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Course Descriptions

PCC 508 (MAIN: Fall; BUCKS: Summer; MONTCO: Summer)
COGNITION AND LEARNING
3 credits

This course details the empirical and theoretical foundations of the present understanding of cognitive psychology and learning psychology and their integration in contemporary social learning theory. Special attention is paid to the application of the theories and research in counseling and psychotherapy.


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PCC 510 (MAIN: AS NEEDED; BUCKS: AS NEEDED)
INFERENTIAL STATISTICS AND RESEARCH DESIGN
3 credits

Analysis of research designs and the inferential statistics appropriate to reaching conclusions when using ordinal or interval data within these designs. Problems set in non-experimental research and the newer statistical procedures developed in reporting such findings. A brief treatment of program-evaluation procedures. Training in accessing programs on computers.
Prerequisite: PSY/PCC/PCMF 506.


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PCC 511 (MAIN: Fall 2010 and alternate (even) years)
RELIGION, PSYCHOLOGY, AND CULTURE
3 credits

This course examines the historical roots of Western psychology theory in the rise of liberalism and capitalism, the myth of progress, and the individualism of John Locke. The struggle to secure a place for psychology as a science is explored with a study of the biographies of the founders of schools of psychology, European and American. The reasons for animosity to religion or for its radical reinterpretation are studied. The impact upon psychology, often not acknowledged, of Jewish and Christian mysticism is a point of departure for a post-modern critique of a discipline that was and is an offspring of modernity. Oriental as well as Semitic religious experience is surveyed in the human quest for the therapeutic.


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PCC 512 (MAIN: Spring, Summer; Bucks: Summer; MONTCO: Fall)
ADDICTIONS COUNSELING
3 credits

This course focuses mainly on chemical substance abuse but considers the etiology and manifestations of other addictions as well. Attention is given to the occurrence of addiction in the family with particular reference to the physical, behavioral, and attitudinal manifestations of addictive behavior and identification and diagnosis of addiction, as well as the selection of appropriate processes of intervention.


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PCC 515 (MAIN: Fall; BUCKS: Spring 2010 and alternate (even) years; MONTCO: Fall 2011 and alternate (odd) years)
PERSONALITY THEORIES
3 credits

This course presents understanding of the development of human personality and social behavior from the perspective of contemporary social psychology. The course gives attention to application of theories and research in counseling and psychotherapy.


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PCC 524 (MAIN: AS NEEDED; BUCKS: AS NEEDED)
HISTORY AND SYSTEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY
3 credits

This course undertakes an examination of the roots of psychology in ancient and modern philosophy, its beginnings in 19th-century science, and its development from early schools and national identities to its contemporary characteristics.


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PCC 533 (MAIN: Fall; BUCKS: Fall)
BUSINESS BASICS FOR INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 credits

This promotes an understanding of the fundamentals of the structure and processes of business organizations. Examines the basic business concepts encountered in the development of behavioral interventions. It also provides an overview of the challenges facing staff contributors in designing behavioral interventions in a bottom-line-oriented business environment.


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PCC 550 (MAIN: AS NEEDED; BUCKS: AS NEEDED)
BIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR
3 credits

This course provides an examination of the biological substrates of behavior from the cellular to the systemic to the behavioral level. Demonstrations and laboratory exercises will be included.


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PCC 610 (MAIN: Fall, Summer; BUCKS: Spring 2011 and alternate years; MONTCO: Spring 2010 and alternate (even) years)
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL APPROACHES IN COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY
3 credits

This is a clinical skills course with a focus on the initial problems addressed in the process of therapeutic intervention, namely the self-regulation of thoughts, feelings, and actions. Training is in a broadly conceived cognitive behavior therapy that includes a variety of specific intervention strategies designed to address problems of self-regulation. Prerequisites: PSY/PCC/PCMF 500 and PSY/PCC/PCMF 502.


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PCC 644 (MAIN: Summer; BUCKS: Fall; MONTCO: Summer)
CAREER COUNSELING
3 credits

This course offers an opportunity to help adapt your clinical skills to the critical area of career development. It also relates career success and satisfaction to mental health and life fulfillment, considers theories of career development and the process of career counseling, and utilizes career assessment, career resource information, and job placement requirements. Additionally, it includes career counseling with special populations. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC 500.


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PCC 649 (MAIN: Spring; BUCKS: Fall; MONTCO: Fall 2010 and alternate (even) years)
PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT
3 credits

This course provides students with basic information about the selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected personality assessment procedures used in differential diagnosis. It addresses theoretical, research, psychometric, and ethical issues in clinical assessment and emphasizes the major objective personality inventories, behavioral assessment measures, structured clinical interviews, and projective techniques used in clinical assessment. Class sessions incorporate seminar and didactic methods. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC 509.


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PCC 653 (MAIN: Summer 2010 and alternate (even) years; BUCKS: Summer 2011 and alternate (odd) years)
ORGANIZATIONAL INTERVENTIONS
3 credits

This course is designed to assist individuals interested in a career in industrial/organizational psychology in learning about the issues involved in implementing organizational change and development programs. These issues include engaging employees in the change process, diagnosing organizational problems, effective methods for implementing change programs, and the techniques needed to evaluate the entire process.


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PCC 654 (MAIN: Spring 2011 and alternate (odd) years; BUCKS: Spring 2012 and alternate (even) years)
ISSUES IN ORGANIZATIONAL TRAINING
3 credits

This course reviews the issues that need to be addressed when designing and implementing training programs in organizational settings. Special emphasis is given to issues of needs analysis, design of programs, technologies that enhance training, the evaluation of training results, and the transfer of training to the work setting. The course includes review of these issues, as well as hands-on experience in designing and delivering training topics.


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PCC 659 (MAIN: Fall 2011 and alternate (odd) years; BUCKS: Fall 2010 and alternate (even) years)
ASSESSMENT IN ORGANIZATIONAL SETTINGS
3 credits

This course presents methods for assessing skills, emotional problems, and personality in an organizational setting. It provides a) information regarding the review and interpretation of assessment tools as well as the appropriate usage of test results and b) practical experience in using these tools. Instruments are selected from more commonly used tests of skills, emotions, and personality. Training will be provided in the use of computer-assisted testing and with standardized interview instruments. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC 509 or equivalent.


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PCC 660 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Fall, Spring, Summer; MONTCO: Fall, Spring, Summer)
PRACTICUM
2 credits

This is a practicum at an approved field placement site for a minimum of 100 clocked hours observing and/or practicing clinical skills with individuals, couples, families, and/or groups under the direction of an approved supervisor. The practicum must be taken in conjunction with the on-campus seminar in professional ethics (PSY/PCC 661). Prerequisite: Successful completion of written comprehensive examination and completion of 18 credit hours, including PSY/PCC/PCMF 502 and one additional skills course. Corequisite: PSY 661.


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PCC 661 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Fall, Spring, Summer; MONTCO: Fall, Spring, Summer)
PROFESSIONAL/ETHICAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING
1 credit

This course examines professional and ethical issues, with particular reference to the everyday issues of practice. The student is encouraged to develop a "critically examined" personal style and stance with which to address these issues. The class focus will be on the development of an understanding and a working knowledge of the Codes of Ethical Conduct of the American Counseling Association, the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy, the American Psychological Association, and relevant State of Pennsylvania Laws and Statutes.


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PCC 685 - 686 (MAIN: FALL, SPRING, SUMMER; BUCKS: FALL, SPRING, SUMMER; MONTCO: FALL, SPRING, SUMMER)
I/O-MHR PROGRAM INTERNSHIP
2 credits

The supervised internship experience is in an approved human resource (or closely related) department of a non-profit or for-profit agency for a minimum of 200 hours per term. (Continued with 686.) Each semester is two credits. Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including necessary I/O and MBA courses and successful completion of written comprehensive examination. PSY/PCC 685 taken with PSY/PCC 695; PSY/PCC 686 taken with PSY/PCC 696.


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PCC 695 - 696 (MAIN: FALL, SPRING, SUMMER; BUCKS: FALL, SPRING, SUMMER; MONTCO: FALL, SPRING, SUMMER)
I/O-MHR PROGRAM PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR
1 credit

This seminar addresses the personal, practical, and ethical issues involved in the field of industrial/organizational psychology and human resource management. It examines professional development, professional associations, continuing education, credentialing, legal responsibilities and liabilities, confidentiality, agency practice, independent practice, consulting, and inter-professional cooperation. (One credit each semester.) Corequisite: PSY/PCC 695 taken with PSY/PCC 685; PSY/PCC 696 taken with PSY/PCC 686. Prerequisite: Same as PSY/PCC 685.


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PCC/PCMF 500 (MAIN: Fall; BUCKS AND MONTCO: Spring)
COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY: THEORIES AND INTERVENTIONS
3 credits

This course examines major theories of counseling and psychotherapy and the interventions based on those theories. It includes an emphasis on knowledge, skills, and ethical standards needed to provide direct counseling and psychotherapeutic interventions for individuals, families, and groups.


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PCC/PCMF 502 (MAIN: Fall, Spring; BUCKS AND MONTCO: Spring)
COUNSELING LABORATORY I
3 credits

This laboratory course is designed to develop the basic counseling skills that will enable students to understand the client, to develop a trusting relationship with the client, and to facilitate the client’s self-exploration.


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PCC/PCMF 503 (MAIN: Fall, Spring; BUCKS: Fall; MONTCO: Summer)
PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
3 credits

This course discusses the major categories of psychological disorders, as well as theory and research regarding etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Introduction to the use of the DSM.


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PCC/PCMF 504 (MAIN: Fall, Spring; BUCKS: Fall; MONTCO: Summer)
HUMAN BEHAVIOR: A DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVE
3 credits

This course addresses principles of human development and family processes that form the context for the study of human behavior. Special emphasis will be given to grand theories that have made important contributions, both historically and currently, to the study of human development, as well as recent discoveries in developmental science. Issues of separation, individuation, and integration in life patterns will be studied within the context of these major theories.


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PCC/PCMF 506 (MAIN: Spring, Summer, Fall; BUCKS: Summer; MONTCO: Fall)
BASIC PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH DESIGN, STATISTICS, PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT, AND EVALUATION
3 credits

This consumer-oriented course focuses on broad concerns common to all forms of social research. Criteria for evaluation and interpretation of various statistical techniques and research designs are covered.


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PCC/PCMF 509 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Spring; MONTCO: Spring)
PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT I: ASSESSMENT IN CLINICAL AND CAREER COUNSELING
3 credits

This course addresses the basic concepts in the construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment procedures commonly used in psychology. It uses major reference works for selecting and evaluating assessment procedures and includes supervised experience in selecting, administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment procedures and experience with computer-assisted testing. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC/PCMF 506.


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PCC/PCMF 570 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Fall, Spring, Summer; MONTCO: Fall, Spring, Summer)
STATISTICS AND RESEARCH METHODS
3 credits

This is a foundation course that satisfies the undergraduate prerequisites and does not count toward the 48 hours needed for the M.A. degree.


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PCC/PCMF 574 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Fall, Spring, Summer; MONTCO: Fall, Spring, Summer)
INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE RESEARCH AND WRITING
3 credits

This cross-disciplinary seminar introduces students to the latest research technology and databases for advanced work in their major. Emphasis is placed on research and communication skills, including oral presentations and written reports. (Credits in this course do not count toward the 48-hour program requirement.)


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PCC/PCMF 600 (MAIN: Spring 2010 and alternate (even) years; BUCKS: Fall 2011 and alternate (odd) years; MONTCO: Summer 2011 and alternate (odd) years)
CHANGE PROCESSES IN COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY
3 credits

This clinical skills course introduces the student to the nature and impact of psychotherapy as a change agent. It will incorporate consideration of the process of spiritual change as an element of therapeutic change. The focus will be on client-therapist interaction and how change is experienced and promoted in that context. Prerequisites: PSY/PCC/PCMF 500, 502, 503.


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PCC/PCMF 602 (MAIN: Spring & Summer; BUCKS: Summer; MONTCO: Fall)
ADVANCED COUNSELING LABORATORY
3 credits

This course builds on the basic skills practiced and developed in the first counseling laboratory—PSY 502. It provides the student with an intermediate experience and opportunity (prior to field placement) to develop a range of additional counseling skills and strategies, with particular attention given to distinguishing between the content and the process of therapy. While it emphasizes those skills and techniques common to many, if not most, approaches, it also highlights those emphasized and represented in the respective concentrations of the program. Students are assigned to sections of this course according to their concentration. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC/PCMF 502.


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PCC/PCMF 607 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Fall, Spring, Summer; MONTCO: Fall, Spring, Summer)
GRADUATE RESEARCH
3 credits
Elective

Graduate Psychology Research is designed to provide an opportunity for students to engage in research. Students will be required to complete a literature review and design and complete a research project. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC/PCMF 506.


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PCC/PCMF 611 (MAIN: Spring 2011 and alternate (odd) years; BUCKS: Fall 2010 and alternate (even) years; MONTCO: Summer 2012 and alternate (even) years)
INSIGHT-ORIENTED APPROACHES IN COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY
3 credits

This clinical skills course focuses on the issues addressed in the process of psychological intervention, namely, the client’s personal quest for self-understanding, intimacy, maturity, and personal meaning. It includes training in cognitive approaches that emphasize enhanced maturity through insight. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC/PCMF 500.


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PCC/PCMF 612 (MAIN: Spring and Summer; BUCKS: Summer; MONTCO: Fall)
GROUP PROCESSES IN COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY
3 credits

This course combines experiential and didactic approaches. The student learns the major theoretical approaches to group counseling and psychotherapy and also participates in group counseling sessions on issues presented by the classroom group. This will illustrate the dynamics of groups and lead to the acquisition of skills needed to assist in the resolution of behavioral problems. Prerequisites: PSY/PCC/PCMF 500 and PSY/PCC/PCMF 502.


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PCC/PCMF 619 (MAIN: Fall and Summer; BUCKS: Spring; MONTCO: Spring)
MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING AND THERAPY
3 credits

This course explores multicultural counseling theory as well as culture-specific counseling strategies for culturally diverse clients. It is designed to help students develop their multicultural counseling competence and increase their ability to work effectively and ethically in a complex and diverse social world.


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PCC/PCMF 626 (MAIN: Summer; BUCKS: Spring 2012 and alternate (even) years; MONTCO: Spring 2011 and alternate (odd) years)
CHILD IN THE FAMILY CONTEXT
3 credits

This course considers the child in the context of the family. It builds on a knowledge base of individual and family development, and it reviews normative experiences and critical incidents that underscore clinical work with children. A range of problems is examined and the selection and appropriateness of methods of assessment and intervention are highlighted. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC/PCMF 500.


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PCC/PCMF 633 (MAIN: Fall 2011 and alternate (odd) years; BUCKS: Spring 2012 and alternate (even) years)
PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN ADDICTIONS COUNSELING
3 credits

This course provides an in-depth review of the critical issues, pertinent information, and current trends related to addictions counseling. Examples of these issues include: ethics, e.g., confidentiality and code of ethical conduct; dual diagnosis; controversial issues regarding the nature of addictions; professional identity; DSM IV/ICD 10 diagnostic criteria; drug testing; referral strategies and responsibilities; abstinence model of treatment; “wellness” and “professional burnout”; current trends in addictions research; and certification, credentials, and licensing. Prerequisite: PSY/PCC 512.


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PCC/PCMF 634 (MAIN: Fall and Spring; BUCKS: Spring; MONTCO: Fall )
ADDICTIONS AND THE FAMILY
3 credits

This course focuses on an understanding of how addictive processes interact with social and family contexts. This allows more effective treatment interventions to be designed. The current research on family dynamics and treatment of codependence, adolescent substance abuse, and children of addicts will also be reviewed


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PCC/PCMF 641 (MAIN: AS NEEDED; BUCKS: AS NEEDED)
COUNSELING FAMILIES IN THE FACE OF LOSS
3 credits

This course addresses issues of loss and mourning experienced by families as a result of physical and mental disability, job loss, aging, illness, and death. It presents an understanding of the psychological and relational impact of loss with particular reference to those who minister to families in face of loss.


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PCC/PCMF 680-682 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Fall, Spring, Summer; MONTCO: Fall, Spring, Summer)
INTERNSHIP
2 credits

An internship takes place in a supervised experience at an approved field placement site for approximately 200 hours per term. By the conclusion of the internship, students are required to accrue a minimum of 600 clock hours, half of which are client contact. PSY/PCMF 502 and two additional skills courses, completion of PSY 660 (for students required to take this course), and practice in clinical skills with individuals, couples, families, and/or groups. Includes on-campus case seminar. (Continued with PSY 681, 682. Each semester is two credits.) Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including successful completion of written comprehensive examination. Corequisite: PSY/PCC/PCMF 680 taken with PSY/PCMF 690; PSY/PCC/PCMF 681 taken with PSY/PCC/PCMF 691; PSY/PCC/PCMF 682 taken with PSY/PCC/PCMF 692.


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PCC/PCMF 690-692 (MAIN: Fall, Spring, Summer; BUCKS: Fall, Spring, Summer; MONTCO: Fall, Spring, Summer)
PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR/CASE SEMINAR
1 credit

This course addresses the personal, practical, and ethical issues involved in the practice of professional counseling and marriage and family therapy. It also examines professional development, professional associations, continuing education, credentialing, legal responsibilities and liabilities, confidentiality, agency practice, independent practice, consulting, and inter-professional cooperation. (PSY/PCC /PCMF 691, 692—continuation of Professional Seminar—one credit each semester.) Prerequisite: Same as PSY/PCC/PCMF 680, plus completion of PSY/PCC 661 (for students required to take this course).


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PCMF 505 (MAIN: Fall and Spring; BUCKS: Fall; MONTCO: Fall)
SYSTEMS AND SYSTEMS THINKING
3 credits

In this course, the student is given an overview of family functioning. Family structure, family development, family health, family dysfunction, and family treatment are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a systems perspective and applying that perspective to an understanding of family functioning.


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PCMF 603 (MAIN: Summer; BUCKS: Spring; MONTCO: Fall)
HUMAN SEXUALITY
3 credits

This course examines the variety of ways that human sexuality is expressed in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in the context of the interplay between social, physiological, and psychological factors. Methods of studying sexual behavior, concepts of variation and difference, psychosexual development in life stages, and sexual dysfunctions and treatment are addressed.


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PCMF 614 (MAIN: Fall; BUCKS: Spring; MONTCO: Summer)
WORKING WITH FAMILIES
3 credits

This course covers the basic principles, techniques, applications, uses, and contra indicators of the major family therapy systems models. Specifically, the intersystems interface among intrapsychic, interpersonal, and family systems dynamics is addressed. Assessment techniques and intervention rationales are covered along with the role of the therapist and the therapist as person. The concepts of family-of-origin, family functioning, structure, strength, and narratives will be studied through an experiential and didactic approach. Application of theory and research to practice is discussed. Prerequisite: PCMF 505.


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PCMF 616 (MAIN: AS NEEDED; BUCKS: AS NEEDED; MONTCO: AS NEEDED)
CONTEXTUAL FAMILY THERAPY
3 credits

This course provides an exploration of the convictions, concepts, strategies, and techniques of Contextual Therapy, a resource-oriented, trust-based modality of healing interventions for individuals, couples, and families.


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PCMF 624 (MAIN: Summer ; BUCKS: Summer; MONTCO: Spring )
MARITAL AND COUPLES THERAPY
3 credits

Role playing is used to illustrate couples’ treatment dynamics and intervention strategies from initial contacts through the treatment process. Special issues in couples therapy, such as the relationship history, communication patterns, sexual intimacy, and the “couple” relationship vs. the “parenting” relationship, are addressed. Prerequisite: PCMF 505.


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PCMF 628 (MAIN: Spring; BUCKS: Fall; MONTCO: Summer)
UNDERSTANDING RELATIONSHIPS
3 credits

This course is an examination of human relationships with particular reference to their various forms, functions, and patterns of development. The processes of attachment, separation, individuation, and differentiation are highlighted and are used in a contextual (systemic) framework to examine each relationship. Special emphasis is placed on the clinical applications of this knowledge to couples and families. The student is required to complete a study of one of his/her primary dyadic relationships.


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Program offered at:


Francis Berna, OFM, Ph.D.

Donna A. Tonrey, Psy.D., LMFT, LPC
Director

Counseling and Family Therapy
Master's Programs
Office: Wister Hall, Room 218
1900 West Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141 USA
Phone: 215.951.1767
Fax: 215.991.3585
psyma@lasalle.edu


La Salle University reserves the right to alter or change this information
at any time, without notice.

© Copyright 2014 La Salle University