resources, and practices that support dynamic and noteworthy community engagement. La Salle is one of only 240 schools nationwide earning this distinction. The University was also recognized for its community engagement in 2010.

“Community engagement is a big part of what we are as an institution, and how we define ourselves as Lasallians,” said Brother Robert Kinzler, F.S.C., Director of La Salle’s Office of University Ministry and Service. “We’re humbled and gratified to receive such recognition from the Carnegie Foundation, which is because of the efforts of many students, faculty, staff, and community partners in living the mission of the University.”

Some examples of La Salle’s community engagement—locally and beyond—are:

  • La Salle’s Communication Sciences and Disorders students and faculty provide hearing assessments and screenings for local preschool-aged children in partnership with Head Start. The clinics are located on La Salle’s campus, serving the local community at little or no cost.
  • Through AIDS Outreach, volunteers visit and build relationships with individuals living with HIV at two city hospice centers. They engage in therapeutic social activities and sponsor on-campus educational programs.
  • Neighborhood Tutoring is a free, one-on-one tutoring and mentoring program that serves children in grades K–8 from Philadelphia schools. Each child comes to La Salle’s campus twice a week and spends time with his or her assigned La Salle tutor, doing homework and playing educational games.
  • Project Teamwork, under La Salle’s Athletics Department, works with numerous community organizations, such as Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Logan Elementary School, and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Student-athletes and coaches serve as mentors and role models to youth, providing academic, social, and emotional support.
  • For more than a decade, La Salle students have traveled to Harlan, Ky., during their Spring Break as part of Project Appalachia. The service trip exposes students to the culture and the underlying causes of the region’s economic hardships.
  • La Salle’s Neighborhood Nursing Center provides access to public health, educational, and community services to underserved populations in the region. Emphasis is placed on health promotion, injury prevention, screenings, detections, and referrals.
  • There are service-learning courses across several departments actively engaged with the community. One example is the University’s Writers Matter program, in which La Salle students serve as tutors and mentors for inner-city middle school students, encouraging them to express themselves through writing while learning critical writing skills.
  • The Neighbor-to-Neighbor organization provides much-needed support to the elderly and disabled residents in La Salle’s immediate neighborhood. Students build relationships with their neighbors by doing yard work, painting, planting flowers, and completing other household chores. The program received an award from the American College Personnel Association’s Commission for Social Justice for Outstanding Social Justice Collaboration.

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an independent policy and research center that supports needed transformations in American education through tighter connections between teaching practice, evidence of student learning, the communication and use of this evidence, and structured opportunities to build knowledge. The Foundation is located in Stanford, Calif.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

King’s Dream 2015: La Salle Honors the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., with a Series of Community-Based Events

 

Honoring the life and legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., La Salle University will hold its annual King’s Dream series of events throughout the coming weeks. On Monday, Jan. 19, Martin Luther King Day, La Salle will kick off its program with a day of service.

According to Brother Bob Kinzler, F.S.C., La Salle’s Director of the University’s Office of Ministry and Service, more than 160 La Salle students, faculty, and staff are expected to participate in the day of service; so many people signed up that the University needed to add additional volunteering opportunities. The Lasallians will join neighbors and other community members providing service at organizations near campus, including the Belfield Recreation Center, Calcutta House, an AIDS hospice, and Face to Face, which offers free human services to more than 2,500 low income and homeless individuals each year.

Also on Jan. 19 will be an Interfaith Prayer Service at the De La Salle Chapel:
a fellowship gathering starts at 4:30 p.m., followed by the service at 5 p.m.
At 6 p.m., members of the neighborhood community will be invited to join in an extended fellowship.

Another part of King’s Dream 2015 is the Emerging Leaders Program, which will take place on Jan. 21 at 5 p.m. in Dunleavy Auditorium. It will feature a discussion of inequality in the United States, and how using Dr. King’s message of
non-violence and love can effect positive change. The guest speaker is
William Wright-El, a spoken word artist and founder of the Philadelphia
“NO Boundaries” program.

As part of this celebration of Dr. King, La Salle students and high school students are also invited to enter the University’s third annual Oratorical and Spoken Word Contest, scheduled for Feb. 10. Students are to submit either an oratorical or spoken word piece reflecting a theme based on an excerpt from one of Dr. King’s speeches:

“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. The true neighbor will risk his position, his prestige, and even his life for the welfare of others. In dangerous valleys and hazardous pathways, he will lift some bruised and beaten brother to a higher and more noble life.”

An online application must be completed before Monday, Jan. 26, at http://studentaffairs.lasalle.edu/mlk/events/oratory/.

For information on all MLK events, visit: http://studentaffairs.lasalle.edu/mlk/events/day-of-service/.

La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order, which St. La Salle founded in 1680. La Salle is an educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools
(60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

La Salle University’s 14th Annual Economic Outlook Forum to Feature Stuart G. Hoffman, Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, for The PNC Financial Services Group, as Keynote Speaker on January 22 at the Union League of Philadelphia

 

Stuart G. Hoffman, Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, for The PNC Financial Services Group, will be the keynote speaker at the 14th annual Economic Outlook forum on January 22 at The Union League of Philadelphia. Hoffman’s address is titled, “Prospects for the US Economy in 2015.”  The event, which starts at noon, is sponsored by The Union League of Philadelphia Business Leadership Forum and La Salle University.

“We are at a very different place in both our national and the global economy, than we’ve been in the past several years,” said William Sautter, Chair of the La Salle University Board of Trustees, “so I am looking forward to having a person of the stature of Stuart Hoffman share his perspective on the economic prospects for 2015 with the leaders of our region’s business community.”

WPHT talk show host Chris Stigall will introduce Hoffman, and following the presentation will moderate a brief question and answer session between the audience and Hoffman.

Hoffman will discuss the U.S. economy and financial markets and those economic indicators contributing to his favorable outlook for both in 2015.  As one of the most accurate forecasters and consistently “bullish” economist, Hoffman will share the reasons why he calls for the economic and stock market “bears” to be, as he puts it, “boiled in (cheap) oil.”

Hoffman joined PNC in 1980, following a six-year tenure with the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. He became Vice President and Senior Economist for PNC in 1987 and was elected Senior Vice President and Chief Economist in 1991. He has earned a solid reputation as one of the leading economists in the country, having been recognized as the most accurate forecaster for 2004 by Business Week and the second most accurate economic and interest rate forecaster for 2006 by USA Today. He was named one of the top forecasters in The Wall Street Journal economic survey covering the period of 1988 to 2012. Hoffman is a regular guest on national business television and radio programs, including CNBC, Bloomberg TV, and The Wall Street Journal Radio Report, and he is frequently quoted in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and Barron’s. He is currently serving on the American Bankers Economic Advisory Committee. He also serves on the board of directors of the Economic Club of Pittsburgh, the local chapter of National Association for Business Economics. He is a past president of the National Association for Business Economics.

Hoffman is a 1971 graduate of Pennsylvania State University. He received a master’s degree in 1973 and a doctorate degree in economics in 1975, both from the University of Cincinnati, where he was a Charles Phelps Taft Memorial Fellow. In 2004, the University of Cincinnati honored him as a Distinguished Alumnus and, in 2011, presented him with The Carl Linder Award for Outstanding Business Achievement.

For tickets, click here, or call, 215.951.1540.

The PNC Financial Services Group is one of the United States’ largest diversified financial services organizations, providing retail and business banking; residential mortgage banking; specialized services for corporations and government entities, including corporate banking, real estate finance and asset-based lending; wealth management and asset management.

La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order, which St. La Salle founded in 1680. La Salle is an educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values. The University is ranked by U.S. News & World Report among the top 30 schools in the North Region and among the top 10 Catholic schools in the region.

La Salle University’s Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic Offers Rehabilitative Services to Those Needing Help With Speech, Language and Cognitive Impairments

 

When Gertrude “Trudy” Snyder woke up from her third brain operation, she could not speak.

But you probably wouldn’t know that if you engaged her in a casual conversation.

She saw therapists at the Moss-Rehabilitation Clinic in Elkins Park, Pa., and now receives treatment every Thursday at the Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic at La Salle University, where she is treated by a graduate student.

The Northeast Philadelphia resident has made remarkable progress, but admits she has a ways to go before making a complete recovery.

At one point, she could not utter a complete sentence. “Now, I’m working with multi-syllable words,” said Snyder. “I speak OK in a one-on-one conversation, but I have trouble speaking in front of a group, which I’ve had to do for my therapy at Moss. I also have trouble reading aloud, but they don’t care about me taking so long to speak.”

In a one-on-one situation, Snyder seems relaxed and answers questions easily, but once in a while she’ll say words out of order, such as “That you much very.”

Still, this is a long way from when she started.

In her early 20s, she had two operations to remove brain tumors, and was fine until the tumor grew back five years ago. After surgery, she could not form words.

“When I started they would show me a picture and ask me to say something about the picture, what it is,” said Snyder.

At the La Salle clinic, Megan McGlinchey, a first year student in the University’s master’s program in speech-language-hearing pathology, has Snyder doing more complex exercises:

“She’ll assign me a letter, such as T, and in one minute ask me to say as many words as I can think of that begin with the letter T,” said Snyder.

The La Salle clinic charges only nominal fees for therapy sessions, says director James Mancinelli, M.S., CCC-SLP. “When a patient has no insurance, or their insurance runs out during treatment, we’re a resource,” he said.

Many people think the clinic only deals with speech issues such as stuttering, but Mancinelli said the clinic has treated people who suffered brain injuries or traumatic injuries from auto accidents that affect a patient’s language and cognitive skills.

Services for adults includea variety of communication and swallowing disorders such as aphasia, traumatic brain injuries, cognitive-communication impairments, right-hemisphere disorder, stuttering, apraxia of speech, dysarthria, and voice disorders.

Services for children includedisorders of articulation and phonology, expressive and receptive language delays, hearing loss, auditory processing disorders, stuttering, voice disorders, and speech and language disorders as a result of developmental disabilities including autism spectrum disorders, as well as pediatric feeding and swallowing impairments.

Snyder is McGlinchey’s first patient.

“I was a little nervous at first,” she said, “but I’ve grown more confident.” According to Snyder, “She’s terrific!”

One of the biggest differences between learning how to treat patients and actually working with one, McGlinchey said, is paperwork:

“I’m learning how to keep records of patient sessions, which are important,” she said.

Each student-patient session is monitored by a trained therapist watching on a video monitor; this way the therapist can show the student what they did right and how they could improve. These taped sessions are also used in classes.

For information about the clinic, call 215-951-1888 or visit http://www.lasalle.edu/snhs/centers-and-clinics/speech-language-hearing-community-clinics/

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association Presents Annual Award to La Salle University History Chair Stuart Leibiger

 

La Salle University History Department Chair and professor Stuart Leibiger, Ph.D., will receive the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association Award, given annually to a person who has done great service to perpetuate the memory and virtues of the first president.

“I am honored to receive this award because it is a lifetime achievement award. It recognizes that I have been researching, writing about, and lecturing about George Washington and the Founding (of the country) for more than 25 years,” said Leibiger, who joined the La Salle faculty in 1997. “I am also honored to receive this award because past recipients of the ward include distinguished Washington scholars whom I have long admired.”

Leibiger will receive the award on Washington’s birthday, Feb. 22, 2015, at the George Washington Masonic Temple in Alexandria, Va.

In addition, he will participate in a symposium at the George Washington Masonic Temple, giving a lecture on a Washington-related topic of his choice. He will present “Washington and Lafayette: Father and Son of the Revolution.”

He will also participate in a three-member session on Washington, in which each member will speak for 30 minutes, followed by a Q&A session.

Leibiger is the author of Founding Friendship: George Washington, James Madison and the Creation of the American Republic, which chronicles the little-known personal and professional relationship Washington and Madison shared.

He has written numerous articles on the Founders for historical magazines and journals, and he has been a historical consultant for television documentaries and museums. He has worked on the editorial staffs of the Papers of George Washington and the Papers of Thomas Jefferson.

In addition, Leibiger has been a history content scholar for numerous teacher workshops run by the Bill of Rights Institute and other educational institutions in 17 states.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

Not a Problem: La Salle University Students Win Computing Contest

 

La Salle University computer science students Candice Schumann and Howard Stickley recently won a problem-solving competition at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in College-Eastern Region (CCSC-E) conference at York College of Pennsylvania.

Teams from 10 colleges had three and one-half hours to solve five problems. Schumann, a senior, and Stickley, a junior, were the only competitors to solve four problems. They received Amazon gift cards for placing first.

“It was a crazy experience! I have never been on a team that solved more than three problems before,” Schumann said. “Since it was my last competition at La Salle, I pushed myself to try to get through as many problems as fast as possible. There were other teams in a different room, so we didn’t know how we were doing in comparison.”

Stickley said, “It was the best experience I have personally had at a competition. Our team has done well in the past, but I don’t remember us ever having solved more than three problems. The experience was made even more memorable because this was Candice’s last programming contest, so this was the last time we would have a chance to work as a team.”

They practiced 16 hours to prepare for the latest CCSC-E competition.

Schumann said she and Stickley tried to solve the easiest problems first, then the harder ones. Schumann has competed at five CCSC-E competitions, and Stickley has competed at four. A second La Salle team, with students Kane Sebesky and Jefferson Lima, also participated, and completed two of the problems.

Schumann has received three grants from the National Science Foundation to attend special programs on advanced mathematics. La Salle University Mathematics and Computer Science Department Chair Jonathon Knappenberger, Ph.D., said Schumann came to the University with such a strong background in math that she bypassed freshman-level courses in her first year, and will graduate a semester early in December.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

La Salle University Honors Johnson & Johnson’s Mike Rose with Information Technology Leadership Award

 
Provost Joseph Marbach presents the 2014 Information Technology Leadership Award to alum Michael Rose.

Provost Joseph Marbach presents the 2014 Information Technology Leadership Award to alum Michael Rose.

La Salle University honored Michael Rose, a vice president at Johnson and Johnson Health Care Systems Inc. and a La Salle alumnus, with its 11th annual Information Technology Leadership Award.

Rose is Vice President, Supply Chain Visibility, Customer & Logistics Services with the Johnson & Johnson Supply Chain. “My responsibilities include: product identification and traceability, product identification standards and eCommerce strategy,” he said.

Rose was a biology major at La Salle, but it was during course electives that his interest in technology grew.

“I took several extra math and physics classes. My classmates, Jack Powers and Paul Coady, would take Steve Longo’s physics classes because we really liked Steve as a professor, and we knew that any course taught by Steve would be worthwhile,” Rose said. “My only regret is that I dropped (mathematics professor) Sam Wiley’s topology class during the spring semester of my senior year. As fate would have it, to prepare for one of my classes in graduate school, I had to quickly learn topology to be able to complete the course assignments.”

“I was always interested in science and technology, even as a kid,” Rose said. “I had a microscope and collected rocks and minerals. I value the practical application of technology—not necessarily technology for technology’s sake alone—because its use has positive impacts in so many areas: our families, our lives, our culture, as well as creating business opportunities. Johnson and Johnson’s (J&J) use of technology improves the lives of our patients that use our innovative products. From a supply chain perspective, we use technology to combat counterfeit products and help ensure that our customers receive genuine products. Through the business application of technology, J&J continually improves their efficiency and effectiveness.”

Margaret McCoey, Director of La Salle’s Graduate Programs in Computer Information Science and Information Technology Leadership said, “I actually remember Mike’s student days and his tutoring of math students—I was one—along with his participation and membership in the computer science advisory board.”

“One specific instance I recall involved a student who missed an opportunity to apply for the J&J Leadership Program. Mike heard about the student and intervened on her behalf. The intervention was positive for the student, who is still a current J&J employee,” McCoey said. “Whenever we have asked Mike for help, either on curriculum reviews, classroom visits, or panel discussions, the answer is always the same. I am pleased we are able to honor Mike with this award and proud to be associated with him professionally and as a member of the La Salle community.”

Rose and his wife, Donna, have been married for 35 years and they have two sons. They reside in Fountainville, Pa.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

 

 

La Salle University Economics and Finance Major Matthew Accardi Interning with the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

 

La Salle University senior Matthew Accardi is interning this semester with the Federal Reserve Bank (FRB) of Philadelphia.

An economics and finance double major, Accardi is working with the FRB’s Business Outlook Survey. “It surveys regional manufacturing firms and asks basic economic questions. This survey is widely read and moves markets when it is released. I get to work in every step of the survey’s development and processing,” said Accardi, who is from Stone Harbor, N.J., and a graduate of Wildwood Catholic High School.

Accardi began La Salle undecided on a major, but, after taking introductory courses on economics he decided to concentrate in the field.

“I enjoy the intuitive approach necessary in studying and succeeding in the field of economics,” Accardi said. “Economics is constantly evolving and new, exciting opportunities seem to be constantly arising.”

Mike E. Trebing, senior economic analyst at FRB, said Accardi is, “very organized.  A good listener.  He takes good notes and utilizes them to remember tasks performed up to six months ago. This is very important in developing effective research skills and in the learning process.”

“He also said he had very little, if any, programming experience, but picked up on that as well,” Trebing added. “Most importantly, I think he took the sage advice of Federal Reserve President Charles Plosser, who, during the welcoming of our interns, said  that they should add value and make good recommendations to improve the way we do things.”

According to the FRB, more than 3,500 students applied for 35 intern spots this semester.

Recently, Accardi was inducted into La Salle’s Alpha Epsilon Honor Society, which recognized high scholarship and community service. He volunteers at Cristo Rey High School in Philadelphia and at the Crest Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center inCape May Courthouse, N.J.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.