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PHY 105
GENERAL PHYSICS I
4 credits

Vectors, elementary mechanics of point particles and rigid bodies, gravitation. Prerequisite: MTH 120. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.

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PHY 106
GENERAL PHYSICS II
4 credits

Simple harmonic motion and waves. Elementary optics, electromagnetism, and DC circuits. Prerequisite: PHY 105. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.

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PHY 120
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY
3 credits

A study of some interactions between science, technology, and society. Topics include: the scientific community; history of technology; weapons; science, technology, and the arts; and technology and change.

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PHY 121
WOMEN, MEN; SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY
3 credits

An exploration of gender components in science and technology. Extra-scientific influences on scientific theories; why there are not more female engineers and scientists; how science views male/female differences; use of science to reinforce social attitudes; the political content of technology and how technology impacts differently on men and women.

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PHY 150 (F, S)
SOME REVOLUTIONS IN PHYSICS
3 credits
Frameworks
A non-mathematical introduction to physics with emphasis on studying the processes of scientific change. Ancient astronomy and mechanics. The Copernican/Newtonian Revolution, Special Relativity. Current ideas in elementary particle physics.

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PHY 201 (F)
COMPUTER ELECTRONICS I
3 credits

Binary representation of numbers including various types (integer, unsigned and floats) with an emphasis on the finiteness of that representation (range, overflow, etc.) Basic logic gates and their use in the realization of any truth tables (combinatorial logic). Simplification procedures, such as Karnaugh maps. Flip-flops, registers and memory (sequential logic). Specific components such as adders, comparators, multiplexors, counters, buses, etc. Introduction to design and architecture.


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PHY 202 (S)
COMPUTER ELECTRONICS II
3 credits

Simple circuit components: resisitors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transformers, transistors, and logic gates. Emphasis on their roles in computer electronics.


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PHY 207 (F)
MODERN PHYSICS I
3 credits

The breakdown of classical physics around the turn of the century and its replacement by relativity theory and quantum mechanics. Attention to the experiments leading to this breakdown. Course culminates with the Schrodinger equation and its application to simple potentials. Prerequisites: PHY 105, 106; MTH 221 concurrently; or permission of instructor.

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PHY 208 (S)
MODERN PHYSICS II
4 credits

Applies basic quantum theory developed in PHY 207 (the Schrodinger equation) to a series of problems in which it has had marked success. They include: atomic spectra; the physics of molecules including the chemical bond; condensed matter; and the nucleus and fundamental particles. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: PHY 207.

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PHY 270-271
SPECIAL TOPICS
3 credits


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