Course Descriptions

 

BIO 157 (F, S)
LIFE SCIENCE: AN ENVIRONMENTAL APPROACH
3 credits
Frameworks
A foundation biology course for non-majors that places an emphasis on the unifying concepts of ecology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of environmental issues, and establish a relevance to students’ lives. Topics will include human influence on patterns and products of change in living systems, energy matter and organization, and human interaction and interdependence with other living systems.

BIO 158 (F, S)
LIFE SCIENCE: A HUMAN APPROACH
3 credits
Frameworks
A foundation biology course for non-majors that places an emphasis on the unifying concepts of human biology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of life, and establish a relevance to students’ lives. Topics will include maintaining dynamic equilibrium in humans, human reproduction and inheritance, and human growth and differentiation.

BIO 161-162 (F, S)
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
4 credits

A basic course in the structure and functioning of the human body with emphasis placed on the interrelationships of the major organ systems. Intended for Allied Health students. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory; two terms. BIO 161 is a prerequisite for BIO 162.

BIO 163 (F, S)
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY
4 credits

Structure, growth, and identification of medically important microorganisms; role of specific pathogens in the etiology of human disease; immunology; chemotherapeutic and antibiotic control of infectious diseases. Intended for Allied Health students. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

BIO 180
INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY
3 credits
Frameworks
A course designed to familiarize students with some basic concepts in biology and chemistry. The course uses a combination of lecture, laboratory, problem-solving, and critical-thinking techniques. Permission of the Biology Department Chairperson is required.

BIO 210 (F, S)
CELLULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS
4 credits

An introduction to the principles of cellular and molecular biology and genetics. Topics include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular reproduction, and molecular and classical genetics. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: high school or college chemistry.

BIO 220 (F, S)
STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF ORGANISMS
4 credits

An introduction to the principles of plant and animal form and function. Emphasis will be placed on the correlation of structure and function of the major organ systems of plants and animals. Laboratory sessions will focus on physiological phenomena. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

BIO 230
DIVERSITY, EVOLUTION, AND ECOLOGY
4 credits

An integrated study of evolutionary principles and mechanisms, the diversity of life, ecosystem structure and dynamics, human interaction with ecosystem components, and the biological basis of behavior. Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

BIO 301
COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY
4 credits

Comparative systemic anatomy of the vertebrate classes; hypotheses of origin and radiation of the phylum Chordata. Laboratory dissections of representative Chordates from amphioxus to mammal. Two hours lecture; four hours laboratory.

BIO 303
MICROBIOLOGY
3 credits

Structure, growth, identification, and control of microorganisms of major medical, environmental, and industrial importance; molecular control and genetics of bacteria and viruses; immunology; microbial pathogenesis; and epidemiology of infectious diseases of humans. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

BIO 305
GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY
3 credits

A lecture-laboratory course that examines the metabolic processes and associated physiochemical phenomena of vertebrates. Current hypotheses of neural, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, and digestive physiology will be studied. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

BIO 306
NEUROBIOLOGY
3 credits

A lecture-laboratory study of the nervous system, including principles of membrane biophysics, cellular neurophysiology, systems neurophysiology, and neuroanatomy. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

BIO 310 ( )
GENETICS
3 credits

An introduction to genetics at the molecular, cytological, and organismal level. Included are the thorough coverage of Mendelian and other basic transmission genetics phenomena in the light of our knowledge of DNA and cell structure and function; mutation and mutagenesis; and an introduction to recombinant DNA. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

BIO 314
BIOMETRICS
3 credits

Analysis of experiments and research data in quantitative biology. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including probability distributions, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation. Three hours of lecture.

BIO 317
INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY
4 credits

Life processes, phylogenetic advances, and basic classification of the major pre-chordate phyla with an emphasis on their evolution and ecology. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

BIO 318
EVOLUTION
3 credits

A presentation and analysis of the evidence for the evolution of life. Major topics include the origin of life and cellular organelles as well as the development of the diversity of life present today. Heavy emphasis on the ideas of Charles Darwin as expanded and modified by evidence from modern population genetics, cytogenetics, and molecular biology. Three hours lecture.

BIO 319
THE PLANT KINGDOM
4 credits

Functional anatomy, phylogeny, and basic systematics of non-vascular and vascular plants. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

BIO 400
MARINE BIOLOGY
3 credits

A contemporary view of the dynamics establishing community structure in pelagic, estuarine, mangrove tidepool, coral reef, hydrothermal vent, and intertidal ecosystems. Structural, functional, behavioral, and adaptive modifications of marine organisms will be examined. Three hours lecture; field trip(s) typically included.

BIO 402
CELL BIOLOGY
3 credits

Physical properties, chemical structure, and metabolism of simple and specialized cells; recent advances in the techniques of cell culture and investigation. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

BIO 403
PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY
3 credits

Basic concepts of ecology and a broad introduction to overall biosphere functioning. Major topics include energy flows; nutrient cycles; environmental conditions and their importance; plants and animals at the individual, population, and community level; and the overall functioning and development of the major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Three hours lecture.

BIO 404 (F, Odd Years)
FIELD ECOLOGY
3 credits

Field and laboratory projects/research at La Salle’s Penllyn Biostation and other sites. Prerequisite: BIO 403 or permission of instructor, six hours laboratory and field work.

BIO 405
HISTOLOGY
4 credits

An examination of the minute and ultra structure of mammalian primary tissues together with their functional relationships in the formation of major organ systems. A histological basis of function is stressed. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

BIO 406 ( )
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
3 credits

The molecular and genetic analysis of development and differentiation. Some descriptive morphogenesis is considered. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

BIO 412 (F)
BIOCHEMISTRY
4 credits

A course that demonstrates the principles of basic biochemistry while focusing on the interrelationships between those biochemical pathways that provide energy and those that provide the basic molecular species for synthesis. Topics include bioenergetics, low molecular weight biosynthesis, enzyme function and kinetics, and metabolic control. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: CHM 201 and 202.

BIO 413 (S)

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
4 credits
A survey course that will examine the basic concepts of molecular biology. Topics include mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication, transcription and translation, recombinant DNA technology, molecular aspects of gene interaction and recombination, cellular transformation, and the molecular biology of the nervous and immune systems. The laboratory focuses on utilizing the basic techniques currently employed in molecular biology (molecular cloning, ELISA, genetic recombination, gel electrophoresis, etc.) Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory. Required for students starting their studies in the fall of 2008; replaces BIO 418-419. BIO 413 will first be offered to the class that entered in the fall of 2008. Prerequisite: BIO 412.

BIO 418 (S)

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
3 credits

A survey course that will examine the basic concepts of molecular biology. Topics include mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication, transcription and translation, recombinant DNA technology, molecular aspects of gene interaction and recombination, cellular transformation, and the molecular biology of the nervous and immune systems. Three hours lecture (taken alone or concurrently with BIO 419). This course is required for those starting their studies in the fall of 2000 or earlier and will be replaced by BIO 413 starting with the entering class of Fall 2008. Prerequisite: BIO 412.

BIO 460 (F, S, Summer)
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION/INTERNSHIP
3 credits

Normally full-time, paid employment at a cooperating institution/company to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions may qualify). Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. Position must be approved by Department Chair. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. Prerequisite: 3.0 G.P.A.

BIO 470
SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY
3 credits

Periodically, a course will be offered that deals in detail with a topic of interest in current biological research. Students may be asked to write library research paper(s) and present a seminar.

BIO 480-481 (F, S)
BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH
3 credits

For election by qualified students contemplating advanced studies. Intended to provide actual research experience under staff supervision. Students are required to present a seminar on their work and to prepare a poster. Permission of Chair required. Hours to be arranged.

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