Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.)

Program Description

The APA-accredited program leading to the Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) is a professional program intended for those students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in either psychology or a related field, or for those students who hold a master’s degree in a mental health discipline. It is a five-year, full-time program that has a partial part-time option, which allows two levels of the program to be completed over four calendar years for a maximum timeframe of seven years from entry to degree completion. The program follows the practitioner-scholar model of training clinical psychologists, and, as such, an intensive integration of theory, research, and practice is stressed throughout the entire course of study. The program requires the completion of a practicum progression and a full-year clinical internship. It also requires the completion of the Clinical Dissertation, a qualitative or quantitative research project that addresses an important original question of relevance to the practice of clinical psychology. The program emphasizes the integration of science and practice, actively promotes an evidence-based approach to the practice of clinical psychology, and acknowledges and incorporates issues of human diversity throughout the curriculum. The program offers three areas of concentrated study for students with particular career interests: 1) General Clinical Practice, 2) Child Clinical Psychology, and 3) Clinical Health Psychology.

Randy Fingerhut, Ph.D.

Director

215.951.1284

fingerhut@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/psyd

If you have any questions regarding the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology program, please contact:

psyd@lasalle.edu

Mission

La Salle University’s Psy.D. Program in Clinical Psychology strives to educate and train students in the science and practice of clinical psychology so that they may function effectively in a variety of professional psychology roles including, but not limited to, psychotherapy, psychological assessment, and clinical research. The program is based on the practitioner-scholar model of professional training and emphasizes a cognitive-behavioral theoretical orientation. Evidence-based practice, psychological science, psychological theory, ethics and professional standards, and sensitivity to and awareness of diversity and individual differences are embedded throughout the curriculum.

Program Goals

  • The preparation of practitioners of clinical psychology who understand the scientific body of knowledge that serves as the foundation of clinical practice.
  • The preparation of practitioners of clinical psychology who demonstrate understanding of, and competency in, core clinical skills essential for effective professional practice.
  • The preparation of practitioners of clinical psychology who demonstrate an understanding of, and competency in, professional standards and ethics as well as the impact and importance of issues of cultural and individual diversity on clinical practice.
  • The preparation of practitioners of clinical psychology who demonstrate understanding of, and competency in, emerging and expanding roles for the professional psychologist.
  • The preparation of practitioners of clinical psychology able to contribute to and utilize the existing body of knowledge and empirical findings in the science of psychology, to inform and enhance the applications of clinical psychology and to view the profession of clinical psychology as requiring life-long learning.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this program, the student should be able to do the following:

  • demonstrate foundational knowledge of the theories as well as the empirical evidence supporting the theories of personality, social psychology, cognitive aspects of behavior, human development, biological aspects of behavior, and psychopathology; 
  • understand the history of psychology as it pertains to the development of these theories and their scientific foundations;
  • develop effective professional relationships with the persons they serve as well as with professional colleagues and supervisors; 
  • conduct a diagnostic assessment;
  • implement psychological interventions supported by the empirical literature;
  • identify how individual differences and diversity impact psychological diagnosis and treatment;
  • understand the APA code of ethics and how it is applied to clinical situations, and be able to critically evaluate ethical dilemmas in professional psychology;
  • employ theories of clinical supervision in practice scenarios;
  • identify how they use supervision when conducting diagnostic assessments and interventions as student clinicians; 
  • describe the value of professional consultation in general and as it is applied to specific clinical cases;
  • understand the logic of statistical analysis, be able to conduct a variety of univariate an multivariate statistical techniques, understand research methods, be able to develop and implement a research study, know how to select appropriate statistical analyses for a particular research question, be aware of ethical considerations for conducting research, and know the basic elements of manuscript preparation for professional publication;
  • evaluate scientific research in the selection and implementation of clinical interventions and utilize clinical data to inform diagnostic formulations and treatment plans.

Accreditation

The Psy.D. Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association. For general information about APA accreditation or specific information about the accreditation status of the Psy.D. Program at La Salle University, please contact:

Jaqueline Remondet Wall, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
Associate Executive Director, Education Directorate
American Psychological Association
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
(202) 572-3037
Visit the Web site at: http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation/

Admission Requirements

The program is seeking applicants who have the academic, personal and professional qualifications that would make them outstanding prospects toward becoming ethically sensitive, well-informed, and highly competent practitioners. They should possess high academic aptitude and a demonstrable pattern of interest and personal qualifications that would enable them to function effectively in working with problems of individuals, families, and social systems. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree and excellent undergraduate credentials or a master’s degree in psychology or a related mental-health discipline will be given full consideration. The deadline for the completed Psy.D. application, and all required supporting documents, is December 10, 11:59 EST.  Any application materials received after December 10 will not be considered.

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  • Complete the Application for Admission which may be accessed at https://www.lasalle.edu/grad/apply/. It is recommended that the application is submitted before arranging to have transcripts and test scores mailed to La Salle University.
  • Provide evidence of an earned baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with a major in psychology or a related discipline. Those entering with a B.A. must have a grade-point-average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; those with an M.A., a 3.2. The record should show the completion of 15 hours in psychology with particular reference to General Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Personality, Statistics, Methodology and Tests and Measurements (Students lacking these required courses will be required to complete them prior to matriculation).
  • Provide official transcripts from the institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study.
  • Provide acceptable scores on the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing sections of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). These are used in combination with grades and professional experience to inform admission decisions.  Minimum scores of 148 on both the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the GRE are strongly recommended. Our Institution Code is R2363. For more information please go to www.gre.org
  • Foreign students must present an acceptable TOEFL score and all international academic credentials must be reviewed by World Education Services (wes.org).
  • Provide three letters of recommendation from professors or supervisors familiar with the academic/professional and personal qualifications of the applicant. Letters of recommendation from on-line services are not acceptable.  When you are completing the online application, you will be sending an email request to your recommenders that will ask them to complete and upload their letter of recommendation. You should arrange for your recommenders in advance of beginning your application.
  • Provide a current Curriculum Vitae (this will be uploaded with the application).
  • Provide a personal statement (double-spaced, not to exceed two pages) that describes all of the following: why you want to pursue a Psy.D.; why La Salle’s program is a good fit with your career goals (mention specific faculty expertise if applicable); your experience working with clinical populations; your experience conducting research; and your interest in and experience working with the community and disadvantaged populations (can include but is not limited to low SES, rural populations, ethnic/racial minorities, LGBT populations, immigrant families, individuals with disabilities or chronic illness, service learning). (this will be uploaded with the application).
  • All finalists are required to attend a personal interview.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

The Application for Admission may be completed online. Personal statements and CV’s must be uploaded when completing the application. It is best to have these documents and the e-mail contact information for your three recommenders ready when you begin your application. It is recommended that the application be submitted before arranging to have transcripts and test scores mailed to La Salle University.

Documents that are not uploaded, such as transcripts and test scores should be sent directly from the institution or testing service to the following address:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment
            La Salle University- Box 826
            1900 W. Olney Avenue
             Philadelphia, PA 19141
             215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
             grad@lasalle.edu

Degree Requirements

Students earn a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Psychology after successfully completing Level I and Level II courses and passing Part I and II of the Comprehensive Examination.

Upon satisfactory evaluation by the faculty (SPEC*), the doctorate is awarded to candidates who have successfully completed the following requirements of the program:

  • 114 graduate credits of course work as designated.
  • The Comprehensive Examination, Parts I, II, and III (See Student Handbook for details)
  • The Practicum Progression
  • The Clinical Internship
  • The Clinical Dissertation

*  SPEC is an acronym for Student Progress Evaluation Conference, a meeting of all program faculty that meets periodically to review student progress.

Progression through the Program

In its entirety, the program is 114 graduate credits—75 credits of required courses shared by all students, 12 credits specific to the chosen area of concentration, 12 practicum credits (minimum), six dissertation credits (minimum), and nine clinical internship credits.

Students choose a concentrated area of study as they progress through the program. From a solid foundation in the basic competencies in clinical psychology, the program offers three concentrations: General Practice, Child Clinical Psychology, and Clinical Health Psychology. In each concentration area, the student is first provided with the essential foundation material upon which clinical practice is based, and then moves to sequential instruction and training in a range of assessment and intervention modes specific to the particular concentration. Students choosing to follow one of these concentrated areas of study will complete their Doctoral Practicum II in a site appropriate for their concentration and will complete their Clinical Dissertation in their chosen concentration. The program requires the completion of a practicum progression and full-year clinical internship (see Psy.D. Student Handbook for details).

The practicum progression is designed to provide the student with both depth and breadth of experience. Each student will be expected to gain experience with a range of roles, settings, populations, clients, clinical problems, and techniques. This is accomplished in clinics, hospitals, and other community agencies of the richly diverse greater Philadelphia metropolitan area, as well as in our own community clinic (i.e. La Salle University Community Psychological Services). Prior to external practica, students have a “pre-practicum” experience during their first level in the program. This experience is through direct client assessments (as part of the required assessment courses) at the assessment lab and at the La Salle University Community Psychological Services. The practicum progression is ordinarily a two-tiered experience with slight variations built in for students in each concentration area. The two externships share the same structure and requirements, except that the second level requires progressively more sophisticated skills and may encompass a wider variety of clinical activities. All students will complete at least two years of externship training within the program and may choose an optional third externship year. During the entire practicum training experience, in addition to external placements, students will see clinical cases at the psychology training clinic and will participate in weekly clinic team meetings in which they will receive supervision, support, and guidance from clinical faculty and peers.

The clinical internship is a one-year, full-time (or two-calendar-year, part- time) experience that may be undertaken after the student has successfully completed the first four levels of the program, including all practica and Comprehensive Examination Parts I, II, and III, has successfully defended the Clinical Dissertation proposal, and has been approved by the clinical training committee. The clinical internship is an intensive training experience requiring 36 to 40 hours of service a week over one year or 18 to 20 hours a week over two years in a clinical setting. Detailed procedures and requirements for the clinical internship are provided in the Clinical Training Manual.

The program requires the completion of a Clinical Dissertation that addresses an important original question of relevance to the practice of psychology. It is a training experience designed to provide the student with a guided opportunity for integrating and interpreting findings from existing empirical research as well as designing and carrying out a project demonstrating scholarship in addressing a clinically relevant psychological issue.

Course Sequence

Effective Jan. 1, 2007, all APA-accredited programs must disclose education/training outcomes and information allowing for informed decision making to prospective doctoral students. This information can be found at https://www.lasalle.edu/doctor-of-psychology/files/2018/08/psyd-stats-2018.pdf.

Curriculum

Courses Required of All Students (75 hours)
PSY 700 (3) 
  Psychotherapy I: Individual Approaches
PSY 701 (3)   Biological Bases of Behavior
PSY 702 (3)   Foundations of Psychotherapy: Mechanisms of Change and the Therapeutic Process
PSY 703 (3)   Human Behavior IV: Social Bases
PSY 704 (3)   Psychopathology I: Adult Psychopathology
PSY 705 (3)   Psychotherapy II: Group and Systemic Approaches
PSY 706 (3)   Interviewing and Psychotherapy Lab
PSY 707 (3)   Psychopathology II: Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
PSY 708 (3)   Human Behavior I: Developmental Bases
PSY 709 (3)   Psychological Assessment I: Cognitive Assessment
PSY 710 (3)   Psychological Assessment III: Integrative Battery
PSY 711 (3)   Human Diversity
PSY 713 (3)   Human Behavior II: Cognitive Psychology
PSY 714 (3)   Human Behavior III: Personality and Individual Differences
PSY 724 (3)   History and Systems of Psychology
PSY 730 (3)   Psychological Assessment II: Personality and Behavioral Assessment—Objective Approaches
PSY 740 (3)   Advanced Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Theory and Application
PSY 750 (3)   Psychopharmacology
PSY 766 (3)   Working with Families in Clinical Psychology
PSY 770 (3)   Psychological Measurement and Statistical Analysis
PSY 771 (3)   Research Methodology
PSY 784 (3)   Consultation and Education
PSY 785 (3)   Introduction to Professional Practice, Ethics, and Conduct
PSY 787 (3)   Supervision and Management
PSY 792 (3)   Professional Ethics

General Clinical Practice (12 hours)
PSY 741 (3) Advanced Seminar in Psychotherapy and Clinical Practice
Clinical Elective (3)
Clinical Elective (3)
Clinical Elective (3)

Child Clinical Psychology (12 hours)
PSY 719 (3)   Psychological Assessment of Children and Adolescents I
PSY 753 (3)   Pediatric Psychology
PSY 762 (3)   Advanced Seminar in Clinical Child and Family Psychology
PSY 765 (3)   Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy

Clinical Health Psychology (12 hours)
PSY 751 (3)   Clinical Health Psychology I
PSY 752 (3)   Clinical Health Psychology II
PSY 757 (3)   Neuropsychological Assessment I or
PSY 753 (3)   Pediatric Psychology               
Clinical Elective (3)

Doctoral Practicum (12 hours)
PSY 782 (3)   Doctoral Practicum I / Practicum Seminar I
PSY 783 (3)   Doctoral Practicum I / Practicum Seminar I
PSY 788 (3)   Doctoral Practicum II / Practicum Seminar II
PSY 789 (3)   Doctoral Practicum II / Practicum Seminar II
PSY 794 (3)   Doctoral Practicum III / Practicum Seminar III (OPTIONAL)
PSY 795 (3)   Doctoral Practicum III / Practicum Seminar III (OPTIONAL)

Clinical Dissertation
PSY 772 (3)   Clinical Dissertation Seminar I: CD Initiation
PSY 773 (3)   Clinical Dissertation Seminar II: CD Manuscript Preparation
PSY 774 (3)   Clinical Dissertation Seminar III: CD Completion (if necessary)

Clinical Internship
PSY 800, 801, 802 (9)    Clinical Internship (Full Time)
PSY 870, 871, 872 (6)    Clinical Internship (Part Time)
PSY 873, 874, 875 (3)    Clinical Internship (Part Time)

Financial Aid

Information about additional sources of financial aid and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141, 215.951.1070.

Other Financial Aid Resources

APA’s Student Financial Aid Pages and Peterson’s Web site contain information about how to finance your advanced degree, including loans, grants, employment on campus, and off-campus jobs.

Transfer Credit

Students who have completed graduate work in psychology or a closely related discipline may have up to 18 credits of foundations course work transferred. Only foundation courses will be considered for transfer. Under no circumstances will clinical skills courses be eligible for transfer. Courses that can be considered for transfer are: Social Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Personality and Individual Differences, Cognitive Psychology, Psychological Measurement, and Statistical Analysis and Research Methodology. Credit may be awarded for previous course work in these areas that meet the program’s equivalency criteria with regard to course content and competency level. Students must submit written requests for transfer prior to beginning class in Level I and include syllabi and any other supporting documentation. Faculty will evaluate the syllabi/ documentation submitted and will recommend transfer if the previous course overlaps with the La Salle University course syllabus by 80 percent, and the student passes the appropriate part of the foundations examination given to doctoral students. Decisions in this regard will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Tuition and Fees

Information regarding tuition and fees can be found at  https://www.lasalle.edu/doctor-of-psychology/files/2018/08/psyd-stats-2018.pdf.

Tuition Assistance

A limited amount of tuition-reduction funding is available for full-time students enrolled in the first level of the program. To qualify, students must contact the financial aid office and apply for federally funded work-study (through submission of a FAFSA form). While students do not have to accept an offer for work-study, this process allows the Psy.D. Program to verify financial need. Students who qualify for work-study thus also qualify for consideration for the limited tuition-reduction funding available in the first year of the program.

Faculty

Program Director: Randy Fingerhut, Ph.D.
Director of Clinical Training: Nataliya Zelikovsky, Ph.D
Director of Psy.D. Research and Dissertations: Sharon Armstrong, Ph.D.

Director, La Salle University Community Psychological Services: Kathleen Murphy-Eberenz, Ph.D.
Associate Professors: Armstrong, Cardaciotto, Fingerhut, Goldbacher, McClure, Montague, Moon, Roth, Spokas, Sude, Wilson, Zelikovsky

Assistant Professors:  Kratz
Core Adjunct Faculty (Instructors): Adler Mandel, Gold, Johnson, Mattei, Palmer, Sposato

Course Descriptions

PSY 700 Psychotherapy I: Individual Approaches

A first course in psychological treatment designed to provide the student with an understanding of foundational knowledge and skills required for provision of effective evidence-based psychological treatment to individuals. Students will be exposed to the range of approaches to individual psychotherapy utilized in contemporary clinical practice, with particular attention and emphasis given to behavioral, cognitive- behavioral, and other empirically supported models of psychotherapy. Issues of diversity in clinical practice will be considered throughout.

PSY 701 Biological Bases of Behavior

This course will focus on an examination of the biological substrates of behavior from the cellular to the systemic to the behavioral level. The course will examine basic aspects of functional neuro-anatomy and brain-behavior relationships. Models of mind, consciousness, and cortical functioning will also be explored.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 702 Foundations of Psychotherapy: Mechanisms of Change and the Therapeutic Process

A clinical skills course that will examines psychotherapy as a change agent. The empirical foundations of psychotherapy will be addressed with an emphasis on practice implications of current therapy research on readiness for change, efficacy, and effectiveness, client-therapist variables, and the therapeutic relationship. In addition, consideration will be given to issues relating to matching clients to therapy type, as well as the theoretical, empirical, and practical consideration of essential mechanisms of change in psychotherapy. The role of spirituality and its impact on the therapeutic process will also be addressed.

PSY 703 Human Behavior IV: Social Bases

An examination of the theories and research in social psychology with particular reference to multicultural issues and their relevance to mental health models and psychological practice.

PSY 704 Psychopathology I: Adult Psychopathology

This course will explore the major categories of adult psychological disorders. Theory and research regarding symptomatology, etiology, maintaining factors, and diagnostic issues will be examined in detail. Students will receive an introduction to the use of the DSM-IV.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 705 Psychotherapy II: Group and Systemic Approaches

A continuation of PSY 700 with the course focus being on those intervention models and techniques appropriate for working with groups, couples, and families. While students will be exposed to a wide variety of intervention approaches seen in contemporary clinical practice, the course will emphasize those models having demonstrated empirical support.
Prerequisite: PSY 700

PSY 706 Interviewing and Psychotherapy Laboratory

A laboratory course designed to develop basic diagnostic and interviewing proficiency. In addition, basic relational and intervention skills essential to establishing an effective therapeutic alliance and promoting behavioral change will be discussed and practiced.

PSY 707 Psychopathology II: Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

A second course in psychopathology looking at psychological disorders found in childhood and adolescence. Issues of etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and impact on systems over the life span will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues and diversity. Students will be introduced to the DSM and related diagnostic systems for disorders of childhood and adolescence.
Prerequisite: PSY 704

PSY 708 Human Behavior I: Developmental Bases

This course examines how developmental pathways are shaped by the interaction of biological (e.g., genetics) and environmental factors. We explore various theoretical frameworks for the study of development, with an eye toward those that have received empirical support. Particular attention is paid to the ways that developmental processes are similar and dissimilar across various sociocultural groups, and to the clinical implications of such processes.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 709 Psychological Assessment I: Cognitive Assessment

This course provides students with basic competencies in the selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of individually administered tests of intelligence and achievement. The Wechsler scales will be highlighted. Issues of theory, research, clinical utility, and ethics are addressed. Special attention will be given to issues relating to culturally sensitive assessment methodology.
Co-requisite: PSY 770

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 710 Psychological Assessment III: Integrative Assessment Battery

This course will provide for focused study and experience integrating psychological tests and test batteries. Particular focus will be on writing professional reports specific to a variety of clinical settings and in cross- validating psychological assessment results with interview and other available data.
Prerequisites: PSY 709 and 730

PSY 711 Human Diversity

This course will provide students with the knowledge needed to be clinically sensitive therapists able to work with a range of individuals from diverse backgrounds.

This course has two parts: 1) multicultural diversity and 2) individual diversity. In the first part of the course, we will cover cultural differences and how they relate to the diagnosis of psychopathology and what we consider "normal" versus "abnormal." We will explore how cultures differ on important clinical issues such as violence, suicide, expression of emotions, and childrearing, among many others. Practical implications, the APA's guidelines for multicultural competency, and some multicultural therapy approaches will be presented. The second part of the course will be a discussion of the other ways individuals are diverse and therefore can be treated unfairly in our society. We will spend time examining society's acceptance, views, and treatment of individuals who are considered diverse, or would be considered minorities, because of their gender, religious practices, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, or medical conditions. Our role as psychologists in assisting those in need and the importance of social activism will be explored. Practical implications for successful therapy with diverse individuals will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss the importance of therapists' acknowledgment of their own biases and how these biases can influence the therapeutic process if not addressed.

PSY 713 Human Behavior II: Cognitive Psychology

This course provides students with the empirical and theoretical foundations of contemporary cognitive psychology. Topics include attention, perception, memory, knowledge representation, and structure, consciousness and metacognition, imagery, language, reasoning, decision making, and emotion. Attention will also be given to how cognitive processes may change with aging, be compromised in certain disorders, or vary within gender and culturally diverse groups.

PSY 714 Human Behavior III: Personality and Individual Differences

This course will involve an exploration of historical and contemporary models for understanding human personality. The focus in this course will be an in-depth examination of the range of major theoretical models that explain and describe human behavior and differences between individuals. Socio-cultural differences in behavior will be given careful attention throughout the course. Attention to both categorical and dimensional models of personality will be examined. In addition, the application of personality theories and research in clinical assessment and psychotherapy will be addressed; in particular, there will be a detailed exploration of personality disorders in terms of both DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria and underlying psychopathology.

PSY 719 Psychological Assessment of Children and Adolescents

This is a skills course in which the student will become familiar with psychological assessment principles, tools, and practice with children and adolescents. The student will be given training in the selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of a variety of measures appropriate to children and adolescents. Students will then learn procedures for effectively utilizing these measures with the individual assessed, family, school, and other significant elements of the child's world.
Prerequisite PSY 709 and 730

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 720 Psychological Assessment of Children and Adolescents II

This course is a continuation of PSY 719 in which the student will extend their knowledge, proficiencies, and skills in psychological assessment with this population.
Prerequisite PSY 719

PSY 724 History and Systems of Psychology

This course provides the student with knowledge about and understanding of the development of psychology as a science and profession. Three general topic areas are examined: psychology's historical roots in philosophy, natural science, and national cultures; the work of the early psychologists; and the development of various "systems" or "schools" of psychology in the 20th century.

PSY 730 Psychological Assessment II: Personality and Behavioral Assessment/Objective Methods

This course will focus on theory and practice of personality and behavioral assessment. The student will be given training in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of several of the more widely used measures of personality and behavioral/emotional functioning (MMPI-II, MMPI-II-RF, MMPI-A, PAI, MCMI-III, BDI, etc.). Ethical and cultural issues related to this approach to assessment will also be highlighted.
Prerequisite: PSY 709

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 740 Advanced Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Theory and Application

This course is intended to provide the historical development, theoretical rationale, and the empirical base for rationalist, constructivist, and contextual approaches to cognitive behavioral therapy. Contemporary approaches to cognitive behavioral psychotherapy will be discussed in terms of its efficacy in the treatment of a wide range of psychological disorders and with diverse populations. Issues relating to psychotherapy integration and treatment of diverse populations will also be covered in this class.
Prerequisite: PSY 700

PSY 741 Advanced Seminar in Psychotherapy and Clinical Practice

This is an advanced seminar exploring issues in psychotherapy and the contemporary practice of clinical psychology. Focal topics will be announced and resource speakers with expertise in those areas will be invited to participate. Disciplined and thorough literature reviews will be stressed.
Prerequisite: PSY 740

PSY 742 Clinical Psychology in Primary Care

This course will address the importance of the psychologist-physician relationship in the treatment of chronic and acute medical illnesses and the role of psychological interventions in the primary care setting. Illnesses will be conceptualized based on disease causes, treatments, and barriers, and specific interventions for each will be addressed. Treatment techniques, including, but not limited to, brief therapy, stress management, pain management, smoking cessation, and cognitive behavioral therapies, will be addressed as they relate to the psychologist's role in helping patients manage medical illness more effectively.
Prerequisite: PSY 700 and 705

PSY 743 Clinical Hypnosis

An intellectual and experiential introduction to hypnosis as a tool in various forms of psychological intervention. The course will examine the history of hypnotic phenomena, the extensive scientific research over the past 40 or so years, and the use of hypnosis in the contemporary practice of psychotherapy.

PSY 747 Biofeedback Training and Self-Regulation

An introductory course in the theory and methods of biofeedback and self-regulation training. The emphasis will be upon presenting the theoretical basis for and technology associated with the primary modalities of biofeedback and their applications to physical rehabilitation and psychotherapy. Demonstrations and hands-on training will be used throughout.
Prerequisite: PSY 700, 701, 757, and 758

PSY 750 Psychopharmacology

A study of how psychoactive drugs impact human behavior. Emphasis will be on how selected drugs interact with neurotransmitter systems and how neurotransmitter systems modulate behavior. Particular reference will be made to reaction of central nervous system to chemically effective drugs (anti-anxiety, anti-depressant, anti-psychotic). Indications and contraindications will be stressed as well as management strategies.
Prerequisite: PSY 701

PSY 751 Clinical Health Psychology I: Introduction to Behavioral Health

Clinical Health Psychology I is a graduate-level course that will provide doctoral students with a foundation of clinical health psychology and behavioral medicine. First, the most widely studied and empirically supported theories of health behaviors will be introduced in relation to behavioral risk factors. Next, we will focus on assessment and treatment of the primary behavioral problems encountered within behavioral medicine, which include sleep disorders, sexual dysfunction, high-risk sexual behaviors, obesity, eating disorders, chronic pain, substance abuse/ dependency, and tobacco addiction.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 752 Clinical Health Psychology II: Working with Medically Ill Populations

This course will build on the foundation provided by Clinical Health Psychology I. Clinical Health Psychology II is a graduate-level course that will provide doctoral students with an in-depth look at working in medical settings. We will cover working in primary care and working in specific populations such as cancer. We will discuss the practical side of setting up behavioral consultation services in medicine and specific issues related to various diseases seen in primary cancer as well as cancer, and we will also integrate issues that have been found to be important when working within primary care or oncology. We will discuss the medical field, medical professionals, patient perspectives in health care, and communications between health-care providers and patients. Finally, we will use case examples in discussing disease processes and clinical therapy interventions.
Prerequisite: PSY 751

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 753 Pediatric Psychology

This course will provide an overview of theory, research, and professional practice in pediatric psychology. The course will review medical and behavioral aspects of the most common chronic pediatric illnesses, theories explaining the etiology and maintenance of behavioral aspects of pediatric illness, and considerations for psychological assessment and intervention in areas such as adherence to medical interventions, emotional difficulties related to chronic illness, and coping with medical procedures. Course content will also include discussion about the evolving role of psychologists in pediatric settings.

PSY 757 Neuropsychology I: Fundamentals of Neuropsychological Assessment

An introduction to neuropsychological assessment techniques. Interview- based and psychometric approaches will be examined. The course will emphasize the development of skills for recognizing and describing deficits in major aspects of cognitive functioning. The relationship between neuropsychological assessment techniques and procedures and brain- behavior relationships will be highlighted.
Co-requisite or prerequisite: PSY 701

PSY 758 Neuropsychology II: Administration and Interpretation of Comprehensive Batteries

The role of the comprehensive neuropsychological assessment procedures in the evaluation of neurobehavioral disorders is explored. Comprehensive batteries, including the Halstead-Reitan and the Luria-Nebraska, will be employed, as well as general use batteries, batteries for assessing
specific disorders (e.g. dementia, CVA, etc.), and Lezak's patient-oriented hypothesis-testing model. Both psychometric and qualitative aspects of the assessment process will be explored along with the selection and use of appropriate normative comparison standards.
Prerequisite: PSY 757

PSY 762 Advanced Seminar in Clinical Child and Family Psychology

An advanced seminar on issues of theory and practice in contemporary child-clinical and family psychology. This seminar focuses on in-depth analysis of modern issues impacting child and family psychology, including the practical application of empirically supported treatments and discussions of present-day debates. This seminar is designed to extend the student's knowledge of basic principles and theories beyond the classroom and carefully consider how these translate to real-life situations. Disciplined and thorough literature reviews will be stressed.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 765 Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy

An advanced course focusing on issues of theory and practice in child and adolescent psychotherapy. The focus of study will be on those interventions with demonstrated empirical support. Both individual and systemic approaches will be carefully examined and considered. Special attention will be given to issues of diversity and its impact on working with children, adolescents, and their families.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 766 Working with Families in Clinical Psychology

This course is designed to provide clinical psychology students with an understanding of the major concepts in the field of family therapy, as well as a comprehensive overview of systems approaches. The course will provide a thorough examination of the classic schools of family therapy and an overview of recent developments in the field. The intrapersonal, interpersonal and intersystemic dimensions of diagnosis and treatment will be explored. The concepts of family of origin, family functioning, structure, strength, and narratives will be studied. The ethical considerations in treating a family, a couple or an individual will also be explored, examined, and discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 770 Psychological Measurement and Statistical Analysis

Students will be introduced to fundamental principles and concepts of measurement theory. In addition, students will develop a fundamental understanding of the foundation of statistical procedures and data analysis and will develop the statistical skills necessary for accurate interpretation of clinical measures and completing a research project.

Students will be introduced to fundamental principles and concepts of measurement theory, including reliability, validity, standard error of measurement, and correlation. In addition, students will develop a fundamental understanding of the foundation of statistical procedures and data analysis and will develop the statistical skills necessary for accurate interpretation of clinical measures and completing a research project.

PSY 771 Research Methodology

The focus of this course will be upon developing an understanding of research design and development of those skills necessary for the implementation of a research project. In particular, students will develop and have an understanding of issues, concepts, and procedures in clinical efficacy and effectiveness research.
Prerequisite: PSY 770

PSY 772 Clinical Dissertation Seminar I: Project Initiation

This course will focus on developing a dissertation idea, conducting a preliminary literature search, and developing appropriate research strategies. The course includes an introduction to advanced statistical approaches such as logistic regression and multivariate analysis of variance. This statistical training is meant to facilitate the student's literature review as well as provide a foundation in techniques that may be used in the dissertation project. Details about the Clinical Dissertation can be found in the Clinical Dissertation Manual included in the Student Handbook
Prerequisite: PSY 771

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 773 Clinical Dissertation Seminar II: Manuscript Preparation

This course will focus on organization of data and manuscript preparation in preparation for a completion of the written and oral portion of the Clinical Dissertation project.
Prerequisite: PSY 772

PSY 774 Clinical Dissertation Seminar III: Project Completion

This course must be taken by all students who do not complete the Clinical Dissertation by the conclusion of PSY 773. This course must be retaken until the project is fully completed.

PSY 782, 783 Doctoral Practicum I/ Practicum Seminar I

The first of two externships in an approved field placement site. To be accompanied by the practicum seminar. Details are listed in the Practicum and Internship Manual included in the Student Handbook.

PSY 784 Consultation and Education

Designed to prepare students for the role of psychologist consultant and educator, this course will pay particular attention to the dynamics of working with groups and organizations in a variety of settings and making effective interventions at a systemic level. In addition, education in psychology, with an emphasis on Core curriculum and competencies, historical developments, and future directions will be thoroughly explored.

PSY 785 Introduction to Professional Practice, Ethics and Conduct

This course includes didactic and discussion components and focuses on issues important to professionals about to enter the field, including an orientation to modern clinical psychology, an introduction to ethical and legal issues, and trends in professional education and practice.

PSY 786 Individual Human Diversity

This course will focus on the impact and implication of diversity issues, beyond cultural differences, on the functioning of individuals and relationships, as well as on the theories of psychopathology and practice of psychotherapy. Clinical psychologists commonly deal with issues related to gender, class, aging, disability, and sexual preference when working with clients. This course will provide students with a solid appreciation of these issues and how living in our society, combating these issues daily, can affect individuals, families, and relationships. Further, we will discuss how therapists can acknowledge their own biases and how these biases can influence the therapeutic process if not addressed. Finally, this course will provide clinical guidelines for working effectively and sensitively with individuals and families dealing with issues of gender, age, disability, class, and sexual preferences.

PSY 787 Supervision and Management

This course will stress the supervisory and case management roles and the student's ability to be a leader and catalyst in these processes. Furthermore, practice development and economic issues in clinical psychology are explored. The student should have completed the first practicum before enrolling in this course.

Number of Credits: 3

PSY 788, 789 Doctoral Practicum II/Practicum Seminar II

The second of two externships in an approved field placement site. To be accompanied by the practicum seminar. Details are listed in the Practicum and Internship Manual included in the Student Handbook.

PSY 794, 795 Doctoral Practicum III/Practicum Seminar III (Optional)

The third optional externship in an approved field placement site. To be accompanied by the practicum seminar. Details are listed in the Practicum and Internship Manual included in the Student Handbook.

PSY 800, 801, 802 Full-Time Clinical Internship

One-year, full-time internship in an approved facility. Continuous registration over three semesters for a total of nine credits is required. The total clock hours served should not be less than 2,000. See Practicum and Internship Manual included in the Student Handbook for details.
With Permission of Director of Clinical Training

PSY 860 Dissertation Project Advancement

This 1-credit independent study will provide expert mentoring to a student from her/his Chair for accomplishing the tasks necessary to complete her/his dissertation proposal or final dissertation document and successfully defend it. Course materials may include readings, data-analysis software, or other research software platforms.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 861 Diagnostic Interviewing

This 1-credit independent study focuses on the refinement of diagnostic interviewing competencies. The independent study is taught by a clinical faculty member. Course materials may include readings, additional training cases at LUCPS, or other specified training experiences.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 862 Treatment Planning and Implementation

This 1-credit independent study focuses on the refinement of treatment planning and implementation competencies. The independent study is taught by a clinical faculty member. Course materials may include readings, additional training cases at LUCPS, or other specified training experiences.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 870, 871, 872, 873, 874, 875 Part-Time Clinical Internship

Two-year, part-time internship in an approved facility. Continuous registration over six semesters for a total of nine credits is required. The total clock hours served should not be less than 2,000. See Practicum and Internship Manual included in the Student Handbook for details.
With Permission of Director of Clinical Training