College of Professional and Continuing Studies
College of Professional and Continuing Studies
College of Professional and Continuing Studies
College of Professional and Continuing Studies La Salle University : Professional and Continuing Studies photo
College of Professional and Continuing Studies
ACC 307 (F)
INCOME TAX
3 credits

A comprehensive introduction to the Internal Revenue Code as it applies to the individual taxpayer. The course is intended to examine theoretical concepts, the structural flow of tax data, the interrelationship of taxable transactions and tax liabilities, and tax planning for the individual. Topics include inclusions, exclusions, basis issues, property transactions, capital gains and losses, sale of a residence, involuntary conversions, nontaxable exchanges, business expenses, itemized deductions, filing status, and exemptions. Computer based case studies are assigned to assist in the application of the tax concepts. Prerequisites: Bus 101.

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BUS 205 (F, S)
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY WITH APPLICATIONS
3 credits

This course provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be a knowledgeable end-user. The course focuses on the management of information systems within various organizational settings. Topics include: information systems in organizations, telecommunications, database management systems, transactional processing, management information systems, decision support systems, expert systems, systems analysis and design, systems development and implementation, end-user computing, information resources management and emerging technologies and issues in management information systems. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate one of several areas of emerging information technology such as Electronic Business, Data Warehousing, Data Mining, Decision Support Systems, Expert Systems, etc. Through active participation, students are required to utilize the specific information technology in a hands-on environment. Prerequisite: CSC 155.

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BUS 206 (F, S)
FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS
3 credits

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. Prerequisite: BUS 101.

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BUS 300 (F, S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
3 credits

Students study international aspects of accounting, finance, economics, management, marketing and management information systems.

The course helps students develop an appreciation for how different cultures, governments, and approaches to doing business impact international business-to-business relationships as well as devising strategies to enter markets in other countries. In some semesters the course is taught as a travel-study course that includes company site visits. Prerequisites (or corequisites): BUS 100, BUS 101, and three of the following: BUS 203, BUS 204, BUS 205, BUS 206.

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BUS 304 (F, S)
BUSINESS PROBLEM SOLVING AND DECISION MAKING
3 credits

Presents an integrated view of problem framing and the methodology of decision-making. Introduces students to several quantitative models applicable to problems in a variety of functional areas of business. Analysis of business cases using computer software allows for a focus on conceptual understanding of the models and how they should be used. Depending on the relevance to chosen case studies, topics covered may include several of the following: Decision Analysis, Forecasting, Inventory Management, Linear Programming, Critical Path Method/Project Evaluation and Review Technique, Quality Control, and Simulation. Prerequisites: MTH 114 and BUS 202, 204, 205, 206, 207, and 208.

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BUS 400 (F, S)
STRATEGY FORMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION
3 credits

This course is the capstone course for Business majors. It views the enterprise of the firm from the top management point of view where the various functions of business are shaped and re-shaped in response to technological, global, environmental or economic changes in the company's environment. The course includes industry analysis, company assessment, competitive advantage, network organization and diversification strategies, implementation and business ethics. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

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FIN 401 (F)
INVESTMENT ANALYSIS
3 credits

Focuses on current practice and recent theoretical developments in the securities market. Special emphasis on the stock and bond markets. Deals with the characteristics of individual securities and portfolios. Also criteria and models for alternative portfolio composition, and criteria for evaluation and measurement of portfolio performance, all in a global context. Prerequisites: BUS 202, 206, 208.

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MGT 307 (S)
DESIGNING ORGANIZATIONS FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE
3 credits

Develops an understanding of the interaction of organizational structure and processes. Examines relationship of internal and external environments. Studies organizational design and utilizes current theories of organizational behavior as practical tools in analyzing specific organizations. Prerequisite: BUS 203.

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MGT 350 (F, S, Summer)
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (JUNIOR STANDING)
3 credits

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm.

Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Management Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the director of the program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 203 and preferably an upper-level major course.

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MGT 353 (S)
DISPUTE RESOLUTION
3 credits

Dispute resolution and conflict management describe a set of theories, principles, and techniques that build upon skills of analysis and communication. Managers negotiate every day to resolve conflicts between individuals and groups both within and outside the organization. Readings, exercises, and cases are utilized to study the complex human activity that is dispute resolution. Prerequisite: BUS 203.

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MGT 354 (S)
GROWING A BUSINESS: ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
3 credits

The actual art and practice of managing a small enterprise. Concepts and methods for decision making and being competitive. Actual cases with live situations and outside speakers from all areas – business, government, and organized labor – impinging on the small entrepreneur today. Prerequisite: BUS 203.

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MGT 355 (F)
POWER, MOTIVATION, AND LEADERSHIP
3 credits

This course focuses on social influence processes in organizations by examining theories and research regarding power, motivation, and leadership. We will examine not only the effectiveness of various management approaches for accomplishing the goals of the organization, but also the impact of these approaches on the satisfaction and development of employees. Prerequisite: BUS 203.

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MGT 356 (F)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
MANAGING IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY
3 credits

Changes in the world business environment are bringing new opportunities and challenges to firms and individuals. In Philadelphia, an increasing number of companies and public agencies are involved in international business. This course will study the area connections to the global economy through discussions with experts in global trade, and with representatives of international businesses. Course will feature planned class visits to important businesses, sites, and staging areas for the Philadelphia aspect of the global economy. Prerequisite: BUS 203.

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MGT 357 (F)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
MANAGING CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE
3 credits

This course is designed to teach students how to manage the growing multicultural workforce in the United States. Students will be exposed to the basic concepts and issues of intercultural communication and cross-cultural relations, and will explore the challenge that managing cultural diversity presents to organizations and individuals. Prerequisite: BUS 203.

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MKT 301 (F, S)
PERSONAL SELLING
3 credits

Examines the importance and practice of professional, consultative selling in business-to-business relationships. Students learn and practice interpersonal problem-solving communication skills in sales roleplays. Students learn how to respond to different buyer types, to develop benefit-based sales presentations, and to engage in ethical selling practices. Prerequisite: BUS 204


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MKT 302
ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONAL MANAGEMENT
3 credits

Focuses on the economic and social aspects of non-personal promotion, including the important methods and techniques of research which form the basis of any promotional campaign. Includes a practical treatment of sales promotion programs, advertising copy, layout and media; measurement of promotional effectiveness; and advertising departments and agencies. Prerequisite: BUS 204 or equivalent.

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MKT 303
SALES MANAGEMENT
3 credits

The activities of a sales manager in directing and controlling a sales force; recruiting, selecting, training, compensating, motivating, and supervising sales personnel; establishment of sales territories, quotas, and budgets. Prerequisite: BUS 204.

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MKT 304
BUSINESS TO BUSINESS MARKETING
3 credits

A study of business activities involved in the marketing of products and services to organizations (i.e., commercial enterprises, non-profit institutions, government agencies, and resellers). Emphasis also is on organizational and interfunctional interaction, buyer behavior, global interdependence and competition, and negotiation. Prerequisite: BUS 204.

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MKT 305 (S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as writing intensive  
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
3 credits

A managerial view of the marketing function from a global perspective. Describes and explores the complexities, problems, and opportunities of world-wide marketing. The Spring course is travel-study and requires permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: BUS 204.

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MKT 306
INTERNET MARKETING
3 credits

The course examines the foundation, operation and implications of the Internet and digital economy. Topics include: Internet technologies, online market mechanisms, interactive customers, knowledge-based products, smart physical products and services, pricing in the digital economy, online auctions and e-marketplaces, digital governance, policies for the Internet economy and an outlook for the new economy. Prerequisite: BUS 204

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MKT 308 (F (cross-listed with FIN 308))
FINANCIAL SERVICES MARKETING
3 credits

This course focuses on how financial institutions such as banks, investment firms, investment bankers, stock brokerages, investment advisors, venture capitalists, insurance companies, credit card issuers, and other financial institutions design and market their services and products. The marketing mix for financial services, consumer and commercial markets, and their buying behavior also are studied. Finally, the impact of regulatory factors on marketing financial services and product is studied. The course is designed especially for marketing and/or finance majors contemplating a career in financial services marketing. Prerequisites: BUS 204, BUS 206, BUS 208. MKT 308 is required for dual finance and marketing majors.

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MKT 371
CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
3 credits

A study of the consumer with applications for marketing strategy development. Looks at the cultural, social, and psychological influences on consumers and the consumer decision process. Prerequisite: BUS 204.

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MKT 401 (F, S)
MARKETING RESEARCH
3 credits

The use of scientific method in the solution of specific marketing problems and in the conduct of general market research studies: methods of marketing research, gathering data, tabulation and analysis, interpretation of results, and report presentation. Prerequisites: BUS 204, BUS 202.

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MKT 402 (F, S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as writing intensive  
MARKETING MANAGEMENT
3 credits

As the capstone course for marketing majors, integrates all other marketing courses. Includes a study of actual business cases employing a managerial approach to marketing. Emphasizes decision making and strategy development in marketing under rapidly changing market conditions. Prerequisites: All other required marketing courses for the major or permission of the instructor.

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PHL 151
THE HUMAN PERSON
3 credits
Patterns 1
A study of the human person that integrates the biological, social, and religious dimensions of human life. Possible topics include freedom and determinism, body and soul, the individual and society, and mortality and immortality.

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PHL 152
MORAL INQUIRY AND MORAL CHOICE
3 credits
Patterns 1
An investigation of classic moral theories. Possible topics include virtue and happiness, social justice, moral relativism, and moral obligation. General principles will be applied to concrete moral issues.

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PHL 206
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A critical examination of the nature of society through the reading and discussion of primary philosophical texts. Themes include: person and society, the foundation of the political order, human rights and law, justice and society, and the natural and the social sciences. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 212
CURRENT ETHICAL ISSUES
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
An application of ethical principles to present-day moral problems and controversies. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair.

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PHL 222
LOVE AND HUMAN SEXUALITY
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A philosophical exploration of human love and sexuality. Classical and contemporary writings will be used. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 223
PERSPECTIVES ON DEATH
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A study of various philosophical strategies for coming to terms with human death. Philosophical views on death applied to problems such as aging and dying, suicide and euthanasia, the medical conquest of death, and definitions of death. Of particular value for students choosing careers in the health professions. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 264
CRITICAL THINKING
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
Aims at developing the skill of analyzing, interpreting, and criticizing arguments from a variety of disciplines. Topics include: clarification of concepts, distinguishing between conclusions and reasons for conclusions, evaluation of arguments, and the recognition of fallacies. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 265
PHILOSOPHY OF ART
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
An introduction to the philosophy of art with emphasis on the metaphysics of beauty and on art's role in politics and society. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 267 (F,S)
PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACHES TO GOD
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A study of philosophical positions about the existence and nature of God. Themes discussed include various concepts of God; the possibility of proof for the existence of God; and the philosophical dimensions of the religious experience. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 269
WORK AND CULTURE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A philosophical consideration of the relationship between work and other dimensions of human life. Topics include: work and society, work and rationality, work and morality, work and play, work and creativity, and work and alienation. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 270
SPECIAL TOPICS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
Some recent topics have included:
  • Philosophy and Literature
  • Philosophy and Film
  • Christian Ethics
  • Tao and Zen
  • Art and Fascism

Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair


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PHL 303
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A critical history of thought in North America, tracing its gradual transformation from 17th-century Puritanism to 20th-century pragmatism. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair.

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PHL 306
ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
The course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to a wide range of philosophical issues and problems that attach to the attribution of moral concern to the environment. Topics may include deep ecology, ecofeminism, social ecology, social action, and the moral standing of animals as well as other living beings. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 308
THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A study of some of the principal viewpoints about historical knowledge and historical development. Problems discussed include: subjectivity and objectivity, causality and explanation, and perspective and relativity in history. The great schemes of historical interpretation are also considered. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 309
THE PHILOSOPHY OF THOMAS AQUINAS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A study of the philosophical problems that arose in the Middle Ages and of the solutions proposed by Thomas Aquinas. Texts principally from the Summa Theologiae. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 310
EXISTENTIALISM
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A critical study of existentialist thinkers and themes from the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics may include absurdity, nihilism, subjectivity, freedom, authenticity, and the Other. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 311
PROBLEMS OF KNOWLEDGE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A systematic investigation into the sources, limits, and nature of knowledge. Topics include: meaning and its relation to truth of statements; nature and criteria of truth; and the role of observation, perspective, and conceptualization in the justification of knowledge claims. Prerequisites: PHL 151or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 313
METAPHYSICS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A study of the ways in which major philosophers have answered questions about the basic nature of reality. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 323
PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
The course looks at the practice of science, its aims, its methods, and its relation to society. Possible topics include the justification of scientific findings, the nature of scientific progress, the various branches of science, morally responsible scientific practice, and science and religion. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 325
SYMBOLIC LOGIC
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
An introduction to formal logic, including truth-functional and quantificational logic. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 326
HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: THE ANCIENT WORLD
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Plotinus. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 327
HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: LATE ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
Late antique and medieval philosophy, concentrating on St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 328
HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: EARLY MODERN WORLD
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
Seventeenth- and 18th-century philosophy is studied with a concentration on the rationalists, the empiricists, and Kant. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 329
HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY: CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A comparative study of trends in continental and Anglo-American philosophy. These may include linguistic analysis, phenomenology, deconstruction, post-modernism, neo-pragmatism, and critical theory. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 330-336
THE GREAT PHILOSOPHERS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
An in-depth study of a single major thinker from the philosophical tradition. Emphasis on the critical reading of texts, although attention will be given to the historical setting of the thinker's work. Previous thinkers have included St. Augustine, Karl Marx, Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Pope John Paul II, and Michel Foucault. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 339
GENDER, BODY, AND CULTURE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A philosophical analysis of social and cultural practices that construct gender identity. Strategies of resistance to dominant modes of embodiment and concepts of sexual difference will also be explored. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PHL 341 ( )
MINDS, BRAINS, AND ZOMBIES
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

An examination of human consciousness. Topics include the relation between the mind and the brain, the possibility of building conscious machines, the mental life of animals, and conceptual puzzles posed by zombies. Prerequisites: PHL 151, PHL 152, HON 131, or permission of the Department Chair.


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PHL 350
BUSINESS ETHICS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
Business practices evaluated in the light of ethical principles. Special concern given to moral dimensions of management decision making and to the ethical problems of consumerism and government control. Prerequisites: PHL 151 or 152 or HON 131 or permission of the Department Chair

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PSY 230 (S)
INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 credits

A study of the application of psychological principles and theories to organizational settings. Topics examined include research methodology, employee selection and assessment, leadership, motivation, job satisfaction, and characteristics of the workplace that affect employee and organizational well-being.

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REL 210 (F)
THE HEBREW BIBLE/OLD TESTAMENT
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course examines the Jewish canonical writings in their historical and cultural contexts, introduces the scholarly tools employed to discover the meaning(s) of the documents, and investigates the rich and complex development of the religion of ancient Israel and biblical Judaism(s). The deutero-canonical writings, those not included in the Jewish canon, will also be discussed.

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REL 211 (S)
THE NEW TESTAMENT
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course examines the Christian canonical writings in their historical and cultural contexts, introduces the scholarly tools employed to discover the meaning(s) of the documents, and investigates the continuities and the transformations of Christianity from a Jewish movement to an independent religion.

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REL 212 (S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as having a service-learning component  
THE PROPHETS OF ANCIENT ISRAEL
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

A study of prophecy and prophetical literature in the Bible. This course explores prophecy as an institution in the Near East and its unique development in Israel in connection with the theological message of the biblical prophets.


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REL 214 (F)
THE GOSPELS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course is an introduction to the four New Testament gospels. While these texts agree on major events in the life of Jesus, they individually offer unique perspectives on who Jesus was. The synoptic gospels: Mark, Matthew, and Luke will be studied first, with special attention given to the question of literary relationships between these three texts, what scholars identify as the “Synoptic Problem.” Next, we will study the Gospel of John, the most unique of the four gospels. Finally, we will briefly explore apocryphal (extra-biblical) gospel traditions about the life and teachings of Jesus.


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REL 220 (F)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
CATHOLICISM IN THE MODERN WORLD
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course is a historical and theological introduction to the study of Catholicism as it shapes and is shaped by the social, economic, political, and religious contexts of the late 20th century. Catholicism will be studied in light of the history of the issues and current theological thought.

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REL 221 (S)
CHRISTIAN ORIGINS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course is an introduction to the development of Christianity from a fringe, Jewish apocalyptic movement to the state religion of the Roman Empire. The course objectives are as follows: (1) to familiarize students with the history and literature of formative Christianity in its Greco-Roman context; (2) to explore Jesus traditions in the New Testament and later Christian writings; (3) to discuss the diversities of “heretical” and “orthodox” Christianity in the first four centuries; and (4) to explore the roles of women in the earliest Christian communities.


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REL 223 (S)
ISSUES IN CHRISTOLOGY: JESUS AND HIS ACHIEVEMENT
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course studies the person, mission, and achievement of Jesus in the New Testament with reference to the post-biblical church reflections on this tradition. This course also examines contemporary attempts to interpret the story of Jesus and to draw implications for personal faith and society.

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REL 224 (S)
CHRISTIAN SPIRITUALITY: VISIONARIES, MYSTICS, AND SAINTS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

An exploration of the ways in which Christians, both Eastern and Western, have striven to express and deepen love of God and others. The course will analyze the origins and development of their various movements in spirituality and the means used to embody Christian discipleship.


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REL 225 (F)
THE SACRAMENTS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course inquires into the origins and developments of, as well as the current theological issues concerning, Christian rites and symbols. This course also studies some of the problems of contemporary sacramental theology.

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REL 226 (S)
CHRISTIAN WORSHIP
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
A study of the shape and practice of worship, especially in Western Christian Sunday liturgy. The course understands worship as lying between art and life. The course examines both symbol and ritual and surveys the development of Sunday worship and contemporary issues.

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REL 231 (F, S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
BUDDHISM, HINDUISM AND OTHER RELIGIONS FROM THE FAR EAST
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course examines the major religious traditions that originated in India and China: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. The topics covered will include basic doctrines and practices of each religion, major figures like Confucius and the Buddha, central scriptures like the Bhagavad Gita and Dao De Jing, and the impact of each religion on society and culture. Secondary attention will be paid to other religious traditions from the Far East, such as Sikhism, Jainism, or Shinto.

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REL 232 (S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
JUDAISM, ISLAM, AND OTHER RELIGIONS FROM THE NEAR EAST
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course examines Judaism and Islam. The Judaism segment of this course covers the historical origins, roots and developments of Judaism as a religion. The course will evaluate Jewish social and cultural values as well as religious problems faced by Jews today. The Islam segment covers the origins of Islam and the background and development of the Qur'an, Muslim traditions, and values as well as the inner tensions, contemporary movement, and interaction with the non-Muslim world. Secondary attention will be paid to Middle Eastern Christianity (e.g., Coptic or Syrian), Zoroastrianism, Ba'hai, or other aspects of the religious life of Israel, North Africa, and the Middle East.


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REL 240 (F)
CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS THOUGHT
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course offers a critical study of the principal figures who have shaped religious thought in the modern world and exerted influence on societies and their ecclesiastical and political systems. Each phase of the course is structured around a significant religious writer or theme in order to analyze the issues of justice, peace, and responsible leadership in both church and state.

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REL 241 (F)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
WOMEN AND WESTERN RELIGION
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
An examination of the interaction between women and religion in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Readings will attend to the role of women in the origins and development of these traditions, to contemporary women’s efforts to reform the traditions, and to recent diverse women’s spiritualities outside the mainstream tradition.

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REL 242 ( )
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
SPORTS AND SPIRITUALITY
3 credits
Patterns 2 or Concentration Option or

This course explores contemporary spirituality in relation to the phenomena of sports. Students study how human beings encounter the Holy in the midst of everyday life with emphasis on how experiences associated with sports, either as an athlete participant or as identifying with athletes and teams, impact on developing a critical assessment of one’s personal values system. This assessment, in turn, becomes a focus on the ways in which one relates to the Holy or the Transcendent in the course of one’s life.


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REL 243 (F)
RELIGION AND CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

A study of religion and religious themes in literature, this course focuses on both literary critical concerns and a religious analysis of the readings. This course is cross-listed with ENG 243.


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REL 244 (S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
RELIGION IN AMERICA
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course examines the origins of the American national character, the religious and secular roots that have nourished it, and the myths—especially those of being a chosen people, of Progress, and of unlimited freedom. The dominant Protestant tradition in its Calvinist, Evangelical, and Fundamentalist forms will be examined, as well as the the religious “outsiders” who came to be Americans: Catholics, Jews, Native Americans, Blacks, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, and East Asians. The secular tradition will be explored as a religion of possessive individualism and consumerism as a new way of being religious. Finally, the apocalyptic strain in American thought will be considered as feeding the desire for an American world empire.


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REL 250 (F)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course studies and promotes discussion on the variety of moral perspectives on selected current issues: war, racism, social justice, sexual conduct, abortion, euthanasia, women’s rights, and capital punishment, as these relate to diverse faith traditions.


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REL 251 (S)
PEACE, JUSTICE, AND THE CHRISTIAN TRADITION
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course explores the fundamental principles which have influenced religious thinking about and action for peace and justice. Although the principal focus is on Western Christian thought, peace and justice traditions of other world religions may also be included.

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REL 315 (S)
ST. PAUL
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

A study of the 13 New Testament letters associated with Paul. These letters bear witness to a diversity of belief and practice in the earliest Christian communities. This course will examine the following: the first century historical and political context, Paul's Jewish background, authorship of the letters, Jesus according to Paul, Paul and women, and primitive Christianity as described in his letters.


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REL 316 (S)
WOMEN IN THE BIBLE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

A select survey of “women” in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and New Testament, this course examines biblical stories about women; biblical attitudes about femaleness; women’s religious and social roles in their respective historical settings; and recent feminist biblical interpretation.


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REL 345 (F, S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
RELIGION IN PHILADELPHIA
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course in historical theology examines religion through the prism of significant events in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania. In examining the original inhabitants of the Delaware Valley, the Lenni Lenape, and their relations with William Penn, the course considers the meaning of race in America. Similarly, through study of the origins of the African Methodist Episcopal Church and of abolitionism, the course deals with race in the United States. Feminist strands of American religious history also emerge in the writings of Lucretia Mott and Jarena Lee, and in the watershed ordination of 11 women in the Episcopal Church in 1974. Important contemporary ideas and forces follow from the history of the region. Readings are both primary and secondary, and students visit historical sites and attend at least one contemporary religious service. The premise of the course is that education about the past and experience in the present lead to an understanding of culture and self.


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REL 352 (F)
PLAYING GOD: RELIGION, ETHICS, AND THE LIFE SCIENCES
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course will examine the dilemmas and debates related to many of today’s most controversial issues in the life sciences, as well as the role of religion as a frame for understanding and evaluating the ethical dimensions of these controversies. Topics will include: the American health-care system, stem cell research, genetic engineering, cloning, drug development, pollution, global warming, euthanasia, plastic surgery, and reproductive technology.


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REL 353 (S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
SOCIAL JUSTICE AND COMMUNITY SERVICE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or
This course is designed for students who would like to become involved in community outreach activities or who have already demonstrated an ongoing commitment to such activities. This course will integrate community service with issues of justice from the perspective of theology. Its purpose is to provide not only analysis, but also a deeper appreciation and respect for the disadvantaged, and a more long-lasting commitment to enter into solidarity with them in their struggle for justice. Through readings, reflection, a community service project, and discussion, this course will allow students to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the social, political, spiritual, and economic causes of injustice and how their service influences the clause of social justice.

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REL 354 (F, S)
LOVE, SEX, AND FRIENDSHIP: RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

What is the nature of love? What role does friendship play in our happiness? Can sex be a religious experience? Does it have to be? This course will explore how different figures in Western religious thought have dealt with questions such as these, and how love, as a theological idea and as the foundation of a religious ethic, has had an impact on the various religious perspectives on sexuality, friendship, and family life.


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REL 360 (S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
THE RELIGIOUS HISTORY OF IRELAND (TRAVEL/STUDY)
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course explores the foundations of Ireland’s religious history from its foundations in Celtic-Druidic religious practices through to its Christianization under Patrick and subsequent influence on Irish Catholicism, political conflicts, and cultural development. Students focus on how the more democratic monastic movement entered into conflict with the hierarchical Roman Church and what role Irish monasteries played as centers of culture and education from the Dark Ages to the medieval period. The course directs attention to the role a powerful Roman Catholicism played in the periods of persecution following the Reformation and in the struggle for independence from Great Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, the course examines the decline of the Roman Catholic Church's influence on politics through contemporary Ireland’s emergence as an economic power, its confrontations with the “troubles” in Northern Ireland, and a budding anti-clericalism. As a travel/study course, students journey to Ireland to see first-hand the various sites that illustrate Ireland’s impressive and diverse religious history and culture.


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REL 400 (F)
Identifies courses that have been designated as writing intensive  
MAJORS CAPSTONE
3 credits
Concentration Option or Patterns 2 or

This course focuses on scholarly research through the selection, writing, and small-group presentation of formal papers in an area selected by the student in consultation with his or her instructor. Required of all religion majors; open to others approved by the Chair. Prerequisite: 15 hours of religion. May be taken in junior or senior year.


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SOC 306 (S)
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding Abroad  
Identifies courses that have been designated as Understanding at Home  
COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY
3 credits

A study of the founding, transformation, and disbanding of organizations, the pace of organizational evolution in modern societies as well as the sources of change and stability in contemporary organizations in the U.S. and in other societies, particularly organizational structures, processes, environments, culture, innovation, and effectiveness.

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