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Dr. Alice L. Hoersch
Executive Assistant to the President and Professor

Department of Geology, Environmental Science, and Physics
La Salle University
Philadelphia, PA 19141
Office Number: Peale House
Office Hours: Drop in or by appointment
Phone: 215.951.1269
hoersch@lasalle.edu
Education  
Ph.D.

The Johns Hopkins University

MA

The Johns Hopkins University

AB

Bryn Mawr College

Awards, Grants, and Achievements

Gilman Fellow, The Johns Hopkins University, 1972-1977

Emma Osborne Prize in Geology, Bryn Mawr College, 1972

Department of Housing and Urban Development Special Purpose Grant, Institute for the Advancement of Mathematics and Science Teaching, La Salle University, 1993

Office of Naval Research Grant, Workshop on Oceanography for Undergraduate Science and Engineering Faculty, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, 1992

National Science Foundation Academic Research Infrastructure (ARI) grant for renovation of biology and chemistry laboratories, La Salle University, 1997

National Science Foundation ILI Grant, XRD system for Geology and Chemistry, La Salle University, 1993

National Science Foundation ISEP Grant, Microscopy Closed-Circuit Television System for the Department of Geology, La Salle, University, 1980

NATO Grant to attend Advanced Study Institute, “Thermodynamics in Geology,” Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom, 1976

Sigma Xi, Grants-in-aid-of-Research, 1974, 1975

Geological Society of America, Penrose Research Grant, 1974

Publications

Articles

Crawford, M.L., Crawford, W.A., Hoersch, A. L. and Wagner, M.E. (1999) Stratigraphy and Sedimentary Tectonics: Selected rocks of the Piedmont Upland in The Geology of Pennsylvania, C. H. Shultz, ed., Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Pittsburgh Geological Society, p. 28-35.

Crawford, M.L., Crawford, W.A., Hoersch, A. L. and Wagner, M.E. (1999) Structural Geology and Tectonics: Piedmont Upland in The Geology of Pennsylvania, C. H. Shultz, ed., Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Pittsburgh Geological Society, p. 234-241

Crawford, M.L., Crawford, W.A., Hoersch, A. L. and Wagner, M.E. (1999) Geologic History: Precambrian in The Geology of Pennsylvania,C. H. Shultz, ed., Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Pittsburgh Geological Society, p. 414-417.

Smith, D.L., Hoersch, A.L. and Gordon, P.R. (1995) Problem-based learning in the undergraduate geology classroom: Journal of Geological Education, vol. 43, p. 385-

Hoersch, A.L. and Crawford, W.A. (1988) The Mine Ridge of the SE Pennsylvania Piedmont: Northeastern Geology, vol. 10, No. 3, p. 181-194

Keller, W.D., Stone, C.G., and Hoersch, A.L. (1985) Textures of Paleozoic chert and Novaculite in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma and their geological significance: Geological Society of America Bulletin, vol 96, p. 1353-1363.

Keller, W.D., Stone, C.G., and Hoersch, A.L. (1984) The geologic significance of textures of Paleozoic chert and novaculite in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma: Contributions to the Geology of Arkansas, vol. 2, p.87-96.

Crawford, W.A. and Hoersch, A.L. (1984) The geology of the Honey Brook Upland, SE Pennsylvania: in Geological Society of America Special Paper 194, p. 111-125.

Keller, W.D., Stone, C.G., and Hoersch, A.L. (1983) Textures of chert and novaculite: an exploration guide: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, vol. 67, p. 1466.

Hoersch, A.L. (1981) Progressive metamorphism of the chert-bearing Durness limestone in the Beinn an Dubhaich aureole, Isle of Skye, Scotland: A re-examination: American Mineralogist, vol. 66, p.491-506.

Hoersch, A.L. (1979) General structure of the Skye Tertiary igneous complex and detailed structure of the Beinn an Dubhaich granite from magnetic evidence: Scottish Journal of Geology, vol. 15, p. 231-245.

Crawford, W.A. and Hoersch, A.L. (1972) Calcite-aragonite equilibrium from 50 o C to 150 o C: American Mineralogist, vol. 57, p. 995-998.

Book Review

Hoersch, A. L. (2004) Gender Equity or Bust! On the Road to Campus Leadership with Women in Higher Education , Mary Dee Wenniger and Mary Helen Conroy, Editors, In Planning for Higher Education, vol. 32, number 2.

Professional Memberships

American Association for the Advancement of Science
American Association for Higher Education
Association for Women Geoscientists
Council on Undergraduate Research
Geological Society of America
Mineralogical Society of America
National Association of Geology Teachers
Philadelphia Geological Society
Society of College and University Planning

Courses Taught at La Salle

Geo 204 - Optical Mineralogy
This course is designed to prepare students for the study of materials using a petrographic microscope. Topics to be covered include the elementary principles of crystal optics, familiarization with the microscope, and mineral behavior in transmitted/polarized light. By the end of the course students should be able to readily identify the major rock-forming minerals in thin sections and in grain mounts. In addition students will learn how to find the necessary information to identify an unknown and perhaps never studied mineral. Students will also explore topics in environmental mineralogy, including those involving mine wastes, landfills, nuclear waste, the atmosphere and the human body.

Geo 305 - Environmental Geochemistry
This course covers the origin of organic and organic pollutants in the terrestrial environment, the chemical processes that affect their fate and transport, the analysis of water and wastewater, and remediation techniques used to clean up sites.

Geo 470 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
The aim of the course is to present and synthesize the mineralogic, chemical, petrographic, geophysical and tectonic aspects of igneous and metamorphic processes. As a result of the course, students will better understand the origins of the two types of rocks, mineral reactions that take place, diagrammatic representations of mineral reactions, and will become more familiar with their minerals and textures, particularly in thin sections. Time will be spent in the field and laboratory, integrating concepts learned in class and lab. Additionally students will study the geologic hazards present in volcanic areas. Students will hone their mineral and rock identification, critical thinking, oral communication, and written communication skills. Because of these latter aspects, this course has been designated as a writing-intensive course.The aim of the course is to present and synthesize the mineralogic, chemical, petrographic, geophysical and tectonic aspects of igneous and metamorphic processes. As a result of the course, students will better understand the origins of the two types of rocks, mineral reactions that take place, diagrammatic representations of mineral reactions, and will become more familiar with their minerals and textures, particularly in thin sections. Time will be spent in the field and laboratory, integrating concepts learned in class and lab. Additionally students will study the geologic hazards present in volcanic areas. Students will hone their mineral and rock identification, critical thinking, oral communication, and written communication skills. Because of these latter aspects, this course has been designated as a writing-intensive course.


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