Course Descriptions

 

ISBT 101 (F)

LIVING SYSTEMS I

4 credits

This course provides students with an introduction to biology, chemistry, environmental science, and geology with an emphasis on practical applications. Included in this course are the fundamentals of computer use, including training on how to use the computer to prepare laboratory reports. The course is laboratory-intensive with hands-on group learning experiences. Students will be expected to master basic laboratory skills and gain a degree of comfort in working in the laboratory.

ISBT 102 (S)

LIVING SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY

4 credits

Students (working in teams) are required to select 2 to 3 technologies that are derived from the sciences they were introduced to in ISBT 101. Students analyze the technology from its inception to its current status. The analysis includes business considerations, an understanding of the basic science, moral, social, and ethical issues related to the technology, and a summary suggesting a future for the technology. Each team is required to prepare both written and oral presentations. Prerequisite: ISBT 101.

ISBT 111 (F)

TECHNOLOGY AND SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

4 credits

This course introduces students to the field of systems analysis and to the broad spectrum of technologies that are integrated into the design, construction, and operation of a high-tech electronic commercial product. The product is disassembled into its simplest parts followed by an analysis of the form, function, and fundamental physical-science-basis of each component. Using laboratory computers, equipment, and software tools, students assemble the components into a working prototype of the commercial product.

ISBT 112 (S)

TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATIONS I: PROCESS

4 credits

This course examines the fundamental physical processes utilized by a wide range of technology, including the technology introduced in the ISBT 111 course. Topics from areas including kinematics, energy, thermodynamics, light, and optics are discussed. The calculus-level math concepts used to describe these topics will be introduced along with their applications. The course is laboratory-intensive with hands-on group learning experiences. Upon completion of this course, students will be comfortable in a physical science laboratory. Prerequisite: ISBT 111.

ISBT 201 (F)

LIVING SYSTEMS II

4 credits

This course examines specific concepts and practices underlying biology, chemistry, environmental science, and geology. Students spend most of their time in the laboratory learning the skills and procedures that are essential in the technological practice of these sciences. Students work in teams and practice hands-on problem solving. Prerequisite: ISBT 101, 102.

ISBT 202 (S)

TECHNOLOGY AND BUSINESS ANALYSIS

4 credits

This course continue the student’s exploration of existing technologies and the process of commercialization. Students, working in teams, create companies and analyze three different technologies as if their companies were creating and developing those technologies. Specifically, the students need to demonstrate the science of the technology in the laboratory, define the need, analyze the sales and marketing plan, understand the moral and ethical implication, and calculate costs and profitability. The students assess the business-state of the technology and recommend directions in which the technology should expand. Each team is required to prepare both written and oral presentations.

Teams will be required to select a technology from each of the ISBT areas of concentration, i.e.: biotechnology and energy and natural resources.. Analysis of a technology from each of the areas prepares students to choose their area of concentration. Prerequisite: ISBT 111 and 201.

ISBT 211 (F)

INSTRUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT

4 credits

This course examines the acquisition of data through an analysis of measurement transducers, instrument design, and computer data-acquisition and interfacing. The descriptive statistics and data-visualization techniques required to transform raw data into useful information are investigated in a laboratory setting. The incorporation of multiple measurements into process-level monitoring and control systems is studied with respect to the various commercially available intelligent instruments, industrial network architectures, and information control systems. Prerequisite: ISBT 111, 112.

ISBT 212 (S)

TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATIONS II: MATERIALS

4 credits

This course examines the materials utilized in machines, devices, and consumer products. The study of metals, polymers, ceramics, adhesives, coatings, fuels, and lubricants is combined with the exploration of mechanical and nondestructive materials testing in a hands-on laboratory environment. In addition, the sources of raw materials, production methods, markets, costs, and waste products of each type of material are evaluated. Prerequisite: ISBT 211.

ISBT 311(F)

LABORATORY INFORMATICS

3 credits

Laboratories and production facilities utilize electronic information systems to enhance productivity, quality, safety, and efficiency. This course introduces students to the concepts of laboratory and production information systems, collectively known as “Laboratory Informatics.” This includes an examination of information collection, storage, and retrieval from computer databases, analysis of technical data including statistical analysis, curve fitting, feature extraction, digital signal processing, frequency analysis, and data modeling, and the study of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) methodologies.

ISBT 312 (S)

COLLABORATIVE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

3 credits

This course introduces students to the tenants of Collaborative Software Development and Project Management. As the majority of commercial and professional software is developed by a group of software engineers rather than individuals, this course examines methods of software project management and specifically utilizes the agile development method of Extreme Programming. Working software is developed throughout the course. The course also utilizes collaborative tools including wikis, source code management, and popular tools used in Project Management including Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Project.

Software projects use the National Instruments LabVIEW Graphical Software Development Environment. Use of LabVIEW is introduced within the course along with Microsoft Project and other popular Project Management tools.

ISBT 411 (F)

INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS

3 credits

This course presents a systematic introduction to the fundamentals of computational intelligence, including in-depth examination of artificial neural networks, evolutionary computing, swarm intelligence and fuzzy systems. Computational intelligence is the study of adaptive mechanisms to enable or facilitate intelligent behavior in complex and changing environments. Specific environments examined include Laboratory Automation, Automated Process Control, Robotics, and Business Decision Support.

ISBT 412 (S)

KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY

3 credits

This course introduces students to the Knowledge Discovery process with special concentration on the various concepts and algorithms of Data Mining. Specific topics include an examination of Online Analytical Processing (OLAP), data warehousing, information retrieval, and machine learning. The core concepts of classification, clustering, association rules, prediction, regression, and pattern matching are followed by a discussion of advanced topics such as mining temporal data, spatial data, and Web mining. This course incorporates the algorithms examined in ISBT 411—Intelligent Systems—and emphasizes the importance of Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining in research, product development, and production facilities.

ISBT 431

REGULATORY AFFAIRS

3 credits

This course focuses on the history, issues, roles, and future trends of the U.S. agencies such as the FDA, EPA, and OSHA that are responsible for administering the major laws and regulations pertaining to the life cycle of products in commerce. Emphasis is on understanding the impacts of environmental, health, safety (EHS), and product laws and regulations with which most businesses have to comply. All of the major EHS Acts are presented and case studies, practical exercises, and team group work are used to discover the business impact. Prerequisite: ISBT junior standing.

ISBT 481-482

CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE I, II

3 credits

As an extension of a student’s concentration, individual students or teams of students work on a real-world problem designed by the student or team. The project culminates in the student’s formal presentation of results and conclusions both orally and in written form.

CONCENTRATION/ELECTIVE COURSES

BIOTECHNOLOGY

ISBT 301

METHODS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

4 credits

This course provides a hands-on introduction to biotechnology. Through the semester the student learn many of the techniques routinely used in molecular biology and biotechnology. The majority of the time is spent in the laboratory. Upon completion of the course, the student should have sufficient fundamental knowledge of molecular biology and biotechnology to be able to function in a biotechnology laboratory. Prerequisite: ISBT 201

ISBT 302

TISSUE CULTURE

4 credits

This course provides the student with a hands-on introduction to cell culture. Through the semester, the student learns techniques for handling, storing, growing, and manipulating cells in culture. The majority of the time is spent in the laboratory practicing these techniques. Upon completion of the course, the student should have sufficient fundamental knowledge of cell culture to be able to function in a cell culture laboratory. Prerequisite: ISBT 201

ISBT 371

BIOINFORMATICS

3 credits

This course examines current biological problems and explore and develop bioinformatic solutions to these issues. Each topic includes a definition of the problem, a review the basic biological concepts involved, an introduction to the computational techniques used to address the problem along with a utilization of existing web-based tools and software solutions often employed by professionals in the field of bioinformatics. Biological topics include those such as antibiotic resistance, genetic disease and genome sequencing. Computational solutions use industry-standard tools including the Perl and LabVIEW algorithm development languages.

ISBT 401

BIOPROCESSING

4 credits

This course provides students with a hands-on introduction to bioprocessing. Through the semester, students learn how to set up, maintain, and operate bioreactors. Along with the operation of the equipment, they learn and understand the growth requirements for the organisms they choose to grow and the specific requirements for the product they wish the organisms to generate. The majority of the time is spent in the laboratory practicing these techniques. Upon completion of the course, students should have sufficient fundamental knowledge to be able to run a small-scale bioreactor. Prerequisite: ISBT 201

ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

ISBT 321

FUNDAMENTALS OF ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

3 credits

This course covers the fundamental concepts from chemistry, physics, and engineering within the context of energy applications. This includes the principles governing energy transformations, transport, and conversion, including the laws of thermodynamics, the study of heat, and chemical and nuclear reactions. The course focuses on the way natural resources are used to obtain energy. In addition to basic principles, the instructor also uses current events, policy making, and the media’s treatment of issues surrounding the use of natural resources to put these principles in context. Prerequisite: ISBT 212

ISBT 322

ROLE OF ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES IN MODERN SOCIETY

3 credits

This course provides a fairly comprehensive overview of available energy resources both domestically and internationally. This course is taught by a professional in the field who draws upon his or her own experiences. Prerequisite: ISBT 321

ISBT 421

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 credits

This course covers natural resource use, conservation, and management. It begins with a discussion of renewable energy sources, contrasting their use with the use of non-renewable sources. This discussion is followed by one regarding other natural resources, such as water, forests, minerals, and the atmosphere. In addition to basic principles, the instructor also uses current events, policy making, and the media’s treatment of issues surrounding our use of natural resources to put these principles in context. Prerequisite: ISBT 321

ISBT 422

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENT

3 credits

This course covers the topic of sustainability as it relates to the use of our natural resources. It focuses on the philosophy, economics, implementation, public and government involvement in this area, the reality and the future of sustainability. The instructor also uses current events, policy making, and the media’s treatment of issues surrounding our use of natural resources to put these principles in context. Prerequisite: ISBT 321

ELECTIVE COURSES

ISBT 333

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND HIGH TECH BUSINESS I

3 credits

This course directs the student through the many steps required to take a concept from business start-up, through invention and development to commercialization. Students learn through two pathways studying cases and through their own creative efforts. Time is spent tracing the history of high tech start-ups, both those that have survived and those that did not. In parallel, students are required to simulate their own companies. Prerequisite: BUS 100

ISBT 334

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND HIGH TECH BUSINESS II

3 credits

This course is an optional follow-up to ISBT 333. It is aimed at students who have a business idea that they are ready to take to the next level. In this course, students take the business plan they wrote for ISBT 333 and find and include the detail needed to start the business. Students design and participate in feasibility studies, technology demonstrations, market surveys, solicitation of funds, and due diligence. Prerequisite: ISBT 333

ISBT 350, 450

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION I, II

3 credits

This course is for students with full-time, paid assignment in a cooperating firm, and involves job-related learning under faculty and on-site supervision. Students meet regularly with a faculty member and are encouraged to reflect on the relationship between course work and their co-op experience. The positions are arranged through the Director. Required: junior or senior standing, minimum G.P.A. of 3.0, and approval of the Department Chair.

ISBT 360, 460

ISBT INTERNSHIP I, II

3 credits

Normally, students enrolled in this course have part-time or summer employment in a cooperating site that provides practical experience. Working under professional supervision, students learn how to apply their education to everyday demands of the world of work. Students meet regularly with a faculty member who encourages them to reflect on the relationship between course work and their internship experience. Required:  junior or senior status, minimum G.P.A. of 3.0, and approval of the Department Chair.

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