Print Compilation – Grad

General Info

Financial Considerations

Financial Obligations

At the time of registration, the student contracts for the full amount of the tuition and related fees, regardless of the arrangement for payment. A student who is financially delinquent or who has a record of indebtedness cannot attend class, register for subsequent semesters, or receive grade reports, transcripts, or a diploma until such indebtedness is paid.

Tuition and Fees

Students may find the tuition and fee schedule on the Financial Aid website. 

Invoices and Payments

Fall semester electronic bills (eBills) will be available for view­ing and payment in July, spring semester eBills will be available in December, and summer semester eBills will be available in April. Payments are due as follows:

Fall semester:

August

Spring semester:

January

Summer semester:

May

Credit card (American Express, Discover, MasterCard and VISA) and eCheck (ACH) payments can be made at http://my.lasalle.edu. Credit card payments are subject to a 2.85 percent convenience fee; however, eCheck payments are not subject to a convenience fee. An ACH payment is an electronic debit of a checking or savings account. You must have your account number and routing number available to make an ACH payment. If you choose to pay via wire transfer, instructions are available on the secure portal. You must include your student ID number.

Write your student ID number on the face of the check/money order to ensure accurate and timely processing. A $45 fee will be assessed for all returned checks. If the University receives a total of three returned checks, all future payments must be made via cash, certi­fied check, or money order. DO NOT SEND CASH THROUGH THE MAIL.

When you access your eBill you will also be able to pay on-line. If full payment cannot be made, the La Salle Payment Plan is available. 

Third-Party Payments

If a recognized third party (employer, labor union, foundation, etc.) is paying all or a portion of your tuition, you must send the official notification to the Student Accounts Office to be applied to your account. To be eligible, the third party must be a recognized organi­zation, not an individual. The official notification must be on letter­head and contain the following, student name, La Salle Identification number, amount that will be paid, billing instructions and signature of authorized representative. Remember to remit payment for any amount due, not covered by a third party. Third party billing authorizations are accepted in lieu of payment and should be received by the payment due date. Please fax or email your billing authorization to 215.951.1799 or studentar@lasalle.edu.

Tuition Reduction for Catholic School Teachers

Students employed as full-time teachers in Catholic schools within the dioceses of Philadelphia, Allentown, Trenton, Camden, and Wilmington may receive a 30 percent tuition reduction for courses taken in all programs, except for Graduate Religion and Psy.D. to apply for this tuition reduction, the student is required to present a letter to the Office of Financial Aid from his or her principal, verifying full-time employment for each semester the tuition reduction is granted. Students must apply each semester.

Late Fees

A one percent monthly late payment fee will be assessed to all stu­dents who have not made payment in full or acceptable payment arrangements by the tuition due date for the semester. The fee will be monthly.

If you are unable to make payment in full, you are encouraged to sign up for the La Salle Payment Plan or refer to the Financial Aid section of the University Web site for directions on how to apply for financial aid.

Refund of Tuition

When registration has been finalized, a student shall be considered to be in continuous attendance until proper notice of withdrawal is received by the University. Students must file a withdrawal with the Dean of their school of study. Ceasing to attend and/or giving notice to your instructor(s) does not constitute the proper notice of withdrawal. The allowed percentage of a tuition refund will be based upon the date the notice of withdrawal is received.

*For the purpose of refund computation, a week shall be defined as the period of seven consecutive days; beginning with the official start date of the semester, not the first day of a class or first day of attendance.

** The first day of the semester is defined as the official start date of the semester, not the first day of a class or first day of attendance.

Full Fifteen Week Term

Up to and including the first week* of the semester 100% refund

Second week 60% refund

Third week 40% refund

Fourth week 20% refund

After fourth week no refund

Ten through Twelve Week Terms

Up to and including the first week* of the semester 100% refund

Second week 60% refund

Third week 20% refund

After the third week of the semester no refund

Five through Nine Week Terms

Up to and including the second day of the semester 100% refund

First week of the semester 60% refund

After the first week of the semester no refund

One through Four Week Terms (includes intersession)

Up to and including the first day** of the semester 100% refund

After the first day of the semester no refund

La Salle University uses federal regulations to determine the refund of fed­eral financial aid funds to the federal government. A copy of this federal refund calculation is available in the Office of Financial Aid.

Federal and State Financial Aid Programs

Applying for Financial Aid

To apply for financial aid, incoming day students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by Nov. 15. Return­ing day students must complete the FAFSA and the La Salle Institu­tional Data Form (IDF) by April 15. New and returning Pennsylvania residents in evening programs must complete the FAFSA by May 1 to be eligible for the PHEAA State Grant.

While all evening and graduate students must complete the FAFSA and IDF to be awarded financial aid, there is no La Salle deadline. However, remember that it takes at least six weeks to process finan­cial aid. If an evening or graduate student wishes to have a refund check for books and living expenses at the start of the term, and to pay all outstanding balances to avoid late fees, then the student should apply early for aid.

La Salle’s Title IV code is 003287. The FAFSA can be completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

For some students, the federal government requires us to collect additional documentation to complete an application. Notification will be sent that details the additional documentation that is need­ed. The documentation must be submitted within 30 days of receipt of the request letter. (See the section below on deadlines for more information). No aid information will be awarded until the request­ed documentation is returned.

All students must reapply each year for all forms of financial aid.

Financial aid and loans cannot be awarded once the student ceases to attend.

Deadline Dates

The purpose of the deadline dates is to ensure that there is enough time for the student’s financial aid to be processed and credited to the student’s account for the beginning of classes. Filing late or submitting requested documentation after the deadline may cause a reduction in the financial aid award or a delay in having aid cred­ited to the account. (However, generally, if a student files after the deadline date, there are still many types of aid available). If a stu­dent misses the application or the additional documentation dead­line, and if the financial aid is not in place for any reason, then the student must be prepared to use the payment plan offered by the Office of Student and Accounts Receivable. If the necessary payment arrangements are not made, late fees will be charged.

Please note, students also be prepared for a delay in receiving a refund check for living expenses or a transfer of funds to their Gold Card to buy books if a deadline is missed and the financial aid is not in place.

Types of Federal and State Financial Aid

Federal Pell Grants

The Pell program is a federally administered program based on exceptional need. Eligibility is determined by the federal government and notification is sent directly to students. Students who are Pell Grant eligible, may receive up to 12 semesters of funding as a full-time student; part-time students are eligible for a prorated number of semesters.

Federal Perkins Loans

The Federal Perkins Loan provides students, with exceptional need, with long-term, low-interest loans for educational expenses. The University deter­mines the amount of the loan to be offered within certain federal guidelines. Interest at the rate of 5 percent per year on the unpaid balance begins to accrue nine months after the student is enrolled in less than half-time study. The loan repayment period may be as long as 10 years, depending upon the total amount borrowed. Effective 10/1/2017, the Perkins Loan Program has expired. No new loans will be offered.

Pennsylvania State Grants (PHEAA) And Other State Grant Programs

Pennsylvania state grants are administered by the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA). Eligible students must demonstrate financial need, meet Pennsylvania residency requirements, and be enrolled at least half-time. Full-time students must complete a minimum of 24 credits per year, while half-time students must complete a minimum of 12 credits annually. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be filed by May 1 in order to be eligible.

PHEAA requires students to have at least 50 percent of their reg­istered credits on-campus. If more than 50 percent of a student’s registered credits during a given semester are for online classes, the student will be ineligible to receive a PHEAA State Grant for that semester.

Other states in addition to Pennsylvania have scholarship programs for their residents. Information and applications are available from the respective state boards of education.

Federal Work Study Program

The Federal Work Study Program provides students with exceptional need the opportunity to be eligible for part-time jobs on campus. The funds earned do not provide direct tuition relief, but they are intended to help meet incidental expenses encountered by students. Stu­dents are paid on a biweekly basis for the number of hours worked. The total amount that may be earned through the work program is determined by students’ needs and availability of funds at the Uni­versity. Students work an average of 12 hours a week throughout the academic year. Job listings are online.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)

The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) program is a federally funded, college-administered program avail­able to students with exceptional need who are also Federal Pell Grant recipients.

Federal Direct Subsidized Loan

The Direct Subsidized Loan is a fixed-rate loan awarded direct­ly by the federal government on the basis of financial need. This loan is interest-free during full-time and part-time enrollment in a degree-seeking program. Repayment and interest for this type of loan begins six months after leaving school or enrolling less than half-time, and allows for up to a maximum of 10 years to repay. Annually, a student may borrow up to $3,500 as a freshman, $4,500 as a sophomore, and $5,500 as a junior or senior.

The federal government has permanently limited eligibility for sub­sidized loans to 150 percent of the length of the student’s academic program for new borrowers beginning on or after July 1, 2013. The 150 percent change means students in a four-year program will be eligible for subsidized student loans for the equivalent of six years— three years for students in a two-year program. The student who reaches this limitation may continue to receive Unsubsidized Direct Loans if he or she is otherwise eligible (for example, student con­tinues to meet the school’s satisfactory academic progress require­ments).

Once a borrower has reached the 150 percent limitation, his or her eligibility for an interest subsidy also ends for all outstanding sub­sidized loans that were disbursed on or after July 1, 2013. At that point, interest on those previously borrowed loans would begin to accrue and would be payable in the same manner as interest on unsubsidized loans.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan

The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is an interest-accruing, fixed-rate loan available to dependent and independent students with no financial need requirement. The annual loan maximums are the same as those listed above for the Direct Subsidized Loan, except dependent students may borrow up to an additional $2,000 each year, while independent students may borrow up to $6,000 as a freshman and sophomore, and up to $7,000 as a junior and senior. If the parent of a dependent student is credit-denied for a Parent PLUS Loan, the student is eligible to borrow up to the same level as an independent student. Repayment for this type of loan begins six months after leaving school or enrolling less than half-time, and allows for up to a maximum of 10 years to repay.

Federal Direct Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students

The Federal PLUS Loan is a non-need-based loan for the parents of undergraduate students who are enrolled as at least half-time stu­dents. Borrowers have the option of beginning repayment on the PLUS Loan either 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed, or defer­ring until six months after the dependent student on whose behalf the parent borrowed, is no longer enrolled on at least a half-time basis. The interest rate is a fixed percentage with a set origination fee. For current interest and origination fee rates, please visit www.lasalle.edu/parentplus.

La Salle Scholarships and Grants

A variety of scholarships and grants are available for La Salle students, who must be enrolled for at least 12 credits in a day program to be eligible. Among those currently available to students in good standing are:

Full-Tuition Christian Brothers Scholarships

Full-tuition Christian Brothers Scholarships are offered annually to high school seniors who have demonstrated exceptional academic aptitude and achievement and offer evidence of potential for lead­ership in the La Salle community. This scholarship competition is open to high school seniors who have scored approximately 1360 on the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) Critical Read­ing and Mathematics sections and who have a class rank in the top 10 or top 10 percent of their high school graduating class. A sepa­rate application for a full-tuition scholarship is required and may be obtained by contacting the Director of the Honors Program or down­loaded from the Scholarship section of the Financial Aid Office Web site. The completed scholarship materials must be received by the Honors Program no later than January 15.

Founder’s Scholarships

Founder’s Scholarships are awarded in the memory of St. John Bap­tist de La Salle, the founder of the Christian Brothers, the religious order that sponsors the University. St. La Salle’s vision of teachers who would transform the lives of students and his desire to pro­vide access to education to those who would otherwise not receive it revolutionized education. For his achievement, he was named the Patron Saint of Teachers. His work is carried on at La Salle Universi­ty as well as at schools in 80 countries throughout the world.

Without neglecting the life of the mind, the traditional mission of the Lasallian School has been to help young people plan and prepare for a useful and humanly rewarding career.

The awarding of a Founder’s Scholarship is based on a variety of criteria, chief of which are grade point average, strength of course schedule, and SAT scores. The scholarship is renewable for four years provided the student maintains satisfactory academic prog­ress and full-time day status for the academic year. All students who have been accepted for admission by March 1 will be considered for the scholarship; no additional application is required.

La Salle Grants

As a reflection of its dedication to providing financial aid to stu­dents on the basis of financial need, the University has established the La Salle Grant program. Awards from this program are made to students based on their financial need as determined through completion of the FAFSA form. Awards are renewable provided the student maintains satisfactory academic progress and continues to show financial need and submits all requested documentation with­in deadline dates. Priority is given to full-time day students.

Athletic Grants

La Salle University offers grants to men and women excelling in ath­letics. Contact with the La Salle University Athletics Department is made by the student’s high school coach. These grants can be main­tained through the four years of study at La Salle University. No athletic grant is final until an official notification is sent from the Financial Aid Office. The awarding of an athletic grant may result in a reduction of the student’s financial aid. The student will be noti­fied in writing if such a reduction occurs.

Community Service Scholarships

Tuition scholarships are awarded to entering freshmen who have shown interest in and commitment to community service prior to their undergraduate careers, and who are willing to continue such involvement during their years at La Salle.

The grants are for $5,000 and may be combined with a Founder’s Scholarship. They are intended to free recipients from the need to seek employment during the academic year. The grants are renew­able each year if the recipient maintains a 2.5 GPA and full-time day status and continues his or her involvement with community ser­vice.

The application can be downloaded from the Scholarship section of the Financial Aid Office Web site.

All completed scholarship materials must be submitted by January 15 to the Office of University Ministry and Service.

Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation Scholarships

Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation Scholarships are offered to women who are at least 25 years of age, who are part-time or full-time students, and who will be enrolled at La Salle for a minimum of six credits during the term in which the scholarship will be used. The student must demonstrate financial need, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, and have completed a minimum of 60 credits by the term during which the scholarship will be used. Additional application information can be obtained from the Student Financial Services section of the La Salle Web site at www.lasalle.edu. The pri­ority deadline is August 1.

Institutionally Administered Scholarships

Through the generous contributions of foundations, corporations, and individuals, La Salle students are eligible for a variety of private scholarships.

Students may apply each academic year by filling out a Common Scholarship Application, which is available via www.lasalle.edu/commonscholarship. Even if a student has been awarded a scholar­ship in the past, the student must reapply for that scholarship each academic year.

For more information and a complete listing of scholarships, please refer to the Financial Aid website.

Veteran’s Benefits

Students who qualify for Veteran’s benefits should contact the Financial Aid Office at 215.951.1070. Information for full-time and part-time veteran students is also available under the Active Duty Veterans link within the Tools and Resources section of the Financial Aid website.

Policies and Progress

Satisfactory Standards of Academic Progress/All Financial Aid

In order to continue receiving federal and financial aid, a student must be maintaining satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of the program of study. The student must be moving toward the goal of graduation.

Standards of Academic Progress

In order to continue to receive federal and institutional need-based aid, the student must successfully earn 67 percent of all attempted credits, and achieve the cumulative GPA as listed below:

Required Minimum Credits Earned Cumulative GPA

1-23: 1.50

24-53: 1.75

54 and above: 2.00

Graduate Students: 2.00

For the definition of “attempted” and “earned” credits, and for the formula of the calculation of the GPA, please contact the Registrar.

Some scholarships require a higher GPA for renewal.

Maximum Time Frame

The maximum time frame for completion of the undergraduate or graduate program cannot exceed 150 percent of the published pro­gram length for a full-time student. For example, the minimum credits for an undergraduate to complete a program is 120; there­fore, the student would have a maximum time frame of 180 attempt­ed credits to complete the program before loss of eligibility for fed­eral and institutional aid.

Measurement of Progress

Academic progress for each student will be measured in May, or at the end of the summer session, if applicable. If a student does not meet the standards of academic progress, then that student will not be considered for federal or institutional funds. In order for the stu­dent’s eligibility to be reinstated, the student’s grades must meet the required levels.

Appeals of Progress

Appeals may be based on either a serious personal illness or injury, the death of a relative, or other extenuating circumstances. The stu­dent must be able to demonstrate that the illness, injury, or exten­uating circumstance had a direct impact on the student’s academ­ic performance. If a student experience circumstances preventing completion of the program within the 150 percent time frame, then an appeal may be made on this basis.

All appeals for waivers of academic progress must be done in writ­ing and be accompanied by the Financial Aid Progress Appeal form, which can be found via www.lasalle.edu/finaidforms. Please follow the directions on this form, and submit it to the Financial Aid Office. If the Appeals Committee feels that there are mitigating circum­stances that had a direct bearing on the student’s academic perfor­mance, then the student can be funded during a probationary period for one semester. If a student fails to meet the standards of academ­ic progress at the end of the probationary period, then the student becomes ineligible for federal and institutional financial aid.

The University’s Academic Censure Policy and its Standards for Academic Progress for Financial Aid are two distinct policies. The University may allow a student to enroll for a semester but elect to withhold funding.

Repeat Coursework

Students are permitted to repeat a course that he/she has already passed one additional time and be eligible for financial aid. Any additional attempts of the same course will not be covered through financial aid.

If a student attempts a course for a third time, the student’s enroll­ment minus the repeated course must be equal to at least 6 credits as a part-time student or at least 12 credits as a full-time student in order to be aid-eligible.

For example: A student enrolled in 12 credits who is attempting a 3-credit course for a third time, will continue to be charged the tui­tion rate for 12 credits, but will be eligible for aid only as a part-time student (12 credits – 3 credits = 9 credits).

Standards of Academic Progress For PHEAA State Grant Program

The student must successfully complete at least 24 credits of new passing coursework for every two semesters of full-time PHEAA State Grant assistance received. For part-time PHEAA State Grant recipients, the above requirement will be prorated. (A student may appeal this policy directly to PHEAA.)

Financial Aid Policies

The University reserves the right to reduce financial aid due to a change in the student’s enrollment or housing status, or if a student receives additional funding from an outside source. Financial aid may also be reduced if there has been an error in the calculation of a student’s financial aid, as a result of verification, or if a student missed a deadline.

Students participating in a study abroad program are not permitted to use any institutionally-funded grants or scholarships, or athletic awards during the semester abroad. This includes, but is not limited to the Founder’s Scholarship, La Salle Grant, Academic Achievement Scholarship, and Excellence in Learning Grant, as well as any endowed scholarship that is awarded by the Financial Aid Office. Study abroad scholarships are available to qualified students.

Students interested in studying abroad must make an appointment with a representative in the Financial Aid Office as soon as possible to discuss the implications studying abroad will have on their finan­cial aid, scholarships and University billing.

If a student is doing a co-op/internship and will be enrolled in fewer than 12 credits during that semester, he/she must come to the Financial Aid Office to see how his/her financial aid may change due to differences in tuition charges and credits. If a student is enrolled ­ in at least 12 credits during the co-op/internship semester, his/her financial aid will not change.

La Salle University reserves the right to reduce University need-based or non-need-based funding in the event an “overaward” occurs due to a change in a student’s enrollment, housing, or finan­cial situation, or if additional outside funding is made available to a student. There are five types of overawards:

  1. When the total of a student’s grants and scholarships exceeds the student’s direct costs for tuition, room, board, and fees, La Salle University reserves the right to reduce institutional funding, either need-based or merit-based. All outside grants and scholarships will be applied first to University charges. University grants and scholarships will then be applied to subsequent University charges. The one exception to this policy is athletic aid, as the NCAA regulations take precedent.
  2. If a student receives more funding than the student’s federally calculated need allows, the University is required to resolve the overaward per federal and institutional policy, which prohibits a student from receiving aid in excess of need. If a student is awarded additional aid, which causes the total of all aid to exceed the federally calculated need, then there must be a reduction in the financial aid. To resolve this overaward, financial aid will be reduced in the following order: Perkins Loan, Federal Work Study, SEOG, La Salle grant, and Direct Loan.
  3. If a student has been awarded one or more La Salle University merit-based scholarships and then is subsequently awarded a half-tuition or greater scholarship, then the student becomes ineligible for those La Salle University merit-based scholarships.
  4. The total amount of all financial aid for a student cannot exceed that student’s financial aid cost of attendance. Financial aid includes Federal PLUS loans and alternative loans.
  5. If a student earns in excess of the Federal Work Study award, then La Salle University reserves the right to reduce other need-based aid.

Exception: If a student has already been awarded need-based aid and subsequently receives additional funding, such as a private scholarship, then no other aid will be reduced as long as the total of the financial aid does not exceed need.

It is the responsibility of all financial aid applicants to check their La Salle e-mail and mylasalle accounts for notices concerning finan­cial aid deadlines, policies, procedures, and eligibility. Important information may be sent through e-mail or posted on the Web site rather than through paper correspondence.

Fund Returns

Refund of Excess Aid

Students who are credited with aid in excess of tuition and other charges after all the appropriate forms have been completed will be sent a refund.

Withdrawals and Return Of Title IV Funds

If a student is a recipient of federal financial aid (Title IV funds) and withdraws from the University, then federal regulations require the University to follow a prescribed withdrawal process and stipulate the refund of funds to the federal financial aid programs.

Withdrawal Date

For a federal financial aid recipient, the withdrawal date is the date the student notifies the Dean of his or her school that he or she is withdrawing from the University. This can be done orally or in writ­ing. The student may rescind the official notification of withdrawal. This must be done in writing.

If the student does not notify the Dean of his or her withdrawal, the date of the withdrawal becomes the midpoint of the semester or the date of the student’s last attendance at a documented academically related activity.

If a student does not notify the Dean of his or her withdrawal due to circumstances beyond the student’s control, the withdrawal date becomes the date related to that circumstance. Finally, if a student does not return from an approved leave of absence, the withdrawal date becomes the date the student began the leave.

Return of Title IV Funds

If a student withdraws, the student’s federal financial aid will be prorated based on the number of days that the student completed in the term. This is the earned amount of federal financial aid. Once a student completes 60 percent of the term, then all federal financial aid has been earned and no refund to the programs is required. For the University policy on refund of tuition charges, see the section on Expenses. Please note that the Federal Return of Title IV Funds policy no longer stipulates how the University calculates its refund of tuition, fees, and other charges.

If a student has received disbursed aid in excess of the calculated earned aid, then funds must be returned to the federal financial aid programs in the following order: Unsubsidized Federal Direct loans, Subsidized Federal Direct loans, Perkins loans, Federal PLUS loans, Federal Pell Grant, and Federal SEOG.

A student will only be eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement of federal financial aid if the amount of the disbursed aid is less than the amount of the earned federal financial aid.

If a student has received a cash payment due to excess of financial aid over allowable tuition, fees, and other charges and if the student subsequently withdraws from the University, then the student may be required to repay monies to the federal financial aid programs. After a student is notified that he or she owes monies to the federal financial aid programs, the student has 45 days to either repay the funds or make satisfactory payment arrangements with the Depart­ment of Education. If the student fails to do either of the two previ­ous options, then the University must report “overpayment” to the National Student Loan System.

If a student receives final grades for a term that are all failures, then the student must present documentation that he/she attended for that particular term. If the student fails to produce such documen­tation, the Department of Education requires that the University assume that the student only attended through the midpoint of the term. We are then required to perform the Title IV Refund calcu­lation using the midpoint date as the estimated last date of atten­dance for that student. In these cases, we are required to return some or all of the student’s federal financial aid.

Students’ Rights and Responsibilities with Regard to Financial Aid

The following are the rights and responsibilities of students receiving federal funds.

You Have the Right to Ask a School:

  • The names of its accrediting or licensing organizations.
  • About its programs, about its instructional, laboratory, and other physical facilities, and about its faculty.
  • About its cost of attendance and its policy on refunds to students who drop out.
  • What financial assistance is available, including information on all federal, state, local, private, and institutional financial aid programs.
  • What the procedures and deadlines are for submitting applications for each available financial aid program.
  • What criteria it uses to select financial aid recipients and how it determines your financial need. This process includes how costs for tuition and fees, room and board, travel, books and supplies, and personal miscellaneous expenses are considered in your cost of education. It also includes how resources (such as parental contribution, other financial aid, assets, etc.) are considered in calculating your need:
  • How much of your financial need, as determined by the institution, has been met and how/when you will be paid.
  • To explain each type and amount of assistance in your financial aid package.
  • What the interest rate is on any loan that you have, the total amount you must repay, the length of time you have to repay, when you must start repayment, and what cancellation or deferment privileges apply.
  • How the school determines whether you are making satisfactory progress, and what happens if you are not.
  • What special facilities and services are available to people with disabilities.
  • If you are offered a federal work-study job, what kind of job it is, what hours you must work, what your duties will be, and how and when you will be paid.
  • To reconsider your aid package, if you believe a mistake has been made or if your enrollment or financial circumstances have changed.

It Is Your Responsibility to:

  • Review and consider all information about a school’s program before you enroll.
  • Pay special attention to your application for student financial aid, complete it accurately, and submit it on time to the right place. Errors can delay or prevent your receiving aid. Meet all deadlines for applying for and reapplying for aid.
  • Notify your school of any information that has changed since you applied.
  • Provide all additional documentation, verification, corrections, and/or new information requested by either the Financial Aid Office or the agency to which you submitted your application.
  • Read, understand, and keep copies of all forms you are asked to sign.
  • Comply with the provisions of any promissory note and other agreements you sign.
  • Repay any student loans you have. When you sign a promissory note, you’re agreeing to repay your loan.
  • Notify your school of any change in your name, address, or attendance status (half-time, three-quarter-time, full-time, housing status). If you have a loan, you must also notify your lender of these changes.
  • Complete an exit interview if you have a Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Loan, or PLUS Loan.
  • Perform the work agreed upon in Federal Work-Study job.
  • Understand the school’s refund policy.
  • Meet all financial aid deadlines.

Home

This catalog has been prepared for students, prospective students, faculty, and officers of La Salle University and others wishing to know more about the University’s academic programs. The information contained herein is to be considered directive in character. It is accurate as of the date of publication (August 2018). The University reserves the right to make from time to time at its discretion and without prior notice, changes, modifications, or deletions to its academic programs, including courses, schedules, calendars, and any other provisions or requirements in this catalog as University administrators consider appropriate and in the best interest of La Salle University and its students.  As such, this catalog cannot be considered an agreement or contract between individual students and the University.

The catalog is especially useful as a tool for new students as it contains policies, procedures, resources, and curricular information. Ultimately, students are responsible for utilizing the range of resources that La Salle University offers in preparation for the selection of courses, completion of degree requirements, and to acquaint themselves with the regulations that pertain to them.

Overview and Policies

Who are we?

Mission

La Salle University is a Catholic university in the tradition of the Brothers of the Christian Schools.  To a diverse community of learners, La Salle University offers a rigorous curriculum and co-curricular experiences designed to help students gain theoretical and practical knowledge, deepen their ethical sensibilities, and prepare for a lifetime of continuous learning, professional success, and dedicated service.

As a Catholic university rooted in the liberal arts tradition, La Salle challenges students to contemplate life’s ultimate questions as they develop their faith, engage in a free search for truth, and explore their full human potential.  As a Lasallian university, named for St. John Baptist de La Salle, patron saint of teachers, La Salle promotes excellence in teaching and scholarship, demonstrates respect for each person, nurtures mentoring relationships, and encourages authentic community. As an urban university, La Salle invites students to enhance their academic experience by immersing themselves in the rich resources of Philadelphia and the region.  All members of our community are called to maintain a heightened sensitivity to those marginalized within society as they practice civic engagement, provide leadership with a global perspective, and contribute to the common good.

Read more about our Mission and Core Values

The Lasallian Tradition

Following in the footsteps of founder Saint John Baptist de La Salle, the first De La Salle Christian Brothers first arrived in North America in the early 1800s and established the first permanent Lasallian school in Montreal, Canada, in 1837. In 1842, John McMullin became the first American De La Salle Brother.  He founded Calvert Hall College in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1845, which became the first permanent Lasallian school in the United States.  For more than a century-and-a-half, the Lasallian educational mission has spread throughout the United States and Canada with the establishment of schools, ministries, and services that have adapted to the changing needs of the times over the years as it continues to provide a human and Christian education to the young, especially the poor.

The college that was to become La Salle University was founded in Philadelphia in 1863.  The incorporators were a group of Christian Brothers, priests, and laymen, a cooperative group unusual among boards of American Catholic colleges.  Two of the group were the co-founders of the College, Bishop James Wood, fifth bishop of Philadelphia, and Brother Teliow, a German immigrant who had joined the Brothers in America.  Brother Teliow was at the time principal of the Brothers' Academy in St. Michael’s parish (at 2nd and Jefferson Streets).  Four years after its foundation at St. Michael's, the college moved to Filbert Street, opposite what was to become Philadelphia’s new City Hall. Here the small collegiate department developed for some twenty years in tandem with the high school department; the borders between the two, in fact, were at times indistinct.  Because crowding continued during the 1870's, the trustees sought more commodious space "uptown" at 1240 North Broad Street.  The College was finally moved there in July, 1886, where it would remain until 1929.

After the end of World War I, the College looked forward to further expansion in the '20's.  For this purpose, the trustees purchased a part of the historic Belfield Farm, home from 1810 to 1821 of the American painter and Renaissance man, Charles Willson Peale.  No sooner was work on the new buildings completed, however, than the country plunged into its worst depression.  Only belt-tight economy and persistence by Presidents Alfred and Anselm and help from other Brothers' schools got the College through its mortgage crisis and World War II, when enrollment dropped from 400 to 80 students.  But a new dawn came soon thereafter.

In 1946, La Salle College was faced with a wave of returning war veterans and began a period of expansion which has continued to the present.  New buildings mushroomed and an increasingly lay faculty kept pace with a student body that soon numbered thousands.  Since then the University (as of 1984) has expanded physically through acquisition of adjacent properties (basically reuniting Peale’s “Belfield”), constructing (and in some cases renovating) various campus buildings, and expanding the number of academic programs on both the Undergraduate and Graduate levels, including three doctoral degrees.

La Salle describes itself today as an urban comprehensive university, and it is clear that it has achieved important success over the last century and a half, combining the old and the new of American higher learning with the enduring values of Catholic tradition.

The Campus

Learning occurs both in and out of the classroom. As a La Salle student, you’ll find yourself in the fifth-largest city in the U.S., a city of neighborhoods rich with unique historical, educational, social, and cultural opportunities. Classes are regularly complemented by city-based activities and the University enjoys fruitful partnerships with a variety of organizations in and around the city that provide excellent experiential opportunities for students. North, south, east and west -- this city has it all. 

View Campus Map and Directions

Main Campus: the heart of the University, numerous buildings are located here, containing various administrative offices, classrooms, and laboratories.  The Connelly Library is also located here, as well as nearby residence halls.

West Campus: is home to the School of Business (in Founders’ Hall) and the School of Nursing and Health Sciences (in Benilde Tower).  Offices for University Advancement are also located in Benilde.

South Campus: the Department of Communication is located here, as are several residence halls and the “Tree Tops” dining room, located adjacent to the St. Basil’ residence hall(s?).

Satellite Campuses: La Salle University maintains three separate locations away from the main campus:

  • Bucks County (La Salle University-Newtown, 33 University Dr., Newtown, PA 18940):
  • Plymouth Meeting (Victory Office Park, 220 West Germantown Pike, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462): a variety of Graduate and Undergraduate programs are offered at this site, among which are: Bachelor of Social Work, Master of Business Administration, and Master’s in Professional Clinical Counseling.
  • Allentown (St. Paul School, 219 W. Susquehanna St. 2nd Floor, Allentown, PA 18103): the site for the BUSCA [Bilingual Undergraduate Studies for Collegiate Advancement]-Lehigh Valley program.

Nationally Recognized

La Salle University has consistently been recognized for excellence and value. Recently, the University achieved the following citations:

  • named to the FORBES Top Colleges 2017 ranking
  • ranked 34th overall in the North Region in the 2018 edition of S. News & World Report’s “Best Colleges” guidebook
  • earned a place on Forbes’s “America’s Best Value College” list
  • named by The Economist as a “Top 100 School in the U.S. for Value”
  • ranked fifth by Money magazine’s 2016 list of “50 Colleges That Add the Most Value”

Also, notably, in a study issued by The New York Times, La Salle graduates were in the top six percent for median income by age 34 ($58,700).  And, according to a new data study from U.S. News and World Report, the School of Business’s MBA program has the fourth highest employment rate in the nation; it was named to The Princeton Review’s Best 294 Business Schools 2017; and its Part-Time Hybrid MBA was included in U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 edition of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Read more information about La Salle’s ranking

Accreditations and Memberships – The Mark of Excellence

La Salle University was chartered in 1863 by the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and is empowered by that authority to grant academic degrees.

LaSalle is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE), 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 267.284.5000.  The Commission on Higher Education is recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education to conduct accreditation and pre-accreditation (Candidacy status) activities for institutions of higher education in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, including distance education and correspondence education programs offered at those institutions.  MSCHE is also recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) to accredit degree-granting institutions which offer one or more post-secondary educational programs of at least one academic year in length in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and other geographic areas in which the Commission conducts accrediting activities.

La Salle is also accredited by:

AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business)
777 South Harbor Island Blvd., Suite 750
Tampa, FL 33602-5730
813.769.6500

Pennsylvania Department of Education
333 Market St., 12th Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17126
717.787.5041

Regents of the University of the State of New York
Albany, NY 12234
518.474.5844
American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education

One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 610,
Washington, D.C. 20036
202.293.2450

American Chemical Society
1155 16th Street, NW,
Washington, D.C. 20036
202.872.4589

American Psychological Association
750 First Street, NE,
Washington, D.C. 20002-4242
800.374.2721

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)
One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530,
Washington, D.C. 20036
202.887.6791

Council on Social Work Education
1600 Duke St.,
Alexandria, VA 22314
703.683.8080

The Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology at La Salle University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

The Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of The American Dietetic Association, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312.899.0040 (La Salle University’s Didactic Program in Nutrition is currently granted approval and the Coordinated Program in Dietetics is currently granted developmental accreditation.)

The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs accredited the Frank J. Tornetta School of Anesthesia at Montgomery Hospital/LaSalle University Nurse Anesthesia Program.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Education’s Bureau of Teacher Preparation and Certification approved the School Nurse Certificate and the Certificate for Speech and Language Disabilities.

The Marriage and Family Therapy Master’s program at LaSalle University is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE) of the Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), 112 S. Alfred Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, (703) 838-9808.

By affirming that a program is meeting or exceeding established benchmarks of excellence and quality, accreditation is one of the most sought-after and highly-regarded achievement a program can earn. The BSN, MSN, DNP, and APRN Post-master’s Certificate programs at La Salle University are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, 202-887-6791.

Member of: Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences, American Council on Education, Association of American Colleges and Universities, National Collegiate Honors Council, College Entrance Examination Board, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Association of College Admissions Counselors, National Catholic Educational Association, College and University Council of Pennsylvania, Association of Liberal Arts Colleges of Pennsylvania for the Advancement of Teaching, Pennsylvania Catholic Education Association, American Library Association, Urban Studies Association, National Commission on Accrediting, American Catholic Historical Society, Educational Conference of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, National Association for Foreign Student Affairs, National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Association of College and University Housing Officers, and National Association of College and University Business Officers.

Policies, Rights, Responsibilities

Nondiscrimination Policy

La Salle University is a diverse community dedicated in the tradition of the Christian Brothers, and is concerned for both ultimate values and for the individual values of its faculty, employees, and students. Accordingly, in support of this values-driven mission, the University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment or any student or appli­cant for admission based upon race, color, religion, sex, age (40 years and older), disability, national origin or ancestry, citizenship, sexual preference or orientation, marital, parental, family, and pregnancy status, gender identity, military or veteran status, genetic informa­tion, or any prohibited basis, unless there is a bona fide occupation­al qualification which justifies a differentiation. This commitment applies to all aspects of the employment relationship, including hir­ing, promotion, compensation, discipline, discharge, and any term or condition of employment and extends to participation in all edu­cational programs and activities of La Salle University. Employment is based upon an applicant’s ability to meet the established require­ments for employment. All employment and admissions decisions will be made in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local antidiscrimination laws.

In addition, La Salle University will make reasonable accommoda­tion for qualified individuals with disabilities that are known to the University. The University will also make reasonable accommoda­tions to the religious beliefs and practices of which it is aware. The University, however, need not make any accommodation that would cause it an undue hardship.

Further, La Salle University firmly believes in providing a learning environment that is free from all forms of harassment and will not tolerate any form of impermissible harassment. Such harassment disregards individual values and impedes the Lasallian mission of providing an educational community that fosters both intellectual and spiritual development. Included in this prohibition are sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, and sexual violence, racial harass­ment, national origin harassment, and harassment based upon ancestry, color, religion, age, disability, citizenship, marital status, gender identity, military or veteran status, sexual preference or ori­entation, genetic information, or any basis prohibited under appli­cable non-discrimination laws.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): Rights And Privacy Act Provisions

Each year, La Salle University informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 . This act was intended to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to pro­vide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal or formal hearings.

To fulfill basic requirements for compliance with the act, each insti­tution must inform each student of his or her right to prevent dis­closure of personally identifiable information. Although La Salle does not publish a public directory, the Office of the Registrar, at its discretion, does disclose the following information: name, address, dates of attendance, class, major field of study, degree(s) conferred (including dates), and e-mail address.

Under the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Priva­cy Act, currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of such information. To prevent disclosure, written notification must be received by the Office of the Registrar by October 1 in the fall semester and February 15 in the spring semester. The University will honor each request to withhold any of the categories of infor­mation listed above but cannot assume responsibility to contact a student for subsequent permission to release them. Decisions about withholding any information should be made very carefully. Should a student decide to inform the institution not to release any infor­mation, any future requests for such information from non-institu­tional persons or organizations will be refused.

La Salle University assumes that failure to request the withholding of “directory information” indicates approval for disclosure.

Jeanne Clery Act and The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Act 73/College and University Security Information Act

To comply fully with the provisions of the Jeanne Clery Act and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Act 73, the College and University Security Information Act of 1988, La Salle University has available its Crime Statistics Report for the most recent three years, as well as a publication entitled “Safety and Security at La Salle University.” Copies of either document may be requested without charge in writ­ing from the Office of Safety and Security, La Salle University, Phil­adelphia, PA 19141 or can be accessed at on the Office of Safety and Security website.

Federal Consumer Information Regulations

To comply with Federal Consumer Information Regulations, La Salle University provides specific consumer information about the school to prospective and currently enrolled students and, in some cases, employees. Please visit the Student Consumer Information website for more information.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

A student’s matriculation at La Salle University is a voluntary decision that involves acceptance of the responsibility to perform academically and to behave socially in ways consistent with the goals and objectives of the University. When registering at La Salle, students accept University rules and regulations and the authority of the University to exercise disciplinary powers, including suspension and dismissal. The Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities is available on the University's web site. All students are expected to follow the policies contained in the guide.

Administration

Board of Trustees

The membership of the Board changes annually.

Stephen T. Zarrilli, Chair
Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D., President
Reginald M. Browne
Frank G. Byrne, F.S.C.
Diego F. Calderin
Jack Curran, F.S.C.
Hannah C. Datz
Stephen K. Degnan
Peter M. DiBattiste, M.D.
James T. Durkin
Edward J. Fierko
Philip W. J. Fisher
Daniel K. Fitzpatrick
AmyLynn V. Flood, CPA
James F. Gaffney, F.S.C.
John S. Grady Jr.
John R. Greed
Elmer F. Hansen III
Brian Henderson, F.S.C.
John Kane, F.S.C.
Margaret A. Kane
Mark A. Lafond
Dennis Lee, F.S.C.
Thomas A. Leonard
Jerome S. Lezynski II
Robert W. Liptak
JoAnn Magnatta
Denise D’Antonio Malecki
Bernadette M. Mangan
William W. Matthews III, Esq.
Ralph J. Mauro, Esq.
James V. Morris
Anthony J. Nocella
Kevin F. O’Donnell
Frank C. Palopoli
Daniel S. Robins, Ph.D.
William R. Sasso, Esq.
John T. Shannon Jr.
Gregory J. Webster
Joseph A. Gallagher, Emeritus
G. Dennis O’Brien, Ph.D., Emeritus

Officers of The Corporation

Stephen T. Zarrilli, Chair
Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D., President
Edward J. Fierko, Vice Chair
William W. Matthews III, Esq., Vice Chair
Edward J. Sheehy, F.S.C., Ph.D., Vice President
Stephanie Pricken, Treasurer and Financial Adviser
Kevin E. Dolan, Esq., Secretary

President

Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D.

President’s Cabinet

Vice President and General Counsel
Kevin E. Dolan, Esq.

Chief of Staff and Executive Director of Government Affairs and Community Affairs
Joseph Meade

Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation
William Bradshaw

Vice President, Office of Mission
Ernest Miller, F.S.C.

Provost and Vice  President of Academic Affairs
Brian Goldstein, PhD

Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs
Dawn Soufleris, PhD

Vice President of Advancement
Kathleen Pasons-Nicolic

Vice President, Enrollment Services
TBD

University Offices and Services

View the complete listing of University Offices and Services online.

Academic Calendar

The Academic Calendar for the next year is usually published in the preceding Fall semester.  It is accompanied by a less-detailed schema for the next five years.

Student Resources

La Salle prides itself on putting students first and developing community among all of its members. Some of the most important experiences students have take place outside of the classroom during unplanned hours in a variety of locales. There are resources that directly support classroom learning and groups centered on common interests or lifestyles, academics, Greek life, and sports, as well as service, travel, and internships. If an activity or service you’re seeking doesn’t exist, let us know and help us create it. After all, part of exploration is invention.

Art Museum

The mission of the La Salle University Art Museum is to further the University’s Lasallian educational objectives by helping students, other members of the University community and the general public to experience significant, original works of art in an intimate setting and to place them in meaningful contexts. In addition to acquiring, preserving and exhibiting its collections, the Museum offers viewers an opportunity to sharpen their aesthetic perception and to investigate the interrelationships which emerge between art and other disciplines. A teaching museum first, the La Salle University Art Museum complements classroom instruction and provides experiential learning opportunities for students

Located in Olney Hall, the La Salle University Art Museum's core collection focuses on Western art, with a comprehensive selection of European and American art from the Renaissance to the present, featuring examples of most major art movements with a range of subject matter. This core collection includes close to 350 paintings, 65 sculptures, 500 drawings, 3,000 graphic prints, 175 photographs and a few items of furniture and decorative art.  The Art Museum also owns a wide range of special collections of non-Western and ancient art. Selections from works which are not on permanent view often form the basis for temporary exhibitions, sometimes supplemented by loans from other museums. For more information visit the online collections database or contact artmuseum@lasalle.edu.

Center for Academic Achievement

The Center for Academic Achievement, located on the top floor of the Lawrence Building, offers a variety of resources to support the academic success of all students at La Salle. These include content-specific Subject Tutoring for many undergraduate courses, Supplemental Instruction in select math, science, and accounting courses, and Writing Tutoring for all student writing.

Additionally, one-on-one Academic Coaching appointments can help students strengthen important skills such as time management, study strategies, reading strategies, note-taking, test-taking, and organization. The Center offers a variety of workshops on these topics and more. 

Students may make an appointment via GradesFirst in the mylasalle portal, or contact Tutoring Support Services for more information: tutoringsupport@lasalle.edu, (215) 951-1326.

The Center also coordinates the First-Year Advising process and oversees the GradesFirst Early Alert system, which allows faculty to identify at-risk students in their courses and communicate concerns directly with students, advisor(s), and academic support staff. First-year students should contact their freshman advisers and meet early and often with them.

The Academic Achievement Center at Trumark serves as a satellite office and serves as a resource for student athletes.  The Academic Support for Student Athletes office is housed in the Academic Achievement Center at Trumark and is also a part of the Center for Academic Achievement.  The primary goal of this unit is to assist student athletes in their transition to the collegiate environment and to help them better understand the academic and athletic demands they will encounter. Through educational programming, advising, counseling, and other support services, La Salle student athletes are encouraged and supported in their pursuit of personal, academic, career and athletic goals.

View the Center for Academic Achievement website for more detailed information about all of the services and resources offered.

Center for Entrepreneurship

The La Salle Center for Entrepreneurship is leading the culture of innovation at La Salle. Because Entrepreneurship is the backbone of our economy and drives personal, national and global success, students in all majors are welcome to take advantage of an exciting array of programs including:

  • The Innovation Factory where students are designing and building tomorrow’s inventions
  • The Business Engagement Center where students consult with small and start-up businesses to help them plan and expand
  • The Open Minds Innovation Competition where students compete for funding to support continuing research into complex problems
  • Entrepreneurship Coursework which enables students to use electives to take courses or minor in entrepreneurship thereby building skills and competency in business and innovation
  • Professional Mentoring to enhance career exploration or venture development
  • Networking Events and Regional Competitions fully supported and paid for by us!

View the La Salle University Center for Entrepreneurship website for more information or contact Steve Melick at 215.951.1439 or LCE@lasalle.edu

The Connelly Library and Bucks County Resource Center

 The Connelly Library is the academic heart of La Salle University, offering traditional and innovative library services including Information Literacy Instruction, in-person and chat reference support, interlibrary loan and other services, plus warm and inviting individual and group study spaces that are open over 100 hours a week, with extended late night hours around midterms and finals. In addition to an extensive print and electronic book collection, the library collects feature films and documentaries that support the university’s academic and recreational needs. The library also provides access to almost 100 online research databases that support teaching and learning activities in every discipline.

The Special Collections area holds hundreds of rare and illustrated editions of the Holy Bible, archival material related to historic properties on La Salle’s grounds, the largest collection in the world of literary and creative works concerning the Vietnam War, and unique academic collections exploring popular culture, including a collection on Bob Dylan. The University Archives serves as the official repository for University records which possess permanent historical, administrative, legal, cultural, or fiscal value, and document the history of La Salle University.

In addition to the Connelly Library on the Main Campus, students at Bucks County Center can visit the Resource Center to work on assignments or meet with a librarian for research support. Connelly Library books and interlibrary loan materials can also be delivered to the Bucks County Center or the Montgomery County Center for pick up.

Visit the Connelly Library website to access library hours, search the library’s online and print resources, contact a librarian, access 24/7 chat reference or learn more about the Connelly Library.

Canvas

Canvas is a Learning Management System. It provides students with an online space to access course information.

  • Most courses that you are enrolled in while at La Salle University will have a corresponding online course area in Canvas.
  • It is up to your instructors to decide which Canvas tools and features they will use.
  • Some instructors may use this online space to post the syllabus and other important files. Others may use it to send messages to students, post online discussions, or offer online tests/quizzes.

Learn more about Canvas online.

Degree Works

Degree Works is an easy-to-use set of online academic planning tools that help students and advisers see what courses and requirements students need to graduate. The program provides an audit of your unique student record including program, major and catalog year and displays each course you have taken or transferred in and how it applies to your curriculum. It also displays credits earned, grades and GPA.

The program makes it easy to manage and track your degree progress by:

  • Delivering real-time academic advice conveniently online
  • Keeping degree plans consistent, organized, and error-free
  • Helping students achieve their degrees more quickly
  • Reducing paperwork and manual program check sheets
  • Keeping students and advisers aware of unique program changes

Degree Works should be used along with faculty advising. It is not an academic transcript and not an official notification of degree completion. Students should speak with their academic adviser, department chair, or the Dean’s Office regarding official degree progress.

Degree Works is available through the mylasalle portal under Tools.

For any questions, concerns, or issues regarding Degree Works, please email registrar@lasalle.edu.

Degree Works User Guides:

IT Helpdesk

The La Salle University IT Helpdesk can assist you with technology issues you may encounter. You can reach the Helpdesk by calling 215.951.1860, emailing helpdesk@lasalle.edu, or by clicking on Helpdesk from the Tools menu in the mylasalle portal.

Check out the Technology at La Salle webpage for more information about technology help and support.

Office of the University Registrar

As the central administrative office for student information, the Office of the University Registrar maintains La Salle’s integrity by ensuring the accuracy of official student records and upholding University policy. Student services provided by this office include, but are not limited to, assistance with new freshmen registration and current student registration, updating majors/minors/concentrations, address changes,  name changes, and employee partnership discounts.  Students may request documents, through the Office of the University Registrar, such as academic transcripts, enrollment verification, degree verification, and parental disclosure form.

The Office of the University Registrar is located in the Lawrence Administration Building, room 301. For more information about our services please contact regacct@lasalle.edu, 215- 951-1020 or visit our website.

Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, is the hub for all issues involving student life outside the classroom.  Departments that report within the Division of Student Affairs include:  Residence Life and Community Development, Student Conduct, Campus Life, University Ministry, Support and Services, the Career Center, the Multicultural Center, Student Wellness Services (Student Health Center, Student Counseling Center and the Substance Abuse and Violence Education—SAVE), and La Salle Public Safety.

View the Student Affairs website for more information or stop by Union 123 or call 215.951.1017.

Campus Life

Campus Activities at La Salle oversees more than 100 student organizations and clubs. These include academic clubs, honor societies, liturgical organizations, multicultural organizations, political organizations, performing arts, Greek Life, service organizations, student media organizations, and more! We are also responsible for Explorientation, our five-day orientation program occurring the week prior to F all classes. It consists of both educational sessions and fun social events; the week is designed to welcome new students to La Salle University by helping them prepare for college life both in and out of the classroom.

The Multicultural and International Center, supports students with resources that address their specific needs and raise cultural awareness on campus. The center provides a wide range of academic support and personal development services and events, such as special luncheons, reunions, and employment workshops, for students from diverse backgrounds. We offer advocacy and advisement for U.S. minority students, international students, and students interested in studying abroad.

View the Campus Activities and Explorientation website for more information or stop by Union 34, call 215.951.5044, or e-mail kazmierc@lasalle.edu

For more information about Union and Conference Services or the Information Desk, located in Union 123, call 215.951.1019, or e-mail spotok@lasalle.edu

View the Multicultural and International Center website for more information or stop by 1923 Olney Ave., call 215.951.1948, or e-mail rush@lasalle.edu

Career Center

La Salle’s Career Center offers an array of services, programs, and resources to help you prepare for and achieve your career goals, whether they be graduate school, full-time employment, or long-term volunteer opportunities. Regardless of your major or year, our staff is ready to help you plan for “life after La Salle”. Our program offers career planning, job search preparation, on-campus recruiting services, annual job fairs, resume reviews and assistance with planning for graduate studies.

View the Career Center website for more information or stop by Founders Hall, call 215.951.1682,  or e-mail baileyn@lasalle.edu

Residence Life and Community Development

The Office of Residence Life and Community Development wants you to feel welcome in your home away from home, whether you are living in one of our 15 residential areas on campus, or commuting from home. Browse our site for valuable information on housing, meal plans, policies, accommodations and more, but feel free to drop us a line anytime.

View the Residence Life and Community Development website for more information or stop by Union 301, call 215.951.1370, or e-mail housing@lasalle.edu or holmest@lasalle.edu

Office of Student Conduct

The Office of Student Conduct is responsible for coordinating and administering the student disciplinary process at La Salle. This includes receiving reports of alleged misconduct, ensuring that students receive due process and fair treatment throughout the hearing process, and maintaining students' disciplinary records. Additionally, the Office of Student Conduct staff is committed to informing students of their rights as members of the university community and educating them regarding the responsibilities they have to themselves and the other members of the university community.

View the Student Guide website for more information about Student Conduct, call 215-951-1565, or e-mail zenilman@lasalle.edu

Public Safety Department

The La Salle University Public Safety Department is deeply committed to its mission of ensuring the safety of La Salle students, faculty, staff and guests. The department is opened and staffed year-round, 24 hours a day, providing safety and other services for the La Salle residence halls and apartment complexes, walking, vehicular access and egress routes, and public property immediately adjacent to the University in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police Department. In addition to providing security patrol services in and around campus, the department operates shuttle services during the Fall and Spring semesters and manages parking permit registration. Escort services are available year-round.

View the Public Safety website for more information or stop by Good Shepard Hall (West Campus in the Shoppes at La Salle complex) or call 215.951.1300.

FOR EMERGENCIES, CALL 215.991.2111  

Student Wellness Services

Student Wellness Services at La Salle University consists of three units: the Student Counseling Center, the Student Health Center, and the Substance Abuse and Violence Education Center. Together, these three offices work to support students in their lives outside of the classroom. Through health care, counseling, crisis management, and intervention services, students receive support and guidance around alcohol and drugs, sexual violence and overall health and wellness throughout their careers at La Salle.

View the Student Health Center website for more information stop by St.Benilde Hall, call 951.1357, or e-mail wessellj1@lasalle.edu

View the Student Counseling Center website for more information or stop by the Medical Office Building, Suite 112, call 215.951.1355, or e-mail brannan@lasalle.edu

View the Substance Abuse and Violence Education (SAVE) website for more information or stop by the Medical Office Building, Suite 112, call 215.951.1357, or e-mail shirleyk1@lasalle.edu

University Ministry, Service and Support (U-MSS)

University Ministry, Service and Support provides students with Catholic and interfaith initiatives that help promote spiritual engagement and worship, encourage reflection and dedicated service, and foster a supportive and inclusive community among students, faculty, staff, and Christian Brothers.  Campus Ministry mentors and guides students through events and activities such as celebrations of the Eucharist, retreats, student-driven liturgies, Evensong, and more. Civic Engagement provides opportunities for students at all levels to experience and lead service learning and volunteer opportunities in the Philadelphia area, within the U.S. and abroad.  Services within U-MSS include a food pantry, clothing resources, and other support for students in need.

View the Campus Ministry website for more information or stop by the lower level of College Hall, call 215.951.2026, or e-mail gauss01@lasalle.edu

View the Civic Engagement website for more information or stop by the St. Neumann Annex, call 215-951-2016, or e-mail hutchinson1@lasalle.edu

Graduate Specific Policies & Procedures

Academic Policies

Standards for Graduate Education

Graduate education is not wholly distinct from undergraduate education, because all education is a continuous process of personal development. Neither are graduate programs at the master’s and doctoral levels entirely identical. Some programs have an academic research orientation while others are more practice oriented. However, all graduate programs require the development of sophisticated and complex skills in students, and are also more demanding than seminars or sessions for which graduate credit is not conferred. In general, they place more emphasis on students’ abilities to critically analyze facts and theories, to make independent judgments based on objective data, to aptly communicate what has been learned, and to synthesize new ideas to make sound decisions. All graduate programs at La Salle are expected to emphasize these more advanced skills. In graduate work at La Salle, all students are expected to:

  • Think critically;
  • Engage in higher-order  intellectual ability by applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating concepts;
  • Understand both historical and current issues and approaches to their discipline;
  • Demonstrate mastery of the body of knowledge, theories, and skills necessary to function as a professional in their discipline;
  • Apply ethical, discipline-based and professional standards;
  • Identify and use primary sources of information appropriate to their discipline;
  • Participate in the creation of knowledge to advance theory and practice in their discipline for those students involved in doctoral studies;
  • Work independently and collaboratively with faculty and/or other students;
  • Evidence proficiency in oral and written communication skill;
  • Contribute substantially to courses through rigorous assessments of learning goals.

Academic Policy and Student Responsibilities

A student’s matriculation at La Salle University is a voluntary decision that involves acceptance of the responsibility to perform academically and to behave socially in ways consistent with the goals and objectives of the University. When registering at La Salle, the student accepts University rules and regulations and the authority of the University to exercise disciplinary powers, including suspension and dismissal. The Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities delineates these responsibilities and is available on the University's web site. All students are expected to follow the policies contained in the guide.

Students are expected to pursue their studies adhering to the basic principles of academic honesty. The University’s Academic Integrity Policy, which defines academic honesty and the consequences for academic dishonesty, is available on the University’s web site. Students who are guilty of academic dishonesty may be dismissed from their graduate program. 

Additional program-specific guidelines for monitoring students’ academic progress and grades are detailed in the section for each program or in the program’s student handbook. Students are expected to understand and adhere to the individual program standards and handbook policies, as they are amended, and should recognize that these individual program standards may be more specific or rigorous than the overarching university standards.

Students may be expected to undertake research projects as part of their curriculum. Research projects that use human subjects must be approved by the Institutional Research Board.

Academic Standing

Every student in La Salle University’s graduate programs is required to maintain a cumulative scholastic average of 3.0, which translates to an overall G.P.A.. equivalent to a B (a B- average is not sufficient). A student whose academic performance falls below this standard is subject to academic review by the director of the appropriate graduate program, and may be required to withdraw from the program as specified by the individual program's assessment guidelines. A student with a cumulative grade point average below 3.0 is automatically in academic jeopardy whether or not he or she receives written notification of this status, and regardless of the number of credits earned. A student admitted on a conditional basis who has a cumulative grade point average of less than 3.0 upon the completion of six credits may be required to withdraw from the program as specified by the individual program's assessment guidelines

Students with a G.P.A. below 3.0 should consult with their graduate director and/or academic advisor to ascertain any potential actions to improve academic success within the program.

All graduate students must have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 or better to graduate from La Salle University, and students below that standard will not receive a graduate degree regardless of the number of credits completed.

A student who is required to withdraw for academic reasons may appeal the dismissal within 30 calendar days from the date of the dismissal letter  A student may not register for or attend classes while an appeal is pending. The appeal must be made in writing to the program director.   The appeal should detail the following:

  • the events that contributed to the poor academic performance, and;
  • an outline of the specific actions the student will take to a remedy for the poor academic performance.

A student may submit additional written evidence or include any other information that may be helpful in reaching a decision.

The academic officer in charge of the program, in consultation with the academic review committee of the program, makes a recommendation to the Dean. The Dean considers both the student's request and the recommendation of the program director. The Dean sends a letter by certified mail to the student with a copy to the program director that states the decision. If the request is approved, the letter from the Dean must include the stipulations to be satisfied by the student. 

Note that neither the process of submitting this appeal nor any particular argument made in the appeal guarantees reinstatement.

A student who is required to withdraw for Academic Dishonesty may appeal that decision, using the procedure outlined in the University's Academic Integrity Policy. Please see the above section "Academic Policy."

A student who is required to withdraw for professional reasons, such as unprofessional behavior or dismissal from a clinical site, may not appeal the dismissal.

Grading

The following is the breakdown and definitions of grades distributed for courses completed:

4.0 A  indicates the demonstration of a superior level of competency.

3.67 A- indicates the demonstration of a very good level of competency.

3.33 B+  indicates the demonstration of a good level of competency.

3.0 B   indicates the demonstration of an average, satisfactory level of competency.

2.67 B-  indicates the demonstration of a less than average level of competency.

2.0 C   indicates a level of competence below that expected of graduate work.

0.0 F   indicates failure to demonstrate even a marginal level of competency.

  indicates work not completed within the semester period.

M indicates a military leave of absence.

indicates an authorized withdrawal from a course unit after the semester has commenced.

S   indicates a satisfactory level of competence

indicates an unsatisfactory level of competence

X   indicates audit

Those faculty who do not want to assign +/- grades are not obligated to do so.

Academic censure may be specific to individual program requirements. A student who receives a grade of “C” in two or more courses or a grad of “F” in one course may be dismissed from the program. A student who receives a grade of “B-“ or below may be required to repeat the course, according to the specific program’s policy and with written approval of the director. If a course is repeated, the course with the higher grade is calculated in the GPA and the course with the lower grade is excluded from the GPA. All repeated courses are viewable on the transcript.

An Incomplete grade ("I") is a provisional grade given by an instructor to a student who has otherwise maintained throughout the semester a passing grade in the course, but who has failed to take the semester examination or complete the final project for reasons beyond his or her control. "I" grades are not granted to students automatically.  Rather, the submission of an "I" grade is at the discretion of the course instructor to whom the student must make the request for an "I" grade.  A student who receives a grade of “I” for a course must complete the remaining work within the timeframe of the next semester immediately following that in which the "I" was submitted (regardless of whether the student is enrolled in course work or not during that subsequent semester). The instructor sets a time limit for completing the work no later than the last day of final examinations of the following semester. If the work is not completed successfully within that time, the “I” will remain on the transcript permanently. The student must re-register for the course, and complete the course with a satisfactory grade to receive credit for the course. When it is impossible for the student to remove this grade within the time limit, he or she must obtain a written extension of time from his or her program director, as well as the dean of his or her school.

The “W” grade is assigned when the student is approved by the program director for withdrawal from a course if the student requests the withdrawal by the stated deadline each semester. The course appears on the student's transcript. Note that a course assigned a "W" is different from a dropped course; courses may only be dropped during the drop/add period, and dropped courses do not appear on the transcript.  More information concerning dropped courses appears in the "Registration for Courses" section, and more information concerning course withdrawal may be found under “Course Withdrawal/Withdrawal from the University” section of this catalog.

No grade will be changed after the graduate degree is awarded.

Admission

Admission criteria are program-specific. For that reason, they are detailed in the section introducing each program. La Salle's Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Matriculation

A matriculated student is one who meets all entrance requirements and who has begun working in a definite program toward the graduate degree. A maximum of seven calendar years is allowed for the completion of the graduate degree. A maximum of 10 calendar years is permitted for Theology and Ministry students participating only during summer sessions.

Students should know that they are classified differentially for financial aid purposes and for program purposes.

For financial aid purposes, graduate students are classified as follows:

  • A full-time student is one who is matriculated and registered for six or more hours of credit for the semester
  • A part-time student is one who is matriculated and registered for a minimum of three credits for the semester.
  • A non-degree student is one who has not matriculated into the graduate program, but who has been given permission by the director of the program to take specific courses.

So designated full-time and part-time students are eligible to apply for financial aid.

For program purposes, all graduate students are considered to be part-time except for students who are enrolled in programs designated as full-time.

International Student Admission

La Salle is authorized by the Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service to issue Certificates of Eligibility (Form I-20) for non-immigrant “F-1” student status to international students who meet admission requirements. La Salle University is also authorized by the State Department to issues certificates of eligibility (DS2019) for non-immigrant “J-1” student status to international students who meet admission requirements and the requirements of the Exchange Visitor Program. Prospective graduate international students should visit http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ to apply for admission to La Salle University. Each graduate program has its own admission requirements. Students are encouraged to consult the individual program website for the program in which they are interested.

Student Responsibilities

A student’s matriculation at La Salle University is a voluntary decision that involves acceptance of the responsibility to perform academically and to behave socially in ways consistent with the goals and objectives of the University. When registering at La Salle, the student accepts University rules and regulations and the authority of the University to exercise disciplinary powers, including suspensions and dismissal. As an individual, the student assumes responsibility for knowing and complying with all existing regulations in the Graduate Bulletin, Student Handbook, and Student Guide to Rights and Responsibilities, and in the student handbooks of individual graduate programs. Copies of the handbooks can be obtained from the directors of the programs.

Registration for Courses

During announced registration periods published on the academic calendar, students should contact their Academic Adviser to create a roster of courses for the upcoming semester. The student may register for courses via the mylasalle portal, through their Graduate Director, or in person during the times specified by the Office of the University Registrar.

  • Students enrolled in Ten through Full Fifteen Week Terms may register through the first full week of classes. A week shall be defined as the period of seven consecutive days; beginning with the official start date of the semester, not the first meeting day of a class or first day of attendance.
  • Students enrolled in Five through Nine Week Terms may register up to and including the second day of the semester, not the second meeting day of a class or second day of attendance. **
  • Students enrolled in One through Four Week Terms (includes Intersession) may register up to and including the first day of the semester. The first day of the semester is defined as the official start date of the semester, not the first meeting day of a class or first day of attendance.

A course that is dropped during the registration period will no longer appear on the student’s academic record. After the registration period is over, students may withdraw from a course on or before the withdrawal deadline. Refer to the section titled “Course Withdrawal.”

** Students enrolled in the MBA ONLINE program may register up to and including the third business day prior to the official start date of the session in which they wish to register. Students may drop a course by the second day of the session in which they are registered, not the second meeting day of a class or second day of attendance.

Course Withdrawal / Withdrawal from the University

It is the student’s responsibility to notify the University in the event that he or she needs to withdraw from a course(s) or withdraw from the University entirely.

Withdrawal From Course(s)

Students who choose to withdraw from a course(s) prior to its completion must:

  • Notify their graduate director and complete a Course Withdrawal form in their Graduate Director’s office on or before the “Last day for withdrawal from classes,” published in the Academic Calendar . After this date, grades will be assigned that reflect the result of the student’s course attendance and performance.
  • Contact the offices of Financial Aid and Student Accounts Receivable to determine whether an outstanding balance is due, to inquire about the financial implications of withdrawal, and to make arrangements to meet financial obligations.

Additionally:

  • International students should contact one of the International Education Associates in the Multicultural and International Center.
  • Students receiving Veteran’s benefits should consult their Veteran’s Benefits Certifying Official to understand how this change in their enrollment status may affect their future aid.

Please be advised that the date of filing the withdrawal notice is considered as the date of withdrawal from the class(es).

Ceasing to attend a class does not constitute a withdrawal; students must officially withdraw by completing the Course Withdrawal form in their Graduate Director’s office. Ceasing to attend without officially withdrawing will result in the student receiving a grade for the course, possibly a failing grade. A “W” designation will only be assigned upon official withdrawal from a course.

Withdrawal From the University

Students who choose to withdraw from the University must:

  • Notify their Graduate Director’s office and complete the Withdrawal from the University form. Students must withdraw on or before the “Last day for withdrawal from classes,” published in the Academic Calendar to receive a “W” grade for the courses in which they are enrolled. After this date, grades will be assigned that reflect the result of entire semester’s attendance and performance in each course.
  • Contact the offices of Financial Aid and Student Accounts Receivable to determine whether an outstanding balance is due, to inquire about the financial implications of withdrawal, and to make arrangements to meet financial obligations.
  • Contact the Housing Services Coordinator and Food Services, if living on campus and/or using a meal plan.

Additionally:

  • International students should contact one of the International Education Associates at the Multicultural and International Center.
  • Students receiving Veteran’s benefits should consult their Veteran’s Benefits Certifying Official to understand how this change in their enrollment status may affect their future aid.

Please be advised that the date of filing the Withdrawal from the University form is considered as the date of withdrawal from the class (es) and the University.

Ceasing to attend classes does not constitute a withdrawal from the University; students must officially withdraw by filling out the Withdrawal from the University form in their Graduate Director’s office. Ceasing to attend without officially withdrawing will result in the student receiving grades for all coursework, possibly failing grades. A “W” designation will only be assigned to coursework upon official withdrawal from the University.

Refund Schedule

When registration has been finalized, a student shall be considered to be in continuous attendance until proper notice of withdrawal is received by the University. Students must file a withdrawal with their Graduate Program Director. Ceasing to attend and/or giving notice to your instructor(s) does not constitute the proper notice of withdrawal. The allowed percentage of a tuition refund will be based upon the date the notice of withdrawal is received.

*For the purpose of refund computation, a week shall be defined as the period of seven consecutive days; beginning with the official start date of the semester, not the first day of a class or first day of attendance.

** The first day of the semester is defined as the official start date of the semester, not the first day of a class or first day of attendance.

Full Fifteen Week Term
Up to and including the first week* of the semester 100% refund
Second week 60% refund
Third week 40% refund
Fourth week 20% refund
After fourth week no refund

Ten through Twelve Week Terms
Up to and including the first week* of the semester 100% refund
Second week 60% refund
Third week 20% refund
After the third week of the semester no refund

Five through Nine Week Terms
Up to and including the first day** of the semester 100% refund
First week of the semester 60% refund
After the first week of the semester no refund

One through Four Week Terms (includes intersession)
Up to and including the first day** of the semester 100% refund
After the first day of the semester no refund

La Salle University uses federal regulations to determine the refund of federal financial aid funds to the federal government. A copy of this federal refund calculation is available in the Office of Financial Aid.

Tuition Refund Appeals

The University recognizes that rare and extraordinary circumstances may justify an exception to the tuition refund terms when withdrawing from the University. For information on the procedure for requesting an appeal, contact your Program Director. Requests for such an exception to policy must be submitted no later than 30 calendar days after the first class day of the subsequent term (e.g., a request for the spring semester must be submitted no later than 30 days after the first class day of the first summer session). While reasonable appeals will be considered, the University is under no obligation to take any course of action that would result in a refund, removal of charges, or credit. In order to file an appeal, a student must withdraw from all classes for the semester in question.

Leave of Absence

Students are encouraged to remain active in their graduate studies. However, those who will not be attending for two or more consecutive terms must notify the director of their program and request a leave of absence in writing. Students not enrolled for six consecutive terms (including summer) and who have not been given a written leave of absence will be administratively inactivated from the program.

Readmission

When seeking readmission, students who have withdrawn from the university are required to reapply to the university, following all of the requirements for admission into the desired program. The Admission Committee of the program will review the new application, the student’s academic record in the program, and the original admission profile judged against current admission criteria. Students who have been dismissed from a program may not reapply to that program.  Students who have been dismissed because of an academic integrity violation may not apply to another program.

Transfer of Credit

With approval of the program director, students may transfer up to six hours of graduate level work into graduate programs that are 36 credits or less in length. Students may transfer up to nine hours of graduate-level work into programs that are greater than 36 credits in length. Course credit may be transferred only from graduate programs at accredited institutions, and only courses with a grade of B or better may be transferred. The type of accreditation may vary by program. Course credit may not be transferred into graduate certificate programs.

Graduation

Students who will complete requirements for a degree in a given semester must make a written application for graduation at the time specified by the Registrar. Degrees are conferred three times each year - on August 31, January 15, and on the date of the Commencement exercises in May. Commencement take place once a year in May. All students who have completed degree requirements during the previous year (June through May) may participate in the May Commencement ceremonies.

Students enrolled in graduate programs are responsible for adhering to all regulations, schedules, and deadlines pertinent to their particular program. It is the responsibility of students to make sure that they have met all graduation requirements. If they are in doubt, they should consult with the director of their program prior to registration for each semester.

Student Rights and Grievance Procedure

This section details policies for curricular standards for all graduate students. These policies have been approved by the Graduate Council of La Salle University.

  • A student shall have the right to pursue any course of study available in the graduate programs of the University providing he or she can be accommodated within the program, meet the requirements for entering, and continue to meet the requirements of the program.
  • A student shall have the right to know at the beginning of each semester, ordinarily during the first week of class, the criteria to be used by the instructor in determining grades in each course.
  • A student shall have the right to see his or her own tests and other written material after grading, and the instructor shall have the duty to make this material available within a reasonable time.
  • Upon request, a student shall have a right to have his or her grade on such written material explained by the instructor. A request for such explanation must be made within one week after the written material, as graded, is made available to the student.
  • If a student believes that his or her final grade is the product of the instructor’s bias, whimsy, or caprice, rather than a judgment on the merits or demerits of his or her academic performance, the student must follow the procedure described in this subsection:
    • The student must initiate the complaint procedure with the instructor before or within the first two weeks of the next regular semester.
    • After receiving an explanation from the instructor in the course, the student may make a formal complaint to the instructor, giving his or her reasons, in writing, for thinking that the grade was biased, whimsical, or capricious.
    • If dissatisfied with the explanation that has been given, the student may appeal to the director of the appropriate program.
    • The student has a further appeal to the appropriate dean, who will:
      • Request a written statement from that student, which will contain a complete and detailed exposition of the reasons for the student’s complaint. A response from the faculty member will then be requested.
      • Advise and assist the student in a further attempt to resolve the problem at the personal level.
    • If the student remains dissatisfied with the explanation that has been given, the student may initiate a formal appeal:
      • The faculty member who is accused of bias, whimsy, or caprice may elect one of two procedures. The faculty member may request that the dean investigate the matter personally. In the alternative, the faculty member may request that a committee investigate the matter and reach a judgment on the merits of the complaint. In either case, the burden of proof shall be upon the complainant. Neither adjudicating forum (dean or committee) shall substitute his/her or its academic judgment for that of the instructor, but shall investigate and adjudicate only the complaint of bias, whimsy, or caprice.
      • If a committee is to be established, the dean shall appoint the committee, consisting of two students and three faculty members. The two students and two faculty members shall, if possible, be from the graduate department responsible for the subject in which the grade was given. The third faculty member shall be from another graduate program.
      • Should the designation of the review body (dean or committee) be delayed beyond a reasonable time, then the committee structure described in item 2 above will be convened and the question heard.
    • If it is found that the grade given was neither biased, whimsical, nor capricious, the case will be dismissed. If it is found that the grade given was the product of bias, whimsy, or caprice, the review body (dean or committee) shall direct that a notation be entered on the student’s transcript that the grade “had been questioned for cause and the recommendation had been made that it be changed because of apparent (bias, whimsy, or caprice).” The original grade, however, will remain a part of the transcript unless changed by the instructor.
  • A student shall be promptly informed if he or she is placed on any form of academic censure.

Individuals who hold a master’s degree in one of La Salle’s programs and are seeking a master’s degree in a second La Salle program may have credit for courses taken for the first degree apply to the second degree on condition that:

  • Credits transferred from programs in other accredited institutions may not exceed six in La Salle programs requiring 36 credits or less, or nine in La Salle programs requiring more than 36 credits.
  • All requirements for the degree in the second discipline are met to the satisfaction of the program director and dean.
  • Courses taken for the first degree and to count for the second degree are essential to meeting requirements of the second degree.
  • The total number of credits taken for the two degrees reach a minimum of 48 credits or the equivalent.

Transfer of Program

Active students in good academic standing may elect to transfer from one program at La Salle to another program at La Salle.  To do so, they must complete an application for the desired program. Acceptance into that program is not guaranteed; the student must meet all eligibility requirements of the desired program. The student should also contact the Directors of both the previous and the desired program to request a copy of their academic file to be given to the prospective program director.  Students should know that although the grades for courses taken in the previous program might not count towards graduation in the desired program, a student’s grade point average is cumulative.  That is, the grades received in the first program will remain on the student’s transcript and will count towards the student’s G.P.A.

Centers, Offices, and Services

Transcripts

Students may request a transcript of their collegiate work through the Office of the University Registrar, in person, by mail, or online. Official transcripts bearing the signature of the Registrar and the seal of the University are sent, at the request of the student, to other institutions and organizations.

A fee will be charged per transcript. The University requires at least one week’s notice for the issuance of transcripts. No transcripts can be issued until all financial obligations to the University have been satisfactorily settled.

International Student Advising

The International Education Coordinator promotes the overall welfare of international students through the coordination and development of programs that enhance international student success. These include orientation and referral for academic advising; participation in the sponsorship of academic, cultural, and professional activities that promote the educational, recreational, and emotional well-being of international students; and verifying and maintaining all necessary immigration documents. The International Education Coordinator can be contacted at the Multicultural and International Center at 215.951.1948.

Bucks County Center

La Salle University offers Master’s and undergraduate degree programs at its Bucks County Center in Newtown, PA.  The center is located in the Silver Lake Executive Campus, approximately one mile from the Newtown-Yardley exit of I-95.  This full-service educational facility includes traditional classrooms, seminar rooms, nursing labs, computer labs, executive training and professional development facilities, a student lounge, and a Resource Center that houses library materials and computer workstations.

Courses are offered during the evening and on weekends to accommodate adult learners and working professionals.  Students can complete master’s degree programs in a variety of academic areas, including Master of Business Administration (MBA), Education, Professional Clinical Counseling, and Marriage and Family Therapy, and Nursing.  An undergraduate degree in Nursing (ACHIEVE), and a full-time day program in Organizational Leadership are also offered at the Center.  Click on the links above for additional information about these programs.

Montgomery County Center

La Salle University offers some master’s degree programs, a bachelor’s degree and certificate programs at the Montgomery County Center, located in the Victory Office Park on Germantown Pike in Plymouth Meeting, PA, approximately one-quarter mile East of Exit 19 of I-476 (“Blue Route”) and approximately one-quarter mile South of the Norristown exit (Exit 333) of the PA Turnpike (I-276).  The facility includes classrooms, computer classrooms and labs, a student lounge, and a Resource Center that houses library materials, and computer work stations.  An accelerated Bachelor of Social Work degree completion program, the Master of Business Administration and the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy or Professional Clinical Counseling, along with certificate programs also are offered at the Montgomery County Center.  Click on the links above for additional information about these programs.

Library Services

The Connelly Library & Bucks County Resource Center

The Connelly Library is the academic hub of La Salle University, offering traditional and innovative library services including Information Literacy Instruction, in-person and chat reference support, interlibrary loan and other services, plus warm and inviting individual and group study spaces that are open over 100 hours a week, with extended late night hours around midterms and finals. In addition to an extensive print and electronic book collection, the library collects feature films and documentaries that support the university’s academic and recreational needs. The library also provides access to almost 100 online research databases that support teaching and learning activities in every discipline.  The Special Collections area holds hundreds of rare and illustrated editions of the Holy Bible, archival material related to historic properties on La Salle’s grounds, the largest collection in the world of literary and creative works concerning the Vietnam War, and unique academic collections exploring popular culture, including a collection on Bob Dylan. The University Archives serves as the official repository for University records which possess permanent historical, administrative, legal, cultural, or fiscal value, and document the history of La Salle University. In addition to the Connelly Library on the Main Campus, students at Bucks County Center can visit the Resource Center to work on assignments or meet with a librarian for research support. Connelly Library books and interlibrary loan materials can also be delivered to the Bucks County Center or the Montgomery County Center for pick up. To access library hours, search the library’s online and print resources, contact a librarian, access 24/7 chat reference or learn more about the Connelly Library visit library.lasalle.edu .

Computing / Technology-Based Learning Facilities

Main Campus

Computer Labs and Technology

The computer facilities at La Salle University’s Main Campus offer state-of-the-art computers with the latest software for all majors. Computer labs are located in several buildings on campus. The main student lab is located in Wister Hall.

Technology on campus also extends beyond the labs. La Salle University offers wireless access in most buildings on campus, including the Student Union.

Academic Technology

The University’s Web portal, mylasalle, provides a single point of access to e-mail, calendar, Br. LUWIS, school events, and customized content for students, faculty, and staff.

The University also offers Canvas, a course-management system that allows faculty and students the ability to share content and communicate online. With this technology incorporated within courses, they can access multimedia and Web resources, communicate and share information within the class, collaborate on projects with team or group members, post assignments, or take tests and quizzes.

Tutoring services are accessible using the GradesFirst system. Please visit the mylasalle portal for more information.

The La Salle mobile application provides a full range of iOS- and Android-enabled tools for students with mobile devices. Features include viewing the following:

  • View Class Schedule and Final Grades
  • Gold Card Balance
  • Today At La Salle (Weather, Events, Photos)
  • Emergency Contact Information
  • Device Specific Apps 
  • Faculty/Staff Directory
  • RSS Feeds (News, Athletics)
  • Library Hours and Information
  • Real-time Shuttle Tracking

IT technical support is available in Olney 200. This Help Desk, staffed by an IT technician, can assist with password resets, laptop troubleshooting, or other technical issues. Help Desk services are also available by phone at 215.951.1860.

Bucks County Center

The computer facilities at the Bucks County Center also offer students access to the latest hardware and software technologies. These Centers include computer labs and wireless technology as well as integrated classrooms.

Montgomery County Center

The computer facilities at the Montgomery County Center also offer students access to the latest hardware and software technologies, including mylasalle and Canvas.

Visit the Information Technology Department website for more details about the services offered.

Dining Services

Main Campus

La Salle Dining Services offers a wide array of dining choices to meet the needs of even the most busiest of schedules. From our two “all you care to eat” dining halls, Blue & Gold and Treetops Cafe, to the Union Food Court and our P.O.D. Markets, our locations offer a variety of options which include grab and go options and traditional hot meals.

Blue and Gold Dining Hall and Treetops Cafe are our two "all you care to eat" dining halls where students can enjoy breakfast, lunch, and dinner for a meal swipe that is deducted from their weekly or semesterly balance, depending on their meal plan. Both dining halls have multiple stations including a Mongolian grille, a deli, a hot food line consisting of home-style meals, and a grill serving hot dogs and hamburgers, among options. Blue and Gold is located along Olney Avenue on main campus and is open seven days a week, and Treetops Cafe is located on South Campus next to Saint Basil Court and is open for traditional meal service Monday through Friday. Blue and Gold Dining Hall and Treetops Cafe also have convenience stores where students can use their Special Food Account (SFA) dollars​ which are built into their meal plans along with Gold Card, cash, and credit card. These locations offer grab and go meals, chips, snacks, and drinks.

Treetops Cafe also offers a late night snack option. Treetops After Dark is open Tuesday through Saturday and serves casual hot food in a relaxed environment, and students can enjoy our game room which includes Xbox, air hockey, ping pong table, and an arcade game. The Treetops Express convenience store is also open for students to purchase snacks, chips, and drinks. Students can use their Special Food Account Dollars, Gold Card, cash, and credit card at Treetops After Dark

The Union Food Court is located inside the Student Union Building on main campus and has multiple food kiosks offering personalized foods including salads at Greens to Go, pizza and Stromboli at Bene Pizza, burgers and fries at Grille Works, and Mexican flare at Zoca. The Union Food Court is also home to the Union Market, a convenience store offering snacks, chips, drinks, and grab and go meals, and a full-service Subway and Starbucks. Students can use their Special Food Account Dollars, Gold Card, cash, and credit card in the food court, or meal exchange at Subway and Starbucks.

For hours of operations and locations of all dining options, as well as meal plan information and reloading Special Food Account dollars, visit us at www.lasalle.campusdish.com. Also, keep up with us on social media! Follow us on Instagram: @LaSalleDining!

Saxby's Coffee

Saxby's is a coffee shop located in Founder's Hall on West Campus along Olney Avenue. Saxby's serves a variety of hot and cold drink options in addition to a variety of sandwiches and pastries. Students can use their Gold Card funds at this location.

Bucks County Center

Bucks Xpress is open evenings; and vending machines located near the Cafe provide a wide variety of snacks, light meals, and beverages.

Montgomery County Center

Limited vending machine food choices provide snacks and beverages.

Career and Employment Services

Career development is a continuous process in which skills are learned, developed, or enhanced through education and experience. The Office of Career and Employment Services provides graduate students with the opportunity to discuss and formulate their career goals and plans, develop or expand contacts with potential employers, and research career information and trends. Resources, services, and events offered through Career and Employment Services include personalized career counseling, information on careers and employment, resume review and interview preparation, alumni networking receptions, and on-campus recruiting and job fairs.

The Career Services Center is located on the fourth floor of the Administration Building on Main Campus and is open throughout the year, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and during the academic year until 6:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. A Career and Employment Services staff person will also be available (by appointment) at La Salle’s Bucks County Center and Montgomery County Center on selected days. Appointments during evening hours and/or at our Bucks and Montgomery County locations must be made in advance. Please call 215.951.1075 to make an appointment. (www.lasalle.edu/careerservices)

Housing / Community Development

La Salle University’s office of Community Development assists students in locating housing in the surrounding community. Off-campus property listings are available by contacting the Off-Campus Community and Commuter Student Services Coordinator at 215.951.1916. These listings should not be construed as indicating approval or supervision by the University, and all agreements entered into by the users of this listing are traditional agreements between the landlords and students. The University’s role is merely that of a conduit for the listing.

Counseling and Health Services

Residential graduate students are eligible to use the services of the Student Health Center, the Student Counseling Center, and the Alcohol and Other Drug Education Center. The La Salle University Student Health Center is a primary health-care facility that provides acute health care and is staffed by clinical nurse practitioners. It is open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. during the academic year. All residential graduate students must have a completed health history form on file. After-office hour emergencies are referred to Albert Einstein Medical Center. Security or fire rescue will transport students to Einstein Medical Center. Students are financially responsible for emergency room visits. The Student Health Center can be reached at 215 951 1565. The Student Counseling Center provides short-term counseling and crisis intervention. Appointments can be made by calling 215.951.1355. The Alcohol and Other Drug Education Center (AODEC) offers individual counseling, personal assessments, support groups and resources concerning issues related to substance use. The AODEC can be reached by calling 215.951.1357. Part-time and non-residential Graduate Students can access counseling services through Graduate Psychology’s Community Center for Psychological Services (215.951.1006).

All residential Graduate students as well as all Graduate Students registered for six (6) or more credits or in a full-time program are required to carry health insurance coverage, either through the University-sponsored plan or through an alternative comparable plan, such as coverage on a parent’s health insurance plan. Prior to first attendance at the University, and annually thereafter, registered Graduate students in in the aforementioned categories must complete the online student health insurance waiver/enrollment process. In order to complete the waiver/enrollment process or if you have questions regarding coverage, please go to www.firststudent.com or call customer service at 800-505-4160.

Public Safety

The Public Safety Department is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, patrolling campus and responding to emergencies and calls for service. Public Safety provides shuttle service around campus and to SEPTA between 7:15 am and 1 am each day during the academic year, in addtion to personal safety escorts in the immediate vicinity of the University which are available at all times. If there is an incident requiring a timely warning or emergency notification, Public Safety will send a La Salle Alert notification via the Rave Emergency Notification System.

Public Safety can be contacted at 215.951.1300 or by downloading the Rave Guardian app on your mobile device. Rave Guardian provides 2-way texting and voice directly to Public Safety.

La Salle University complies with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act which includes crime statistics for three most recent years, and policy statements related to crime, emergency management, and fire safety, where incident occurred on, or immediately adjacent to, property owned or controlled by the University. Compiled by La Salle University Public Safety Department. Copies of the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report are available online and in print at Public Safety Headquarters and the Student Affairs Office.

Shuttle Bus Service and Parking

Public Safety provides shuttle service around campus and to SEPTA between 7:15 am and 1 am each day during the academic year. La Salle's shuttle buses can be tracked in real time online or via the La Salle mobile app.

Identification Cards

All students attending classes on campus are required to carry a valid La Salle ID card. This card is also the Library card. The ID Office issues ID cards. Information about obtaining ID cards can be found by visiting the mylasalle portal. The schedule for the ID office is 8:00a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. This schedule will be modified as necessary during school holidays and breaks. ID office phone number is 215.951.1579.

Recreational Facilities

La Salle University invites all students, faculty, and staff to utilize the recreational facilities.

The IBC Fitness Center is located on South Campus and contains free weights, cardio, and strength equipment. The facility also has men's and women's locker rooms.

Across from the IBC Fitness Center is the St. Basil's Fitness Studio. The studio is available for all resident students, and is located on the second floor of the residence hall. It is equipped with ellipticals, a cardio area, and dumbbells.

The Hayman Center offers the use of the following: three full-length basketball courts; a six- lane, 25-yard pool with diving well; locker rooms; and two fitness lofts above Kirk Pool equipped with treadmills, ellipticals, and bikes.

The Saints Edward and Francis residence halls are home to two outdoor basketball courts, a sand volleyball court, and play host to Explorer Fitness classes. Classes are open to all members of the La Salle community, free of charge.

The Belfield Tennis Courts are located on 20th Street, complete with six tiered and lighted tennis courts.

Across 20th Street, McCarthy Stadium features a multi-purposed, synthetic surface athletic field surrounded by a quarter-mile, all-weather track.

DeVincent Field, home to the Explorers baseball and field hockey programs, also has a Sprinturf surface and outdoor batting cages.

The Explorers softball field and open grass recreation field are on West Campus. The Rowing Room is also located on West Campus in Benilde Tower.

Users can check the availability and hours of facilities, take a virtual tour of several facilities, and get general information online or by calling the Recreation office at 215.951.1560.

Art Museum

The Art Museum at La Salle University opened its doors in 1975 as a cultural resource for La Salle students and for the communities surrounding the University. Currently, La Salle is the only university or college in Philadelphia with a permanent display of paintings, drawings, and sculpture from the Renaissance to the present. In addition to the permanent collection, the Art Museum owns a number of special collections that are not on regular view. The largest of these is the works on paper collection. Smaller holdings include groups of rare illustrated Bibles, Japanese prints, Indian miniatures, African art, Chinese ceramics, pre-Colombian pottery and Ancient Greek ceramics. Selections from these works, often supplemented by loans for other museums, form the basis for temporary exhibitions held four or five times a year. The collection is housed in a series of period rooms on the lower level of Olney Hall. Admission is free. For more information, including arranging group tours, call 215.951.1221.

English Language Institute

La Salle University’s English Language Institute (ELI) was established to provide the highest quality English as a foreign Language (EFL) instruction for international students and business professionals.  Courses focus on all aspects of EFL learning proficiency – listening, speaking, reading and writing to meet learning goals.  The ELI recognizes that learning English requires more than just studying in the classroom.

ELI students are encouraged to interact with other students and share experiences as a valuable part of their education and for learning English. As the ELI is a part of and located on the campus of La Salle University, EFL students are encouraged to participate in campus activities as well as events organized by the ELI.  For more information contact the ELI at ELI@lasalle.edu or 215.991.2600.

Student Health Insurance Requirement

All Graduate Students registered for six (6) or more credits or in a full-time program are required to carry health insurance coverage, either through the University-sponsored plan or through an alternative comparable plan, such as coverage on a parent’s health insurance plan. Prior to first attendance at the University, and annually thereafter, registered Graduate students in the aforementioned categories must complete the online student health insurance waiver/enrollment process.

In order to complete the waiver/enrollment process, registered students should go to www.firststudent.com.  Select La Salle University, click on the Waiver Your Schools Insurance button or the Enroll Now button and follow the directions.  Students with questions regarding coverage may go to www.firststudent.com or call customer service at 800-505-4160.  They may also contact Administrative Services at 215-951-1370.

Mission Statements

La Salle University Statement of Mission

La Salle University is a Catholic university in the tradition of the Brothers of the Christian Schools. To a diverse community of learners, La Salle University offers a rigorous curriculum and co-curricular experiences designed to help students gain theoretical and practical knowledge, deepen their ethical sensibilities, and prepare for a lifetime of continuous learning, professional success, and dedicated service.

As a Catholic university rooted in the liberal arts tradition, La Salle challenges students to contemplate life’s ultimate questions as they develop their faith, engage in a free search for truth, and explore their full human potential. As a Lasallian university, named for St. John Baptist de La Salle, patron saint of teachers, La Salle promotes excellence in teaching and scholarship, demonstrates respect for each person, nurtures mentoring relationships, and encourages authentic community. As an urban university, La Salle invites students to enhance their academic experience by immersing themselves in the rich resources of Philadelphia and the region. All members of our community are called to maintain a heightened sensitivity to those marginalized within society as they practice civic engagement, provide leadership with a global perspective, and contribute to the common good.

Mission Statement for Graduate Studies

As a Catholic institution in the Lasallian tradition, our graduate programs educate students with theoretical and practical knowledge. These programs enhance the students’ depth of knowledge in their discipline, develop professional competencies, prepare them for career growth, and foster an appreciation of lifelong learning. The faculty and staff engage in mentoring relationships with the students, and in modeling and encouraging excellence as scholars and practitioners. Enriched by personal attention, collaborative practice, and sound ethical principles, our students are prepared to make a significant contribution to global welfare.

History of Graduate Studies

Graduate programs have been available at La Salle from the earliest days of its existence. The more modern development of graduate education on our campus began in 1950 in response to the needs of the sponsoring religious congregation, the Christian Brothers. That year saw the introduction of the master’s program in religion, initially introduced to train the young Brothers in theology.

With the growth of the institution since the late 1940s, and the added distinction of university status granted by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1984, the graduate programs have grown in diversity. In 1998, La Salle introduced its first doctoral program—a Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology. The University now offers a variety of doctoral, master’s and graduate certificate programs in face-to-face, hybrid, and online formats for the convenience of its students.

Student Services

Tuition, Fees, and Payment Options

Payment of Tuition

Fall semester electronic bills (eBills) will be available for viewing and payment in July, and spring semester eBills will be available in December, and summer semester eBills will be available in April. Payments are due as follows:

Fall semester: August

Spring semester: January

Summer semester: May

Credit card (American Express, Discover, MasterCard, and VISA) and eCheck (ACH) payments can be made at http://my.lasalle.edu. Credit card payments are subject to a 2.75 percent convenience fee; however, eCheck payments are not subject to a convenience fee. An ACH payment is an electronic debit of a checking or savings account. You must have your account number and routing number available to make an ACH payment. If you choose to pay via wire transfer, instructions are available on the secure portal. You must include your student ID number.

Write your student ID number on the face of the check/money order to ensure accurate and timely processing. A $45 fee will be assessed for all returned checks. If the University receives a total of two returned checks, all future payments must be made via cash, certified check, or money order. DO NOT SEND CASH THROUGH THE MAIL.

If full payment cannot be made, the La Salle University Payment Plan is available for the fall, spring, and summer semesters.  All financial obligations must be satisfied before a student’s enrollment is finalized.

Third-Party Payments

If a recognized third party (employer, labor union, foundation, etc.) is paying all or a portion of your tuition, you must send the official notification to the Student Accounts Office to be applied to your account. To be eligible, the third party must be a recognized organization, not an individual. The official notification must be on letterhead and contain the following, student name,
  La Salle Identification number, amount that will be paid, billing instructions and signature of authorized representative.  Remember to remit payment for any amount due, not covered by a third party.  Third party billing authorizations are accepted in lieu of payment and should be received by the payment due date.  Please fax or email your billing authorization to 215.951.1799 or studentar@lasalle.edu.

Employer Assisted Graduate Deferred Payment Plan

La Salle University has established a deferred payment plan for graduate students who qualify for tuition reimbursement from their employer. Students accepted into the plan may defer payment of the portion of their tuition reimbursable under their employers’ program until 45 days after the end of the semester. Any balance not covered under an employer education assistance plan must be remitted by the payment due date. If you are using the Employer Assisted Graduate Deferred Payment Plan, you must follow these steps:

Complete the Deferred Payment Plan Application at the following link: http://www.lasalle.edu/financeadmin/bursar/EmployerAssistedDPP.pdf. Submit the form, along with a $50.00 payment, proof of employment letter and a copy of your employer’s reimbursement policy. You may forward the application and documents via email (studentar@lasalle.edu), fax (215.951.1799), or U.S. mail, to the attention of the Office of Student Accounts Receivable. If you choose to submit your application and documents via email of fax, you may remit your $50.00 application fee on the Student Portal via Br. LUWIS.

Late Payment Penalty

A one percent monthly late payment fee will be assessed to all students who have not made payment in full or acceptable payment arrangements by the tuition due date for the semester. The fee will be monthly.

If you are unable to make payment in full, you are encouraged to sign up for the La Salle Payment Plan or refer to the Financial Aid section of the University Web site for directions on how to apply for financial aid.

Changes

La Salle University reserves the right to amend or add to the charges listed above and to make such changes applicable to new and enrolled students.

Financial Aid

Although payment of tuition is the responsibility of the student, the University makes every effort to assist students in attaining adequate levels of financial support. Students should utilize private, as well as public, fund resources (e.g., banks and private scholarships, as well as the government loan programs). The professional staff in the Office of Financial Aid will work with each student in reference to the loan programs.

Financial aid is also available from the sources described in this section. Applicants for financial aid are required to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the Web Institutional Data Form (WIDF). This form can be completed through the mylasalle portal. If the student is a loan applicant, all awards must be reported to the Financial Aid Office for loan eligibility computation. For further information, please call the office at 215.951.1070.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan

The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is an interest-accruing, fixed-rate loan available to students enrolled on a part-time or full-time basis.  Graduate students may borrow up to $20,500 per year.  Repayment for this type of loan begins six months after leaving school or enrolling less than half-time, and allows for up to a maximum of 10 years to repay.

Veteran’s Benefits

Students who qualify for Veteran's benefits should contact the Financial Aid Office at 215.951.1070. Information for full-time and part-time students is also available under the Active Duty Veterans link within the Tools and Resources section of http://www.lasalle.edu/financialaid/

Masters

Analytics

Program Description

The M.S. in Analytics provides students with the background needed to delve deeper into review and questioning of data, internal and external related to their specific industry and professional needs.  The program mixes statistical analysis with data preparation to provide visual results to questions.  The program may be adapted to the industries needed for the student's professional growth.

If you have any questions regarding the Analytics program, please contact:

Margaret McCoey, M.S.
Director
215.951.1136
mccoey@lasalle.edu
www.lasalle.edu/analytics

If you have any questions regarding the Analytics program, please contact: analytics@lasalle.edu

Mission

The graduate program in M.S. Analytics educates students in theoretical and practical knowledge of data analytics.  The program develops professional competencies in analytics which may be applied to various industries.  The faculty, staff and students engage in relationships with industry practitioners to encourage excellence and provide attention to ethical principles.

Program Goals

The learning goals of this proposed program are the following:

  • Prepare students to participate ethically and professionally in analytics professions.
  • Prepare students to enter the field of analytics.
  • Prepare students and faculty to be leaders in analytics.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Define and explain differences between descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics.
  • Formulate business practices related to specific industries and ethical behavior.
  • Describe statistical methods related to data collection.
  • Construct relevant views of data sources based on independent variables.
  • Develop models for data sources.
  • Construct data simulations based on data models.
  • Transform data sources for data analysis.
  • Generate data trends based on data sources.
  • Integrate data sources into historical repositories.
  • Generate visual data solutions.
  • Formulate problem and solutions to applied analytics problems.

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission into the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the application for Admission which may be obtained at https://www.lasalle.edu/grad/apply/
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in the completion of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution of higher education. Candidates must have an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0.
  3. Request official transcripts from the insitutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable). For work completed outside of the US, the transcripts need to be evaluated by World Education Services (www.wes.org).
  4. Provide a professional resume.
  5. Request two letters of recommendation from professors or current or past supervisors at his/her place of professional employment.
  6. Attend an interview with a faculty member to assess the candidate’s requirements.

This program is offered online. International students may take the program at their home, but are not permitted to receive US Student VISAs because of the delivery format.

Students should be comfortable with the use of basic spreadsheet tools. Students need to be inquisitive. Students with professional experience in a corporate setting would be the best suited to enter this program.

Please refer to the University's Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based soley upon applicant's qualifications.

All documents should be sent to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University - Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141

215.951.1100 / Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Curriculum

Students are required to complete 10 courses (30 credits) for this program.  This includes a capstone course (3 credits)

ANA 601

Overview of Analytics

ANA 613

Statistics for Data Analytics

ANA 615

Optimization Methods for Data Analytics

ANA 617

Modeling and Simulation for Data Analytics

ANA 523

Database Management Systems

ANA 658

Data Mining 

ANA 624

Data Warehouse 

ANA 652

Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

ANA 665

Data Visualization

ANA 880

Analytics Capstone 

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Part-time students can apply for need-based financial aid. For more information on financial aid or to apply for a Federal Stafford Loan and the Additional Unsubsidized Loan Program, please contact the Student Financial Services office at 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Program Director: Margaret McCoey, M.S.
Associate Professors: DiDio, Fierson, Highley. Redmond
Assistant Professors: McCoey, Wang
Lecturers: Crossen, Parker, McGinley, Smith

Course Descriptions

ANA 523 Database Management Systems

This course entails analysis and evaluation of database designs in relation to the strategic mission of the project. Topics include database systems, database architectures, and data-definition and data-manipulation languages. Also included are logical and physical database design, database models (e.g., entity-relationship, relational), normalization, integrity, query languages including SQL. The course will address the use of Cloud Storage, non-structured data, the use of NOSQL databases. The course discusses social and ethical considerations and privacy of data. This course incorporates case studies for real project implementations.

Number of Credits: 3

ANA 601 Overview of Analytics

This course introduces the student to the foundational principles, terminology, history and types of analytics used in industry. Students will learn how to define requirements and identify challenges, examine design strategies, explore approaches to analyzing data and identify appropriate data visualization tool(s). Students will explore trends, uncover ethnical challenges presented during data analysis and collection using case studies, problem scenarios and team projects. Topics include understanding your client & their need/use for data, analytic trends, and examples of using data to illustrate a picture for your client.

Number of Credits: 3

ANA 613 Statistics for Data Analytics

An introduction to the essential principles of descriptive and inferential statistics needed for effective data analysis and decision making. Applications and case studies using realistic data will be used to demonstrate how statistical methodology is used to generate predictions necessary for decisions via data collection, statistical analysis and interpretation. Topics include applied probability, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear and multiple regression, analysis of variance, and model building. Technology, including spreadsheets and dedicated statistical software, will be employed where appropriate.

Number of Credits: 3

ANA 615 Optimization Methods for Data Analytics

This course introduces students to mathematical models that can be employed to make informed decisions in a wide variety of data-driven fields, including (but not limited to) finance, banking, marketing, health care, retail, manufacturing, and transportation. Goals such as increasing revenue, decreasing costs, and improving overall efficiency of operations in the face of various constraints are considered. Students learn to recognize when a problem lends itself to a particular type of model, formulate the model, and use appropriate methods to solve or extract information from the model. Particular emphasis is placed on linear programming (with exposure to network models and integer programs) and the simplex method. Forecasting, inventory management, and queueing models, as well as Markov chains, are also studied. Additional topics covered include sensitivity analysis, duality, decision analysis, and dynamic programming. Software (both spreadsheets and a computer algebra system) is employed consistently throughout the course to expedite the solution and analysis process; emphasis will be placed on the practical application of models rather than on the models' mathematical properties.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ANA 613

ANA 617 Modeling and Simulation for Data Analytics

This course introduces students to modeling and simulation. Topics include basic queueing theory, the role of random numbers in simulations, and the identification of input probability distributions. Students will also learn to identify limitations of simulations and draw correct conclusions from a simulation study. Students will work with specialized simulation packages.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ANA 615

ANA 624 Data Warehousing

This course covers the use of large-scale data stores to support decision making; critical success factors in designing and implementing a data warehouse and management of a data warehouse project; requirements analysis; design using the star schema; entire data warehouse integration; infrastructure needs; data staging process, including data cleansing and transformation; and data access, including On-line Analytic Processing (OLAP) tools and Big Data. Also considered are introduction to data mining and analysis, evaluation, and selection of data warehousing tools, techniques, and methodologies. Prerequisite: ANA 523

Number of Credits: 3

ANA 652 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

This experiential course emphasizes the importance of feedback and self-assessment for leadership development. It includes extensive assessment of each participant’s management style and skills based on self-evaluations (using structured questionnaires) and feedback from coworkers, faculty, and other participants. Leadership development experiences emphasize time and stress management, individual and group problem solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, and team leadership. Each participant identifies skills he or she needs to develop and reports on efforts to develop those skills.

Number of Credits: 3

ANA 658 Data Mining

This course introduces the field of data mining, with specific emphasis on its use for Machine Learning algorithms. Techniques covered may include conceptual clustering, learning decision rules and decision trees, case-based reasoning, Bayesian analysis, neural networks and text mining. The course covers data preparation and analysis of results. Skills in Microsoft Excel are useful.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ANA 523

ANA 665 Data Visualization

This course develops data visualization techniques to provide effective display and presentation of analytical solutions in organizational contexts. The course topics include analytical reasoning, human perception of visual information, visual representation and interaction technologies, data representation and dissemination using texts, graphics, images, sounds. Students will learn research trends in space, time, multivariate analytics and extreme scale visual analytics.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ANA 617

ANA 880 Analytics Capstone

The capstone is an opportunity to pursue an independent learning experience focused on a specific aspect of Analytics. Students choose from an advanced research topic focused on analytics, a professional application of analytics to a specific case or an experiential learning opportunity focusing on the application of analytics. The capstone extends students beyond the course work and cases to apply knowledge to situations relevant to their professional goals. Each student will be required to present his/her capstone as both an oral presentation and a summary written document.

Number of Credits: 3

Bilingual/Bicultural Studies

Program Description

The Master of Arts degree in Bilingual/Bicultural Studies is a part-time and/or full-time degree program (evenings) for educators and other professionals who work with the ever-growing Latino population of the Philadelphia area and the nation. The program is designed to provide extensive bilingual and bicultural instruction for nurses and doctors, patient care hospital employees, social workers, court employees, law enforcement personnel, human resources professionals, business professionals, lawyers, paralegals, and teachers.

The program is flexible and may be tailored to fit the needs and interests of individual students.

The language component is individualized, and students are encouraged to apply regardless of their current proficiency level in the Spanish language.

If you have any questions regarding the Bilingual/Bicultural Studies Program, please contact: hispanicinstitute@lasalle.edu.

Mission

The program is designed to provide extensive bilingual and bicultural instruction for nurses and doctors, patient care hospital employees, social workers, court employees, law enforcement personnel, human resources professionals, business professionals, lawyers, paralegals, and teachers.

Program Goals

The Master of Arts in Bilingual/Bicultural Studies may be either a part-time degree program or a full-time program (nine credits per semester or more) for educators and other professionals who work with the ever-growing Latino population of the Philadelphia area and the nation.

The overall goals and objectives of the program are as follows:

  • To provide extensive bilingual and bicultural instruction for nurses, hospital employees, social workers, business professionals, court employees, police officers, human resources professionals, and others.
  • To develop, for advanced language students, the capabilities of using vocabulary that is pertinent to a particular Hispanic culture to allow circumstantial language usage.
  • To assure that students are exposed to a variety of Hispanic cultures on a first-hand basis through community service.
  • To develop an application and understanding of diverse cultural backgrounds and to relate/contrast these cultures, particularly, in terms of the dominant culture in the USA.
  • To acquire a solid historical perspective of various Hispanic groups in the USA with an emphasis on special relationships and conflicts among Hispanic groups themselves and in co-existence with the dominant Anglo culture.
  • To acquire an understanding of the roles played by race, ethnicity, language, culture, social stratification, family, class structure, and social mobility among Hispanic groups and in contrast to those played by Anglo society.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the students will be able to

  • Develop proficiency in Spanish so they can better serve the Hispanic community as nurses, hospital employees, social workers, business professionals, court employees, police officers, human resources professionals, and other professions.
  • Demonstrate the capability of using vocabulary that is pertinent to a particular Hispanic culture to allow circumstantial language usage.
  • Apply their knowledge of diverse cultural backgrounds and to relate/contrast these cultures, particularly, in terms of the dominant culture in the USA on a first-hand basis through an internship that serves the Hispanic community.  
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the diverse historical perspective of various Hispanic groups in the USA with an emphasis on special relationships and conflicts among Hispanic groups themselves and in co-existence with the dominant Anglo culture. 
  • Synthesize their acquired understanding of the roles played by race, ethnicity, language, culture, social stratification, family, class structure, and social mobility among Hispanic groups and in contrast to Anglo society.

Curriculum

A minimum of thirty-three (33) credits is required for the degree. All courses are three (3) credits each.

Depending on the student’s linguistic skills in Spanish, candidates will be classified as “Advanced Language,” “Intermediate Language Proficient”or “Not Advanced Language.”  Classification of a student will depend on past academic background and other linguistic life experiences. The student’s classification will also be subject to the judgment of the Director of the program, and an assessment interview is required to determine initial linguistic skills. This assessment will be conducted by the Director of the program.

The curriculum for each of these three (3) classifications will consist of the following courses:

Advanced Language Students:

Core Requirements

  • BLS 508   Workshops and Symposia
  • BLS 511   Language and Culture of Puerto Rico I
  • BLS 512   Language and Culture of Puerto Rico II
  • BLS 520   Field Experience in the Latino Community
  • BLS 600   Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication
  • BLS 639   Advanced Spanish Grammar and Syntax
  • BLS 651   Master’s Project
  • Any Caribbean Literature Course

Elective Requirements

  • Any three courses, nine (9) credits offered by any of the programs within The Hispanic Institute, subject to each program’s prerequisites

Intermediate Language Proficient Students:

Core Requirements

  • BLS 502   Urban Spanish 2 or BLS 503 Urban Spanish 3 (depending on proficiency)
  • BLS 504   Urban Spanish 4
  • BLS 505   Urban Spanish 5
  • BLS 508   Workshops and Symposia
  • BLS 511   Language and Culture of Puerto Rico I
  • BLS 520   Field Experience in the Latino Community
  • BLS 600   Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication
  • BLS 651   Master’s Project

Elective Requirements

  • For students beginning with BLS 502:any two courses offered within The Hispanic Institute, subject to each program’s prerequisites (6 credits)
  • For students beginning with BLS 503: any three courses offered within The Hispanic Institute, subject to each program’s prerequisites (9 credits)

Not Advanced Language Students:

Core Requirements

  • BLS 501   Urban Spanish 1
  • BLS 502   Urban Spanish 2
  • BLS 503   Urban Spanish 3
  • BLS 504   Urban Spanish 4
  • BLS 505   Urban Spanish 5
  • BLS 508   Workshops and Symposia
  • BLS 511   Language and Culture of Puerto Rico I
  • BLS 520   Field Experience in the Latino Community
  • BLS 600   Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication
  • BLS 651   Master’s Project

Elective Requirements

  • Any one course offered within The Hispanic Institute (Note:  If a course is waived with permission of the Director, an elective course is added since candidates must complete 33 credits to earn the M.A. in Bilingual Bicultural Studies degree.)

Faculty

Director: Guadalupe Da Costa Montesinos, M.A.
Associate Professors: Biehl, Ossa
Lecturers: Ezquerra-Hasbun, Hain-Poorman, Kopec, Natalini, Tellez, Toro, Zucker

Course Descriptions

BLS 501 to BLS 505 Urban Spanish Series

These five (5) courses are intensive language courses taught by instructors familiar with the pronunciation, intonation, and idiomatic characteristics of Spanish. The courses use current language methodologies and are extensively individualized. Teachers, police officers, social workers, and nurses, for example, develop special vocabularies that increase their effectiveness in communicating with Spanish-speakers. Tests (in Spanish) evaluate oral and written competency of the candidate at each level. 

Length: Eight weeks (twice a week)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 508 Workshops and Symposia

Offered only during the Summer I session (May-June), this course consists of a series of symposia and practical workshops presented by specialists chosen from bilingual schools, the fine arts, medical agencies, law enforcement facilities, and social agencies as well as from local universities, including La Salle. (In English)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 511 Language and Culture of Puerto Rico I

This course is for advanced students of Spanish who need development in understanding the spoken and written language of Puerto Rico. Special attention is given to colloquial expressions of the Caribbean. Reading materials in this course not only represent special linguistic characteristics of Puerto Rico, but also reflect the cultural roots and values of the Puerto Rican community in urban mainland settings. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 512 Language and Culture of Puerto Rico II (Summer I Session)

This is an intensive language course for advanced Spanish students and forms part of the Immersion Program. Emphasis is placed upon group work that provides students with practice in listening and speaking in Caribbean Spanish. Students discuss contemporary themes and cultural characteristics of Puerto Rican society. Readings are from Puerto Rican short stories, essays, poems, and periodicals.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 520 Field Experience in the Latino Community

During the academic year, each student works in placements in a field experience directly related to his or her profession in the Greater Philadelphia/New Jersey Latino community. Teachers assist in bilingual schools; police in districts in bilingual neighborhoods; and social workers in social agencies dealing with Latinos, etc.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BLS 600 Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication

The major objectives of this course are to develop an appreciation of diverse cultural backgrounds, especially among Latinos and Anglos, and to develop awareness of the complexity of cross-cultural communication. The following areas are considered as they relate to the dynamics of cross-cultural communication: the communication process; group properties and communication; linguistic approaches; the nonverbal element of communication systems, especially related to Anglos and Latinos; language and culture; language as social behavior; and channels of communication.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 601 Techniques of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

The course analyzes various methodologies used in teaching English as a second language. Emphasis is placed upon methods in teaching, listening, and speaking. Microteaching of difficult points of pronunciation and grammar is also emphasized. Significant attention is given to effective techniques in second-language acquisition.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 602 History of the Americas

This course treats the history and culture of the major Latino groups in the United States, especially those from the Caribbean. Emphasis is placed on such topics as Puerto Rico's special relationship with the United States, Latino populations (e.g., Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, and Central American) in the United States, and the historical relationship between Latino and Anglo communities.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 603 Literature of the Spanish Caribbean

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 604 Cultural Pluralism and Minority Groups in the U.S.

Focusing on the ethnicity, language, and cultural and social stratification of minorities, with an emphasis on that of Latinos, this course analyzes contemporary American opportunity, family and class structures, social mobility, migration, the so-called "culture of poverty," urbanism, and related concepts and issues. Certain psychological dimensions, such as self-concept and the self-fulfilling prophecy, are also examined.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 605 Curriculum and Development of Bilingual Programs

This course discusses the historical background of the bilingual movement, especially pertinent legislation, as well as the organization of a bilingual program. Topics of lecture and discussion include needs assessment of pupils, staff, and community; various types of curriculum models of bilingual and school organizations; selection of instructional materials for training bilingual students; and proper evaluative procedures.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 606 Making Language Connections through Content in ESOL and Bilingual Classrooms

The major objective of this course is to provide mechanisms for second language content delivery utilizing the sheltered class model, SIOP, and "learning to learn" methods. The curriculum includes an analysis of academic language in content and texts and provides for a discussion of metacognitive processes and strategies that may be used in the classroom. Additionally, the role of learning styles and multiple intelligences is examined together with the rationale for and structure of thematic units for lesson planning purposes. The integration of language objectives and "what's difficult" for language learners is directed toward an authentic assessment of content and language.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 607 Art and Culture of the Spanish Caribbean

This course traces the history of art in the Spanish Caribbean, emphasizing the major influences on its evolution and contemporary manifestations. Taino, Spanish, and African contributions to art in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic will be explored in detail and in all expressive forms: paintings, broadcasting, cinematography, theater, and popular culture. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 610 Comparative Analysis English/Spanish

This course studies the comparative/contrastive grammar in the English-Spanish language pair. The course includes intensive practice in reading comprehension, *skim, scan, main idea, key words*, sequence of events, usage, error detection, synonyms, and most common translation problems in terms of grammar, vocabulary, idioms, and slang. Registers of speech are also explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 611 Fundamentals of Interpretation

This course introduces the basic skills of interpretation: public speaking, memory work, and text analysis, as well as the theoretical foundations of interpretation. In addition, the students learn terminology research and professional skills: general business practices and ethics. Practicum emphasis is on public-speaking skills, as well as the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 612 Consecutive Interpretation and Sight Translation

This course builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in BLS 611, Fundamentals of Interpretation. In consecutive interpreting, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. The course reinforces the ability to perceive essential meaning and introduces note-taking techniques. It emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Note taking and sight translation are introduced in the latter part of the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BLS 611

BLS 613 Simultaneous Interpretation

In simultaneous interpreting, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode. The course begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students to develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the target language with correct grammar, diction, and style.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

This course further develops the skills in consecutive interpretation with note taking, sight translation, and simultaneous interpreting. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the introductory courses and produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting.

Students are introduced to the procedures in criminal and civil law, legal language, the courtroom, and the Interpreter's Code of Ethics. Practice in the classroom strives to recreate the most common scenarios in which legal interpreting takes place while developing the interpreting skills needed to work as a court interpreter. Students refine their note-taking skills, and special attention is given to develop stamina and maintain concentration while under stress in the courtroom. Assessment takes into account both accuracy and fluency in delivery.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 615 Health-Care Interpretation

This course provides information on the health-care system in the United States, medical terminology, code of ethics for medical interpreters, and use of interpreters in health-care situations. In consecutive interpreting, students continue to enhance their memory and note-taking skills. They work on detecting and correcting problems from the listening stage to the delivery stage. In simultaneous interpreting, students work on polishing their delivery and language register. In sight translation, students become familiar with the different forms used in hospitals and health-care centers. Peer-assessment and self-assessment are encouraged in order to bring awareness of the importance of self-monitoring in interpreting. Furthermore, this course discusses current issues in health-care interpreting and provides information for further development in the profession.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 616 Business Interpretation

This course introduces simultaneous interpreting with text, so that students learn to use visual or written materials appropriately to enhance their accuracy and completeness when interpreting. Conference interpreting is practiced in class, with students carrying on research and preparation for "conferences," including compilations of glossaries and topic research. A code of ethics for conference interpreters is discussed, as well as booth etiquette. In consecutive interpreting, students continue to develop their note taking skills and interpret longer utterances without interruption. Speech production aspects such as voice, fluency, and pacing are assessed as well.

Material for practice comes from diverse business areas such as banking, finance, world economic issues, and insurance, among others. Students are expected to read and research topics, make presentations, practice, grade peer exercises, and provide self-assessment. The purpose of these assignments is to develop confidence and assertiveness in students and resources for them so they are able to deal with nuances of meaning and accuracy in interpretation while delivering the interpretation smoothly and naturally in their target language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 617 Technology: Applications in Translation and Interpretation

This course analyzes current tools to enhance and speed the translation process. These tools include word processors as well as CAT (computer-assisted translation), voice-recognition, and proofreading tools. The course explores and discusses their practical applications and features in terms of pricing, productivity, user-friendliness, quality output, and compatibility with other tools. The course examines simultaneous interpretation and video and telephonic interpreting in terms of both the software and hardware available to perform these types of interpreting and the job opportunities for interpreters in these growing areas. The course also introduces students to new fields in which translation and interpretation skills are being applied, such as subtitling, web and software localization, and voice-over, along with the tools needed to work in these fields. Students will become familiar with tools and resources to aid them in launching a translation and interpretation business and in keeping current with new advances in the industry.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 620 Independent Study

Independent study in Caribbean history, language, or literature must be approved by the Director of the program.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 635 Myths and Legends in Caribbean and Latin American Literature

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 639 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Syntax

This course is designed to provide a review of standard Spanish grammar and syntax for advanced students of the language. It includes intensive oral and written practice with a view toward improving native and non-native students' speaking and writing skills. The course also intends to make all speakers aware of standard Spanish cultivated in schools of the Spanish-speaking world. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 640 Translation Studies: theory and Practice

The first stage of this course is theoretical. Examining statements on the art of translation acquaint students with typical issues experienced by literary translators. Focusing on individual solutions to translation problems heightens awareness of the challenges of working interculturally and independently. Reading essays on the process of translation helps students understand what the field of translation studies has come to mean in abstract terms. Using explanations of the history of translation and of current theories helps students to develop a broad perspective on the field as a whole as they begin to incorporate standard terms in their own usage.

The second stage of this course is practical. Newspaper articles are examined as examples of language posing different challenges that, when identified, prompt the appropriate stylistic choices for a translator. Discussion and collaborative in-class translations of examples of each type complement the individual work done outside of class.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 641 Professional Uses of Spanish: Medical

The topics and linguistic skills covered in this course include the following: vocabulary, oral practice (Spanish-English and English- Spanish), ethnical norms, health-care practices in the U.S., the Hispanic culture of the patient, role-playing, writing of a short medical script, observation at a local hospital with bilingual services, and supplemental readings on specific diseases or community health problems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 642 Professional Uses of Spanish: Business

This course provides students the opportunity to translate a variety of texts, with emphasis on current world economic and financial issues, international trade, and business and economic forecasts. Students learn to apply basic concepts of economics and business to real-world texts, thereby improving their command of the technical terminology of these fields. Texts include printed and online promotional and informational material, as well as various types of business correspondence and transactions. The course both overs sectors of the business world in which consecutive interpretation is frequently used and emphasizes sequential logic in note taking and accurate terminology in delivery.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

A series of legal documents are analyzed for their technical features in order to grasp some of the systemic and cultural complexities that need to be understood in order to bridge the gap between lawyer and client when Spanish and English are both involved in a common legal proceeding.

Deeds, lease agreements, liens, living wills, and powers of attorney, all commonly used documents in the U.S. today, are translated. Students learn how to communicate efficiently with Spanish-speaking clients as well as to relay their verbal messages to a lawyer or a court. Through sight translation of written testimony (for example, letters or statements from clients), students practice basic skills of court translation. Attention is given to registers of speech (slang, police jargon, legal terms, or norms for courtroom testimony). Typical sessions of client counseling and contract negotiations are simulated in teams for classroom practice.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 651 Master's Project/Thesis

A supervised, individual project that may be related to the student's fieldwork in the Latino community is the required capstone experience in the M.A. program. All project topics must relate to the mission and goals of the Bilingual/Bicultural Studies program.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BLS 678 Texto En Contexto: A Panorama of Present-Day Puerto Rico Through Selected Texts

A survey of contemporary Puerto Rican thought, this course explores issues critical to the Caribbean island nation's social, cultural, historical, and political identity. Texts hail from a multiplicity of academic disciplines, literary genres, and popular cultural forms. Among the social sciences covered are sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science. Literary genres covered include poetry, fiction, and the essay. Popular cultural forms include folkloric and popular music. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 700 Consecutive and Simultaneous interpreting

The purpose of this capstone course is to acquaint translation students with the variety of ways they may be expected to handle language in the profession. Sight and speed translation, oral summary of a written text, conference interpreting of speeches, consecutive interpreting of interviews, dubbing, and simultaneous interpreting of various sorts will all be practiced. Whether treating familiar texts from previous coursework or handling new, unfamiliar texts (from the areas studied), students will use the same intensive approach. "Best practices" with problematic aspects will be stressed so as to train participants to resolve issues. In this final stage students will draw on knowledge and techniques taught as they also develop their note-taking methods and public speaking skill.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 701 Internship

Upon the conclusion of all other courses in the program, each student is required to complete an internship in one of the following venues: (1) the state courts in Pennsylvania or New Jersey, as openings are available; (2) a health-care institution such as Einstein Hospital or the Shriners Hospital; (3) an international business where translation and/or interpretation is required of the intern; or (4) a translation and interpretation company providing such services to the public, corporations, courts, or health-care organizations. The student has the ability to establish his/her preference. However, the preference voiced is subject to the availability of intern openings at the time. Each student is assigned a faculty supervisor who monitors the kind of translation/interpretation being conducted by the student and determines if it is appropriate to the development of skills needed for the student. Equally, the faculty member is in a position to assess whether the student is putting into practice the skills and theories learned during his/her coursework. The internship last an entire semester, and a minimum of 100 hours of actual service is required. Service is defined as translation/interpretation time, exclusive of any other associated duties.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 702 Master's thesis/Project

This is a supervised, individual thesis/project that must be related to the field of translation and/or interpretation. It requires a quality research paper that could explore the linguistic, sociolinguistic, communication dynamics, applications of learned theories, and other matter related to the investigation of translation and interpretation in a general sense or, more particularly, in a specialized linguistic field in legal, business and health-care translation/interpretation. The project is the required capstone experience of all graduate students in the M.A. in Translation/Interpretation program. All students are assigned a faculty adviser to direct his/her thesis/project.

Number of Credits: 3

EDC 650 Language Assessment and Special Education of ESL Learners

This course provides an overview of federal, state, and local mandates regarding the assessment of ESL learners. Placement testing, standardized assessment, performance assessment, rubrics, and portfolios are addressed specifically. Issues in authentic assessment and assessment in
the content areas are also addressed. This course also helps students to understand the legislation that promotes individual rights for children and adults with disabilities, the special education classification and labeling process, and current trends in the education of children with disabilities. Students analyze the impact that a handicapping condition has on the individual in learning and social environments. Prerequisites: BLS 600 and BLS 601

Number of Credits: 3

ESL 650 Language Assessment and Special Education of ESL Learners

This course provides an overview of federal, state, and local mandates regarding the assessment of ESL learners. Placement testing, standardized assessment, performance assessment, rubrics, and portfolios are addressed specifically. Issues in authentic assessment and assessment in the content areas are also addressed. This course also helps students to understand the legislation that promotes individual rights for children and adults with disabilities, the special education classification and labeling process, and current trends in the education of children with disabilities. Students analyze the impact that a handicapping condition has on the individual in learning and social environments.

Prerequisites: BLS 600 and BLS 601

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 608 Research Methods in TESOL

This course explores research design methods and writing conventions in the field of TESOL. It provides experience in using research materials and constructing logically coherent and professionally documented research in the discipline. The course connects sociolinguistics and language teaching by researching and reflecting on the social, historical, legal, and cultural issues influencing language learning in the context of cultural and linguistic diversity. The course also explores micro and macro levels of context in a variety of sites for learning a second and foreign language (U.S., international, university-based, community-based, public school-based) and with a variety of types of learners (varying age, ethno linguistic background, educational experiences, socioeconomic class, etc).

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 609 Language Study for Educators

This course serves as a practical foundation in linguistics and its sub-branches for teachers who want to apply basic linguistic knowledge and research findings to their practice. The course begins with an overview of phonology and sounds and moves gradually through to morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics and gives special focus to first and second language acquisition research. Attention is given to developmental sequences of language acquisition and implications from research findings in first and second language acquisition literature as well as interlanguage research for designing lessons for the English Language Learner (ELL). During each unit, comparisons are made between languages from around the world with English, with special attention given to Spanish.

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 610 Teaching Second Language Writing in TESOL

The purpose of this course is to provide teachers with a wide range of strategies for teaching ELLs (English language Learners) the art of writing for different audiences, while examining English grammar as it applies to curriculum and instruction. Methods used in current approaches to teaching grammar are examined and appraised.

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 611 Multimedia Approaches to TESOL

The purpose of this course is to study the application of multimedia technology in the second language acquisition process. The course considers the effect of the use of technology-based centers to the development of listening, viewing, talking, reading, and writing skills in English within the context of Content-Based Instruction (CBI). Students taking this course explore the use of cassette/CD players, movies and shows, computers and the Internet, video cameras, cassette recorders, newspapers, and magazines to develop the second language acquisition continuum at a faster pace. Prerequisite: BLS 609: Language Studies for Educators

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 612 Sociolinguistics for Educators

This course delves deep into the social, cultural, historical, and very personal arenas within sociolinguistics. Students engage in readings and projects around such issues as language identity, language variation and education, bilingualism, multilingualism, the impact of language planning and policy on education, codes switching, dialects, standard and non-standard languages, language contact, diglossia, language maintenance, and language loss. The purpose of the course is to move beyond viewing language as an isolated subject so that one can take into account the many factors that make communication in multilingual societies so complex. Examples from multilingual environments from all over the world will be used as a basis for discussion of such topics, although special attention is given to the impact of these factors on language instruction and interaction in the classroom.
Prerequisite: BLS 609: Language Studies for Educators

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 613 Special Projects in English Education

This course focuses on current issues of second language acquisition and can be taken as an independent study.

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 701 Practicum/Field Experience

In this practicum, the students apply what they have learned during their studies in a new setting such as a school or nonprofit organization. Students select the organization with the Director's approval and provide the Director with a supervisor who oversees the practicum at the organization. It is expected that students take advantage of the practicum not only as a way of putting to use what they have learned but also as a means to further understand the cultural dimensions of communication and nuances of language teaching and learning in a specific setting (the Field Experience).

This practicum is required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for the ESL Specialist Certification Program.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Core and Elective courses, M.A. in TESOL Program and ESL Specialist Certification Program.

TSOL 751 M.A. TESOL Master's Project/Thesis

Students must complete a master's project/thesis as a capstone project that reflects their practicum, student teaching, and/or teaching practice as a culminating experience. It should provide the opportunity to apply, synthesize, and evaluate knowledge and skills acquired during their graduate studies. Students should consult their faculty adviser for a description of options and guidelines to meet the requirements of the M.A. in TESOL program.

Students should register for the capstone master's thesis in the semester in which they plan to complete the project. Students must successfully complete ALL required and elective courses (including the practicum) before they would be allowed to register for TSOL 751. Research that involves human subjects will be reviewed by the University's Institutional Review Board (IRB) and may not proceed until approval is granted by the IRB.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Business Administration (Full-time)

Program Description

Accredited by the Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) and built on a tradition of educating business leaders, La Salle University’s Full-time MBA Program (FTMBA) provides students with the skills necessary to become successful business leaders in the international job market. Students with an undergraduate degree in business or a related field can complete their degree in one year. Students without a business background will be able to complete their program in four semesters (15 to 24 months).

The program welcomes students with work experience and those who enter directly after their graduation from college. Combined with challenging academics, students are immersed in an intercultural environment as a result of La Salle’s worldwide recruiting efforts. FTMBA students have the option of specializing in accounting, business systems and analytics, finance, general business administration, management, or marketing. Partial scholarships awarded on merit are available to support both American and international students. Formal work experience is not required.

Reasons to Choose Lasallian Business:

  • Earn a degree at an institution that is among five percent of the world's business schools accredited by the Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business.
  • Join a program with a high rate of return on investment: exceptional placement rates and tuition set to allow students to receive an excellent return on their investment.
  • La Salle University's School of Business was named to The Princeton Riview's Best 294 Business Schools 2017.
  • Opportunity to travel to a foreign country  and study with faculty.
  • Engage in events sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia and Philadelphia's International Visitors Council.
  • Career Focus: Career Development Course, Careeer Fairs, On-Campus Interview Sessions with employers, etiquette luncheons, networking events,
    Women's MBA Association, a personal academic and career advisor. 

Elizabeth Scofield, MBA
Director
215-951-1057
scofield@lasalle.edu
www.lasalle.edu/mba

If you have any questions regarding the Full-Time MBA program, please contact: mba@lasalle.edu

Goals and Objectives

Master of Business Administration

Strategic thinking through integrating discipline-specific business knowledge

  • Demonstrate the ability to integrate business disciplines to achieve strategic objectives.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and evaluate the usefulness of various competitive strategies (e.g., adaptive, market entry, positioning) that firms use within domestic and global markets.

Leadership Skills

  • Demonstrates the ability to identify and analyze current leadership styles and the ability to develop and enhance leadership skills.
  • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team.

Business-related oral and written communication skills

  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver a professional presentation on a business issue.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write a clear, concise, and well-organized professional presentation of a business issue.

Awareness of how the business environment influences
decision-making

  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and analyze ethical and legal business dilemmas and the ability to recommend and defend appropriate solutions and strategies.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how cultural, economic, and political factors shape the management of global business.

Knowledge and skill concerning financial analysis, reporting, and markets

  • Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the financial position of for-profit organizations through the examination of financial information contained in balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements, and footnotes, as well as information gathered from other sources (such as public filings, business news publications, and Websites) in order to enable stakeholders (e.g., management, shareholders, or creditors) to understand a firm’s progress in maximizing its value to stakeholders.

One- and Two-Year Options

One-Year MBA Option: Students with an undergraduate degree in business or a related field can complete the degree in one year. Their program consists of 11 or 12 three-credit courses and two one-credit courses: Professional Development Seminar and Written Communication Skills for Business.

Two-Year MBA Option: Students who do not have a degree in business or a related field can complete the degree in 15 to 24 months. Their program consists of up to 15 three-credit courses and two one-credit courses: Professional Development Seminar and Written Communication Skills for Business.

Students who have taken one or more courses equivalent to our Foundation courses do not need 17 courses to complete the program. The Program Director provides each student with a model roster upon acceptance. The model roster lists the courses needed for the MBA for each student.

Admission

The Admission Committee of the Full-time MBA Program is concerned with each applicant’s interest, aptitude, and potential for achievement in graduate business studies. The program is structured to accommodate students with various undergraduate degrees. Program applications are reviewed on a “rolling” basis. Students may enter the program in the fall, spring, and summer. All candidates must have completed a four-year undergraduate degree or its equivalent from an accredited institution of higher learning to qualify for admission. Formal work experience is not required.

Application Procedures and Deadlines

Although there are no formal application deadlines, it is recommended that all the information be received from U.S. students in the Office of Graduate Enrollment by August 1 for fall admission, December 15 for spring admission, and April 15 for summer admission. International students need to apply for the program at least two weeks earlier to allow sufficient time to process their paperwork.

All applicants must submit the following items directly to the Office of Graduate Enrollment:

  • Online application
  • Test scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). [La Salle’s school code for reporting scores from the GMAT is 548-KK-38. La Salle’s school code for reporting scores from the GRE is 2363.] The University does not accept scores directly from students. See information regarding GMAT/GRE requirements below.
  • Official transcripts from all institutions previously attended.

International Students

In addition to the requirements above, international candidates must also meet the following requirements.

  • Either take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and have their test scores forwarded to the Office of Graduate Enrollment by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), in Princeton, NJ. (1.800.257.9547)  [La Salle's school code for reporting scores from the TOEFL is 2363], or take the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) www.ielts.org.
  • Have their academic credentials from foreign institutions evaluated by World Education Services (WES.org) or a similar organization.
  • Once accepted into the program, submit a Statement of Financial Responsibility Form.

All documents should be submitted to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University—Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141-1199

215.951.1100 / Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Upon receipt of the documents above, candidates are interviewed by Skype or in person (whenever feasible) prior to final admission decisions.

Selection Criteria

Because each applicant’s background and profile are unique, the Admission Committee does not establish specific quantitative minimum requirements for admission; however, it does adhere to the accreditation standards established by the Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business.

The University's Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon an applicant’s qualifications.

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

La Salle University offers workshops for anyone interested in preparing for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). 

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) are designed to assess capabilities that are important in the study of management at the graduate level. The GMAT is sponsored and controlled by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) and is administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). ETS consults with this council on matters of general policy, develops test materials, administers the test, and conducts research projects aimed at improving the test.

Waiver of the GMAT Requirement

Applicants possessing a master’s or Ph.D. degree (or equivalent) may be considered for a GMAT/GRE waiver.

Applicants with an undergraduate business degree from an AACSB-accredited program who have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.2 or above are not required to complete the GMAT/ GRE exam for admission into the program.

TOEFL and IELTS

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are not required of applicants whose native language is English and applicants who have undergraduate degrees from universities in the United States, and applicants who studied at a foreign institution that offers classes in English. In addition, the test requirement may be waived in certain cases where English language proficiency can otherwise be demonstrated. The minimum scores for the TOEFL are: 230 computer-based score, and 88 Internet-based score. The minimum score for the IELTS is 6.5

Conditional Admission

A limited number of U. S. and resident alien students with at least a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher may be admitted into the program for one semester without GMAT or GRE test scores. Conditionally accepted students are required to successfully complete the GMAT or GRE by the end of their first enrolled semester.

International students are eligible for conditional admission; however, all their conditions must be met before an I-20 can be issued. Conditional admission can be offered for GMAT, GRE, TOEFL, and IELTS.

Transfer Credit

An applicant may request the transfer of graduate credit(s) earned at another AACSB institution. Each request will be evaluated on its own merits but must be a grade of “B” or better. No more than six hours of graduate credit in the Core, Specialization, and Executive Perspectives areas of the program will be accepted.

Curriculum

The structure of La Salle's Full-Time MBA Program is comprised of six areas: Basic Skills, Foundation, Core, Specialization, Executive Perspectives, and the Integrative Capstone. Students must complete between 34 and 47 credits to complete the MBA degree at La Salle University. The total number of credits required depends upon the student’s academic background.

Basic Skills

MBA 590 Professional Development Seminar
MBA 592 Written Communication Skills for Business

Foundation

The purpose of the Foundation area is to provide students with a functional knowledge of business theory in the context of decision-making and leadership skills. The following five courses (three credits each) are required but may be waived based on a student’s academic background:

MBA 610  Applied Economic Analysis
MBA 615  Financial Accounting: A User Focus
MBA 630  Financial Markets

The Core

The following courses (three credits each) provide students with practical applications for business leaders in the areas of marketing, accounting, and financial management:

MBA 690  Creating Customers Through Effective Marketing Management
MBA 691  Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning, and Control
MBA 692  Financial Performance: Control and Measurement
MBA 693  Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making

Specialization

All students select a specialization and are required to complete three 700-level courses in their specialization area. Students may select accounting, business systems and analytics, finance, management, marketing, or general business administration as their area of specialization.

Students who wish to design their own specialization select general business administration. One must choose any three courses in the 700 level of the program. This option provides the most flexibility in creating an MBA program tailored to a student's interests.

Students may elect to complete a dual-specialization as part of their MBA program. Since the variations are many, students meet with the Program Director to discuss what would be required for a dual-specialization.

Executive Perspectives

The following four courses (3 credits each) provide students with a greater understanding of what it means to lead ideas and people in an organization. Topics include assessing and developing one's leadership skills, learning how to use technology for managing the vast array of information sources available, and making appropriate decisions and understanding how the financial outlook of an organization might be effected by such decisions.

MBA 811  Leadership: Theories and Skill Development
MBA 820  Information Technology for Decision Making
MBA 830  Financial Statement Analysis
MBA 840 Frameworks For Socially Responsible Decision Making

Integrative Capstone
MBA 902  Competitive Strategy

Specialization

Students electing a specialization are required to complete three 700-level courses in one of the following areas.

  • Accounting
  • Business Systems and Analytics
  • Finance
  • General Business Administration
  • Management
  • Marketing

Descriptions of the specialization courses are listed under the Part-time MBA Program in the previous section.

Course Descriptions

The course descriptions for the majority of the courses offered in the Full-Time MBA are listed under the Part-Time MBA Program. The Courses specific to this program are MBA 590, MBA 592 and MBA 811. The descriptions for these courses are listed below: 

MBA 590: Professional Development Seminar

1 credit

This course focuses on career development and building a "Professional Skills Portfolio." The initial orientation toward building a resume and developing strategies to obtain a job provides the basis of continued career planning and professional growth. This course is offered in conjunction with MBA 811.

MBA 592: Written Communication Skills for Business

1 credit

Students will learn to plan, draft, revise, and edit documents (such as letters, memos, e-mails, executive summaries, proposals, and reports) required of them as professionals in a business environment.

MBA 811: Leadership: Theories and Skill Development

3 credits

This course reviews major leadership theories including trait theory, behavioral theories, contingency models, expectancy theory, path goal theory, transformational leadership, and servant leadership. The course also covers a series of in-depth exercises that address leadership skills including individual decision making, team decision making, nominal group technique, problem framing, negotiation, and managing organizational change. Students are expected to complete a written exam and a series of five short analytical papers.

Tuition and Fees

Online Application: Free
Tuition (per semester): $12,225
Technology Fee (per semester): $150
General University Fee (per semester): $100
Graduation Fee: $100

Scholarships

Merit Scholarships: Students in the Full-time MBA program are awarded partial scholarships based on their GPA and GMAT scores. Scholarships range from $1,000 to $3,000 per term.

Beta Gamma Sigma Tuition Discount: Beta Gamma Sigma students from all AACSB institutions worldwide are eligible for a 25% tuition discount. Eligible students should contact the program director as soon as their application is submitted.

 

Faculty and Staff

Dean: MarySheila McDonald, J.D.
Associate Dean: Patrick O’Brien, M.S.
Director, Full-time MBA Programs: Elizabeth Scofield, MBA
Professors: Borkowski, Jiang, Tavana, Schubert, Van Buskirk
Associate Professors: Ambrose, Cooper, Lafond, Szabat, Ugras
Assistant Professor: Radetskiy
Dean Emeritus & Assistant Professor: Bruce

Business Administration (One-Year)

Program Description

La Salle University's One-Year MBA program (OYMBA) is designed for recent graduates and those with working experience who are in various stages of their careers. The program offers majors in accounting, business systems and analytics, and finance. Students who elect to major in accounting must have an undergraduate degree in accounting. International and American students may receive partial scholarships awarded on merit. Work experience is not required.

La Salle’s internationally recognized program is accredited by the Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International), which less than 5 percent of business schools worldwide attain. La Salle's OYMBA students gain the professional and personal skills to be leaders in their fields.

Applicants from AACSB accredited programs who have a minimum overall GPA of 3.2 or above will be granted a GMAT/GRE waiver. Beta Gamma Sigma students from all AACSB institutions worldwide are eligible for a 25% tuition discount. Eligible students should contact the program director as soon as their application is submitted.

The program is ideal for students who are preparing to meet the 150-hour CPA requirement. Students majoring in finance take the managerial track or CFA track. Our CFA track is designed around developing the skill set necessary to become a Chartered Financial Analyst. 

La Salle's highly innovative curriculum uses half-credit to three-credit modules to provide a flexible, dynamic program. The modules focus on both traditional topics and current emerging topics. They are updated or replaced as trends evolve, ensuring that the curriculum keeps pace with the rapidly changing business environment.  

Reasons to Choose Lasallian Business:

  • Earn your MBA with a specialization in accounting , business systems and analytics, or finance in one year.
  • Join a program with a high rate of return on investment: exceptional placement  rates.
  • Participate in workshops, career fairs and networking events to enhance your international business etiquette skills and your job seeking skills.
  • Enjoy small classes with your classmates and professors and learn in the Lasallian tradition that blends academic theory with practice.
  • Prepare for the CPA or Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam.
  • Have the opportunity to participate in study tours in other countries with faculty.

Elizabeth Scofield, MBA
Director
215-951-1057
scofield@lasalle.edu

Goals and Objectives

Master of Business Administration

Strategic thinking through integrating discipline-specific business knowledge

  • Demonstrate the ability to integrate business disciplines to achieve strategic objectives.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and evaluate the usefulness of various competitive strategies (e.g., adaptive, market or entry, positioning) that firms use within domestic and global markets.

Leadership Skills

  • Demonstrates the ability to identify and analyze current leadership style and the ability to develop and enhance leadership skills
  • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team.

Business-related oral and written communication skills

  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver a professional presentation on a business issue.
  • Demonstrate the ability to write a clear, concise, and well-organized professional presentation of a business issue.

Awareness of how the business environment influences decision-making

  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and analyze ethical and legal business dilemmas and the ability to recommend and defend appropriate solutions and strategies.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how cultural, economic, and political factors shape the management of global business.

Knowledge and skill concerning financial analysis, reporting, and markets

  • Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the financial position of
    for-profit organizations through the examination of financial information contained in balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements, and footnotes, as well as information gathered from other sources (such as public filings, business news publications, and websites) in order to enable stakeholders (e.g., management, shareholders, or creditors) to understand a firm’s progress in maximizing its value to stakeholders.

Program Structure

Students who minored in business administration or have an undergraduate business degree are able to complete the program in 12 months. Applicants without a business degree enroll in pre-MBA Foundation courses at an additional cost. Pre-MBA courses are offered at La Salle University online: MBA 610, MBA 615 and MBA 630. Students may feel free to take these courses at other institutions and transfer the credit to La Salle. The One-Year MBA Program begins each year in the Fall Semester.

Admission

The Admission Committee of the One-Year MBA Program is concerned with each applicant’s interest, aptitude, and potential for achievement in graduate business studies. The program is structured to accommodate students with various undergraduate degrees. Students enter the program in the Fall Semester if they have a degree in business or in the spring and/or summer if they require pre-MBA courses. All candidates must have completed a four-year undergraduate degree or its equivalent from an accredited institution of higher learning to qualify for admission. Students majoring in accounting must have earned a degree in accounting. Formal work experience is not required.

Application Procedures and Deadlines

Although there are no formal application deadlines, it is recommended that all the information be received in the Office of Graduate Enrollment by July 31, for U.S. and Resident Alien students and July 1, for international students.

All applicants must submit the following items directly to the Office of Graduate Enrollment:

  • Online application.
  • Test scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). [La Salle’s school code for reporting scores from the GMAT is 548-KK-38. La Salle’s school code for reporting scores from the GRE is 2363.] The University does not accept scores directly from students. See information regarding GMAT/GRE requirements below.
  • Official transcripts from all institutions previously attended.

International Students

In addition to the requirements above, international candidates must meet these requirements:

  • Take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and have their test scores forwarded to the Office of Graduate Enrollment by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), Princeton, N.J., USA (1.800.257.9547). [La Salle's school code for reporting the TOEFL is 2363].The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) may be substituted for the TOEFL. See below for further information on these tests.
  • Have their academic credentials from foreign institutions evaluated by World Education Services (WES.org) or a similar organization.
  • Once accepted, Submit a Statement of Financial Responsibility Form, which may be obtained from the Multicultural and International Center at La Salle University

All documents should be submitted to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University—Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141-1199

215.951.1100 / Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Upon receipt of the documents above, candidates are interviewed by Skype or in person (whenever feasible) prior to final admission decisions.

Selection Criteria

Because each applicant’s background and profile is unique, the Admission Committee does not establish specific quantitative minimum requirements for admission. However, it does adhere to the accreditation standards established by the Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business.

The University's Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the Introduction section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon an applicant’s qualifications.

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

La Salle University offers workshops for anyone interested in preparing for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is designed to assess capabilities that are important in for study at the graduate level. The GMAT is sponsored and controlled by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) and is administered by Pearson/VUE.
For more information about the GMAT, visit www.mba.com. La Salle’s school code for the GMAT exam is 548-KK-16. Students are also permitted to submit their scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Waiver of the GMAT or GRE Requirement

Applicants possessing a master’s or Ph.D. degree (or equivalent) may be considered for a GMAT/GRE waiver.

Applicants with an undergraduate business degree from an AACSB-accredited program who have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.2 or above are not required to take the GMAT or GRE exam for admission into the program.

TOEFL and IELTS

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are not required of applicants whose native language is English, applicants who have undergraduate degrees from universities in the United States, or applicants who have degrees from universities outside the United States where the language of instruction is English. In addition, the test requirement may be waived in certain cases where English language proficiency can otherwise be demonstrated.

Conditional Admission

A limited number of U.S. and Resident Alien  students with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher may be admitted into the program for one semester without GMAT or GRE test scores. Conditionally accepted students are required to successfully complete the GMAT or GRE by the end of their first enrolled semester and are not eligible for financial aid loans until they are fully admitted.

International students are eligible for conditional admission; however, all their conditions must be met before an I-20 can be issued. Conditional Admission can be offered for the GMAT, GRE, TOEFL, and IELTS.

Transfer Credit

An applicant may request the transfer of credits for Foundation Courses earned at another institution. Each request will be evaluated on its own merits. Grades accepted for transfer must be "B" or better. A maximum of 9 credits will be accepted for transfer purposes.

Curriculum

 

Accounting Track

Accounting is often considered the “language of business,” because it is the core of any business organization. Accountants are responsible for communicating and interpreting financial information as a basis for strategic decision-making.

Our professors are teachers, mentors, and scholars. They are connected with businesses around the globe, they are savvy about the challenges and innovations in play in the marketplace. Our graduates leave La Salle ready to perform.

Students interested in becoming a CPA meet the 150-credit requirement.

Fall Semester

MBA 692  Financial Performance: Control and Measurement 3.0
MBA 693  Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making 3.0
ACC 750  Tax Strategy 1.5
ACC 770  Governmental and Non-profit Accounting 1.5
ACC 755  Advanced Tax Strategy for Accountants 1.5
ACC 749  Current Issues in Accounting 1.5

Spring Semester

MBA 591  Optional Travel Study This course is not required for graduation
MBA 592  Written Communication Skills for Business
MBA 690  Creating Customers through Effective Marketing Management 3.0 
MBA 811  Leadership: Theories and Skill Development 3.0
MBA 820  Information Technology for Decision Making 3.0
MBA 830  Financial Statement Analysis 3.0

Summer Semester

ACC 782   AIS and ERP Systems Accounting 3.0
MBA 840  Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making 3.0
MBA 902  Competitive Strategy 3.0

Total MBA credits for Accounting Track: 34/35 credits

Business Systems and Analytics Track

The business leaders of tomorrow face an exciting challenge. To innovate and prosper they need to solve problems and make informed decisions. Just as important, they need to manage technology and data.

La Salle’s Business Systems and Analytics option prepares students to do both. It prepares them for careers as business intelligence analysts, business applications consultants, data warehousing specialists, and sports analytics managers, to name a few.

Fall Semester

MBA 691  Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning, and Control 3.0
MBA 692  Financial Performance: Control and Measurement 3.0
MBA 820  Information Technology for Decision Making 3.0
BSA  720   Data Warehousing and Data Mining 3.0

Spring Semester

MBA 591    Optional Travel Study 1.0 This course is not required for graduation
MBA 592   Written Communications Skills for Business 1.0
MBA 690   Creating Customers through Effective Marketing Management 3.0
MBA 811   Leadership: Theories and Skill Development 3.0
MBA 830   Financial Statement Analysis 3.0
BSA  710   Systems Analysis and Database Design 3.0

Summer Semester

MBA 840  Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making 3.0
MBA 902  Competitive Strategy 3.0
BSA  790   Special Topics in Business Systems and Analytics 3.0

Total MBA credits for Business and Systems AnalyticsTrack: 34/35 credits

Investment Analysis Track (CFA) and the Managerial Finance Track

The Investment Analysis Track (CFA) is designed around developing the skill set necessary to become a Chartered Financial Analyst. Our Managerial Finance Track is designed to provide students with the financial and leadership skills necessary to succeed as finance professionals. Following this track, undergraduate accounting majors can also complete their 150-hour CPA requirements.

Fall Semester

ACC 750 Tax Strategy 1.5
MBA 691 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning and Control 3.0
MBA 693 Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making 3.0
FIN 754   Derivative Instruments 1.5
FIN 764   Portfolio Management 3.0

Spring Semester

MBA 591   Optional Travel Study 1.0 This course is not required for graduation
MBA 592   Written Communications Skills for Business 1.0
MBA 690   Creating Customers through Effective Marketing Management 3.0
FIN   746   Enterprise Risk Management (Managerial Finance Track) 3.0 or
FIN   783   Financial Analysis Seminar (CFA Track) 3.0
MBA 811   Leadership: Theories and Skill Development 3.0
MBA 820   Information Technology for Decision Making 3.0

Summer Semester

MBA 830   Financial Statement Analysis 3.0
MBA 840    Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making 3.0
MBA 902   Competitive Strategy 3.0
FIN 767     Mergers and Acquisitions 1.5
FIN XXX   Finance Elective 1.5

Total MBA credits for Finance Track =  37-38 credits

Tuition and Fees

Online Application: Free

The program has a single comprehensive tuition price of $41,900 for students who do not require the pre-MBA courses.

Students who require the pre-MBA courses will be charged $1,030 per credit for the courses they require, plus the General University Fee of $135, and the Technology fee of $150 if they enroll in 3-4 courses or $50 if they enroll in 1-2 courses. Students will be billed for the pre-MBA courses  during the semester they are taken, separately from their fall invoice.

Fees:

Technology Fee (per semester): $150
General University Fee (per semester): $135
Graduation Fee: $100

Scholarships

Merit Scholarships

Merit Scholarships: Students in the One-Year MBA program are awarded partial scholarships based on their GPA and GMAT/GRE scores. Scholarships range from $3,000 to $5,000 per year.

BGS Scholarships

Beta Gamma Sigma students from all AACSB institutions worldwide are eligible for a 25% tuition discount. Eligible students should contact the program director as soon as their application is submitted

 

Faculty and Staff

Dean: MarySheila McDonald, J.D.

Associate Dean: Patrick O’Brien, M.S.

Director, One-Year MBA Program: Elizabeth Scofield, MBA

Professors: Borkowski, Jiang, Schubert, Tavana, Van Buskirk

Associate Professors: Ambrose, Cooper, Lafond, Szabat, Ugras

Assistant Professor: Radetskiy

Dean Emeritus & Assistant Professor: Bruce

Course Descriptions

ACC 749 Current Issues in Accounting

This course provides graduate students with exposure to current issues in accounting that are not covered in other courses, or which have developed recently and are affecting the profession in practice.

Number of Credits: 1.5

ACC 750 Tax Strategy

This course is designed to review the choice of entities that exist and to develop a basic understanding of the parameters surrounding those entities.
Co-requisite: MBA 691

Number of Credits: 1.5

ACC 755 Advanced Tax Strategy For Accountants

This course is designed to review the formation, operation, and structuring of various business entities.

Number of Credits: 1.5

ACC 770 Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting

This course provides an introduction to, and understanding of, accounting and reporting for government and non-profit organizations. It includes a discussion of, and technical practice with, specific issues encountered by these entities. Such exposure allows students to minimize audit and enterprise risk when dealing with such entities in practice. Students will have hands-on assignments using actual U.S. county comprehensive accounting financial reports (CAFRs), current U.S. Federal Government and IRS reports, and a public university's financial statements

Number of Credits: 1.5

ACC 782 AIS and ERP Systems Accounting

This course offers an enhanced understanding of accounting information and enterprise resource planning systems, and is suitable for all MBAs. It includes hands-on experience with a traditional accounting system and with SAP, and weekly discussion of current topics, including privacy and security issues, disaster recovery, anti-fraud and audit resources, and XBRL.
Prerequisite: MBA 691 or equivalent

Number of Credits: 3.0

BSA 710 Systems Analysis and Database Design

This course is about structured analysis and design methodology for complex business systems. Students become familiar and use Entity Relationship Diagrams, Data Structure Diagrams, Data Flow Diagrams, Data Dictionaries, and Process Specifications to develop Systems Specifications. These specifications are utilized as the blueprint to develop and implement relational databases, and explore the Structured Query Language (SQL) used to manipulate and operate the database.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 693

BSA 720 Data Warehousing and Data Mining

This course focuses on data warehousing and data mining in organizations. Topics covered in the course include: data warehousing and mediation techniques aimed at integrating distributed, heterogeneous data sources; data mining techniques such as rule-based learning, decision trees, association rule mining, and statistical analysis for discovery of patterns in the integrated data; and evaluation and interpretation of the mined patterns using visualization techniques.
Prerequisite: MBA 693

Number of Credits: 3

BSA 790 Special Topics in Business Systems and Analytics

This course is designed to introduce students to one of several areas of emerging trends and technologies in Business Systems and Analytics. Students will learn the fundamental principles and concepts of analytics in a specific business domain and implement descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics tools and technologies that support data, information, and knowledge management in the area of study. Course titles include, but are not limited to, Accounting Analytics, Financial Analytics, Healthcare Analytics, Human Resources (HR) Analytics, Marketing Analytics, Sports Analytics, and Supply Chain Analytics among others. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite: MBA 693; other prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic.

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 746 Enterprise Risk Management (Managerial Track)

The course examines the risk management process as applied to the whole range of risks to which a corporation is exposed: financial, insurable, operational, and business. It focuses on risk in general and how multiple sources of risk can be addressed with strategies that integrate risk management and capital management. Specific topics include hedging, insurance, postloss investment, contingent capital, finite risk reinsurance, and insurance-linked securities. Emphasized throughout the course is that managing risk effectively is essential to corporate value, success, and survival.

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 748 Financial Instruments and Markets

This course provides an examination of modern financial markets. Specifically, we discuss the largest financial intermediaries including commercial banks, finance companies, securities firms, investment banks, mutual funds and hedge funds with a focus on balance sheet structures, regulation, and current issues and trends. We also examine various financial instruments, derivatives, and off-balance sheet activities that are useful from a risk-management perspective within the industry.
Prerequisite: FIN 692

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 754 Derivative Instruments

This course will introduce students to the world of financial and real derivatives analysis. The focus will be on options. Students will be introduced to option pricing and policy uses. In addition, the controversial issues of executive stock options, real options, and hedge fund policy will be explored. The course will evolve with the ever- changing derivatives market. The latest products and controversies will be examined.

Number of Credits: 1.5

FIN 764 Portfolio Management

The course focuses on current practice and recent theoretical developments. It deals with the characteristics of individual securities and portfolios, criteria and models for alternative portfolio composition, criteria for evaluation and measurement of performance, and the impact of government regulation. The evaluation of current theory, its significance for the financial management decision-making, and the consideration of relevant empirical evidence are covered.

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 765 Global Financial Management

Current developments in global financial markets and instruments from the perspective of firm management. Topics include an overview of foreign security markets, trends in foreign exchange risk management, and the impact of international debt on multinational firms.
Prerequisite: MBA 692

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 767 Mergers and Acquisitions

The course provides an analysis of the acquisition by one firm of all or some of the assets of another firm, and its impact on both the companies involved and on society. Topics include a discussion of the types of combinations, the motivations of the participants, the financial analysis required to carry out merger or acquisition activities, negotiation strategies, and the tax and accounting options that are available to the parties involved.

Number of Credits: 1.5

FIN 783 Financial Analysis Seminar (Investment Analysis Track: CFA)

This seminar is an integrative course that links corporate finance, financial statement analysis and investment analysis. Students taking the course will be prepared to take the CFA I exam (Chartered Financial Analyst).

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 592 Written Communication Skills for Business

Students will learn to plan, draft, revise, and edit documents (such as letters, memos, e-mails, executive summaries, proposals, and reports) required of them as professionals in a business environment.

Number of Credits: 1

MBA 690 Creating Customers Through Effective Marketing Management

The course shows how the techniques of marketing management can be used to attract and satisfy customers while building long-term business profitability. Topics include (1) market, consumer, and competitive analysis; (2) segmentation, targeting, and positioning; (3) product development, pricing, promotion, and distribution; and (4) marketing strategy and planning.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 691 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning, and Control

This course focuses on the firm's management accounting system as its primary information system. It examines the problems of cost measurement, planning, coordination, control, and performance evaluation. It explores how accounting systems address business problems and evolve in response to the changing economic environment. The course will relate ethical and global issues to managerial accounting topics. The students will explore and analyze "real world" data and apply their gained knowledge to contemporary managerial accounting and cases.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 692 Financial Performance Control and Measurement

This is a survey course focusing on how managers can construct a decision-making process that maximizes the value of the firm. Because the majority of financial decisions require an estimate of future events, considerable time will be spent investigating how to achieve the above objectives, subject to the constraints of an uncertain future. Outside readings, case studies, and text material will be used to integrate current financial theory with pragmatic financial decision making. A working knowledge of the basic concepts in finance, accounting, and statistics is assumed. The use of an electronic spreadsheet is needed for homework assignments and case analysis.

MBA 693 Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making

This course introduces students to the growing field of business analytics. Business analytics is the use of data, information technology, statistical analysis, and quantitative methods and models to support effective organizational problem solving and informed decision making. The course includes methods, tools, and techniques for summarizing and visualizing historical data, which is relevant to descriptive analytics – the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; methods, tools, and techniques for extracting information from existing data in order to determine patterns, which is relevant to predictive analytics – the use of data to find out what will happen in the future; and methods, tools, and techniques for optimization, which is relevant to prescriptive analytics - the use of data to determine the best course of action in the future.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 698 Global Business Concepts

This course is designed to familiarize students with the multiple environments in which international business must operate and focuses on how business strategy is affected by political, legal, economic, cultural, social, competitive and technological conditions in various national markets.

Number of Credits: 1.5

MBA 811 Leadership: Theories and Skill Development

This course reviews major leadershhip theories including trait theory,behavioral theories, contingency models, expectancy theory, path goal theory, transformational leadership, and servant leadership. The course also covers a series of in-depth exercises that address leadership skills including individual decision making, team decision making, nominal group technique, problem framing, negotiation, and managing organizational change. Students are expected to complete a written exam and a series of five short analytical papers.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 820 Information Technology for Decision Making

This course is about the manager's responsibilities for problem solving and decision making, and those areas in which information technology can be used to gain the insight needed to support selection of decision alternatives. Students learn about the role of data, information, and knowledge in managerial problem solving and decision making. Transactional processing and database management systems (DBMS) are used to store, manage, and retrieve data in organizations. Decision support system (DSS) tools and technologies (such as natural language programming and influence diagramming) are used to organize data into information for decision analytics.Expert systems (ES) are used to synthesize information into knowledge for knowledge management. Students are required to use DBMS, DSS and ES software packages in a hands-on environment.

MBA 830 Financial Statement Analysis

This course integrates the areas of finance and accounting and is designed to provide students with the ability to analyze financial statements, understand the incentives of companies to "manage" earnings through their choices of accounting methods, understand the limitations to the usefulness of financial statements, and understand the value of financial statements in decision-making from the perspective of investors, creditors and management.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 692

MBA 840 Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making

This course is designed to explore the complex ethical, legal, cultural, political, social and economic issues confronting individuals, groups, and organizations. We will us various models and theories to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills to address the issues of a diverse set of organizational stakeholders.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 902 Competitive Strategy

This integrative capstone course is designed to expose students to strategies that companies use to build and sustain competitive advantage in the global market. The course provides students with industry, competitor, and business level analytic tools that help students to assess factors that influence strategy formulation and strategy implementation in both domestic and global markets.

Number of Credits: 3

Business Administration (Online)

Program Description

La Salle University provides an innovative Master of Business Administration Program that enables students to develop and strengthen the leadership skills and functional knowledge necessary for the advancement of their current careers and life goals. It is a program where experienced people from diverse professional backgrounds come together to connect, collaborate and learn.

The La Salle MBA curriculum is delivered in a fully online program, which provides working professionals with greater flexibility and convenience as they move through the program. We have developed a learning experience that leverages the latest teaching and learning technologies to deliver an environment to deepen our students’ understanding of business and markets, and improve their decision making skills. With the Lasallian emphasis on the value and impact of personalized interactions among professors and classmates, our students are fully engaged in their education.

La Salle’s online MBA program teaches our students the application of the latest analytical thinking and facilitates the development of their professional and people-oriented skills. In the virtual classroom, our faculty stress the interaction of theoretical knowledge with practical experience and shared ideas. They also challenge our MBA students to maximize their “natural” resources for success. Our professors are committed to the Lasallian tradition of teaching, which means being accessible, focusing on the individual, and contributing to a sense of community.

La Salle understands the lifestyles of its MBA students and is committed to making sure it is as easy as possible to register for courses, meet with a professor or take a semester off, if necessary.

The School of Business and the MBA Programs, including the Online MBA, are accredited by the most prestigious worldwide business school accrediting organization AACSB International, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. 

John Farrell
Director
215.991.2985
farrellj@lasalle.edu

Nicole Blair
Associate Director
215.438.6676
blairn@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/mba

If you have any questions regarding the online MBA program, please contact: mba@lasalle.edu or visit our website www.lasalle.edu/mba.

Admission

The Admission Committee of the MBA Program is concerned with each applicant’s interest, aptitude, and potential for achievement in graduate business studies. The structure of the program lends itself to those students with or without an undergraduate degree in business.

Before an applicant will be evaluated, applicants must submit the following information:

  1. Application form
  2. Official transcripts from all schools attended
  3. Test scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or, with permission of the Director, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
  4. Professional resume

Based on prior academic and/or professional success, the admission requirement to take the GMAT/GRE may be waived or deferred. Please see section below “Waiver of GMAT or GRE.”

All documents should be submitted to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University—Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141-1199

215.951.1100 / Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Because each applicant’s background and profile is unique, the Admission Committee does not establish specific quantitative minimum requirements for admission; the admission committee’s decisions are based on an evaluation of many factors to determine a student’s potential for success in the MBA program.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon an applicant’s qualifications.

International Students

In addition to the requirements above, international candidates are required to:

  • Take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and have their test scores forwarded to the Office of Graduate Enrollment at La Salle University
  • Take the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) and have their test scores forwarded to the Office of Graduate Enrollment at La Salle University.
  • Have their academic credentials from foreign institutions evaluated course-by-course by World Education Services (wes.org) or a similar organization. The evaluation must be sent to La Salle directly by this third party. The evaluation is required to process the application.

Note: The TOEFL and IELTS exams are not required when the applicant can demonstrate proficiency, has an undergraduate degree from a university in the United States or an institution in another country where English is the language of instruction. The minimum scores for the TOEFL are: 230 computer-based score, and 88 Internet based score. The minimum score for the IELTS is 6.0.

Upon receipt of the documents above, candidates may be interviewed by phone or internet-based conferencing Skype prior to final admission decisions.

Application Deadlines

There five application deadlines throughout the year, as admissions to the program are made throughout the year. They occur 10 business days before the start of each term. However, we recommend that all application documents including official transcripts be received as soon as possible. The start of each term is provided on the academic calendar.

Conditional Admission

Is not available for online MBA students.

Waiver of GMAT or GRE Requirement

Applicants with an undergraduate business degree from an AACSB-accredited program who have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.2 or above are not required to complete the GMAT or GRE exam for admission into the program.

The GMAT (or GRE) may be waived for applicants if a student meets the one of the following:

  • Have an undergraduate business degree from an AACSB-accredited University and have:
    • An overall GPA of 3.2 or above,
    • An overall GPA of 3.0 or above and 3 years of professional experience, or
    • More than 5 years of professional experience.
  • Hold a CFA Charter or CPA license or have passed the CPA or CFA certifying exams.
  • Earned master’s degree or higher from a graduate program accredited program in its discipline

The GMAT/GRE can be deferred and eventually waived if an applicant has graduated with a 3.0 GPA in any undergraduate discipline and has at least 2 years of business experience. These students take up to four (4) courses in the program. If the student achieves a B- or better in each course and an overall GPA of 3.3, the GMAT/GRE will be waived.

Transfer Credit

An applicant may request the transfer of graduate credit(s) earned at another AACSB-accredited institution prior to being admitted to the La Salle MBA program. Each request will be evaluated on its own merits, but the student must have received a grade of “B” or better for the course to be considered for transfer. No more than six hours of graduate credit hours (in total for the program) can be transferred.

Transferred specialization courses will only count towards fulfilling the General Business Administration Specialization requirements, as the specializations of Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Business Systems and Analytics and Management are only granted for courses completed at La Salle University. 

Curriculum

Students must complete between 33 and 39 credits to achieve the MBA degree in the online format at La Salle University. The total number of credits required depends upon the student’s academic and professional backgrounds.

MBA Math

Students who score below the 25th percentile on the quantitative part of the GMAT exam or have insufficient background in business, accounting, finance and economics will need to take MBA Math. This self-paced, online quantitative skills course is designed with 10 lessons covering basic quantitative skills in finance, economics and spreadsheets.  Students who are required to take MBA 602 Financial Markets must take the MBA Math course.  MBA Math must be completed within a student’s first term in the program.

Foundation

The purpose of the Foundation area is to provide students with a functional knowledge of business theory and fundamentals in the context of decision-making and leadership skills. The following two courses (1.5 credits each) are required, but may be waived based on a student’s academic and professional backgrounds.

MBA 601 Financial Accounting
MBA 602 Financial Markets

The Core

The following courses (3 credits each) provide students with the theoretical basis and practical applications of marketing, accounting, business analytics and financial management. Through the use of a variety of analytical, problem-solving approaches to business problems, the Core courses expose the students to both the needed depth of analyses and broad business perspectives required for operational, financial and strategic decision making.

MBA 690 Creating Customers through Effective Marketing Management
MBA 691 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning, and Control
MBA 692 Financial Performance: Control and Measurement
MBA 693 Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making

Specialization

All students will select a specialization and are required to complete three 700-level courses in the specialization area. Specialization offerings have been determined by student interest and market need. The courses for each of the six specializations are outlined below:

Accounting
ACC 782 Accounting Information and ERP Systems
ACC 791 Decision-making Using Management Accounting
ACC 792 Applying Research Skills to Contemporary Accounting Issues

Business Systems and Analytics
BSA 710 Systems Analysis and Database Design
BSA 720 Data Warehousing and Data Mining
BSA 790 Special Topics in Business Systems and Analytics

Finance
FIN 748 Financial Instruments and Markets
FIN 764 Portfolio Management
FIN 765 Global Financial Management

Management
MGT 760
 Human Resource Management
MGT 765 Irrational Decision Making
MGT 790 Special Topics in Management and Leadership

Marketing
MKT 730 Strategic Marketing Intelligence
MKT 732 Consumer Behavior
MKT 790 Special Topics in Marketing

General Business Administration
To complete a General Business Administration specialization, students can take three courses from the courses listed above.

Executive Perspectives

The following courses (3 credits each) provide students with a greater understanding of leading people and organizations. Topics include: assessing and developing one’s leadership and managerial skills;  learning how to use technology for managing the vast array of date and information sources; applying the appropriate analytical tools and business factors in making business decisions and evaluating their financial impact; and developing the business, human resource and organizational perspectives needed by executives as they make both strategic and operational decisions.

MBA 810 Self-Assessment for Leadership
MBA 820 Information Technology for Decision Making
MBA 830 Financial Statement Analysis
MBA 840 Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making

Integrative Capstone

The following course (3 credits) is taken the final year of the program. This course provides the opportunity to integrate what has been learned in the Core, Specialization, and Executive Perspective courses while adding global perspectives and reinforcing the ethical dimensions  of decision making needed for success in business today.

MBA 902 Competitive Strategy

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition and Assistance

There are loan programs available for online graduate students. Information about financial aid and the application forms may be obtained from Student Financial Services, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141 or by calling 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Dean: MarySheila McDonald, J.D.

Director: John Farrell

Associate Director: Nicole Blair, M.B.A., M.S.

Professors: Barenbaum, Borkowski, Buch, George, Jiang, Meisel, Miller, Mshomba, Robison, Schubert, Seltzer, Smither, Talaga (Emeritus), Tavana, Van Buskirk, Welsh (Emeritus)

Associate Professors: Ambrose, Chia, Cooper, Jones, Kennedy, Leauby, Paulin, Rhoda, Szabat, Walsh, Wentzel

Assistant Professors: Brazina, G. Bruce, DiPietro, Dynan, Fitzgerald, Gauss, Massimini, Pierce, Plump, Zook

Lecturers: Anderson, Blohm, R. Bruce, Carey, Cerenzio, Crossen, Cruikshank, Falcone, Finnegan, Goldner, Harris, Horan, G. Kochanski, M. Kochanski, Kvint, Lang, Leh, McElroy, Mallon, Market, Mullan, O’Neill, Otten, Planita, Richter, Sable, Sargen, Schaefer, Schwab, Sherlock, Simons, Truitt, Walters, Wong

Course Descriptions

ACC 704 Financial Accounting Theory and Current Practices

This course emphasizes the perspective of preparers of financial statements covering financial statement preparation with an emphasis on the areas of financial accounting that are problematic, including revenue recognition, expense allocation, inventories, post-employment benefits, leases, and stock options.
Prerequisite: MBA 615

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 761 Taxation for Business Planning and Investing

The course is an integration of financial theory and taxation to enable students to develop the ability to translate tax outcomes into cash flows. The course perspective is on using an understanding of taxes in the planning process, not on compliance. Students learn the framework of the current tax system, evaluate tax laws on the basis of both equity and efficiency, and learn the social policy implications of the tax system. Topics include fundamentals of tax planning, measurement of taxable income, choosing business entities, corporate and individual taxation, compensation and retirement planning, and investing and personal finance issues.

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 772 Auditing

The course is a conceptual study of the audit process with applied aspects of the discipline. It relates and compares the role and responsibility of management to that of the independent certified public accountant. It presents generally accepted auditing standards, basic audit methodology, and procedures with an emphasis on the study and evaluation of internal control. The course culminates with an in-depth analysis of the auditor's opinion.
Prerequisite: ACC 704 or equivalent.

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 780 Applied Research in Accounting

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.

Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

ACC 782 Accounting Information and ERP Systems

This course offers an enhanced understanding of accounting information and enterprise resource planning systems, and is suitable for all MBAs. It includes hands-on experience with a traditional accounting system and with SAP, and weekly discussion of current topics, including privacy and security issues, disaster recovery, anti-fraud and audit resources, and XBRL.
Prerequisite: MBA 691 or equivalent

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 790 Special Topics in Accounting

This course will explore a topic of contemporary interest related to accounting. Topics will vary and may include Decision-Making Using Management Accounting, Applying Research Skills to Contemporary Accounting Issues; and Fraud and Forensic Accounting. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite: MBA 615; other prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic.

Number of Credits: 3

BSA 710 Systems Analysis and Database Design

This course is about structured analysis and design methodology for complex business systems. Students become familiar and use Entity Relationship Diagrams, Data Structure Diagrams, Data Flow Diagrams, Data Dictionaries, and Process Specifications to develop Systems Specifications. These specifications are utilized as the blueprint to develop and implement relational databases, and explore the Structured Query Language (SQL) used to manipulate and operate the database.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 693

BSA 720 Data Warehousing and Data Mining

This course focuses on data warehousing and data mining in organizations. Topics covered in the course include: data warehousing and mediation techniques aimed at integrating distributed, heterogeneous data sources; data mining techniques such as rule-based learning, decision trees, association rule mining, and statistical analysis for discovery of patterns in the integrated data; and evaluation and interpretation of the mined patterns using visualization techniques.
Prerequisite: MBA 693

Number of Credits: 3

BSA 780 Applied Research in Business Systems and Analytics

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

BSA 785 Business Intelligence And Knowledge Management

This course develops a basic understanding of fundamental tools and technologies used to exploit potential intelligence hidden in routinely collected data in organizations. Business intelligence topics include: identifying sources of information for business intelligence, competitor analysis, environmental scanning, and business forecasting. The course also develops the basic knowledge to convert this acquired intelligence into a set of business rules for implementation in a rule-based, knowledge-based system. Knowledge Management tools include applied artificial intelligence, knowledge acquisition and validation, knowledge representation, inferencing, and expert system building processes and tools.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 693

BSA 790 Special Topics in Business Systems and Analytics

This course is designed to introduce students to one of several areas of emerging trends and technologies in Business Systems and Analytics. Students will learn the fundamental principles and concepts of analytics in a specific business domain and implement descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics tools and technologies that support data, information, and knowledge management in the area of study. Course titles include, but are not limited to, Accounting Analytics, Financial Analytics, Healthcare Analytics, Human Resources (HR) Analytics, Marketing Analytics, Sports Analytics, and Supply Chain Analytics among others. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite: MBA 693; other prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic.

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 746 Enterprise Risk Management

The course examines the risk management process as applied to the whole range of risks to which a corporation is exposed: financial, insurable, operational, and business. It focuses on risk in general and how multiple sources of risk can be addressed with strategies that integrate risk management and capital management. Specific topics include hedging, insurance, post-loss investment, contingent capital, finite risk reinsurance, and insurance-linked securities. Emphasized throughout the course is that managing risk effectively is essential to corporate value, success, and survival.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 692

FIN 748 Financial Instruments and Markets

This course provides an examination of modern financial markets. Specifically, we discuss the largest financial intermediaries including commercial banks, finance companies, securities firms, investment banks, mutual funds and hedge funds with a focus on balance sheet structures, regulation, and current issues and trends. We also examine various financial instruments, derivatives, and off-balance sheet activities that are useful from a risk-management perspective within the industry.
Prerequisite: FIN 692

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 765 Global Financial Management

Current developments in global financial markets and instruments from the perspective of firm management. Topics include an overview of foreign security markets, trends in foreign exchange risk management, and the impact of international debt on multinational firms.
Prerequisite: MBA 692

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 780 Applied Research in Finance

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

FIN 783 Financial Analysis Seminar

This seminar covers the breadth of material included in the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA I) exam. It includes CFA I mock exams and students are encouraged to sit for Level I of the CFA exam at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: MBA692, MBA830, FIN764 and a minimum graduate GPA of 3.5 or permission of the instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 790 Special Topics in Finance

These courses will explore topics of contemporary interest. Course titles include, but are not limited to Trends in Employee Benefit Planning, and Speculative Market Analysis, among others. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite: MBA692

Number of Credits: 3

MBA Math

This self-paced, online quantitative skills course is designed with 24 lessons covering basic quantitative skills in finance, accounting, economics, statistics, and spreadsheets. This course is required for students who score below the 25th percentile on the quantitative section of the GMAT exam or cannot demonstrate thorught their academic or professional background a level the appropriate level of quantative skills to be successful in the program.

Number of Credits: not for credit

How Offered: Online

MBA 601 Financial Accounting

This course is an introductory study of financial accounting. This includes the study of basic accounting language and concepts, recording financial transactions and preparation of financial statements. Reporting and analyzing operating income, operating assets and owner financing is also emphasized.

Number of Credits: 1.5

MBA 602 Financial Markets

This course serves as an introduction to the financial system and its relationship to the financing of domestic and international business activity. Financial market components and phenomena such as financial instruments, institutions, flow of funds, market efficiency, interest rate determination and term structure, exchange rates, and governmental policy are analyzed.

Number of Credits: 1.5

MBA 610 Applied Economic Analysis

This course is designed to teach the principles of both micro and macro economics and to help the students understand the economic events that shape the world, markets and businesses. The course develops students' abilities to interpret how businesses form and operate under various market situations. Topics such as supply and demand, elasticity, relevant cost definition and relationships, profit optimization, market characteristics and long-run profitability implications, resource costing, and global market competitive responses are studied. The course further examines the role and activities of the various economic sectors consisting of households, businesses, and governments, and how those actions impact the state of the economy. The roles of government and the Federal Reserve are evaluated and their impact examined.  Topics such as Gross Domestic Product, economic growth, inflation, unemployment, fiscal policy, monetary policy, banking, international trade, and exchange rates are studied.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 615 Financial Accounting: A User Focus

This course is an introductory study of financial accounting. It includes the study of basic accounting language and concepts, recording financial transactions, preparation and interpretation of financial statements, accounting methods, business decisions, inventory valuations, and methods of obtaining capital.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 630 Financial Markets

This course serves as an introduction to the financial system and its relationship to the financing of domestic and international business activity. Financial market components and phenomena such as financial instruments, institutions, flow of funds, market efficiency, interest rate determination and term structure, exchange rates, and the balance of payments are analyzed. The governmental impact on financial markets, manifested through monetary and fiscal policy and regulation, is also covered. An introduction is given to the concept of financial asset valuation and the time value of money. The emphasis is on the significance of these elements for conducting the financial affairs of businesses.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 690 Creating Customers Through Effective Marketing Management

The course shows how the techniques of marketing management can be used to attract and satisfy customers while building long-term business profitability. Topics include (1) market, consumer, and competitive analysis; (2) segmentation, targeting, and positioning; (3) product development, pricing, promotion, and distribution; and (4) marketing strategy and planning.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 691 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning, and Control

This course focuses on the firm’s management accounting system as its primary information system. It examines the problems of cost measurement, planning, coordination, control, and performance evaluation. It explores how accounting systems address business problems and evolve in response to the changing economic environment. The course will relate ethical and global issues to managerial accounting topics. The students will explore and analyze “real world” data and apply their gained knowledge to contemporary managerial accounting problems and cases.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 615

MBA 692 Financial Performance: Control and Measurement

This is a survey course focusing on how managers can construct a decision-making process focusing on maximizing the value of the firm. Because the majority of financial decisions require an estimate of future events, considerable time will be spent investigating how to achieve the above objectives, subject to the constraints of an uncertain future. Outside readings, case studies, and text material will be used to integrate current financial theory with pragmatic financial decision making. A working knowledge of the basic concepts in finance, accounting, and statistics is assumed. The use of an electronic spreadsheet is needed for homework assignments and case analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 615, MBA 630, and Completion of MBA Math (if not waived).

MBA 693 Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making

This course introduces students to the growing field of business analytics. Business analytics is the use of data, information technology, statistical analysis, and quantitative methods and models to support effective organizational problem solving and informed decision making. The course includes methods, tools, and techniques for summarizing and visualizing historical data, which is relevant to descriptive analytics – the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; methods, tools, and techniques for extracting information from existing data in order to determine patterns, which is relevant to predictive analytics – the use of data to find out what will happen in the future; and methods, tools, and techniques for optimization, which is relevant to prescriptive analytics - the use of data to determine the best course of action in the future.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Completion of online Math Assessment (if not waived).

MBA 810 Developing Your Leadership Skills

This experiential course emphasizes the importance of feedback and self- assessment for leadership development. It includes extensive assessment of each participant's management style and skills based on self-evaluations (using structured questionnaires, decision making exercises, and role plays) and feedback from coworkers, faculty, and other participants. It includes a full day assessment workshop. Leadership development experiences emphasize time and stress management, individual and group problem-solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, and team leadership. Each participant identifies skills he or she needs to develop and reports on efforts to develop those skills.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 820 Information Technology for Decision-Making

This course is about the manager's responsibilities for problem solving and decision making, and those areas in which information technology can be used to gain the insight needed to support selection of decision alternatives. Students learn about the role of data, information, and knowledge in managerial problem solving and decision making. Transactional processing and database management systems (DBMS) are used to store, manage, and retrieve data in organizations. Decision support system (DSS) tools and technologies (such as natural language programming and influence diagramming) are used to organize data into information for decision analytics. Expert systems (ES) are used to synthesize information into knowledge for knowledge management. Students are required to use DBMS, DSS and ES software packages in a hands-on environment.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 830 Financial Statement Analysis

This course integrates the areas of finance and accounting and is designed to provide students with the ability to analyze financial statements, understand the incentives of companies to "manage" earnings through their choices of accounting methods, understand the limitations to the usefulness of financial statements, and understand the value of financial statements in decision-making from the perspective of investors, creditors and management.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 692

MBA 840 Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making

This course is designed to explore the complex ethical, legal, cultural, political, social, and economic issues confronting individuals, groups, and organizations. We will use various models and theories to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills to address the issues of a diverse set of organizational stakeholders.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: All required foundation courses

MGT 730 Nonprofit Management

This course provides an examination of the management, operations and governance principles and practices of nonprofits in the United States. A large part of this examination focuses on a comparison of and contrast with the for-profit sector as students seek to burst myths, find commonalities, and identify practices from each sector that, if shared, could make both sectors stronger.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 732 (Pending Approval) Managing Effective Teams

Teams have become part of the landscape in most organizations. This course will explore the factors involved in creating and maintaining high performance teams. It will look at issues of teamwork, virtual teams, group dynamics, and problems in developing effective teams, and will provide frameworks and tools for improving team performance. It will discuss both being an effective team member and team leader.
Prerequisite: MBA 810

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 736 Designing Effective Organizational Structures

This course examines various factors that managers should consider when structuring (or restructuring) their organizations, including employees' skill levels and engagement, as well as the organization's size, external environment, competitive strategy, international expansion, technologies, and alliances with other organizations. It also explores the impact that managers' own values and preferences have on the creation of control systems and structures, and on employees' reactions to them. Case assignments require students to apply what they have learned to improve organizational functioning.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 739 Managing Cultural Diversity in the Workplace

This course is designed to teach students how to manage the growing multicultural workforce in the United States. Students will be exposed to the basic concepts and issues of intercultural communication and cross-cultural relations; explore the challenges that managing cultural diversity presents to organizations and individuals associated with them; gain awareness of the issues related to ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, and ageism; develop an understanding and appreciation for people from Hispanic and Asian cultures; discuss current techniques used in cultural analysis; and read and evaluate research in the field of cultural diversity.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 742 Organizational Communication

The course examines organizational communication theories and applications, including issues of organizational climate, the information environment, public communication, and strategies for the development of appropriate communication systems. The course includes student analysis of specific workplace communication networks.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 743 Entrepreneurship

The course looks at fundamental capitalism from its basic unit of new business formation. Special challenges in sensing opportunity, risk evaluation and control, pressure vs. gratification, professional and personal support systems, confidence, and judgment are studied in cases and lectures. Basic capital formation and deployment, growth planning, and self-employed career development are emphasized in a management context.
Prerequisite: MBA 630

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 744 Power and Influence

This course is designed to provide a realistic understanding of individual and organizational power issues. It will help students to produce constructive outcomes for themselves and their organizations. The assignments are designed to help make sense of personal and organizational experiences and will provide additional insight into a student's power orientation and personal influence strategies. The course will be delivered through lectures, in-person and online discussions, collaborative online learning events, and in-person experiential learning.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 752 Managerial Skills Laboratory

This course provides an opportunity for self-assessment and improvement of the skills critical to an effective manager. The design of the course promotes interaction between students and active participation in classroom activities. The objective is to learn conceptual versatility and behavioral techniques that can be practiced in the laboratory setting then applied in a work situation. The course schedule for the Skills Lab is over 4 days (two full weekends) plus a Friday evening follow-up session, and full participation is required. Because of this compressed time frame, there is no hybrid or other online component to this course
Prerequisite: MBA 810

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 760 Human Resource Management

This survey course provides an overview of the major areas of human resource management, including HR strategy and planning, EEO laws, job analysis and competency models, recruiting, selection, training, performance appraisal and management, job design, compensation, benefits, and labor relations. The focus is on both the line manager's and the human resource professional's role in creating a culture that attracts, rewards, and retains the talent necessary to ensure a business' success.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 765 Irrational Decision Making

This course will examine research from behavioral economics, psychology, marketing, and other disciplines to examine the many forces that lead managers to systematically make irrational decisions in business. Students will examine a variety of factors that lead to making irrational decisions including, but not limited to, relativity, anchors, zero cost, arousal, ownership, and diagnosis bias. Students will hunt for instances of irrational decision making in their workplace, the general world of business, and daily life. They will use the frameworks provided in the course to diagnose the causes of these irrational decisions and recommend how they can be reduced or eliminated.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 769 Human Resource Development

This course reviews a variety of approaches to developing human resources in organizations. There is special emphasis on needs analysis as well as on the design, delivery, and evaluation of training programs or development initiatives. The role of performance and behavioral feedback in development is also discussed. The course includes hands-on experience in the design of training programs or development initiatives. Students may also examine special topics (for example, Web-based training, coaching, expatriate training, or executive development).

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 780 Applied Research in Management and Leadership

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

MGT 790 Special Topics in Management and Leadership

This course will explore a topic of contemporary interest related to management and leadership. Topics will vary and may include Performance Management: Challenges, Trends, and Controversies; Conflict and Negotiations; What Every Business Student Should Know about Workplace Rights and Responsibilities; and Managing by Design. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic.

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 720 Advanced Digital Marketing Strategies

This course provides students with the most up-to-date and comprehensive overview of major digital marketing channels and platforms – Search Engine, Digital Display, Video, Mobile, and Social Media. It will teach students how to conceptualize and integrate digital marketing into a firm’s overall marketing efforts. Students will complete the course with in-depth knowledge of and experience with how to develop an integrated digital marketing strategy, from formulation to implementation, and students will also learn how to measure digital marketing efforts and calculate Return on Investment.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 690

MKT 730 Strategic Marketing Intelligence

This course introduces today's most valuable marketing research and analytics methods and tools and offers a best-practice methodology for successful implementation. Hands on projects and case studies provide students an opportunity to apply the marketing research and analytics techniques for solving key problems ranging from product development, segmentation, pricing, campaign management, brand valuation, and digital marketing strategy.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 732 Consumer Behavior

The course examines the social, cultural, psychological, and economic influences on consumer behavior. It looks at the applications of behavioral science principles to the development of marketing strategies.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 734 Advertising and Promotion Management

The course focuses on the study and practical application of the analysis, planning, control, and decision-making activities involved in the promotional process. Topics include objective setting, budgeting, persuasion and attitude change, copy and media decisions, sales promotion programs, and the evaluation of marketing effectiveness.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 739 International Marketing

This course offers a managerial view of the marketing function as it applies to the international field, describing and exploring the complexities, problems, and opportunities of worldwide marketing.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 780 Applied Research in Marketing

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

MKT 790 Special Topics in Marketing

This course will explore a topic of contemporary interest related to Marketing. Topics will vary and may include Product Innovation and Design Thinking, Services Marketing, Sales Management and Leadership, and Travel Study. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic. Prerequisite: MBA 690; other prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic

Number of Credits: 3

Business Administration (Part-Time Hybrid)

Program Description

La Salle University provides an innovative Master of Business Administration Program that enables students to develop and strengthen the leadership skills and functional knowledge necessary for the advancement of their current careers and life goals. It is a program where experienced people from diverse professional backgrounds come together in contemporary classroom setting to integrate their broad range of professional experience with theoretical knowledge.

The part-time MBA program is structured in a Hybrid format which allows working professionals greater flexibility and convenience as they move through the program. Each course is delivered 50% online and 50% in the classroom. By leveraging the latest teaching and learning technologies, the educational experience reflects the ways in which companies operate today. This new approach creates an effective educational experience for working professionals attending as part time students.

La Salle’s part-time MBA program is:

  • Innovative – Students learn and apply the latest business thinking in highly interactive courses. The combination of online and in-person learning and skill development parallels the ways in which professionals learn today.
  • Flexible – The program provides students with face-to-face and meaningful interaction with their instructors and classmates and gives our students significant flexibility to balance the demands of their professional, personal, and educational lives.
  • Invaluable – La Salle’s MBA program provides outstanding graduate business education in a unique learning environment. Throughout the program, students are continuously developing skills and acquiring knowledge that can be applied immediately in the workplace and serve as a foundation for long-term career success. 
  • Collaborative Learning – The program facilitates students working together and networking with a diverse group of peers from a range of industries, including financial services, manufacturing, healthcare, telecommunications, supply chain, nonprofit, and government.

La Salle understands the lifestyles of its MBA students and is committed to making sure that it is as easy as possible to register for courses, meet with a professor before class, or take a semester off, if necessary. The MBA is offered at three convenient locations: Main Campus in Northwest Philadelphia; the Bucks County Center in Newtown, Pa.; and the Montgomery County Center at the Victory Plaza in Plymouth Meeting, PA. 

La Salle’s MBA faculty challenge students to maximize their “natural” resources for success. The part-time hybrid nature of this program brings students in direct contact with other business professionals, creating a classroom experience that blends current business theory with practical, hands-on instruction. The faculty stress the interaction of theoretical knowledge with practical experience and shared ideas, which facilitates the application of their learning to the workplace. Professors are committed to the Lasallian tradition of teaching, which means being accessible, focusing on the individual, and contributing to a sense of community.

The School of Business and the MBA Program are accredited by one of higher education’s most prestigious accrediting bodies—AACSB International, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

John Farrell
Director
215-991-2985
farrellj@lasalle.edu

Nicole Blair
Assistant Director
215-438-6676
blairn@lasalle.edu

If you have any questions regarding the Part-Time MBA program, please contact: mba@lasalle.edu or visit our website at www.lasalle.edu/mba.

Admission Requirements

The Admission Committee of the MBA Program evaluates each applicant’s interest, aptitude, and potential for achievement in graduate business studies. The structure of the program lends itself to those students with or without an undergraduate degree in business.

Before an applicant will be evaluated, he/she must submit the following information:

  • Application (Online)
  • Official transcripts from all schools attended
  • Test scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or, with permission of the Director, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 
  • Professional resume

Based on prior academic and/or professional success, the admission requirement to take the GMAT/GRE may be waived or deferred. Please see the section below "Waiver of GMAT or GRE".

All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelphia, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Because each applicant’s background and profile is unique, the Admission Committee does not establish specific quantitative minimum requirements for admission; however, it does adhere to the accreditation standards established by AACSB.

Please refer to the University's Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog.  Admission is based solely upon an applicant’s qualifications.

Application Deadlines

There are no set deadlines. However, we recommend that all application documents be received by August 15, December 15, and April 15 for the fall, spring, and summer terms, respectively. Under special circumstances, students may be admitted until the first day of the semester. International student applications should be completed at least two months prior to the dates listed above. Contact the MBA office if you have any questions.

Conditional Admission

A limited number of students with at least a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher may be admitted into the program for one semester without the GMAT or GRE  test scores. Conditionally accepted students are required to successfully complete the GMAT or GRE by the end of their first enrolled semester.  Conditionally accepted students are not eligible for financial aid loans until they are fully (regularly) accepted to the program.

Transfer Credit

An applicant may request the transfer of graduate credit(s) earned at another AACSB-accredited institution prior to being admitted to the La Salle MBA program. Each request will be evaluated on its own merits, but the student must have received a grade of “B” or better for the course to be considered for transfer. No more than six hours of graduate credit in the Core, Specialization, Foundation and Executive Perspectives areas of the program will be accepted for transfer purposes. 

Transferred specialization courses will only count towards fulfilling the General Business Administration Specialization requirements, as specializations (Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Business Systems and Analytics and Management) are only granted for courses completed at La Salle University. 

Tuition and Fees

Information on Tuition Assistance can be found on the Student Financial Services Website.

Tuition Assistance

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

The MBA Curriculum

Students must complete between 33 and 45 credits to complete the MBA degree at La Salle University. The total number of credits required depends upon the student’s academic and professional background.

 

MBA Math Course

This course is required for students who score below the 25th percentile on the quantitative of the GMAT exam or do not have sufficient background in the quantitative areas of business.  During the admissions process, the requirement to take MBA math will be determined based on a review of a student’s academic and professional background.  This self-paced, online quantitative skills course is designed with 24 lessons covering basic quantitative skills in finance, accounting, economics, and spreadsheets.

 

Foundation

The purpose of the Foundation area is to provide students with a functional knowledge of business theory in the context of decision-making and leadership skills. The following three courses (3 credits each) are required but may be waived based on a student’s academic and professional background.

MBA 610  Applied Economic Analysis
MBA 615  Financial Accounting: A User Focus
MBA 630  Financial Markets

 

The Core

The following courses (3 credits each) provide students with the theoretical basis and practical applications of marketing, accounting, business analytics and financial management. Through the use of a variety of analytical, problem-solving approaches to business problems, the Core courses expose the students to both the needed depth of analyses and broad business perspectives required for operational, financial and strategic decision making.                                                                                                                                                   

MBA 690  Creating Customers Through Effective Marketing Management
MBA 691  Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning, and Control
MBA 692  Financial Performance: Control and Measurement
MBA 693  Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making

 

Specialization

All students will select a specialization and are required to complete three 700-level courses in the specialization area. Not all specialization options are offered at all locations, as specialization offerings are determined by student interest. Students should contact the MBA office for more information as to what is offered at each location.

  • Accounting
  • Business Systems and Analytics
  • Finance
  • General Business Administration
  • Management
  • Marketing

 

Executive Perspectives

The following courses (3 credits each) provide students with a greater understanding of leading people and organizations. Topics include: assessing and developing one’s leadership and managerial skills; learning how to use technology for managing the vast array of data and information sources; applying the appropriate analytical tools and business factors in making business decisions and evaluating their financial impact; and developing the business, human resource and organizational perspectives needed by executives as they make both strategic and operational decisions.

MBA 810  Self-Assessment for Leadership
MBA 820  Information Technology for Decision Making
MBA 830  Financial Statement Analysis
MBA 840  Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making

 

Integrative Capstone

The following course (3 credits each) is taken the final year of the program. This course provides the opportunity to integrate what has been learned in the Core, Specialization, and Executive Perspective areas while adding a global perspective and the ethical dimension necessary to succeed in the global business arena.

MBA 902  Competitive Strategy

Waiver of GMAT or GRE Requirement

Applicants with an undergraduate business degree from an AACSB-accredited program who have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.2 or above are not required to complete the GMAT or GRE exam for admission into the program.

The GMAT (or GRE) may be waived for applicants if they meet the one of the following:

  • Have an undergraduate business degree from an AACSB-accredited University and have
    • An overall GPA of 3.2 or above,
    • An overall GPA of 3.0 or above and 3 years of professional experience, or
    • More than 5 years of professional experience.
  • Hold a CFA Charter or CPA license or have passed the CPA or CFA certifying exams.
  • Earned master’s degree or higher from a graduate program accredited program in its discipline

The GMAT/GRE may be deferred and eventually waived if an applicant has graduated with a 3.0 GPA in any undergraduate discipline and has at least 2 years of business experience. These students take up to four (4) courses in the program. If the student achieves a B- or better in each course and an overall GPA of 3.3, the GMAT/GRE will be waived.

 

Faculty

Dean: MarySheila McDonald, J.D..

Director: John Farrell

Assistant Director: Nicole Blair, M.B.A., M.S.                                                   

Professors: Barenbaum, Borkowski, Buch, George, Jiang, Meisel, Miller, Mshomba, Robison, Schubert, Seltzer, Smither, Talaga (Emeritus), Tavana, Van Buskirk, Welsh                                                                     

Associate Professors: Ambrose, Chia, Cooper, Jiang, Jones, Kennedy, Leauby, Paulin, Rhoda, Szabat,  Walsh, Wentzel

Assistant Professors: Brazina, G. Bruce, DiPietro, Dynan, Fitzgerald, Gauss, Massimini, Pierce, Zook              

Lecturers: Anderson, Blohm, R. Bruce, Carey, Cerenzio, Crossen, Cruikshank, DiPietro, Falcone, Finnegan, Goldner, Harris, Horan, G. Kochanski, M. Kochanski, Kvint, Lang, Leh, McElroy, Mallon, Market, Mullan, O’Neill, Otten, Planita, Richter, Sable, Sargen, Schaefer, Schwab, Sherlock, Simons, Truitt, Walters, Wong

Course Descriptions

ACC 704 Financial Accounting Theory and Current Practices

This course emphasizes the perspective of preparers of financial statements covering financial statement preparation with an emphasis on the areas of financial accounting that are problematic, including revenue recognition, expense allocation, inventories, post-employment benefits, leases, and stock options.
Prerequisite: MBA 615

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 761 Taxation for Business Planning and Investing

The course is an integration of financial theory and taxation to enable students to develop the ability to translate tax outcomes into cash flows. The course perspective is on using an understanding of taxes in the planning process, not on compliance. Students learn the framework of the current tax system, evaluate tax laws on the basis of both equity and efficiency, and learn the social policy implications of the tax system. Topics include fundamentals of tax planning, measurement of taxable income, choosing business entities, corporate and individual taxation, compensation and retirement planning, and investing and personal finance issues.

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 772 Auditing

The course is a conceptual study of the audit process with applied aspects of the discipline. It relates and compares the role and responsibility of management to that of the independent certified public accountant. It presents generally accepted auditing standards, basic audit methodology, and procedures with an emphasis on the study and evaluation of internal control. The course culminates with an in-depth analysis of the auditor's opinion.
Prerequisite: ACC 704 or equivalent.

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 780 Applied Research in Accounting

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.

Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

ACC 782 Accounting Information and ERP Systems

This course offers an enhanced understanding of accounting information and enterprise resource planning systems, and is suitable for all MBAs. It includes hands-on experience with a traditional accounting system and with SAP, and weekly discussion of current topics, including privacy and security issues, disaster recovery, anti-fraud and audit resources, and XBRL.
Prerequisite: MBA 691 or equivalent

Number of Credits: 3

ACC 790 Special Topics in Accounting

This course will explore a topic of contemporary interest related to accounting. Topics will vary and may include Decision-Making Using Management Accounting, Applying Research Skills to Contemporary Accounting Issues; and Fraud and Forensic Accounting. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite: MBA 615; other prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic.

Number of Credits: 3

BSA 710 Systems Analysis and Database Design

This course is about structured analysis and design methodology for complex business systems. Students become familiar and use Entity Relationship Diagrams, Data Structure Diagrams, Data Flow Diagrams, Data Dictionaries, and Process Specifications to develop Systems Specifications. These specifications are utilized as the blueprint to develop and implement relational databases, and explore the Structured Query Language (SQL) used to manipulate and operate the database.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 693

BSA 720 Data Warehousing and Data Mining

This course focuses on data warehousing and data mining in organizations. Topics covered in the course include: data warehousing and mediation techniques aimed at integrating distributed, heterogeneous data sources; data mining techniques such as rule-based learning, decision trees, association rule mining, and statistical analysis for discovery of patterns in the integrated data; and evaluation and interpretation of the mined patterns using visualization techniques.
Prerequisite: MBA 693

Number of Credits: 3

BSA 780 Applied Research in Business Systems and Analytics

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

BSA 785 Business Intelligence And Knowledge Management

This course develops a basic understanding of fundamental tools and technologies used to exploit potential intelligence hidden in routinely collected data in organizations. Business intelligence topics include: identifying sources of information for business intelligence, competitor analysis, environmental scanning, and business forecasting. The course also develops the basic knowledge to convert this acquired intelligence into a set of business rules for implementation in a rule-based, knowledge-based system. Knowledge Management tools include applied artificial intelligence, knowledge acquisition and validation, knowledge representation, inferencing, and expert system building processes and tools.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 693

BSA 790 Special Topics in Business Systems and Analytics

This course is designed to introduce students to one of several areas of emerging trends and technologies in Business Systems and Analytics. Students will learn the fundamental principles and concepts of analytics in a specific business domain and implement descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analytics tools and technologies that support data, information, and knowledge management in the area of study. Course titles include, but are not limited to, Accounting Analytics, Financial Analytics, Healthcare Analytics, Human Resources (HR) Analytics, Marketing Analytics, Sports Analytics, and Supply Chain Analytics among others. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite: MBA 693; other prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic.

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 746 Enterprise Risk Management

The course examines the risk management process as applied to the whole range of risks to which a corporation is exposed: financial, insurable, operational, and business. It focuses on risk in general and how multiple sources of risk can be addressed with strategies that integrate risk management and capital management. Specific topics include hedging, insurance, post-loss investment, contingent capital, finite risk reinsurance, and insurance-linked securities. Emphasized throughout the course is that managing risk effectively is essential to corporate value, success, and survival.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 692

FIN 748 Financial Instruments and Markets

This course provides an examination of modern financial markets. Specifically, we discuss the largest financial intermediaries including commercial banks, finance companies, securities firms, investment banks, mutual funds and hedge funds with a focus on balance sheet structures, regulation, and current issues and trends. We also examine various financial instruments, derivatives, and off-balance sheet activities that are useful from a risk-management perspective within the industry.
Prerequisite: FIN 692

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 765 Global Financial Management

Current developments in global financial markets and instruments from the perspective of firm management. Topics include an overview of foreign security markets, trends in foreign exchange risk management, and the impact of international debt on multinational firms.
Prerequisite: MBA 692

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 780 Applied Research in Finance

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

FIN 783 Financial Analysis Seminar

This seminar covers the breadth of material included in the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA I) exam. It includes CFA I mock exams and students are encouraged to sit for Level I of the CFA exam at the end of the course.
Prerequisites: MBA692, MBA830, FIN764 and a minimum graduate GPA of 3.5 or permission of the instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

FIN 790 Special Topics in Finance

These courses will explore topics of contemporary interest. Course titles include, but are not limited to Trends in Employee Benefit Planning, and Speculative Market Analysis, among others. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite: MBA692

Number of Credits: 3

MBA Math

This self-paced, online quantitative skills course is designed with 24 lessons covering basic quantitative skills in finance, accounting, economics, statistics, and spreadsheets. This course is required for students who score below the 25th percentile on the quantitative section of the GMAT exam or cannot demonstrate thorught their academic or professional background a level the appropriate level of quantative skills to be successful in the program.

Number of Credits: not for credit

How Offered: Online

MBA 610 Applied Economic Analysis

This course is designed to teach the principles of both micro and macro economics and to help the students understand the economic events that shape the world, markets and businesses. The course develops students' abilities to interpret how businesses form and operate under various market situations. Topics such as supply and demand, elasticity, relevant cost definition and relationships, profit optimization, market characteristics and long-run profitability implications, resource costing, and global market competitive responses are studied. The course further examines the role and activities of the various economic sectors consisting of households, businesses, and governments, and how those actions impact the state of the economy. The roles of government and the Federal Reserve are evaluated and their impact examined.  Topics such as Gross Domestic Product, economic growth, inflation, unemployment, fiscal policy, monetary policy, banking, international trade, and exchange rates are studied.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 615 Financial Accounting: A User Focus

This course is an introductory study of financial accounting. It includes the study of basic accounting language and concepts, recording financial transactions, preparation and interpretation of financial statements, accounting methods, business decisions, inventory valuations, and methods of obtaining capital.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 630 Financial Markets

This course serves as an introduction to the financial system and its relationship to the financing of domestic and international business activity. Financial market components and phenomena such as financial instruments, institutions, flow of funds, market efficiency, interest rate determination and term structure, exchange rates, and the balance of payments are analyzed. The governmental impact on financial markets, manifested through monetary and fiscal policy and regulation, is also covered. An introduction is given to the concept of financial asset valuation and the time value of money. The emphasis is on the significance of these elements for conducting the financial affairs of businesses.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 690 Creating Customers Through Effective Marketing Management

The course shows how the techniques of marketing management can be used to attract and satisfy customers while building long-term business profitability. Topics include (1) market, consumer, and competitive analysis; (2) segmentation, targeting, and positioning; (3) product development, pricing, promotion, and distribution; and (4) marketing strategy and planning.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 691 Managerial Accounting for Decision Making, Planning, and Control

This course focuses on the firm’s management accounting system as its primary information system. It examines the problems of cost measurement, planning, coordination, control, and performance evaluation. It explores how accounting systems address business problems and evolve in response to the changing economic environment. The course will relate ethical and global issues to managerial accounting topics. The students will explore and analyze “real world” data and apply their gained knowledge to contemporary managerial accounting problems and cases.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 615

MBA 692 Financial Performance: Control and Measurement

This is a survey course focusing on how managers can construct a decision-making process focusing on maximizing the value of the firm. Because the majority of financial decisions require an estimate of future events, considerable time will be spent investigating how to achieve the above objectives, subject to the constraints of an uncertain future. Outside readings, case studies, and text material will be used to integrate current financial theory with pragmatic financial decision making. A working knowledge of the basic concepts in finance, accounting, and statistics is assumed. The use of an electronic spreadsheet is needed for homework assignments and case analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 615, MBA 630, and Completion of MBA Math (if not waived).

MBA 693 Business Analytics for Informed and Effective Decision Making

This course introduces students to the growing field of business analytics. Business analytics is the use of data, information technology, statistical analysis, and quantitative methods and models to support effective organizational problem solving and informed decision making. The course includes methods, tools, and techniques for summarizing and visualizing historical data, which is relevant to descriptive analytics – the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; methods, tools, and techniques for extracting information from existing data in order to determine patterns, which is relevant to predictive analytics – the use of data to find out what will happen in the future; and methods, tools, and techniques for optimization, which is relevant to prescriptive analytics - the use of data to determine the best course of action in the future.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Completion of online Math Assessment (if not waived).

MBA 810 Developing Your Leadership Skills

This experiential course emphasizes the importance of feedback and self- assessment for leadership development. It includes extensive assessment of each participant's management style and skills based on self-evaluations (using structured questionnaires, decision making exercises, and role plays) and feedback from coworkers, faculty, and other participants. It includes a full day assessment workshop. Leadership development experiences emphasize time and stress management, individual and group problem-solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, and team leadership. Each participant identifies skills he or she needs to develop and reports on efforts to develop those skills.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 820 Information Technology for Decision-Making

This course is about the manager's responsibilities for problem solving and decision making, and those areas in which information technology can be used to gain the insight needed to support selection of decision alternatives. Students learn about the role of data, information, and knowledge in managerial problem solving and decision making. Transactional processing and database management systems (DBMS) are used to store, manage, and retrieve data in organizations. Decision support system (DSS) tools and technologies (such as natural language programming and influence diagramming) are used to organize data into information for decision analytics. Expert systems (ES) are used to synthesize information into knowledge for knowledge management. Students are required to use DBMS, DSS and ES software packages in a hands-on environment.

Number of Credits: 3

MBA 830 Financial Statement Analysis

This course integrates the areas of finance and accounting and is designed to provide students with the ability to analyze financial statements, understand the incentives of companies to "manage" earnings through their choices of accounting methods, understand the limitations to the usefulness of financial statements, and understand the value of financial statements in decision-making from the perspective of investors, creditors and management.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 692

MBA 840 Frameworks for Socially Responsible Decision Making

This course is designed to explore the complex ethical, legal, cultural, political, social, and economic issues confronting individuals, groups, and organizations. We will use various models and theories to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills to address the issues of a diverse set of organizational stakeholders.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: All required foundation courses

MGT 730 Nonprofit Management

This course provides an examination of the management, operations and governance principles and practices of nonprofits in the United States. A large part of this examination focuses on a comparison of and contrast with the for-profit sector as students seek to burst myths, find commonalities, and identify practices from each sector that, if shared, could make both sectors stronger.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 732 (Pending Approval) Managing Effective Teams

Teams have become part of the landscape in most organizations. This course will explore the factors involved in creating and maintaining high performance teams. It will look at issues of teamwork, virtual teams, group dynamics, and problems in developing effective teams, and will provide frameworks and tools for improving team performance. It will discuss both being an effective team member and team leader.
Prerequisite: MBA 810

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 736 Designing Effective Organizational Structures

This course examines various factors that managers should consider when structuring (or restructuring) their organizations, including employees' skill levels and engagement, as well as the organization's size, external environment, competitive strategy, international expansion, technologies, and alliances with other organizations. It also explores the impact that managers' own values and preferences have on the creation of control systems and structures, and on employees' reactions to them. Case assignments require students to apply what they have learned to improve organizational functioning.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 739 Managing Cultural Diversity in the Workplace

This course is designed to teach students how to manage the growing multicultural workforce in the United States. Students will be exposed to the basic concepts and issues of intercultural communication and cross-cultural relations; explore the challenges that managing cultural diversity presents to organizations and individuals associated with them; gain awareness of the issues related to ethnocentrism, racism, sexism, and ageism; develop an understanding and appreciation for people from Hispanic and Asian cultures; discuss current techniques used in cultural analysis; and read and evaluate research in the field of cultural diversity.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 742 Organizational Communication

The course examines organizational communication theories and applications, including issues of organizational climate, the information environment, public communication, and strategies for the development of appropriate communication systems. The course includes student analysis of specific workplace communication networks.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 743 Entrepreneurship

The course looks at fundamental capitalism from its basic unit of new business formation. Special challenges in sensing opportunity, risk evaluation and control, pressure vs. gratification, professional and personal support systems, confidence, and judgment are studied in cases and lectures. Basic capital formation and deployment, growth planning, and self-employed career development are emphasized in a management context.
Prerequisite: MBA 630

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 744 Power and Influence

This course is designed to provide a realistic understanding of individual and organizational power issues. It will help students to produce constructive outcomes for themselves and their organizations. The assignments are designed to help make sense of personal and organizational experiences and will provide additional insight into a student's power orientation and personal influence strategies. The course will be delivered through lectures, in-person and online discussions, collaborative online learning events, and in-person experiential learning.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 752 Managerial Skills Laboratory

This course provides an opportunity for self-assessment and improvement of the skills critical to an effective manager. The design of the course promotes interaction between students and active participation in classroom activities. The objective is to learn conceptual versatility and behavioral techniques that can be practiced in the laboratory setting then applied in a work situation. The course schedule for the Skills Lab is over 4 days (two full weekends) plus a Friday evening follow-up session, and full participation is required. Because of this compressed time frame, there is no hybrid or other online component to this course
Prerequisite: MBA 810

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 760 Human Resource Management

This survey course provides an overview of the major areas of human resource management, including HR strategy and planning, EEO laws, job analysis and competency models, recruiting, selection, training, performance appraisal and management, job design, compensation, benefits, and labor relations. The focus is on both the line manager's and the human resource professional's role in creating a culture that attracts, rewards, and retains the talent necessary to ensure a business' success.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 765 Irrational Decision Making

This course will examine research from behavioral economics, psychology, marketing, and other disciplines to examine the many forces that lead managers to systematically make irrational decisions in business. Students will examine a variety of factors that lead to making irrational decisions including, but not limited to, relativity, anchors, zero cost, arousal, ownership, and diagnosis bias. Students will hunt for instances of irrational decision making in their workplace, the general world of business, and daily life. They will use the frameworks provided in the course to diagnose the causes of these irrational decisions and recommend how they can be reduced or eliminated.

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 769 Human Resource Development

This course reviews a variety of approaches to developing human resources in organizations. There is special emphasis on needs analysis as well as on the design, delivery, and evaluation of training programs or development initiatives. The role of performance and behavioral feedback in development is also discussed. The course includes hands-on experience in the design of training programs or development initiatives. Students may also examine special topics (for example, Web-based training, coaching, expatriate training, or executive development).

Number of Credits: 3

MGT 780 Applied Research in Management and Leadership

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

MGT 790 Special Topics in Management and Leadership

This course will explore a topic of contemporary interest related to management and leadership. Topics will vary and may include Performance Management: Challenges, Trends, and Controversies; Conflict and Negotiations; What Every Business Student Should Know about Workplace Rights and Responsibilities; and Managing by Design. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.
Prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic.

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 720 Advanced Digital Marketing Strategies

This course provides students with the most up-to-date and comprehensive overview of major digital marketing channels and platforms – Search Engine, Digital Display, Video, Mobile, and Social Media. It will teach students how to conceptualize and integrate digital marketing into a firm’s overall marketing efforts. Students will complete the course with in-depth knowledge of and experience with how to develop an integrated digital marketing strategy, from formulation to implementation, and students will also learn how to measure digital marketing efforts and calculate Return on Investment.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: MBA 690

MKT 730 Strategic Marketing Intelligence

This course introduces today's most valuable marketing research and analytics methods and tools and offers a best-practice methodology for successful implementation. Hands on projects and case studies provide students an opportunity to apply the marketing research and analytics techniques for solving key problems ranging from product development, segmentation, pricing, campaign management, brand valuation, and digital marketing strategy.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 732 Consumer Behavior

The course examines the social, cultural, psychological, and economic influences on consumer behavior. It looks at the applications of behavioral science principles to the development of marketing strategies.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 734 Advertising and Promotion Management

The course focuses on the study and practical application of the analysis, planning, control, and decision-making activities involved in the promotional process. Topics include objective setting, budgeting, persuasion and attitude change, copy and media decisions, sales promotion programs, and the evaluation of marketing effectiveness.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 739 International Marketing

This course offers a managerial view of the marketing function as it applies to the international field, describing and exploring the complexities, problems, and opportunities of worldwide marketing.
Prerequisite: MBA 690

Number of Credits: 3

MKT 780 Applied Research in Marketing

This customized course provides students with a unique opportunity to integrate their academic work with a wide range of professional studies including but not limited to independent studies, research projects, or internships.
Prerequisite: Approval of supervising professor and program director

Number of Credits: 1 to 3

MKT 790 Special Topics in Marketing

This course will explore a topic of contemporary interest related to Marketing. Topics will vary and may include Product Innovation and Design Thinking, Services Marketing, Sales Management and Leadership, and Travel Study. Because the topic of this course will change, it can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic. Prerequisite: MBA 690; other prerequisite(s) may be required depending on the topic

Number of Credits: 3

Computer Information Science

Program Description

The M.S. Computer Information Science program provides students with a structured study of applied technical solutions to real-world problems. The program emphasizes the need to understand the program from definition, through implementation and review. The program uses real-world cases that develop problem solving techniques through the software engineering methodologies. The students also learn to manage the problem solution through the gathering of requirements, problem refinement, design modeling, implementation and user-testing. The curriculum emphasizes group interaction and problem solving skills through iterative processes and project management from problem definition through solution deployment.

The program emphasizes group work, presentation skills and collaboration through the use of technology. The M.S. Computer Information Science requires that students complete a capstone project to integrate core competencies with specific student goals based on the elective certificate. Examples of capstone projects are development and implementation of a new software solution or major extension to a completed software project; a research project on new trends or findings in software application development; analysis of network security standards and policies and policy implementation.

The M.S. Computer Information Science program is offered in an online format. It follows the traditional academic calendar of a fall and spring semester and a shorter summer semester. The fall and spring semesters are divided into two 8 week terms.  A full-time graduate student carries a minimum of 6 semester credit hours. Some courses may require more hours per week in some areas of instruction. All courses are online and 3 credits in the length. The courses will meet both synchronously (optional) and asynchronously. Students are required to participate in chat sessions and/or discussion boards, which will take the place of classroom meetings.  Synchronous sessions will be recorded for students who are not able to attend the actual session.  Students who are not able to attend the synchronous sessions will be asked to complete a short assignment related to the recorded session. Depending on their personal schedules, students may elect to take courses every term or wait for the next term to continue studies.  Courses in the summer are also 8 weeks in length.  If a student decides to take two courses during the summer session, they will overlap in the time frame.

Margaret McCoey, M.S.

Director

215.951.1136

mccoey@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/cis

If you have any questions regarding the Computer Information Science program, please contact:

gradcis@lasalle.edu

Mission Statement

Graduate education in Computer Information Science will provide a forum for the study, investigation, discussion, and presentation of how technical solutions may be used to improve an individual’s productivity and to enhance departmental and corporate systems. In order to prepare computing professionals who will be able to keep pace with the dynamic nature of the discipline and contribute to its growth, this program will emphasize individual and group effort, as well as lecture and hands-on training. The approach will be consistent will the philosophy of graduate education at La Salle.

Program Goals

  1. Prepare students to create, implement, manage and review a technical solution to a real world problem through all phases of the problem resolution
  2. Prepare students to use problem solving techniques and skills to analyze, design, and develop technical solutions using software engineering methodologies.
  3. Manage the problem solution through the gathering of requirements, problem refinement, design modeling, implementation, and user testing
  4. Prepare students to collaborate on problem solutions
  5. Prepare students for professional workforce.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain and differentiate between software engineering methodologies.
  2. Create a plan to implement a proposed solution.
  3. Analyze and design a technical problem solution.
  4. Implement and test a software solution.
  5. Facilitate groups on problem definitions and solution designs.
  6. Present problem requirements and solution proposals.
  7. Prepare professional written reports.
  8. Create solutions specific to current technologies (such as mobile development, database services, and web services.)

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in the completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education with an appropriate major. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 will normally be required.
  3. Provide official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate colleges and universities he/she has attended. For studies completed outside the United States, La Salle University requires that you send your transcripts/marksheets to the World Education Service (www.wes.org) or similar credential evaluation service for a course-by-course evaluation. The agency should then directly send the evaluation to the Admission office. A third-party evaluation of your transcript/marksheets is required to process the application. La Salle reserves the right to determine if the third-party agency meets our criteria.
  4. Provide a professional resume addressing one’s educational and professional background.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professors or supervisors who can address the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrolling in the program.
  6. Attend an interview with member(s) of the Admission Committee. These are typically telephone interviews.
  7. Provide evidence of an appropriate background in computer science or a related discipline, or other equivalent training with demonstration of programming. On the basis of admission credentials, students may be required to complete some foundation courses.

The application package is viewed as a whole, and the prevailing criterion is the applicant’s capacity for completing the program successfully.

The University’s Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely on an applicant’s qualifications.

This program is offered in an online format. The curriculum does not meet the requirements for applicants who need to obtain student visas in the United States.

A maximum of six hours of transfer credit may be granted for graduate work at another institution. The student must supply a course description and syllabus in order to facilitate the transfer of credit. After matriculation at La Salle, students must have a course pre-approved by the director (in conjunction with the appropriate faculty member(s)) for it to be considered for transfer purposes.

All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelpha, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Progression through the Program

Ten (10) to twelve (12) courses (at least 30 graduate credits) are required for the degree. Each student is required to satisfy the foundation courses, all six core courses, three electives, and a capstone project.

The design of this program assumes that the student has either a background in computer science or a related discipline or professional training involving programming. The total number of credits to fulfill the requirements depends upon the student’s academic and professional background. Some students may be required to take one or two foundation courses to supplement their computing expertise. The Admission Committee determines the appropriate number of foundation courses; the foundation courses may be waived, based on the student’s academic and professional background. Individual plans for progression will be determined for each student in consultation with the Program Director.

Students take a maximum of two foundation courses (as specified by the Admission Committee), six core courses, three electives, and a capstone project.

Curriculum

Students complete at least 10 courses, six courses in the core competencies, three elective courses, and a capstone project to integrate all course work.  Students may also be required to take Foundation Courses, based on their background.

Foundation Courses

The purpose of the foundation courses is to provide students with a background in computing concepts and practice, as well as leadership skills. The following three courses are required but may be waived based on a student’s academic and professional training.

CIS 523 Data Processing and Database Management
CIS 540 Network Theory

Core Courses

The core courses provide the essential computing concepts, methodologies, and practical tools for the program. The courses provide a comprehensive study of current Web-centric and data-driven computing concepts and technologies.

CIS 613 Software Engineering
CIS 615 Project Management
CIS 617 Software Project Development
CIS 621 Client Interface Development
CIS 623 Database Services Development using Microsoft Tools
CIS 629 Mobile Development

Students are required to complete three electives.

CIS 612 Ethics, Issues, and Government Regulations
CIS 624 Data Warehouses
CIS 626 Web Services Development
CIS 627 Web Database Services Development
CIS 658 Data Mining
CIS 67x Special Topics in Computer Information Science
INL 631 Technology Architectures
INL 644 Information Security
INL 653 Web Services and Solutions
INL 665 Computer Digital Forensics
CYB 668 Computer and Network Security
or courses approved by program director.

Capstone Experience

Students conclude their studies with a capstone project, completed in one course, under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Students may work on a capstone experience either individually or in a group. Some students partner with an external company or work on a project associated with their employer as a project deliverable for that company. Students may also complete research on new developments in Computer Information Science.

CIS 685 CIS Capstone

Five-Year Bachelor's in Computer Science to Master's in Computer Information Science

Students may earn both a B.A. in Computer Science and a M.S. in Computer Information Science or a B.S. in Computer Science and a M.S. in Computer Information Science by participating in the University’s Five-Year Program. Students would satisfy the undergraduate computer science major requirements during their first four years at the University, earning a minimum of 120 credits, of which a maximum of six may be graduate credits, while maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better. Upon completion of a bachelor’s degree, students may then enter the M.S. in Computer Information Science program by completing the remainder of the full degree requirements.

 

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Partial scholarship grants are offered on the basis of academic credentials and financial need.

Information about other financial aid, payment options, and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Program Director: Margaret McCoey, M.S.
Associate Professors: Blum, Highley, Kirsch, Redmond, Wang
Assistant Professors: McCoey
Lecturers: Casey, Cerenzio, Crossen, Henry, McGinley, McManus, Monaghan, Wacey

Course Descriptions

CIS 523 Data Processing and Database Management

This course entails analysis and evaluation of database designs in relation to the strategic mission of the project. Topics include database systems, database architectures, and data-definition and data-manipulation languages. Also included are logical and physical database design, database models (e.g., entity-relationship, relational), normalization, integrity, query languages including SQL, and relational algebra, in addition to social and ethical considerations and privacy of data. This course incorporates case studies and a project using a relational DBMS.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 540 Network Theory

Lecture/theory course considers the current methods, practices, and standards used to enable communication on computer and voice networks. This includes a study of the physical layers, architectural layers, design, operation, management, and ISO standards, with particular consideration given to many of the IEEE 802 standards, various protocols in the TCP/IP suite, and telephony technologies. Both local and wide area networks are examined.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 612 Ethics, Issues, and Government Regulations

This course considers privacy both on- and off-line; legal background of intellectual property and e-mail; ethics and codes of ethics; effects of computers on work and society; and responsibilities and risks of computing, including topics such as accuracy of information, e-waste, and multitasking. This course includes an examination of government policies and regulations related to data security and information assurance.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 613 Software Engineering

Software Engineering treats the technical and administrative issues of the software development life-cycle process. Models of the software development process, including structured analysis and design as well as object-oriented analysis and design methodologies, are presented.
Topics include software milestones, project planning, team management, requirements analysis, specification development, analysis and design, implementation, integration, testing, and maintenance. Software legal issues, including contractual ownership, copyrights, and intellectual property rights, are considered. Additional topics include ethical issues recommended by the IEEE and ACM Code of Ethics as well as ethical responsibility of accurate software. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) and tools will be utilized. This course requires the completion of a team project.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 615 Project Management

This course entails standard Project Management (PM) concepts, principles, and practices for information technology (IT) and systems. It considers the various corporate organizational structures, politics, and external influences impacting effective PM for IT projects. It also covers systems development, product and PM life cycles, including the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). The course incorporates exploration of project phases and processes and how they relate to the disciplines of PM—integration, scope, time, cost, procurement, risk, human resources, quality, and communications. Students will analyze, evaluate, and select appropriate PM systems, tools, and methodologies from a project leader point of view and develop understanding of PM practices through selected project work.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 617 Software Project Development

This courses focuses on the implementation a software project. The students complete the implementation of a model that was constructed in a previous course or build a system that implements component services from an existing model. Students will use collaborative software development methods.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 621 Client Interface Development

This course addresses the design and development of  standards-based client interfaces for Web applications. The course includes Web-based standards and tool sets that support these standards. Application development  emphasizes client Web interface scripting to serve as a general introduction to computer programming. The specific tool set used will depend on the types of interfaces to be developed, considering technology trends. Examples of possible tools include XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript. This course may be waived if the student has prior experience in client interface development.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 623 Database Services Development Using Microsoft Tools

This course encompasses programming models that support database access, including ADO.NET. It covers client/server and multitiered architectures; use of components, including COM Class Libraries and .NET Framework; development of database applications using VB.NET and ASP.NET; Internet and intranet database design and implementation; database-driven Web sites; and use of XML syntax related to databases. It also considers privacy of data and data protection on servers.
Prerequisite: CIS 523, CIS 622

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 624 Data Warehouses

This course covers the use of large-scale data stores to support decision making; critical success factors in designing and implementing a data warehouse and management of a data warehouse project; requirements analysis; design using the star schema; entire data warehouse integration; infrastructure needs; data staging process, including data cleansing and transformation; and data access, including On-line Analytic Processing (OLAP) tools. Also considered are introduction to data mining and analysis, evaluation, and selection of data warehousing tools, techniques, and methodologies.
Prerequisite: CIS 523

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 626 Web Services Development

This course focuses on the development of Web services for use by many different types of Web applications. The course develops basic programming techniques to implement the server side function of the application. The course uses a non-Windows interface for the tools set.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 627 Web Database Services Development

This course is an extension to CIS 623. It encompasses programming models that support database access, including ADO.NET. It covers client/server and multitiered architectures; development of database applications; Internet and intranet database design and implementation; database-driven Web sites; and use of XML syntax related to databases. Examples of the possible tool sets for this tool set are PHP and mySQL on either a Linux or Windows server. The course also considers privacy of data and data protection on servers. Prerequisite: CIS 523, CIS 622, or CIS 626

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 629 Mobile Development

This course covers development of mobile applications and integration with existing systems on the devices. Students will extend development of mobile solutions with enhancements to views, layouts, and intents including interaction with the location-based services, messaging services, multimedia interfaces, and sensors available on the mobile device. The applications will manage data sources, both locally and from database providers. The applications will be tested in an emulation environment and prepared for deployment in a mobile marketplace.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 658 Data Mining

This course introduces the field of data mining, with specific emphasis on its use for Machine Learning algorithms. Techniques covered may include conceptual clustering, learning decision rules and decision trees, case-based reasoning, Bayesian analysis, genetic algorithms, and neural networks. The course covers data preparation and analysis of results. Skills in Microsoft Excel are useful. Prerequisite: CIS 523

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 670-679 Special Topics in Computer Information Science

Specialized study in Computer Information Science. Topics vary according to interest of students and faculty.

Number of Credits: 3

CIS 685 CIS Capstone (Every semester as needed)

Students will design and implement a project related to computer Information science for use by an external organization or department. The student is mentored by a faculty member, and his or her project proposal must be approved by the graduate director and the faculty member supervising the project. The project design will use a software engineering approach in place for its organization. The goal of the capstone is to use the analysis, design, management, and maintenance techniques to solve the organization’s problem. To complete the capstone project, the student must prepare and submit a paper or report on the project and the solution, provide an oral presentation, and provide and submit the software components for the solution.  Prerequisite: all Core courses

Number of Credits: 3

Counseling and Family Therapy

Program Description

The Counseling and Family Therapy Master's Programs offer three graduate degrees:

  • Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy
  • Master of Arts in Professional Clinical Counseling
  • Master of Arts in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Master's Degree Program

Students earning a Master of Arts degree in in Marriage and Family Therapy will meet the education requirements for licensure as Marriage and Family Therapists. The MFT Master's Program is COAMFTE Accredited.

Professional Clinical Counseling (PCC) Master's Degree Program

Students earning a Master of Arts degree in Professional Clinical Counseling (PCC) will meet the education requirements for licensure as Professional Counselors. The PCC Master's Program is CACREP Accredited.

Industrial/Organizational Psychology (IOP) Master's Degree Program

Students earning a Master of Arts degree in Industrial/Organizational Psychology are trained to deal with many organizational issues requiring unique set of knowledge and skills such as selection, performance appraisal and training. Our program meets the guidelines of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP).

MFT, PCC and IOP Programs Diversity Statement

Diversity includes many areas, and addressing it involves understanding the importance of an appreciation for differing world views. Non-discrimination policy is stated in the opening section of this catalog.

The MFT, PCC amd I/O programs at La Salle University are committed to introducing faculty and students to diverse people, thoughts, and ideas. This is accomplished through courses and coursework, internship and clinical experiences, professional activities, and developmental opportunities.

Issues of diversity are addressed and integrated throughout the MFT, PCC and IOP curricula.

Donna Tonrey, Psy.D., LMFT, LPC
Director, Assistant Professor
215.951.1767
tonrey@lasalle.edu
www.lasalle.edu/cft

 If you have any questions regarding any of the Counseling and Family Therapy programs, please contact: cftma@lasalle.edu

Mission Statements

Marriage and Family Therapy Program Mission

In keeping with this Lasallian tradition, the Marriage and Family Therapy Program strives to prepare professionals with the abilities and competencies requisite for the practice of marriage and family therapy. The curriculum emphasizes a conceptualization of the role of an individual in primary relationships, such as couple, marriage and the family. Students are provided with course work and clinical experiences, which encourages them to examine the complex interplay of all forces (scientific, interpersonal, emotional, mental, and spiritual) that coexist within and exert influence on an individual and on a family system. The goal is to prepare marriage and family therapists who will competently develop and implement comprehensive interventions, acquire a holistic perspective to health care, understand the complexity of addressing the overall, long-term well-being of individuals, their families and their relationships; evaluate and treat mental and emotional disorders, and address a wide array of relationship issues that will best meet the needs of clients within the context of a relationships and the family system.

MFT Program statement on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination
The Marriage and Family Therapy Program harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination policy is in accord with the La Salle university policy on harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination, aligned with the La Salle mission and the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities to establish an environment where students, faculty and staff can function, work and learn, safely and with respect.

The MFT Program publishes a Diversity statement in its Student Handbook and a diversity statement is listed on all MFT Course syllabi. La Salle’s MFT Program is committed to understanding and appreciating diversity among all individuals, and to the principle that there shall be no discrimination in the treatment of any person.

Student’s Guide to Resources Rights and Responsibilities contains the university’s policy on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination.
This can be found online:
https://www.lasalle.edu/students/dean/divpub/manuals/studentguide/

Professional Clinical Counseling Program Mission

In keeping with this Lasallian tradition, the Professional Clinical Counseling Program strives to prepare professionals with the abilities and competencies requisite for the practice of mental health counseling. The curriculum emphasizes a conceptualization of the role of the counselor and what is needed to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to practice effectively and ethically. Students are provided with coursework and clinical experiences, which encourages them to examine the complex interplay of all forces (scientific, interpersonal, emotional, mental and spiritual) that coexist within and exert influence on the individual. The goal is to prepare mental health counselors who will competently develop and implement comprehensive interventions, acquire a holistic perspective to health care, understand the complexity of addressing the overall, long-term well-being of individuals, evaluate and treat mental and emotional disorders, address a wide array of mental health issues that will best meet the needs of clients, and value professional diligence and continued learning throughout their professional career.

The Professional Clinical Counseling statement on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination

The Professional Clinical Counseling Program harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination policy is in accord with the La Salle university policy on harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination, aligned with the La Salle mission and the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities to establish an environment where students, faculty and staff can function, work and learn, safely and with respect.

The PCC Program publishes a Diversity statement in its Student Handbook and a diversity statement is listed on all PCC Course syllabi. La Salle’s PCC Program is committed to understanding and appreciating diversity among all individuals, and to the principle that there shall be no discrimination in the treatment of any person.

Student’s Guide to Resources Rights and Responsibilities contains the university’s policy on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination.
This can be found online and in Appendix A:
https://www.lasalle.edu/students/dean/divpub/manuals/studentguide/

Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology Program Mission

In keeping with this Lasallian tradition, the Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program strives to prepare professionals with the abilities and competencies requisite to deal with many organizational issues which require a unique set of knowledge and skills. Included in this are selection, performance appraisal and training. The curriculum emphasizes an understanding of the fundamentals of the structure and processes of business organizations. The program emphasizes an integration of counseling theory, statistics, research, and measurement into a business or organizational setting. The goal is to prepare students who will competently develop and implement comprehensive interventions and examine the complex interplay of scientific and interpersonal which coexist with and exert influence on an organizational system.

The Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program statement on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination

The Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination policy is in accord with the La Salle university policy on harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination, aligned with the La Salle mission and the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities to establish an environment where students, faculty and staff can function, work and learn, safely and with respect.

The IOP Program publishes a Diversity statement in its Student Handbook and a diversity statement is listed on all IOP course syllabi. La Salle’s IOP Program is committed to understanding and appreciating diversity among all individuals, and to the principle that there shall be no discrimination in the treatment of any person.

Student’s Guide to Resources Rights and Responsibilities contains the university’s policy on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination.
This can be found online and in Appendix A:
https://www.lasalle.edu/students/dean/divpub/manuals/studentguide/

Program Goals

Marriage and Family Therapy

MFT Program Goals

  1. Graduates will be prepared to pass the MFT national exam by demonstrating foundational knowledge in the field of couples and family therapy, including in ethics, cultural competency, systems theory, and research.
  2. Graduates will demonstrate clinical competency in systems skills and delivering MFT interventions and services.
  3. Graduates will be prepared for employment as a MFT professional by demonstrating a commitment to their own professional development.

Faculty Goals of the Program

Faculty will:

  1. Demonstrate sensitivity for diversity within the coursework;
  2. Incorporate clinical experience, marriage and family therapy literature and research in their teaching;
  3. Incorporate COAMFTE Core Competencies and ethical practice in their teaching;
  4. Participate in professional development in the Marriage and Family Therapy field or field related to mental health;
  5. Participate in scholarly activities within the MFT program, department, university and community.

Professional Clinical Counseling

PCC Program Goals

  1. Graduates will be prepared to pass an examination acceptable for licensing by demonstrating foundational knowledge in the field of counseling including in ethics, cultural competency, systems theory, and research.
  2. Graduates will demonstrate clinical competency in counseling skills and delivering counseling interventions and services.
  3. Graduates will be prepared for employment as a counseling professional by demonstrating a commitment to their own professional development.

Faculty Goals of the Program

Faculty will:

  1. Demonstrate sensitivity for diversity within the coursework;
  2. Incorporate clinical experience, Counseling literature and research in their teaching;
  3. Incorporate CACREP Core Curricular Standards and ethical practice in their teaching;
  4. Participate in professional development in the Counseling field or field related to Counseling;
  5. Participate in scholarly activities within the PCC program, department, university and community.

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Instructional Goals of the Program

The goals of the program are to:

  1. Graduate students with 48 credit hours of appropriate coursework typically completed within 3 years;
  2. Prepare students for employment in business organizations, consulting firms, or mental health settings as administrators;
  3. Meet the educational guidelines of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP);
  4. Work satisfactorily with diverse populations and business settings;
  5. Develop as competent I/O professionals.

Faculty Goals of the Program:

Faculty will:

  1. Demonstrate sensitivity for diversity within the coursework;
  2. Incorporate business experience, IO literature and research in their teaching;
  3. Train students to deal with a variety of organizational issues;
  4. Participate in scholarly activities within the IOP program, department, university and community.

Student Learning Outcomes

MFT Program Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the Program, the student will be able to do the following:

  1. Use an ethical approach with developmental and cultural sensitivity.
  2. Use MFT/systems theories to guide case conceptualization, treatment planning, & clinical practice.
  3. Utilize appropriate systemic techniques and interventions to maintain collaborative relationships with clients.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to assess and diagnose in their clinical practice.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to apply research relevant to their clinical practice.
  6. Develop professional identities as marriage and family therapists.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of oneself and professional maturity in their approach to responsibilities.

PCC Program Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the Program, the student will be able to do the following:

  1. Use an ethical approach with developmental and cultural sensitivity.
  2. Use counseling theories to guide case conceptualization, treatment planning, & clinical practice.
  3. Utilize appropriate counseling techniques and interventions to maintain collaborative relationships with clients.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to assess and diagnose in their clinical practice.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to apply research relevant to their clinical practice.
  6. Develop professional identities as counselors.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of oneself and professional maturity in their approach to responsibilities.

IOP Program Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the Program, the student will be able to do the following:

1. Use an ethical approach with cultural sensitivity.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of current and traditional I/O approaches.
3. Utilize appropriate interventions in selection.
4. Demonstrate and ability to assess individuals.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of I/O literature, research, ethical and legal standards.
6. Develop professional identities as I/O professionals.
7. Demonstrate an understanding of oneself and professional maturity in their approach to responsibilities.

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/

2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education with a minimum of 9-12 hours in psychology, counseling, or marriage and family studies and a minimum GPA of 3.0.

  • For Marriage and Family Therapy Program: credit hours should be in psychology, marriage and family studies, or counseling.

  • For the Professional Clinical Counseling Program and the Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program: credit hours should be in psychology or counseling, including courses in general psychology, statistics, and research method.

3. Provide official transcripts from all academic institutions attended. 

4. Obtain and submit acceptable scores in the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Arrangements to take the MAT may be made with the Counseling Center of La Salle University. Information on GRE scheduling is also available from the Counseling Center. (Note: This requirement is waived if the applicant already possesses a master’s degree in any field. It may be waived if the applicant has a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher.)

5. Provide a Professional résumé.

  • Preference is given to applicants with two or more years of work experience, paid or as a volunteer.
  • A maximum of nine hours of transfer credits (for courses that are equivilant to our program courses) may be granted for graduate work taken at another institution. No skills courses credits can be transferred into our program.

6. Provide three letters of recommendation. These should include at least one from a college professor who can assess the applicant’s academic qualifications and abilities as well as one from a supervisor (if the applicant is in or has worked in the field) who can assess the candidate’s professional qualifications, abilities, and motivation for enrolling in this program. If it has been several years since the applicant graduated, three letters from supervisors or professionals is acceptable.

7. Provide a personal statement. Applicants should include what professionalism means to them with regard to their becoming a mental health clinician and/or a industrial/organizational professional. In addition, applicants should include some information about themselves, their intentions concerning their academic and career paths, why they chose the La Salle master’s program, expectations of the program, what they will contribute to the program, and what they believe they will eventually contribute to the mental health field or the industrial/organizational field.

The University’s Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon an applicant’s qualifications.

All documents should be sent to the following:

     Office of Graduate Enrollment
     La Salle University- Box 826
     1900 W. Olney Avenue
     Philadelphia, PA 19141
     215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
     grad@lasalle.edu

Progression through the Program

Depending on the program of choice, students take a total of 60 or 48 credits.

The Marriage and Family Therapy and the Professional Clinical Counseling degrees are both 60 credits, as specified in the curriculum section.

Industrial/ Organizational Psychology is 48 credits.

  • 15-21 credits—Theories and processes in Marriage and Family Therapy, Professional Clinical Counseling, or Industrial Organizational Psychology
  • 15-27 credits—Advanced training in specific approaches in each degree program
  • 12 credits—Supervised practical training through practicum, internships, case seminar, and professional seminar for Marriage and Family Therapy or Professional Clinical Counseling
  • 6 credits for IOP students in practical training through internship or completing a thesis.

Preparation for Licensure

The Marriage and Family Therapy degree (60 credit hours) prepares students to become licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFTs). The Professional Clinical Counseling degree (60 credit hours) prepares students to become licensed Professional Counselors (LPCs).

The I/O Psychology degree (48 credits) does not prepare students for licensure being there is no IOP license.

Supervised Practical Training: (Field Placement)
Includes Practicum, Internship, and Professional Seminar

All students are required to engage in supervised field training. The program has contracts with many mental health agencies and service providers; however it is up to the student to be accepted as an intern. The program prepares the student well to begin Practicum and Internship, and the student is responsible to demonstrate their preparedness when applying to sites in order to complete their Field Placement requirement. It is also up to the student to acquire a Practicum or Internship that is conducive to their academic and personal schedules.

Marriage and Family Therapy students preparing for licensing complete four semesters of Internship (PCMF 680/681/682/683) of at least 700 clock hours, 500 of which need to be direct client hours—the usual clinical internship placement involves 12 to 15 hours per week of on-site service. While engaged in the internship, students also attend Professional Seminar (PCMF 690/691/692/693).

Professional Clinical Counseling students preparing for licensing complete a one-semester practicum (PCC 660) of at least 100 clock hours, 40 of which are direct client hours—the usual practicum placement requires eight to nine hours per week. While engaged in the practicum, students also attend the Professional/Case Practicum Seminar (PCC 661). The internship (PCC 680/681/682) for Professional Clinical Counseling students preparing for licensure is a calendar year of at least 600 clock hours, 300 of which are direct client hours—the usual clinical internship placement involves 12 to 15 hours per week of on-site service. While engaged in the internship, students also attend Professional Seminar (PCC/PCMF 690/691/692).

The I/O Psychology students complete an internship or a thesis.

Internship is PCC 685/686, which is over two consecutive semesters and at least 400 clock hours—the usual non-clinical internship involves 12 to 15 hours per week in a business setting. While engaged in the internship, students also attend Professional Seminar (695/696).

Thesis is PCC 688/689, which is over two consecutive semesters. Students will conduct their own research project under the supervision of a faculty advisor.

Requirements

In addition to the curricular and field placement requirements, students are required to pass the Written Comprehensive Examination and Oral Comprehensive Examination for graduation.

Students must pass the Written Comprehensive Examination prior to applying for Practicum or Internship.

Both the Written Comprehensive Examination and the Oral Comprehensive Examination are specific to the student’s degree.

Curriculum

Marriage and Family Therapy Degree Program

Master's Degree Program (60 Credit Hours)

Required Courses

PCMF 500 (3) Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy
PCMF 502 (3) Counseling Lab I
PCMF 503 (3) Psychopathology
PCMF 504 (3) Human Behavior: A Developmental Perspective
PCMF 505 (3) Systems, Systemic Thinking and Ethics (F/TR)
PCMF 506 (3) Basic Principles of Research and Design
PCMF 602 (3) Advanced Counseling Lab (F/TP)
PCMF 603 (3) Human Sexuality
PCMF 608 (3) Therapeutic Approaches for Children and Adolescents (F/TP)
PCMF 614 (3) Working with Families (F/TP)
PCMF 616 (3) Contextual Family Therapy (F/TP)
PCMF 619 (3) Multicultural Counseling and Therapy
PCMF 624 (3) Marital and Couples’ Therapy (F/TP)
PCMF 628 (3) Understanding Relationships (F/TR)
PCMF 634 (3) Addictions & the Family (F/TR)
PCMF 680/81/82/83 (8) Internship
PCMF 690/91/92/93 (4) Professional Seminar

Total 57

F/TR = Family Theory
F/TP = Family Therapy

Additional 3 credit hours required to meet 60 credits

Choose one of the following:

PCMF 607 (3) Graduate Research
PCMF 601 (3) Grief, Loss and Trauma Counseling
PCMF 646 (3) Sex Therapy
PCMF 647 (3) Motivational Interviewing

Total 3 credits


Professional Clinical Counseling

Master's Degree Program (60 Credit Hours)

Required Courses

PCMF 500  (3) Counseling & Psychotherapy: Theories and Interventions
PCC 501    (3) Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice of Counseling*
PCC/PCMF 502 (3) Counseling Laboratory I*
PCMF 503  (3) Psychopathology
PCMF 504  (3) Human Behavior: A Developmental Perspective*
PCMF 505  (3) Systems, Systemic Thinking, and Ethics
PCMF 506  (3) Basic Principles of Research Design, Statistics, Program Development and Evaluation*
PCC 509   (3) Psychological Assessment I: Assessment in Clinical and Career Counseling*
PCC 511   (3) Practice and Concepts of Clinical Mental Health Counseling
PCC 512   (3) Addictions Counseling
PCC 601   (3) Grief, Loss, and Trauma Counseling
PCC/PCMF 602 (3) Advanced Counseling Laboratory
PCC 612   (3) Group Processes in Counseling and Psychotherapy*
PCMF 619 (3) Multicultural Counseling & Therapy*
PCC 644   (3) Career Counseling*
PCC 660   (2) Counseling Practicum*
PCC 661   (1) Professional/Case Practicum Seminar
PCC 680/81/82 (6) Internship*
PCC/PCMF 690/91/92 (3) Professional Seminar

Total 57

*Required for NBCC Licensure Examination

Additional 3 credit hours required to meet 60 credits

Choose one of the following:

PCC 607 (3) Graduate Research
PCC 608 (3) Therapeutic Approaches for Children and Adolescents
PCC 610 (3) Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches in Counseling
PCC 611 (3) Insight-Oriented Approaches in Counseling and Psychotherapy


Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Master’s Degree Program (48 Credit Hours)

PCC 507 (3) Advanced Statistics
PCC 508 (3) Cognition and Learning
PCC 509 (3) Assessment in Clinical and Career Counseling
PCC 510 (3) Advanced Research Methods
PCC 513 (3) Advanced Social Psychology
PCC 533 (3) Advanced I/O Psychology
PCC 635 (3) Measurement of Individual Differences
PCC 659 (3) Selection/Performance Managment
MGT 736 (3) Organizational Design -OR- MGT 765 Irrational Decision Making
MGT 769 (3) Human Resources Development (Training)
PCC 685/686* (4) Internship
PCC 695/696 (2) Professional Seminar

*The Professional Seminar is taken in conjunction with the Internship

OR

PCC 688/689 (6) Thesis

Total 39

Additional 9 credit hours required to meet 48 credits

Choose three of the following:

PCMF 500 (3) Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy
PCC 512 (3) Addictions Counseling
PCC 644 (3) Career Counseling
MBA 810 (3) Self-Assessment in Leadership
MGT 744 (3) Power and Influence
MGT 752 (3) Management Skills Lab
MGT 760 (3) Human Resource Management
MGT 780 (3) Managing Effective Teams

Counseling and Family Therapy Master's Programs in Montgomery County

Students are able to complete the Marriage and Family Therapy degree or the Professional Clinical Counseling degree at the La Salle University Main Campus in Philadelphia and at the Montgomery County Center, Victory Office Park, in Plymouth Meeting, PA.

For the I/O Psychology degree, courses are offered at the Main Campus. Students may have the opportunity to take electives at both campuses.

Tuition and Fees

  • Tuition per credit $835
  • Technology Fee (per semester) $150
  • General University Fee (per semester) $135
  • Graduation Fee $100

Tuition Assistance

A limited number of scholarship awards and graduate assistantships are available. Consult the Director of the Counseling and Family Therapy Master's Programs for details.

Information about financial aid and application forms for student loans may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141  (215.951.1070)

Faculty

Director of Counseling and Family Therapy Master's Programs: Donna Tonrey, Psy.D.

Associate Professors: Cardaciotto, McClure, Moon, Roth, Sude
Assistant Professors: Mendez, Parker, Tonrey
Associate Clinical Faculty: Cosby, Hannigan, Selm
Lecturers: Albert, Boyll, Cicippio, Cos, DiNardo,  Evans-Weaver, James, Maida, May, Mountney, Rodriguez, Saraga

Course Descriptions

PCC 501 Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice of Counseling

This course instructs the student on the history and philosophy of the counseling profession; in it the student will gain an understanding of the role, function, and interactions counselors engage in with other human service providers. Additionally, the counselors' role and responsibility with regard to emergency, crisis, and trauma-causing events is examined. Self-care of the counselor, supervision practices and models, overview of professional organizations, advocating for the profession, and advocating for the success of clients is also covered. Personal safety concerns for the counselor is discussed and covered. Throughout the course there is a focus on the ethical standards of the professional organizations, credentialing bodies, and licensing as well as legal issues as related to the professional counselor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 507 Advanced Statistics

This course provides students with statistical background that is useful in organizational research settings such as survey analysis and program evaluation. The topics include both parametric and non-parametric statistical methods, such as descriptive statistics, point and interval estimates, means comparisons, correlation, linear regression and multiple regression.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 508 Cognition and Learning

This course details the empirical and theoretical foundations of the present understanding of cognitive psychology and learning psychology and their integration in contemporary social learning theory. Special attention is paid to the application of the theories and research in counseling and psychotherapy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

PCC 509 Psychological Assessment I: Assessment in Clinical and Career Counseling

This course addresses the basic concepts in the construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment procedures commonly used in psychology. It uses major reference works for selecting and evaluating assessment procedures and includes supervised experience in selecting, administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment procedures and experience with computer-assisted testing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 506 (PCC students) PCC 507 (IOP students)

PCC 510 Advanced Research Methods

This course provides students with background on higher level research methods topics and statistical techniques that are useful to students in their roles as consumers and producers of research. Specific topics include the use of statistical methods to establish relationships between variables, psychometric issues, formulation of research-based conclusions, factor analysis, meta-analysis and structural equation modeling.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507

PCC 511 Practice and Concepts of Clinical Mental Health Counseling

In this course, students learn the history, philosophy, trends, and practices within community mental health agencies. This course will review the roles and function of clinicians and help students in developing the knowledge and skills needed to work as professional counselors. This will include reviews of the profession, professional identity, management of programs, and ethics; as well as teaching students how to advocate for clients; develop and review programs; understand, assess, and manage emergencies and crises.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Summer every other even year at Bucks Center; Offered Summer every other odd year at Montgomery Center

PCC 512 Addictions Counseling

This course focuses mainly on chemical substance abuse but considers the etiology and manifestations of other addictions as well. Attention is given to the occurrence of addiction in the family with particular reference to the physical, behavioral, and attitudinal manifestations of addictive behavior and identification and diagnosis of addiction, as well as the selection of appropriate processes of intervention.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offred Summer every other odd year at Bucks Center

PCC 513 Advanced Social Psychology

This course provides students with background on topics related to social bases of human behavior which have direct implications to human behavior in organizational settings. The topics include attitude, social perception and cognition, persuasion, helping, attraction, self-concept, stereotype and prejudice, aggression and group processes.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 533 Advanced I/O Psychology

This course provides a review of psychological principles applied to issues of organizations, including organizational assessment, selection, training, performance, organizational development, motivation, and work-life balance.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 610 Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches in Counseling & Psychotherapy

This is a clinical skills course that focuses on the initial problems addressed in the process of therapeutic intervention, namely the self-regulation of thoughts, feelings, and actions. Training is in a broadly conceived cognitive behavior therapy that includes a variety of specific intervention strategies designed to address problems of self-regulation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Spring every other odd year at Bucks Center; Offered Spring every other even year at Montgomery Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC/PCMF 502

PCC 611 Insight-Oriented Approaches in Counseling and Psychotherapy

A clinical skills course that focuses on the issues addressed in those counseling and psychotherapy approaches that see the gaining of insight as a significant goal in the change process. Key concepts identified with these specific approaches will be presented along with general process issues for working with individuals. Techniques specific to a number of insight-oriented approaches will be explored and students will be encouraged to gain both an understanding of these skills and the ability to utilize them.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Fall every other odd year at Bucks Center; Offered Summer every other even year at Montgomery Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 500

PCC 612 Group Processes in Counseling and Psychotherapy

This course combines experiential and didactic approaches. The student learns the major theoretical approaches to group counseling and psychotherapy and also participates in group counseling sessions on issues presented by the classroom group. This experience will show the dynamics of groups and lead to the acquisition of skills needed to assist in the resolution of behavioral problems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC/PCMF 502

PCC 635 Measurement of Individual Differences

This course provides students with background on various measurement issues in organizations, such as employee selection, performance appraisal, employee attitude surveys, and training evaluation. The topics include classical measurement theory, generalizability theory, item response theory, various psychological tests in I/O settings and professional guidelines in organizational measurements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507 and PCC 533

PCC 636 Work Motivation/Attitude

This course provides students with the basis for understanding research and theory in relevant domains of I/O psychology that represent general applications of one or more motivational perspectives. The topics include worker attitudes, opinions, beliefs, and general strategies for work motivation such as goal setting, job design, incentive systems, and participation in decision making.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507 and PCC 533

PCC 644 Career Counseling

This course offers an opportunity to help adapt a student's clinical skills to the critical area of career development. It also relates career success and satisfaction to mental health and life fulfillment, considers theories of career development and the process of career counseling, and utilizes career assessment, career resource information, and job placement requirements. Additionally, it includes career counseling with special populations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCMF 506

PCC 653 Organizational Interventions

This course is designed to assist individuals interested in a career in industrial/organizational psychology in learning about the issues involved in implementing organizational change and development programs. These issues include engaging employees in the change process, diagnosing organizational problems, effective methods for implementing change programs, and the techniques needed to evaluate the entire process.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: The IOHR program is being taught out, and this course is only offered as an Independent Study for those IOHR students that may need it to graduate.

PCC 659 Selection/Performance Managment

This course presents the theories and techniques involved in the employee selection and performance appraisal/management processes. The topics include job analysis, classical and decision-theory models of selection, alternative selection devices including interview and assessment centers, rating scale construction, rater training, criteria development, designing a performance management system, and legal and societal considerations that affect selection and performance management processes.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507, PCC 533 and PCC 635

PCC 660 Practicum

This is a practicum at an approved field placement site for a minimum of 100 clocked hours observing and/or practicing clinical skills with individuals, couples, families, and/or groups under the direction of an approved supervisor. The practicum must be taken in conjunction with the on-campus seminar in professional ethics (PCC 661).

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Successful completion of written comprehensive examination and completion of 24 credit hours, including PCC/PCMF 502 and one additional skills course.

Corequisites: PCC 661

PCC 661 Professional/Case Practicum Seminar

This course examines professional and ethical issues, with particular reference to the everyday issues of practice, in a peer consultative format. The student is encouraged to develop a "critically examined" personal style and stance with which to address these issues. The class focus will be on the development of an understanding and a working knowledge of the Codes of Ethical Conduct of the American Counseling Association, the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy, the American Psychological Association, and relevant Cpmmonwealth of Pennsylvania laws and statutes.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Successful completion of written comprehensive examination, completion of 24 credit hours including necessary skills courses.

Corequisites: PCC 660

PCC 680-681-682 PCMF 680-681-682-683 Internship

An internship takes place in a supervised experience at an approved field placement site for approximately 200 hours per term. By the conclusion of the internship, PCC students are required to accrue a minimum of 600 clock hours, half of which are direct client contact. MFT students are required to accrue a minimum of 700 clock hours, 500 of which are direct client contact. Prior to beginning Internship, students must have completed PCC/PCMF 502, 602 and one additional skills course; PCC students must also have completed PCC 660; and practice in clinical skills with individuals, couples, families, and/or groups. Includes on-campus case seminar. (Continued with PCC 681, 682 or PCMF 681, 682, 683. Each semester is two credits.)

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including successful completion of written comprehensive examination.; PCC Students: PCC 660

Corequisites: PCC/PCMF 680 taken with PCC/PCMF 690, PCC/PCMF 681 taken with PCC/PCMF 691, PCC/PCMF 682 taken with PCC/PCMF 692 and PCMF 683 taken with PCMF 693.

PCC 685-86 IOP Program Internship

The supervised internship experience is in an approved business/organization for a minimum of 200 hours per term. (Continued with PCC 686.) Each semester is two credits.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including necessary IOP and MGT courses and successful completion of written comprehensive examination

Corequisites: PCC 685 taken with PCC 695; PCC 686 taken with PCC 696

PCC 688/PCC 689 I/O Thesis

Thesis is a culmination of knowledge and skills learned in the program. Students will conduct their own research project under the supervision of a faculty advisor and prepare a research report of high quality that is suitable for publication or presentation at a national and/or professional conference. The Thesis is a total of six credits: PCC 688 (3 credits) and PCC 689 (3 credits).

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including necessary IOP and MGT courses and successful completion of written comprehensive examination

PCC 695-696 Iop Professional Seminar

The personal, practical, and ethical issues involved in the field of industrial/organizational psychology and human resource management. Examination of professional development, professional associations, continuing education, credentialing, legal responsibilities and liabilities, confidentiality, agency practice, independent practice, consulting, and inter-professional cooperation.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: For PCC 685 - completion of 24 credit hours, including necessary IOP and MGT courses and successful completion of written comprehensive examination

Corequisites: PCC 695 taken with PCC 685; PCC 696 taken with PCC 686

PCC/PCMF 502 Counseling Laboratory I

This laboratory course is designed to develop the basic counseling and therapy skills that enables students to understand the client/s, develop a trusting relationship with the client/s, and to facilitate the client/s' self-exploration. Case conceptualization, treatment planning, and progress notes will be covered. Personal safety concerns for the counselor/therapist is discussed and covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC/PCMF 570 Statistics and Research Methods

This is a foundation course that satisfies the undergraduate prerequisites but does not count toward the 48 or 60 credit hours needed for the master's degree.

Number of Credits: 3

PCC/PCMF 574 Introduction to Graduate Research and Writing

This is a foundation course that satisfies the undergraduate prerequisites but does not count toward the 48 or 60 credit hours needed for the master's degree. The course introduces students to the latest research technology and databases for advanced work in their degree. Emphasis is placed on research and communication skills, including oral presentations and written reports.

Number of Credits: 3

PCC/PCMF 602 Advanced Counseling Laboratory

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Summer every other odd year at Bucks Center

Prerequisites: PCC/PCMF 502; MFT Students: PCMF 505; PCC Students: PCC 501

PCC/PCMF 607 Graduate Research

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to engage in research. Students will be required to complete a literature review and design and complete a research project.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered as an Independent Study with approval of Director and sponsored by a faculty member

Prerequisites: PCMF 506

PCC/PCMF 690-91-92-93 Professional/Case Seminar

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: For PCC/PCMF 690 - Completion of 24 credit hours, including successful completion of written comprehensive examination

Corequisites: PCC/PCMF 690 taken with PCC/PCMF 680, PCC/PCMF 691 taken with PCC/PCMF 681, PCC/PCMF 692 taken with PCC/PCMF 682 and PCMF 693 taken with PCMF 683.

PCMF 500 Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy: Theories and Interventions

This course examines major theories of counseling and psychotherapy and the interventions based on those theories. It includes an emphasis on knowledge, skills, and ethical standards needed to provide direct counseling and psychotherapeutic interventions for individuals, families, and groups.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 503 Psychopathology

This course discusses the major categories of psychological disorders, as well as theory and research regarding etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Introduction to the use of the DSM.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 504 Human Behavior: A Developmental Perspective

This course addresses principles of human development and family processes that form the context for the study of human behavior. Special emphasis will be given to grand theories that have made important contributions, both historically and currently, to the study of human development, as well as recent discoveries in developmental science. Issues of separation, individuation, and integration in life patterns will be studied within the context of these major theories.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 505 Systems, Systemic Thinking, and Ethics

This course provides the student with an overview and consideration of family functioning. It includes family structure, family development, family health, family dysfunction, and family treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a systems perspective and applying that perspective to an understanding of family functioning. Ethics, boundaries, technology, licensure laws, and diversity are considered and included in the overall systemic view, thinking, AAMFT Code of Ethics, and identifying as a MFT. Personal safety concerns for the marriage and family therapist is discussed and covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 506 Basic Principles of Research Design, Statistics, Program Development, and Evaluation

This consumer-oriented course focuses on broad concerns common to all forms of social research. Criteria for evaluation and interpretation of various statistical techniques and research designs are covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 601 Grief, Loss and Trauma Counseling

This course will provide students with an advanced understanding of grief, loss, trauma, and related counseling interventions for children, adults, and families. The basics of grief and bereavement will be explicated, as will specific disorders related to trauma. This course is designed to help students identify needs, resources and assets available to clients coping with grief and/or trauma related disorders, and research supported methods in improving client functioning.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Summer every other even year at Bucks Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC/PCMF 502.

PCMF 603 Human Sexuality

This course examines the variety of ways that human sexuality is expressed in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in the context of the interplay between social, physiological, and psychological factors. Methods of studying sexual behavior, concepts of variation and difference, psychosexual development in life stages, and sexual dysfunctions and treatment are addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Springl every other odd year at Bucks Center; Offered Fall every other even year at Montgomery Center

PCMF 608 Therapeutic Approaches for Children and Adolescents

This course is designed to provide an understanding of working with children, adolescents, and their families. It will focus on treating a variety of presenting issues, as well as provide several theoretical perspectives for working with families with children and/or adolescents. We will explore many clinical interventions for working with youth of varying ages, and the course will include play therapy. Students will have many experiential opportunities to learn about play therapy techniques and interventions. Careful attention will be paid to ethical issues, laws regarding mandated reporting, duty-to-warn, when treating children and adolescents, as well as cultural and diversity issues will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Summer every other even year at Bucks Center; Offered Summer every other odd year at Montgomery Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC/PCMF 502

PCMF 614 Working with Families

This course covers the basic principles, techniques, applications, uses, and contra indicators of the major family therapy systems models. Specifically, the intersystems interface among intrapsychic, interpersonal, and family systems dynamics is addressed. Assessment techniques and intervention rationales are covered along with the role of the therapist and the therapist as person. The concepts of family-of-origin, family functioning, structure, strength, and narratives will be studied through an experiential and didactic approach. Application of theory and research to practice is discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Spring every other odd year at Bucks Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 616 Contextual Family Therapy

This course provides an exploration of the convictions, concepts, strategies, and techniques of contextual therapy, a resource-oriented, trust-based modality of healing interventions for individuals, couples, and families.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Spring everyo other even year at Main; Offered Fall every other odd year at Bucks Center; Offerec Spring every other odd year at Montgomery

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 619 Multicultural Counseling and Therapy

This course explores multicultural counseling theory as well as culture-specific counseling strategies for culturally diverse clients. It is designed to help students develop their multicultural counseling competence and increase their ability to work effectively and ethically in a complex and diverse social world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 624 Marital and Couples Therapy

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the issues typically addressed in couples' therapy and the ethical considerations when working with couples. Role playing is used to illustrate couples' treatment dynamics and intervention strategies from initial contacts through the treatment process. Special issues in couples therapy, such as the relationship history, communication patterns, sexual intimacy, and the "couple" relationship vs. the "parenting" relationship, are addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 628 Understanding Relationships

This course examines human relationships with particular reference to their various forms, functions, and patterns of development. The processes of attachment, separation, individuation, and differentiation are highlighted and are used in a contextual (systemic) framework to examine each relationship. Special emphasis is placed on the clinical applications of this knowledge to couples and families. The student is required to complete a study of one of his/her primary dyadic relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 634 Addictions and the Family

This course focuses on an understanding of how addictive processes interact with social and family contexts. This allows more effective treatment interventions to be designed. The current research on family dynamics and treatment of codependence, adolescent substance abuse, and children of addicts will also be reviewed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Fall at Main; Offered Spring every other even year at Bucks Center; Offered Fall every other odd year at Montgomery Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 645 Emotional, Behavioral, and Neuro-Developmental Disorders of Childhood

This course explores a range of psychological disorders in children and adolescents, with a special focus on the role of developmental and social contextual factors, in addition to biological and psychological influences. Each class will focus on a specific disorder or class of disorders, specifically its characteristics, developmental course, diagnostic criteria, protective and risk factors, and implications for prevention and treatment. Students will be encouraged to apply knowledge to current issues in the news and popular culture, as well as their own clinical experiences and lives. This is expected to lead to thoughtful discussions that can be generalized to their development as marriage and family therapists and professional counselors.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PCMF 503

PCMF 646 Sex Therapy

This course examines the variety of ways that human sexuality is expressed in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in the context of the interplay between social, physiological, and psychological factors. Methods of studying sexual behavior, concepts of variation and difference, psychosexual development in life stages, and sexual dysfunctions and treatment will be addressed. Models of sexual response, general theories of sex therapy, and modes of sex therapy will also be explored. Students will learn to take detailed sexual histories, sexual assessments, and applications of sexuality within a clinical framework with consideration of multicultural diversity.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Summer every other even year at Main and every other odd year at Montgomery Center; Offered Fall every other even year at Bucks Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 502, PCMF 602, and PCMF 603

PCMF 647 Motivational Interviewing

This course presents the students with a client-centered approach, using directive methods in order to enhance clients' intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. Motivational Interviewing is appropriate in all stages of counseling and therapy; however, it is most appropriate for individuals who are in the engagement and persuasion stages of treatment. Motivational interviewing principles and the skills are used in different combinations to build a client-centered environment that incorporates rapport and trust.

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Fall every other even year at Main

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC 512 or PCMF 634

PCMF 648 Professional/Skill Development

This course is individually designed by a faculty member for a student who has been recommended for enhanced professional or skill development. The intent of the course is to assist the student in improving their academic ability, clinical skills, and professionalism in order to be successful in the overall program. The student must agree to the professional or skill development plan once it has been established, and continue in the course until it has been determined by the faculty member that the student has passed with a B grade or higher. Students may have to take this course for more than one semester.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: This course is only available to students by recommendation from committee and approval of the Director.

Cybersecurity

Program Description

The M.S. in Cybersecurity program curriculum is aimed at professionals with a background in business management, information technology, computer science, or criminal justice. This multidisciplinary curriculum is designed for busy adult learners and draws courses from our information technology leadership, computer information science, and economic crime forensics programs. The curriculum is intended to create a better understanding of:

  •     Information security policies and procedures
  •     Computer crimes and related legislation
  •     Investigative practices and procedures
  •     Corporate ethics and compliance

The program is offered in a totally online format. It follows the traditional academic calendar of a fall and spring semester and a shorter summer semester. The fall and spring semesters are divided into two 8 week terms.  A full-time graduate student carries a minimum of 6 semester credit hours. Some courses may require more hours per week in some areas of instruction. All courses are online and 3 credits in the length. The courses will meet both synchronously (optional) and asynchronously. Students are required to participate in chat sessions and/or discussion boards, which will take the place of classroom meetings.  Synchronous sessions will be recorded for students who are not able to attend the actual session.  Students who are not able to attend the synchronous sessions will be asked to complete a short assignment related to the recorded session. Depending on their personal schedules, students may elect to take courses every term or wait for the next term to continue studies.  Courses in the summer are also 8 weeks in length.  If a student decides to take two courses during the summer session, they will overlap in the time frame.

 

Margaret McCoey, M.S.

Director, M.S. Cybersecurity program

215.951.1136

mccoey@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/cybersecurity

If you have any questions regarding the Cybersecurity  program, please contact:

cyber@lasalle.edu

Mission Statement

The graduate program in M.S. Cybersecurity educates students in theoretical and practical knowledge of cybersecurity.  The program develops competencies in cybersecurity management as well as breach detection, mitigation and prevention.  The faculty and students develop and maintain relationships with industry practitioners to encourage excellence and provide attention to ethical principles and changes related to cybersecurity.

Program Goals

  1. Prepare students to explain Internet infrastructure and enterprise network connections.
  2. Prepare student to assess organizational security policies, plans and procedures and implementations.
  3. Prepare students to identify and assess legislation related to cybersecurity.
  4. Prepare students to enter specialized careers in cybersecurity.
  5. Faculty maintains currency and breadth in cybersecurity threats and risk mitigation strategies.
  6. Utilize the alumni network to enhance curricular and co-curricular opportunities for students.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain Internet structures, enterprise network structures, and consulting services related to network infrastructures
  2. Develop, propose, and plan an organization’s information security policy.
  3. Assess security gaps in organizational policies and plans.
  4. Identify and analyze federal global legislation related to security and data threats.
  5. Differentiate between cybercrime, cyber espionage, and cyberwar.
  6. Analyze plans to protect personal, corporate and national infrastructures.
  7. Formulate plans for securing and analyzing digital forensic data

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission into the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in the completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education with an appropriate major. Appropriate undergraduate majors include, but are not limited to, management science, business administration, electrical engineering, systems engineering, mathematics, or computer science. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 will normally be required.
  3. Provide official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate colleges and universities he/she has attended. For students whose undergraduate transcripts are from institutions outside the U.S.: Transcripts/marksheets must be sent to the World Education Service (www.wes.org) for a course-by-course evaluation. An appropriate background in management science, systems analysis and design, computer science, or a related discipline, or other equivalent training is required. On the basis of admissions credentials, students may be required to complete a few foundation courses.
  4. Provide a professional resume addressing one’s educational and professional background.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professors or supervisors who can address the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrolling in the program.
  6. Attend an interview with member(s) of the admission committee. These are typically telephone interviews.

 

The application package is viewed as a whole, and the prevailing criterion is the applicant’s capacity for completing the program successfully.

The University’s Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Because oral and written communication is an integral part of many courses, students must communicate clearly in English. Since this program is offered in an online format, it does not meet the requirement for a U.S. student visa.

A maximum of six hours of transfer credit may be granted for graduate work at another institution. The student must supply a course description and syllabus in order to facilitate the transfer of credit. After matriculation at La Salle, students must have a course pre-approved by the director (in conjunction with the appropriate faculty member(s)) for it to be considered for transfer purposes.

 

All documents should be sent to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment

La Salle University - Box 826

1900 W. Olney Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19141

215.951.1100 / Fax 215.951.1462

grad@lasalle.edu

Curriculum

Students are required to complete 10 courses (30 credits) for this program.  The final course is a capstone. 

CYB 540 Network Theory
CYB 612 Ethics Issues and Government Regulations
CYB 604 The Computer and Internet Fraud
CYB 652 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation
CYB 628 Cybercrime, Cyber Warfare, Cyber Espionage
CYB 644 Information Security
CYB 648 Secure Software Development
CYB 665 Digital Computer Forensics
CYB 668 Computer and Network Security
CYB 880 Cybersecurity Capstone

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Partial scholarship grants are offered on the basis of academic credentials and financial need.

Information about other financial aid, payment options, and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, 215.951.1070.

Course Descriptions

CYB 540 Network Theory

Lecture/theory course considers the current methods, practices, and standards used to enable communication on computer and voice networks. This includes a study of the physical layers, architectural layers, design, operation, management, and ISO standards, with particular and telephony technologies. Both local and wide area networks are examined.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 604 The Computer and Internet Fraud

Computers have made organizations easier to run. All accounting information, inventory records, customer data, and intellectual property that an organization possesses is contained somewhere in an electronic file. As such, these electronic files are vulnerable to attacks from both employees and outsiders from around the world. This course will provide the student with an understanding of how computer fraud and manipulation is accomplished and what security measures should be instituted to prevent it.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 612 Ethics, Issues, and Government Regulations

This course considers privacy both on- and off-line; legal background of intellectual property and e-mail; ethics and codes of ethics; effects of computers on work and society; and responsibilities and risks of computing, including topics such as accuracy of information, e-waste, and multitasking. This course includes an examination of government policies and regulations related to data security and information assurance.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 628 Cybercrime, Cyber Warfare and Cyber Espionage

This course introduces students to the differences between cybercrime, cyber espionage, and cyber warfare by discussing the relationship of cyber intrusions and cybersecurity to nations, businesses, society, and people. Students will use case studies to analyze the threats, vulnerabilities and risks present in these environments, and develop strategies to reduce the breaches and mitigate the damages.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 644 Information Security

This course explores all aspects of computing and communications security, including policy, authentication, authorization, administration, and business resumption planning. It examines key security technologies, such as encryption, firewalls, public-key infrastructures, smart cards, and related technologies that support the development of an overall security architecture. Coursework includes plans for developing and implementing a technology security strategy focused on business needs. Prerequisite: CIS 540

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 648 Secure Software Development

This course will provide an overview of current software development methodologies and examine strategies to integrate security into all phases of the lifecycle. By examining current software vulnerabilities, students will develop secure coding guidelines, and strategies for static code analysis; they will create secure testing plans to mitigate security failures.  The course will examine language specific vulnerabilities, input validation and threat modeling.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 652 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

This experiential course emphasizes the importance of feedback and self- assessment for leadership development. It includes extensive assessment of each participant’s management style and skills based on self-evaluations (using structured questionnaires) and feedback from coworkers, faculty, and other participants. Leadership development experiences emphasize time and stress management, individual and group problem-solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, and team leadership. Each participant identifies skills he or she needs to develop and reports on efforts to develop those skills.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 665 Computer Digital Forensics

This course examines techniques used to conduct computer crime investigations and gather probative evidence to secure a conviction under state and federal laws. Students will simulate a computer forensic investigation: developing an investigation plan, securing the crime scene, analyzing evidence, preparing the case for court, and testifying in a moot court situation.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 668 Computer and Network Security

Students will study and implement basic computer and network security strategies on Window and Linux networks. Students examine and analyze network traffic, including investigating wireless transmission, install firewalls and define Internet Protocol Security Controls (IPSEC). Labs include system hardening, dissecting network packet structure and creating encryption formats; managing authentication and access controls. Students study implementing a public key infrastructure and best strategies for using intrusion detection systems.

Number of Credits: 3

CYB 880 Integrative Capstone

The capstone project is an opportunity to pursue an independent learning experience focused on a specific aspect of economic crime forensics based on the student interest. The capstone is intended to extend students beyond the coursework and cases to apply knowledge in ways that are relevant to their professional goals. Students will work on a research project or in an experiential learning environment. Each student will be required to present his/her capstone both as an oral presentation and a summary written document.

Number of Credits: 3

Economic Crime Forensics

Program Description

The goal of this program is to prepare students to enter the field of economic crime and digital forensics in careers such as internal and external fraud auditors, digital forensics specialists, and data and network security managers. The program prepares individuals to detect, deter, and investigate instances of economic crime, misconduct, and abuse. This program is unique to the Eastern Pennsylvania geographic area.

The M.S. in ECF incorporates key components from La Salle's graduate programs in Computer Information Science, Information Technology Leadership, and Master of Business Administration. The program adds additional theory in areas of criminal justice, litigation preparation, and corporate ethics. The program also provides an additional path for technology managers interested in pursuing a leadership career by integrating financial compliance with corporate business goals. Students complete a capstone experience which integrates theory and practice through either an industry specific research project or a program-related experiential position.

The program is offered in an online format and follows the traditional academic calendar of a fall and spring semester and a shorter summer semester. The fall and spring semesters are divided into two 8 week terms.  A full-time graduate student carries a minimum of 6 semester credit hours. Some courses may require more hours per week in some areas of instruction. All courses are online and 3 credits in the length. The courses will meet both synchronously (optional) and asynchronously. Students are required to participate in chat sessions and/or discussion boards, which will take the place of classroom meetings.  Synchronous sessions will be recorded for students who are not able to attend the actual session.  Students who are not able to attend the synchronous sessions will be asked to complete a short assignment related to the recorded session. Depending on their personal schedules, students may elect to take courses every term or wait for the next term to continue studies.  Courses in the summer are also 8 weeks in length.  If a student decides to take two courses during the summer session, they will overlap in the time frame.

The M.S. in ECF focuses on a set of theoretical core competencies which include the following:

  1. Economic crime definition, analysis, and prevention;
  2. Legal and corporate compliance and ethical issues;
  3. Economic risk analysis and mitigation; and
  4. Investigative practices, principles, and prosecution.

 

Margaret McCoey, M.S.

Director

215.951.1136

mccoey@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/ecf

 

If you have any questions regarding the Economic Crime Forensics program, please contact:

ecf@lasalle.edu

Mission Statement

The M.S. in Economic Crime Forensics augments students’ background, to acquire both practical and theoretical knowledge in their chosen field, and to enhance their professional competence. Students who earn a M.S. in Economic Crime Forensics will be prepared to advance in their professional careers while completing a graduate degree.

Program Goals

 
  1. Prepare students to participate ethically and professionally in a global market.
  2. Prepare students to enter the field of economic crime prevention and detection and investigation.
  3. Prepare students to apply standards and best practices of forensics and litigation support.
  4. Prepare students to be corporate leaders in fraud prevention and deterrence.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Propose business law standards, standards of ethics, and professional codes of conduct related to corporate leadership.
  2. Assess corporate cultures related to global markets, including concepts and perceptions related to economic crime and fraudulent activity.
  3. Evaluate and support accounting and auditing concepts related to the causation of corporate economic crime.
  4. Devise plans and processes (i.e., internal controls) to prevent and deter economic crime.
  5. Identify the red flags of fraud within organizations and evaluate the adequacy of the internal controls in place to mitigate these fraud opportunities.
  6. Develop approaches to investigate and quantify suspected fraud schemes, including interview techniques.
  7. Design, plan and execute procedures to secure corporate information systems.
  8. Identify, secure, analyze, and summarize pertinent documentation and information related to litigation matters. 
  9. Develop standards and procedures for handling and custody of digital evidence.
  10. Develop policies and procedures to foster anti-corruption behavior. 
  11. Construct corporate risk mitigation strategies and procedures related to economic crime.

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in the completion of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education. Students with academic studies in business, technology, or criminal justice would be best positioned to complete this program. Candidates must have an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0.
  3. Request that official transcripts from the institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable). For work completed outside the US, the transcripts need to be evaluated by World Education Service (www.wes.org).
  4. Provide a professional résumé.
  5. Request two letters of recommendation from professors at the college level. If the applicant has been out of school for more than two years, the letters of recommendation may be provided by current or past supervisors at his/her place of professional employment.
  6. Attend an interview with a faculty member to assess the candidate’s requirements for foundation courses. This is usually a telephone interview.

The program is intended to serve working professionals who may have already had formal experience in corporate finance, management, or computer security. For these individuals, the letters of recommendation required should come from employers, past and present.
Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

 All documents should be sent to the following:
 Office of Graduate Enrollment
 La Salle University- Box 826
 1900 W. Olney Avenue

  Philadelphia, PA 19141

 215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
 grad@lasalle.edu

Curriculum

Students must complete the ten core courses for the degree:

ECF 601 Fraud Examination Principles and Practices

ECF 604 The Computer and Internet Fraud

ECF 605 Corporate Ethics and Compliance

ECF 610 Criminal Justice and Legal Concepts

ECF 625 Litigation Support Practices and Procedures

ECF 632 Financial Statement Fraud

ECF 636 Occupational Fraud and Abuse

ECF 644 Information Security

ECF 652 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

ECF 655 Fraud Detection and Prevention: Special Cases

Students choose one of the following:

ECF 628 Cybercrime, Cyber Warfare, Cyber Espionage

ECF 638 White Collar Crime

ECF 658 Data Mining

ECF 665 Computer Digital Forensics

All students complete a capstone project:

ECF880 Integrative Capstone

TOTAL CREDITS: 36

Faculty

Program Director: Margaret McCoey, M.S.
Associate Professors: Redmond, Wang
Assistant Professors: McCoey
Lecturers:Casey, Crossen, Henry, Hilkowitz, Monaghan, Smith, Walters, Welde, Zikmund

Course Descriptions

ECF 601 Fraud Examination: Principles and Practices

This course will provide students the weapons to fight fraud by focusing on basic fraud schemes, information and evidence gathering, criminal and civil prosecution, and criminology and ethics. The objective of this course is to provide students with methodologies for resolving fraud allegations from inception to disposition. Students taking this course gain an understanding of the different types of fraud, the legal environment of fraud, and the ways to obtain evidence and assist in the detection and prevention of fraud.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 604 The Computer and Internet Fraud

Computers have made organizations easier to run. All accounting information, inventory records, customer data, and intellectual property that an organization possesses is contained somewhere in an electronic file. As such, these electronic files are vulnerable to attacks from both employees and outsiders from around the world. This course will provide the student with an understanding of how computer fraud and manipulation is accomplished and what security measures should be instituted to prevent it.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 605 Corporate Ethics and Compliance

This course will examine corporate compliance as a response to the Sarbanes/Oxley legislation, which requires corporations to implement programs designed to impact business practices relative to honesty, integrity, compliance, and ethical behavior. Students will review the elements of the Act with particular emphasis on the areas of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB); auditor independence; corporate responsibility; enhanced financial disclosure; corporate fraud; and accountability as they relate to the promotion of enhanced financial security and address corporate malfeasance. Students will evaluate case studies of practical applications of theories and practices on the implementation of ethics and professionalism.

Number of Credits: 3

The course provides an overview of the legal systems and expertise required for fraud risk professionals. The course enables participants to deepen their knowledge of the U.S. legal system by acquiring a broader understanding of processes and procedures that focus on fraud investigation, prosecution, and civil remedies. The course covers knowledge of law enforcement agencies, federal rules and regulations and evidence management, and expert testimony.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 625 Litigation Support Practices and Procedures

Learners will explore white collar misconduct that constitutes civil and/or criminal fraud in a corporate setting, including but not limited to: (1) falsification of business records; (2) false billing; (3) forgery of documents or signatures; (4) embezzlement; (5) creation of false companies; (6) false insurance claims; (7) bankruptcy fraud; (8) investment frauds (such as Ponzi schemes); (9) tax fraud; and (10) securities fraud. Students will develop processes and procedures for proper evidence management as well as learn how to prepare to serve as an expert witness and write legally sound expert reports.

Prerequisite: ECF 610

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 628 Cybercrime, Cyber Warfare, Cyber Espionage

This course introduces students to the differences between cybercrime, cyber warfare and cyber espionage by discussing the relationship of cyber intrusions and cybersecurity to nations, businesses, society, and people.  Students will use case studies to analyze the threats, vulnerabilities and risks present in these environments, and develop strategies to reduce the breaches and mitigate the damages.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 632/FACC 702 Financial Statement Fraud

This course introduces students to the differences between cybercrime, cyber warfare and cyber espionage by discussing the relationship of cyber intrusions and cybersecurity to nations, businesses, society, and people.  Students will use case studies to analyze the threats, vulnerabilities and risks present in these environments, and develop strategies to reduce the breaches and mitigate the damages.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 636 Occupational Fraud and Abuse

Occupational fraud and abuse is described as the use of one’s occupation for personal enrichment through the deliberate misuse or misapplication of one’s employing organization’s resources or assets. Through the use of real-life case examples, this course will focus on the types of persons most likely to perpetrate occupational fraud, the conditions under which fraud might be committed, and the specific schemes used to defraud organizations of amounts ranging from hundreds to millions of dollars.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 638 White Collar Crime

This course focuses on the battle between personal gain and individual integrity and provides a comprehensive analysis of white-collar crime in American society. The course presents a picture of all types of white-collar crime, and includes discussion of high-profile cases, trends in criminal activity, consequences of criminal behavior, and the impact on victims. The course addresses the economic crisis, its causes, cases and participants, and the impact of white-collar crime.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 644 Information Security

This course explores all aspects of computing and communications security, including policy, authentication, authorization, administration, and business resumption planning. It examines key security technologies, such as encryption, firewalls, public-key infrastructures, smart cards, and related technologies that support the development of an overall security architecture. Coursework includes plans for developing and implementing a technology security strategy focused on business needs. Prerequisite: ECF 604

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 652 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

This experiential course emphasizes the importance of feedback and self- assessment for leadership development. It includes extensive assessment of each participant’s management style and skills based on self-evaluations (using structured questionnaires) and feedback from coworkers, faculty, and other participants. Leadership development experiences emphasize time and stress management, individual and group problem-solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, and team leadership. Each participant identifies skills he or she needs to develop and reports on efforts to develop those skills.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 655 Fraud Detection and Prevention: Special Cases

The opportunity to commit and conceal fraud exists only when there are assets susceptible to misappropriation and a lack of internal controls to prevent or detect fraud. This course will focus on the high-risk fraud environments wherein assets are more vulnerable to misappropriation and fraud because of either a lack of, or non-functioning of, internal controls. The study of various fraud investigative methods and the process for communicating an expert report will be an essential part of this course.

ECF 658 Data Mining

This course introduces the field of data mining, with specific emphasis on its use for Machine Learning algorithms. Techniques covered may include conceptual clustering, learning decision rules and decision trees, case-based reasoning, Bayesian analysis, genetic algorithms, and neural networks. The course covers data preparation and analysis of results. Skills in Microsoft Excel are useful.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 665 Computer Digital Forensics

This course examines techniques used to conduct computer crime investigations and gather probative evidence to secure a conviction under state and federal laws. Students will simulate a computer forensic investigation: developing an investigation plan, securing the crime scene, analyzing evidence, preparing the case for court, and testifying in a moot court situation.

Number of Credits: 3

ECF 880 Integrative Capstone

The capstone project is an opportunity to pursue an independent learning experience focused on a specific aspect of economic crime forensics based on the student interest. The capstone is intended to extend students beyond the coursework and cases to apply knowledge in ways that are relevant to their professional goals. Students will work on a research project or in an experiential learning environment. Each student will be required to present his/her capstone both as an oral presentation and a summary written document.

Number of Credits: 3

Education - (M.A.)

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
  3. Provide official transcripts from the institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
  4. Obtain acceptable scores on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Arrangements to take this examination may be made with La Salle’s Counseling Center. This requirement may be waived for applicants with an overall GPA of 3.4 or above or hold an existing masters or advanced degree.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from colleagues or supervisors who can address the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrollment.
  6. Provisionally meet the criteria, both academic and professional, detailed later in this section under the heading “Candidacy Procedures for Teaching Certification.”

Additional information may be requested.

  1. Provide a copy of teaching certificate.
  2. Attend a personal interview with the Director of the program.
  3. Provide a personal statement of your interest in the program.
  4. Provide a professional résumé.
     

Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications. Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog.

All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelphia, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Progression through the Master's Degree Program

Individual plans for progression will be determined for each student in consultation with the program director and program adviser.

Required for Degree:

  • 30 graduate credits consisting of the 6 Core and 4 other courses
  • GPA of 3.0 and higher

Core Courses: Required for the Masters of Arts degree in Education and Elementary/Special Education certification, Middle Level/Special Education, and Secondary Education certification. (*Other programs may have different requirements for the M.A.)

  • EDC 503   Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Development
  • EDC 510   Human Exceptionalities
  • EDC 602   Educational Technology
  • EDC 604   Foundations of Schooling
  • EDC 613   The Developmentally Oriented Teacher
  • EDC 751   Transformative Pedagogy: A Capstone Experience

Electives: 12 credits are required to complete the M.A. (Certification courses can be used as electives for the M.A.)

M.A. candidates may choose to specialize in one of the concentrations listed below.

Autism Spectrum Disorders (12 credits):

  • EDC 655  Dimensions of Autism
  • EDC 657  Systems Approach with Families and Educators
  • EDC 665  Communication Strategies for Teachers of ASD Children and Youth
  • EDC 667  Implementing the IEP in the Inclusive Classroom

Instructional Coaching (12 credits):

  • EDC 505  Introduction to Instructional Leadership I
  • EDC 615  Advanced Instructional Design
  • EDC 652  Leadership and Educational Change I
  • EDC 653  Leadership and Educational Change II

M. A. degree with certification candidates will engage in field experience and integrated coursework:

Elementary and Special Education Certification Candidates

  • Inclusion Practicum (Combines EDC 643, EDC 645, EDC 661)
  • Professional Semester (Combines EDC 662 and EDC 679 or EDC 669 and EDC 679)

Special Education (only) Certification Candidates

  • Inclusion Practicum (Combines EDC 643, and EDC 645 and EDC 661)

Middle Level and Special Education Certification Candidates

  • Inclusion Practicum (Combines EDC 643, EDC 645, EDC 661)
  • Professional Semester (Combines EDC 662 and EDC 679 or EDC 669 and EDC 679)

Secondary Education Certification Candidates

  • Secondary Education Practicum (Combines EDC 647 and EDC 648)
  • Professional Semester (Combines EDC 680 and EDC 689 or EDC 680 and EDC 668)

*Visit the individual program pages for courses of study for each certification option offered.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

A modest amount of need-based, tuition-reduction funding is available. Scholarships are available for STEM education candidates.  Consult the Director or Academic Advisor for more details.

Information about financial aid and application forms may be obtained from the Student Financial Services’ Web site, http://www.lasalle.edu/financialaid/, or by calling 215.951.1070.

Graduate Faculty

Director: Greer Richardson, Ph.D.

Professors: Williams

Associate Professors: Byrne, Lewinski, Liang, Mosca, Richardson

Lecturers: Baker, Conway, Dougans, Finore, Foote, Hughes, Kersul-Wiener, Linso, Ricci, Vassallo, Rulli, Tarducci

Professors Emeritus: Clabaugh, Vogel, Yost

Course Descriptions

EDC 503 Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Development

This course provides an overview of the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, emotional, and moral development for humans across the lifespan. Participants will explore theories of learning and development as they pertain to the individual in the home, in schools, the community, at work, individually, with families and with peers. Attention will be paid to both normative and nonnormative developmental trends.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

EDC 505 Introduction to Instructional Leadership I

This course provides an overview of adult learning, understanding, and communication as a vehicle to teacher growth and instructional leadership skills as well as an introduction to models of assessment, technology standards, technology in assessment, data-driven decision making using Excel and other data-based programs, data analysis, supervision, and professional development. Opportunities to shadow and observe practicum supervisory staff will be provided. Students will also get valuable experiences practicing authentic data collection and analysis through the development of an assessment and professional development plan in the graduate practicum.

Controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development are studied and applied to the construction of a values-based curriculum.
The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that make teachers effective curriculum leaders and school problem solvers.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 613

EDC 510 Human Exceptionalities

This course introduces human exceptionalities and surveys the psychological, medical, legal, and social forces influencing the provision of services for exceptional people. Clarifies perceptions of exceptionalities, defines and describes key terms and concepts, and identifies major trends that affect the scope and nature of service to exceptional people.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

EDC 512 Introduction to the Middle School

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the historical, social, and cultural influences in the development of the middle school concept. It investigates organizational structure, alternative patterns of school and class organization, team planning, and collaboration techniques. This course focuses exclusively on middle-level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 520 Writing Instruction for Literacy Educators

In this course, students will read and analyze books and articles written about the pedagogy of writing instruction to give the foundation necessary to create an authentic writing environment in their classrooms-where all of the students will view themselves as writers. The students will create teaching goals and will present what they learn through a variety of assignments culminating with the creation and implementation of a unit to reflect their growth.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 555 Introduction of Early Childhood Methods

This course provides an overview of historical and current early childhood education models as well as curriculum, classroom management, and assessment considerations based on developmental theories of young children in Prek-4th grades. A special emphasis is placed on holistic curricula integrating literacy, mathematics, science, social studies, art, music, and movement into early childhood classrooms and including the family and community into the overall design. Understanding how to develop a classroom environment that embraces is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 503

EDC 602 The Teacher and Technology

This course helps teachers incorporate modern technologies of instruction into their classroom practices. Includes visual literacy and design principles, videography, the Internet, videodisc technology, cable in classroom, trends in educational computing, and multimedia. Emphasizes the impact of those technologies on human growth and development.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: EDC 503

EDC 604 Foundations of Schooling

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of educational institutions including, but not limited to schooling, both past and present are discussed. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of schools structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy- making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and attitudes that make teachers effective curriculum leaders and school problem solvers.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 503, EDC 510, EDC 613

EDC 612 Geography for Teachers

This course provides educators with the knowledge necessary to institute, update, and enrich the teaching of geography. Examines using geography as an integrative discipline to teach physical and social sciences. Surveys the major research traditions of geography including the earth-science tradition, the culture-environment tradition, the location tradition, and the area analysis tradition. Required of all Elementary and Special Education Certification candidates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

EDC 613 The Role of the Developmentally Oriented Teacher

This course enables students to more expertly apply child and adolescent developmental concepts to the practice of teaching. Explores strategic instructional planning, teaching styles, presentation skills, cooperative learning, and classroom management systems. Emphasizes the role of the teacher as an educational leader and decision-maker. Uses video-assisted micro-teaches both in the laboratory and the classroom.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 503

EDC 615 Advanced Instructional Design

This course advances understanding of managing the teaching and learning environment through instructional and management considerations using research-based approaches for practicing teachers and instructional leaders. The use of technology and other methods to enhance in-depth learning are emphasized. Course content includes strategic instructional planning, curriculum mapping, integrated unit development, differentiated instruction, technology integration, authentic assessments, culturally proficient teaching, and the role that classroom management plays in developing a positive climate for learning. This course may be taken as an elective in the master's program

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 505

EDC 616 Play, Learning, and Education

This course examines various perspectives on the notion of play in culture, with a particular emphasis on children's play. The course will emphasize the link between theory and practice at the sites in society where children interact with each other and adults.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 617 Reading in the Content Areas for Secondary Educators

This course provides students with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instruction techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. Required of all certification candidates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 503

EDC 618 Reading and Writing in the Elementary-Special Education Classroom

Promotes understanding of reading as a strategic interactive process that affects learners' efforts in all academic areas. Explores currently held views of the reading process, instruction techniques, and assessment concerns related to elementary and secondary education. Employs a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. Required of all certification candidates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 503

EDC 619 Literacy Difficulties: Diagnosis and Instruction for Reading Specialists and Classroom Teachers

The major goal of this course is to help future and practicing teachers understand how reading and writing ability develop, why some students have difficulty learning to read/or write, how to diagnose and address reading and writing problems, why a variety of assessment and teaching techniques must be used to identify students' strengths and needs, and how to use the results to design appropriate instruction. The premise for this goal is that both understanding why and knowing how are necessary for a teacher to make informed decisions that impact reading and writing instruction.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 617 or EDC 618; or enrolled in Special Education certification program

EDC 624 Images of Schooling and Childhood in Literature, Painting, and Film

The seminar will examine how concepts of schooling and childhood evolved in American and European culture from the 18th century to the present. The course will focus on how literature, painting, and film reflect these changing concepts as they relate to the following: progressive vs. traditional schooling; school as factory, temple, and town meeting; public vs. private schooling; corporal punishment; moral education; childhood, heredity, and environment; and childhood, creativity, and imagination. The course will also include a field trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 641 Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course focuses on how to develop student understanding of scientific knowledge and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It also addresses science education standards, issues, research, and application. Throughout the semester, students are provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 503

EDC 642 Development of Mathematical Thought

Assists students in understanding how children develop quantitative reasoning and examines implications for teaching math concepts, skills, and problem-solving approaches across content areas. Provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum and offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques. Required of all Elementary and Special Education Certification candidates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 503

EDC 643 Developing and Adjusting Instruction

This course is designed to help elementary and special education teachers use a developmental perspective in order to design instruction that maximizes learning for a diverse groups of pupils. Further, this course will provide the knowledge necessary for teachers to adjust instruction to accommodate the wide variety of needs commonly found among children with and without disabilities and other needs in current elementary and special education classrooms. Education 643 provides the background necessary for understanding developmental levels, learning styles, and research-based instructional strategies that connect to unit development. Education 645 and 661 represents a summer practicum experience necessary to implement instruction in inclusive and non-inclusive educational settings.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

Prerequisites: EDC 503, EDC 510

EDC 644 Assessing the Abilities of all Learners

This course provides an overview of norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, curriculum-based, and authentic assessments used in the evaluation of students with and without disabilities. Classroom-based practices using differentiated assessments are also emphasized in this course. Students will be engaged in evaluating a focus child and writing a report containing Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) goals to meet the needs of the student.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 510 or permission

EDC 645 Planning and Instruction for Students with Special Needs

This course will extend graduate students' understanding of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) planning, including the Individual Transition Plan, and how to collaborate with parents and outside agencies. Included will be IEP interpretation and accommodations for students classified as low incidence students, including autism. In addition, students will learn how to adjust standards-based units of instruction to meet the needs of students with moderate to severe disabilities. Addressed will be the following: functional and basic academics, communication, daily living skills, socialization, community experiences and related services.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 643

EDC 647 Developing and Adjusting Instruction for Secondary Learners

This course applies a developmental perspective to the design and implementation of secondary-level instruction.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 503 or permission

EDC 648 Secondary Education Summer Practicum

An intensive summer immersion program for secondary certification candidates. Provides an early full-time classroom teaching experience in a closely supervised and highly supportive clinical setting.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 503, EDC 647 or permission

EDC 650 Language Assessment and Special Education of ESL Learners

Provides an overview of federal, state, and local mandates regarding the assessment of ESL learners. Placement testing, standardized assessment, performance assessment, rubrics, and portfolios will be addressed specifically. Issues in authentic assessment and assessment in the content areas will also be addressed. Helps students to understand the legislation that promotes individual rights for children and adults with disabilities, the special education classification and labeling process, and current trends in the education of children with disabilities. Students will analyze the impact that a handicapping condition has on the individual in learning and social environments.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BLS 600, BLS 601, or permission

EDC 652 Leadership and Educational Change I

This course focuses on developing education professionals' ability to critically reflect on problems arising in schools for the purpose of achieving positive school change. Using in-depth research related to instructional practices in a specific content area of interest or expertise (reading, mathematics, social studies, science, etc.) or behavior management, students will conduct needs assessments in their schools and design a professional development project that will result in positive classroom or school change. Approval of the project is required by the school leadership and course instructor prior to progressing to the next course (EDC 651), in which the action research project will be implemented.

In order to prepare graduate students for this project they will be exposed to the following 1) school staff development needs and resources based on analysis of data, interviews with teachers and the leadership team, and personal observations; 2) multiple assessments designed to measure program outcomes, and: 3) activities designed to address the needs of the educational program and needs assessment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 505, EDC 615

EDC 653 Leadership and Educational Change II

This course is a continuation of EDC 650: Leadership and Educational Change I. Thus, graduate students will be implementing professional development plans in a school environment and analyzing data collected to measure outcomes of the action research project. Students will be mentored and supervised by a La Salle University instructor as they engage in implementing their school-based projects and measuring outcomes.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 505, EDC 615. EDC 652

EDC 655 Dimensions of Autism

This course provides an overview of the historical and legislative antecedents of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) . Students will learn about the characteristics of students who fall with in the Autistic Spectrum (Asperger's syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder, Rett's syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and hyperlexia) in preparation for teaching students with autism in inclusive and self-contained settings. Students will be introduced to a continuum of interventions for students with ASD.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

EDC 657 Systems Approach With Families and Educators

This course is designed to provide the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Graduate Student, and the Education Graduate Student with an understanding of how family systems, the education system and the community mental health system operate independently and collectively, and the influence each has on the other with regard to the special needs child and family. The goal of the course is to enhance the understanding of the delivery of service, and its impact on the well being of the child and the family. A comprehensive overview of systems approach to family therapy, the educator's role within the education system, and access and understanding of the community mental health system will be examined and explored. Additionally examined will be cultural issues and realities, the ethical considerations in treating a special needs child and family, and how all systems within the child's life can collaborate within the treatment model developed for that child.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 655

EDC 661 Teaching All Students in Inclusive and Special Education Settings

An extension of EDC 645 in which participants design and deliver instruction to moderately and severely handicapped learners. Emphasizes the classroom application of research-based knowledge of child development and individual differences. Prerequisites: EDC 643, EDC 645

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 643 and EDC 645 or EDC 647

EDC 662 Elementary and Special Education Student Teaching

Required of all Elementary and Special Education Certification candidates with no teaching experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Must be taken as final course in certification sequence.

EDC 665 Communication Strategies for Teachers of Students Spanning the Special Needs Spectrum

This course will provide educators with new insights into the communications-related needs of students, enable participants to work more effectively with related services in the delivery of special programming and, teach class members to apply new technologies and strategies to best meet the needs of special needs students including those with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). In collaboration with speech- language pathologists, current practices in monitoring, data-gathering and assessment of students holding communications-related IEPs will be introduced, practiced and applied to the classroom setting in a practicum experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: EDC 655

EDC 667 Implementing the IEP in the Inclusive Classroom

This hybrid course will enhance graduate students' understanding of how to interpret a Comprehensive Evaluation Report (CER) and Individualized Education Plan (IEP) in order to meet the academic, social, and/or behavioral goals of students with disabilities within the context of the general education curriculum. In addition, special consideration of the needs of English language learners and gifted and talented students will be addressed in the course. Application of universal design, differentiated instruction, and specific accommodations and strategies for students with disabilities will be stressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: For the special education certification program: EDC 510, EDC 644, EDC 643, EDC 645, EDC 661; For the ASD program: EDC 655; EDC 665

EDC 668 Secondary Education Supervised Teaching (S)

This course can, with permission of the Candidacy Committee, replace student teaching for candidates with two or more years teaching experience who are also currently employed as teachers. For one semester, the supervised teacher is observed and guided by University faculty while teaching in his or her own current private or public school position. The supervised teacher also conducts an action research project. (Must meet Commonwealth standards as appropriate for area of certification.) Required of all certification candidates who are not required to take student teaching.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Must be taken as final course in certification sequence.

EDC 669 Elementary and Special Education Supervised Teaching/Transitional Teaching

This course can, with permission of the Candidacy Committee, replace student teaching for candidates with one or more years teaching experience who are also currently employed as teachers. For one semester, the supervised teacher is observed and guided by University faculty while teaching in his/her own current private or public school position. The supervised teacher also conducts an action research project. Required of all certification candidates who are not required to take student teaching.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Must be taken as final course in certification sequence.

EDC 670 Special Topics in Education

Permits individual examination of topics of special interest. Requires faculty sponsor and permission of the Director.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

EDC 673 Seminar in School Law

This course surveys the complex legal environment in which schooling takes place. Explores the variety of laws and regulations that govern the work of educators. Outlines guiding legal principles and summarizes the legal processes whereby conflicts are resolved.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 679 Elementary and Special Education Special Methods of Teaching

Weekly seminars held either on campus or at the practicum site designed to help students translate theory into practice by exploring teaching methods in the chosen area of certification. Research project required. Required of all certification candidates.

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Must be taken as final course in certification sequence.

EDC 680 Secondary Education Special Methods of Teaching

Weekly seminars held either on campus or at the practicum site designed to help students translate theory into practice by exploring teaching methods in the chosen area of certification. Research project required. Required of all certification candidates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Must be taken as final course in certification sequence.

EDC 689 Secondary Education Student Teaching

Required of all certification candidates not eligible for Supervised Teaching. Prerequisite: Must be taken as final course in certification sequence

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Must be taken as final course in certification sequence

EDC 751 Transformative Pedagogy: A Capstone Experience

This capstone course, for students in any of the Education programs leading to a Master's degree, will focus on critical pedagogy and transformative pedagogies, while providing the structure and guidance for the completion of a capstone project. Students will be able to choose one of three capstone options: (1) publishable quality paper, (2) development of a curriculum, or (3) action research project. The course will be structured so that students will be guided through project proposal, design
and completion while engaging in coursework and readings that emphasize transformative pedagogies.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: EDC 501, EDC 502, EDC 504, EDC 604, EDC 613

Education - La Salle/RTC (M.Ed.)

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a student must:

  • Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  • Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education. Candidates should have had a Grade Point Average of 3.0 in the bachelor’s degree.
  • Request that official transcripts from institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
  • Provide a professional resume.
  • Provide two professional recommendations enclosed in sealed and signed confidential envelopes.

​Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications. 

All documents should be sent to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University- Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141
215.951.1100/Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Description of the Program

The core program requirements and concentration areas for the La Salle/ RTC M.Ed. are assembled into three distinct tracks: 1) Teaching Strategies for 21st Century Learners; 2) Differentiated Instruction; and 3) Creating Positive Classroom environments. The Lasallian imprint goes even further in the program by requiring specific courses whose content closely aligns with each concentration area. These distinct concentration areas allow a candidate not only to associate their professional inquiry with their teaching practices; it gives them a level of pedagogical expertise consistent with a M.Ed. degree program.

The La Salle/RTC M.Ed. program has been designed to expand student understanding and application of research-based instructional strategies through highly engaging graduate courses that empower teachers with knowledge and skills to enhance effective practice. Moreover, courses are taught by highly-skilled, knowledgeable and experienced classroom practitioners. Instructors work to build a positive and collegial environment that models effective teaching practice. In addition, the interactive, research-based, project-focused courses engage participants as they discover signature pedagogies to further develop their teaching expertise. Finally, the activities, assignments, and LEP’s enable candidates to apply inquiry-based models to what they have learned in their own educational settings. Students in the La Salle/RTC M.Ed.program will be required, across courses, to use their own practice and classroom settings as sites for enacting the methods and concepts that comprise each course.

Courses are offered in three different formats: face to face, hybrid and online.  Face to face classes follow a weekend intensive format during the 10-month school year. Classes meet for five days spread over two or three nonconsecutive weekends, depending on course needs and structure. During summer sessions, courses run on five non-consecutive weekdays spread over two or three weeks. In addition to assignments and activities completed during the courses, all courses have a Learning Extension Project (LEP) due ten days to two weeks after conclusion of the course. Two of the courses; EDM 535 Brain-Based Teaching and Learning* and EDM 580 Differentiated Instruction* have one specific LEP required for all candidates that supports the EDM 635 Reflective Practice in Teaching course culminating in an action-research LEP. 

January M. Baker, Ph.D.
Associate Director La Salle/RTC M.Ed. Program
215.951.1955
gradrtc@lasalle.edu
www.lasalle.edu/rtc

Faculty

Associate Director: January M. Baker, Ph.D.
Director of Instruction/RTC: Mike Kuczala, M.M.E
Assistant Director of College Programs/RTC: Dale Jonathan Miller, Ph.D.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Education incorporates the de La Salle Christian Brothers tradition of teaching excellence and service. Our departmental focus on learning capitalizes on the need for all professional educators to understand and apply developmentally appropriate, contentrich, differentiated instructional, management, technological, and assessment practices that result in deep and meaningful learning.

A Lasallian educator is responsive to the needs of all students and the communities they serve through a rigorous curriculum. La Salle educators are knowledgeable, intellectually curious, reflective collaborative, confident, and proactive. They are service oriented – manifesting a measurable degree of devotion to assist students in need.

This mission statement, reflected in its courses and curricula, makes a strong statement about our sustained and focused commitment to selected graduate programs, particularly those that are located off site, throughout PA, MD or globally, that provide for the development of the area’s most competent and qualified educational professionals. Given La Salle’s history, teacher development is a clear focus of this public service mandate. Because they are typically employed and often have family or other responsibilities, part-time graduate students in education are often limited in how far they can travel to pursue their education. All too often, geography, not the nature of the educational program dictates a prospective student’s choice. 

Because our candidates are certified, practicing PreK-12 teachers, our instructors are mindful to explicate the links between the overall transformative social justice mission of the Education Department and the course experiences provided for candidates as they work to improve their teaching. Lastly, the dynamic integration of theory-practice-reflection domains assures that candidates have ample opportunity to discuss, explore and understand how and in what ways the coursework specifically relates to their work as teachers and their students as learners. The partnership with the RTC merges La Salle University’s excellent reputation in higher education with The Regional Training Center’s comprehensive relevant coursework.

Students who are interested in applying for matriculation into the Master of Education program should reference the section on admission requirements. Students who apply for matriculation into one of La Salle’s other Master of Arts programs may apply a maximum of six credits of RTC coursework as elective credit, pending approval by the graduate program coordinator. Elective credit requirements vary by concentration and students must contact their graduate program coordinator prior to registration for course approval.

Overview

Beginning September 1, 2015 the Graduate Programs in Education will offer courses for professional development as well as courses leading to a new Master of Education in partnership with the Regional Training Center. Founded in 1993, The Regional Training Center’s (RTC) purpose is to provide exciting and relevant graduate professional development opportunities in both executive format and online to teachers in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland in partnership with colleges accredited by Middle States and Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation. This degree program has been designed for certified teachers who want to improve their own instructional practices. At this time, the La Salle/RTC M.Ed. is offered off-site in locations throughout PA and in MD*. (*pending Maryland Higher Education Commission’s approval)

Program Goals

Graduate Programs in Education will:

  1. Foster programming focused on leadership, social justice and equity.
  2. Offer quality graduate program in various learning formats (online, hybrid, executive) to support student needs.
  3. Provide students a cadre of faculty who are well-versed in adult education theory and practice; engaged in scholarly work; and highly productive and visible in their field of study.
  4. Ensures program sustainability through human and capital acquisition and management.
  5. Engage in ongoing program assessment to measure the short- and long-term impacts of Gradate Education programs on teacher practice.
  6. Support student development in three distinct areas: 
  • Professional Learning Stance:  Students will address practice through the lenses of learning and inquiry stances. Students will develop critical habits of mind to address assumptions of practice by evaluating and interrogating significance, perspective, evidence, connection and supposition 
  • 21st Century Communication Skills.  Students will use effective and articulate expression of thoughts and ideas effectively using multiple modalities and technologies in multiple and diverse settings.  Students will use active and effective listening skills to surface underlying meaning, values, attitudes and intentions.  Students will infer message effectiveness and impact before, during and after delivery.
  • Social Justice and Leadership.  Students will engage in respectful collaboration to address professional and community issue.  Students will display an awareness and sensitivity to ethnically, linguistically, cognitively, physically, socially diverse group.  Students will demonstrate a belief in educational equity. 

Progression through the Program

Courses indicated by course number and title.

Individual plans for progression will be determined for each student in consultation with the program director and program adviser.

The Master of Education (M. Ed.) program consists of a set of required courses taken by all students pursuing the degree in addition to concentration courses taken to allow students to focus on one particular area of emphasis. Course registration for this program will occur via the Regional Training Center.

Three (3) concentration options are offered to better meet specific, practice-based goals sought by the candidate for the M. Ed. degree.

Option 1: Teaching Strategies for 21st Century Learners

This area of concentration is designed for the practitioner interested in new insights and skills to effectively teach utilizing strategies and technology to increase academic achievement of P-12 21st century learners.

Required Core Courses (Six Courses: 18 Total Credits)

  • EDM 535 Brain-Based Teaching and Learning*
  • EDM 540 Cooperative Discipline
  • EDM 545 Assessment Techniques: Assessing for Student Learning
  • EDM 580 Differentiated Instruction*
  • EDM 585 Styles of Teaching: Personality Type in the Classroom
  • EDM 635 Reflective Practice in Teaching

Required Concentration Courses (Three courses: 9 Total Credits)

  • EDM 520 Universal Design for Learning: Reaching All Learners in the Digital Age
  • EDM 555 The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning Through Movement
  • EDM 630 Skills for Building the Collaborative Classroom

Elective Course (Choose One 3-credit course or any other RTC course: 3 Total Credits)

  • EDM 524 Technology with Ease: Enhancing the Modern Classroom
  • EDM 530 Encouraging Skillful, Creative and Critical Thinking
  • EDM 620 The Kinesthetic Classroom II: Movement Across the Standards

The LEP requirement for these courses supports the Reflective Practice in Teaching Course LEP project.

Option 2: The Differentiated Classroom

This area of concentration is designed for the practitioner interested in gaining new insights and skills to effectively raise academic achievement using strategies to reach a diverse classroom of P-12 learners.

Required Core Courses (Six Courses: 18 Total Credits)

  • EDM 535 Brain-Based Teaching and Learning*
  • EDM 540 Cooperative Discipline
  • EDM 545 Assessment Techniques: Assessing for Student Learning
  • EDM 580 Differentiated Instruction*
  • EDM 585 Styles of Teaching: Personality Type in the Classroom
  • EDM 635 Reflective Practice in Teaching

Required Concentration Courses (Three courses: 9 Total Credits)

  • EDM 515 The Gendered Brain
  • EDM 560 The Culturally Distinctive Classroom
  • EDM 615 Strategies for ADHD, LD, and a Spectrum of Learners

Elective Course (Choose One 3-credit course or any other RTC course: 3 Total Credits)

  • EDM 530 Encouraging Skillful, Creative and Critical Thinking
  • EDM 555 The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching & Learning Through Movement
  • EDM 575 Skills and Strategies for Inclusion and Disabilities Awareness

The LEP requirement for these courses supports the Reflective Practice in Teaching Course LEP project.

Option 3: Building Positive Classroom Communities

This area of concentration is designed for the practitioner interested in gaining new insights and skills to effectively create a positive and effective learning environment utilizing best practices in classroom management for P-12 learners.

Required Core Courses (Six Courses: 18 Total Credits)

  • EDM 535 Brain-Based Teaching and Learning*
  • EDM 540 Cooperative Discipline
  • EDM 545 Assessment Techniques: Assessing for Student Learning
  • EDM 580 Differentiated Instruction*
  • EDM 585 Styles of Teaching: Personality Type in the Classroom
  • EDM 635 Reflective Practice in Teaching

Required Concentration Courses (Three courses: 9 Total Credits)

  • EDM 565 Increasing Student Responsibility and Self-Discipline in Learning Communities
  • EDM 570 Motivation: The Art and Science of Inspiring Classroom Succes
  • EDM 605 The Bully Proof Classroom

Elective Course (Choose One 3-credit course or any other RTC course: 3 Total Credits)

  • EDM 530 Encouraging Skillful, Creative and Critical Thinking
  • EDM 555 The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning Through Movement
  • EDM 630 Skills for Building the Collaborative Classroom

The LEP requirement for these courses supports the Reflective Practice in Teaching Course LEP project.

Student Learning Outcomes

All courses are involved in some form of the La Salle/RTC ongoing assessment system. To ensure appropriate content and rigor, La Salle has identified five Student Learning Objectives (SLO’s) for each concentration area and the courses in which the SLO is taught and/or assessed. The Student Learning Outcomes for the M.Ed. program are:

Option 1: Teaching Strategies for 21st Century Learners

  1. Teachers will analyze diverse assessment tools and strategies.
  2. Teachers will identify principles of cooperative discipline in the context of 21st
  3. Century learners and apply knowledge to P-12 contexts.
  4. Teachers will apply research on learning to P-12 contexts.
  5. Teachers will conduct an action research project in their specific P-12 classroom context.
  6. Teachers will be able to apply knowledge of 21st century learning to P-12 contexts. 

Option 2: The Differentiated Classroom

  1. Teachers will analyze diverse assessment tools and strategies.
  2. Teachers will identify principles of cooperative discipline in the context of 21st Century learners and apply knowledge to P-12 contexts.
  3. Teachers will apply research on learning to P-12 contexts.
  4. Teachers will conduct an action research project in their specific P-12 classroom context.
  5. Teachers will be able to apply knowledge of diverse learners to P-12 contexts. 

Option 3: Building Positive Classroom Communities 

  1. Teachers will analyze diverse assessment tools and strategies.
  2. Teachers will identify principles of cooperative discipline in the context of 21st Century learners and apply knowledge to P-12 contexts.
  3. Teachers will apply research on learning to P-12 contexts.
  4. Teachers will conduct an action research project in their specific P-12 classroom context.
  5. Teachers will apply knowledge of positive classroom management theories and strategies to P-12 contexts.

Transfer Credit

For the FY 2016 year, it is anticipated that a majority of teachers in MD and PA who are currently matriculated into the current RTC/Gratz master’s program will decide to continue with the RTC executive or online format courses and transfer to La Salle University. Both La Salle University and the Regional Training Center want to avoid any disruption in the program for Maryland and Pennsylvania teachers as there is both a legal and ethical imperative to continue. To best support those teachers who wish to complete their current program and receive a degree through the La Salle/RTC M.Ed. program beginning 9/1/15, La Salle University has agreed to accept all approved courses that are listed on an official transcript from Gratz College’s MA Ed. Following the completion of a transfer form and transcript review, teachers will be able to continue with their graduate program in the Fall of 2015 and receive the La Salle/RTC M.Ed. degree upon successful completion of their coursework.  Effective June 30, 2017, La Salle will no longer gradfather Gratz RTC credits.  New applicants will be held to the same program standards as other applicants (see below).

For new matriculated students who do not have graduate credits form the RTC/ Gratz MA Ed. program, La Salle University may accept up to a maximum six graduate credits from other colleges or universities pending review and approval by the Associate Director. 

Tuition and Fees

Students will register through the Regional Training Center (RTC)’s website and pay the tuition and fees as published. Please see http://thertc.net for more information. 

Tuition Assistance

For students interested in financial aid for their M.Ed. degree, the information regarding required forms and FAFSA can be found at La Salle’s Financial Aid Web site.

Course Descriptions

EDM 511 Creating Health and Balance in Today's Classroom

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning on research that shows students who are physically fit and well-nourished perform at a higher academic level. The impact of stress, poor nutrition, poor time management, and lack of physical activity on students and educators will be examined in order to better facilitate the learning process.

EDM 515 The Gendered Brain

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning in current research on gender differences, including how to provide educational equality enhancing each student's personal worth and meaning through a variety of gender specific activities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 520 Universal Design for Learning: Reaching All Learners in the Digital Age

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning for teachers to apply a blueprint for creating flexible goals, methods, materials and assessments to support classroom-based activities that will enable their students with diverse needs and learning styles to succeed in an inclusive, standards-based, digital classroom.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 524 Technology with Ease: Enhancing the Modern Classroom

Focus on keeping ahead of the technological curve, regardless of your initial comfort working with technology. This course is designed to increase confidence in integrating technology using emerging web applications. Explore the use of educational technology to facilitate student learning and have students become digitally prepared for the 21st century. Question previously conceived notions about content creation, delivery, storage, and assessment, while stretching existing teaching methods to adapt to changing student needs. NOTE: A laptop with WiFi capability is required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online, Hybrid

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 530 Encouraging Skillful, Critical, and Creative Thinking

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning in a practical, experiential course for all educators who want to explore and apply instructional strategies to teach students to be better thinkers. Embedded within the course are five research-based themes to promote student achievement: learning to think skillfully; thinking to learn (using models for thoughtful questioning); thinking together cooperatively; thinking about one's thinking (metacognition and reflection); and thinking big by applying thinking skills and processes to authentic problems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 535 Brain-Based Teaching and Learning

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning utilizing current research in neuroscience that indicate ways that brains naturally learn best. Teachers will then apply what they learn to the P-12 classroom.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 540 Cooperative Discipline

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning to shift the discipline paradigm from controlling student behavior through rewards and punishment to helping all students make better choices. Structured around research-based school success factors, course content identifies the four goals of misbehavior, builds positive classroom climate, and presents multiple strategies to use at the moment misbehaviors occur.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 545 Assessment Techniques: Assessing for Student Learning

This course examines, discusses and offers experience and analyzing authentic assessments, as well as studies the progression of the standards-based movement and how the Common Core State Standards will better allow educators to prepare students for the future.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 555 The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning Through Movement

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning through understanding how instructional content can be enlivened in the P-12 classroom through the use of dynamic movement and kinesthetic activity. By using movement, academic standards can be met, test scores can be improved and important life skills can be developed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 560 The Culturally Distinctive Classroom

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning in strategies for classroom management and lesson delivery in a culturally diverse classroom will be examined. The focus is on understanding our national culture in order to understand and appreciate other cultures. A study of multiculturalism, trends in multicultural education through the perspective of the English Language Learner, as well as trends in second language acquisition are key components of this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 565 Increasing Student Responsibility and Self-Discipline in Learning Communities

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning through using a three-dimensional model for understanding why students may act irresponsibly in the classroom and what can be done about it. Develop an approach that focuses on students' internal dialogues to help them resolve inner conflicts as well as examine strategies for improving responsibility in the learning community.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 570 Motivation: The Art and Science of Inspiring Classroom Success

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning on why the traditional reward-punishment model does little to promote achievement and offers concrete researched-based ways to motivate students. Motivation as it applies to the learning process will be surveyed: basic human needs, the driving force behind all human behavior, inspiration and peak performance, energizing classroom strategies, and frameworks that encourage change and achievement.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 575 Skills and Strategies for Inclusion and Disabilities Awareness

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning to assist teachers to gain a deeper understanding of disabilities, and examine the social, academic and physical considerations in school, community and home as factors in the learning environment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 580 Differentiated Instruction

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning through a framework to design effective instruction for all students using students' learning styles, interests and level of readiness.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 585 Styles of Teaching: Personality Type in the Classroom

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning on Jung's four temperaments to understand more thoroughly issues pertaining to teaching, learning, classroom management, communication, conflict resolution, esteem building, and problem solving. Teachers will apply what they learn to real classroom situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 605 The Bully Proof Classroom

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning on the important issue of bullying that today's families, schools, communities, and society face. This course provides research-based information to better understand the issues and develop strategies to address the problem.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 615 Strategies for ADHD, LD, and a Spectrum of Learners

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning in today's classrooms that include a spectrum of learners who have different levels of attention, learning, communication, and behaviors. Learn how to tap into your students' strengths with appropriate interventions and curriculum practices.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online, Hybrid

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 620 The Kinesthetic Classroom II: Moving Across the Standards

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning to design kinesthetic activities for the P-12 classroom focusing on teaching Common Core and national standards based content. It also supports the refinement of strategies and techniques regarding "The Six-Part Framework" to ensure maximum student participation that enhances academic achievement, builds class cohesion, and develops life skills. Teachers create new activities and tactics to enhance the learning process for the students and design effective action plans to increase movement in the school environment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 630 Skills for Building the Collaborative Classroom

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning to bolster collaboration, cooperation, innovation, creativity and critical thinking (all 21st Century Skills) using interactive hands-on structures and activities. The goal: to engage students living in a global community and ultimately working in a global marketplace. Participants can expect to learn how to successfully encourage students to work cooperatively and collaboratively to THINK, CREATE, SHARE and GROW interdependently.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: none

Corequisites: none

EDM 635 Reflective Practice in Teaching

This course examines, discusses and offers hands-on learning for teachers to apply concepts and principles of reflective teaching practice in the context of critical and transformative pedagogies. Emphasis is placed on linking reflection on practice to make informed instructional decisions. This course is structured so that graduate students are guided through a reflective process leafing to deeper insights into the nature of teaching and learning.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: none

Prerequisites: This course may be taken only after the completion of at least 5 courses in the program.

Corequisites: none

History

Program Description

La Salle’s M.A. in History program is different from all others in the Mid- Atlantic region in several distinct ways:  for example, its two-track program and its unique Concentration in Public History.

A Two-Track Program

  • M.A. in History (30 credits)
  • M.A. in History for Educators (30 credits)

Unique features of the M.A. in History for Educators and the M.A. in History:

  1. A common core of seven courses:

HIS 510: Historiography

HIS 610: Readings in American History

HIS 620: Readings in European History

HIS 630: Readings in World History

HIS 640: Visualizing History

HIS 650: Oral History

HIS 663: Readings in Special Topics in American, European, and Global

2.The option of either a comprehensive exam or writing a thesis.

These unique features of this program provide distinct opportunities to advance the careers of both practicing social studies teachers and aspiring graduate students in history. The appeal for all teachers with teaching certificates is that this program will broaden and deepen their knowledge of history in maintaining active certification status (in conformity with Act 48) and reaching the “highly qualified teacher” category by mastery of content knowledge.

Those students in pursuit of a traditional M.A. in History will also find La Salle’s program attractive:

  • The M.A. in History curriculum is professional in nature and is designed as preparation for the doctorate and numerous professional careers.
  • The common core of seven courses, along with upper-level electives and seminars provides excellent preparation for archival analysis, visual history, material culture, oral history, and interdisciplinary research that, collectively, has become the hallmark of doctoral-level courses in history, as well as most doctoral dissertations.

Unique features of the M.A. in History with a Concentration in Public History:

La Salle’s M.A. in History with a concentration in Public History provides graduates with both historical content knowledge and professional skills needed for successful careers in Public History by offering the following:

  • A general introduction to Public History
  • The acquisition of both content knowledge and pedagogical skills in visual representations associated with American social and cultural history
  • An introduction to the analysis of material culture and archival analysis
  • Familiarization with the workings of history museums and the development of exhibits
  • Familiarization with various digital media skills for the development of Web sites and documentaries
  • An internship with a public history venue in order to develop skills required for a successful career in public history

George B. Stow, Ph.D.

Director

215.951.1097

stow@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/gradhistory

If you have any questions regarding the History program, please contact:

gradhis@lasalle.edu

Mission Statement

In accordance with our belief that History is, as G.R. Elton once put it, “the only living laboratory we have of the human experience,” the History Department of La Salle University seeks to immerse its students as broadly as possible in that experience. In the best tradition of the Christian Brothers, we aspire to teach our students, “where we find them,” regardless of means or status. Toward that end we take to heart the words of the University’s mission statement, seeking to “assist students in liberating themselves from narrow interests, prejudices, and perspectives,” and to show them the full reach of the human past. We believe that such training develops our students as both active citizens and, more important, as fully-realized human beings.

Program Goals

Instructional Goals

  1. The application of varying historiography
  2. The demonstration of a firm understanding of historical content knowledge combined with pedagogy
  3. The production of original historical scholarship
  4. The ability to form convincing historical arguments
  5. The incorporation of substantive primary source material to prove a preconceived thesis

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the student will be able to do the following:

  1. Understand historiographical approaches
  2. Comprehend and retain pedagogical content knowledge
  3. Apply critical thinking and analytical skills relative to the contextual historical scholarship
  4. Use substantive prose style in order to present meaningful explanations of historical events
  5. Appreciate the importance of factual evidence and chronology

Admission Requirements

M.A. in History and M.A. in History with a Concentration in Public History

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

1.   Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University.  The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.

2. Provide evidence of completing a bachelor’s degree with 18 hours of undergraduate course work in history or a related discipline with a GPA of at least 3.0

3.  Provide official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work

4.  Obtain and submit an acceptable score on the Graduate Record Exam General Test   (Native speakers of a language other than English must submit TOEFL scores.)

5. Provide a Professional Résumé.

6. Request two letters of recommendation from colleagues or supervisors who can address    
the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrollment.

7. Provide a writing sample (preferably from an undergraduate research paper)

8. Provide a brief personal statement (250 to 500 words)

Admission is based solely upon the applicant’s qualifications.  Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog 
* The stated admission requirements are construed as guidelines; the graduate admissions committee fully recognizes that some candidates may present either credentials or prior experiences that lie beyond the parameters described above.

All documents should be sent to the following:

 Office of Graduate Enrollment
 La Salle University- Box 826
 1900 W. Olney Avenue
 Philadelphia, PA 19141
 215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

 grad@lasalle.edu

M.A. in History for Educators
To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University.  The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.

2. In most cases, candidates for admission to the M.A. program in History for Educators should have taken 18 hours of undergraduate course work in history or a related discipline, with a GPA of at least 3.0.
3. Request that official transcripts from the institutions of higher education showing all             undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).

4. Present evidence of one of the following:

     a. A currently valid teaching certificate, OR

     b. An acceptable score on the Professional Knowledge section of the Praxis Test (Native      speakers of a language other than English must submit TOEFL scores.) OR

     c. An acceptable score on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)

5. Provide a Professional Résumé.

6. Request two letters of recommendation from colleagues or supervisors who can address the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrollment.
7.  Provide a personal statement of your interest in the program, if requested (optional).

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications. 

Office of Graduate Enrollment
 La Salle University- Box 826
 1900 W. Olney Avenue
 Philadelphia, PA 19141
 215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
 grad@lasalle.edu

Certificate Option (12 credits)
Candidates for admission to the certificate option should submit an application, résumé, and transcripts of all undergraduate coursework.
* NOTE: The stated admission requirements are construed as guidelines; the graduate admissions committee fully recognizes that some candidates may present either credentials or prior experiences that lie beyond the parameters described above.

Progression Through the Program

Required for M.A. in History (30 Credits)

  1. HIS 510 Historiography
  2. HIS 610 Readings in American History
  3. HIS 620 Readings in European History
  4. HIS 630 Readings in World History
  5. HIS 640 Visualizing History
  6. HIS 650 Oral History
  7. HIS 663 Readings in Special Topics
  8. HIS 700* History Elective
  9. HIS 770 Thesis Direction I
  10. HIS 771 Thesis Direction II

Comprehensive Exam Option

  1. HIS 710 History Elective
  2. HIS 760 Seminar: Integration and Application of Research Strategies Presented in Core Courses

*As Additional His 700 can serve as a substitute for one of the following courses: HIS 640 or 650

Required for M.A. in History for Educators (30 Credits)

  1. HIS 510 Historiography
  2. HIS 610 Readings in American History
  3. HIS 620 Readings in European History
  4. HIS 630 Readings in World History
  5. HIS 640 Visualizing History
  6. HIS 650 Oral History
  7. HIS 663 Readings in Special Topics
  8. History/Education/English Elective
  9. HIS 775 Thesis Direction for Educators I
  10. HIS 776 Thesis Direction for Educators II

Comprehensive Exam Option

  1. *HIS 700 History Elective
  2. HIS 761 Seminar in the History of Education

*As Additional His 700 can serve as a substitute for one of the following courses: HIS 640 or 650

Required for M.A. History with a Concentration in Public History (30 Credits)

  1. HIS 505 Introduction to Public History
  2. HIS 510 Historiography
  3. HIS 610 Readings in American History
  4. HIS 615 History of Philadelphia
  5. HIS 640 Visualizing History
  6. HIS 650 Oral History
  7. HIS 665 Museum Studies
  8. HIS 668 Issues and Practices Management
  9. HIS 680 Techniques in Public History
  10. HIS 705 Internship in Public History

Five-Year Bachelor's to Master's In History

Students may earn both a B.A. and M.A. in history by participating in the University’s Five-Year Program. To be eligible for this option, undergraduate students must complete 90 credit hours, be a history major, and have a minimum GPA of 3.0. Students satisfy the undergraduate history major requirements during their first four years at the University, earning a minimum of 120 credits, of which a maximum of six may be graduate credits, while maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better. Upon completion of a B.A., students may then enter the M.A. in History program by completing the remainder of the full degree requirements.

Certificate Option

Non-matriculating degree students have the option of enrolling in a series of courses leading to a certificate in one of three areas:

  • European History
  • American History
  • World History

Students who earn a certificate in one of the above areas may, with the approval of the Director, apply these four courses toward either the M.A. in History or the M.A. in History for Educators. The certificate option will appeal especially—but not exclusively—to those educators already well along in their teaching careers and interested in qualifying for either Act 48 or “highly qualified” status.

Curriculum for the Certificate Program

Students will complete four courses (12 credits):

  • HIS 510 Historiography

A readings course appropriate to the area

  • HIS 610 Readings in American History OR
  • HIS 620 Readings in European History OR
  • HIS 630 Readings in World History

Two appropriate graduate History electives

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Faculty

Director: George B. Stow, Ph.D.
Professors: Desnoyers, Leibiger, Stow
Associate Professors: Allen, Jarvinen, Stebbins
Lecturer: Frassetto, R. Ryan
Professor Emeritus: Rossi, Rossi

Course Descriptions

HIS 505 Introduction to Public History

An introduction to the theoretical and methodological practices of public history. It serves as a foundation for considering the implications of shared practices of history in which professionals consider and collaborate on the meaning of the past for the present.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 510 Historiography: Introduction to Research and Historiography

This course serves as an introduction to the craft of history. In addition to research methodologies, the course explores different "schools" and approaches to the study of the past.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 610 Readings in American History

This seminar, which covers central themes and developments from 1607 to the present, focuses on the growth of national identity, the founding and preservation of the American republic, the crucible of slavery and its aftermath, the rise of the United States as a military and industrial power, and the struggle to create an inclusive society.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 615 History of Philadelphia

A survey of the history of Philadelphia from its founding to the present through an examination of the peoples who imagined it, built it, and struggled for and over it.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 620 Readings in European History

This seminar follows the contours of an advanced course in the development of Western Civilization. The seminar is divided into two segments: from antiquity to the Renaissance and from the Renaissance to the modern era. Readings focus on principal themes and developments in the following areas or disciplines: political and social; economic; religious; scientific; diplomatic and military; intellectual and cultural.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 630 Readings in World History

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 640 Visualizing History

Analysis of historical themes and topics (e.g., American immigration; 20th century American social and intellectual history; the Greco-Roman World; World Wars I and II) through readings, photography, painting, and film documentaries.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 650 Oral History: Theory and Practice

Theme-based readings and practice in oral history (e.g., family history, labor and class history; gender history; African-American history; military history).

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 663 Readings in Special Topics in American, European, and Global History

This course examines aspects of a selected topic in American, European, or Global History. Sample titles might include the following: Readings in the History of Education; Readings in the History of Ideas, Readings in Roman History; Readings in English History; Readings in Asian History.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 665 Museum Studies

An introduction to basic object theory and practice as central to every history museum and historical society. Students gain practical hands-on knowledge through various assignments such as developing exhibitions and creating clear and proper documentation for researchers and future generations.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 667 Historic Site Management

This graduate level course will introduce the basic principles in the administration of historic houses and historic sites. The course poses two larger questions: What challenges are facing history museums today? What kinds of skills are needed to deal with these challenges? We will discuss ethical and legal issues, strategic planning, museum organization, personnel management, collections management, marketing and public relations and governance. The course will focus specifically on developing student knowledge of current issues in the field and building skills needed to work in various areas of museum management.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 668 Issues and Practices in Archival Management

This course is designed to meet two objectives to provide an overview of the field of archival management, and introduce the students to the work of archivists, while at the same time preparing them to fulfill the duties of archivists as a component in a career in public history. The course will also include guest speakers and at least one site visit.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 680 Techniques in Public History

An introduction to the basic concepts of various digital media processes (e.g., the design and publishing of public history projects by using Web sites, audio, and video content). Students also review and evaluate public history Web sites and other media based on criteria used by professional public history organizations.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 700 History Elective

Samples include "The Ordeal of Total War: World War II"; "England in the Late Middle Ages"; "China and Japan"; "American Intellectual History"; "U.S Constitution in Crises"; "Colonial Latin America"; "The American Revolution"; "The Modern Middle East"; "Progressive Era to New Deal"; "Lincoln and the Civil War"; "America and World War I"; Explorers and Travelers of the 19th Century"; and "Soviet Russia: Lenin to Stalin."

*Can serve as a substitute for HIS 640, HIS 650, or HIS 663

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 705 Internship in Public History

An internship experience that allows students to combine theory and course content knowledge with practice through hands-on experience in one of several public history venues in the Philadelphia area. Working approximately 15 hours a week under professional supervision, students learn how to apply their education. The student will meet with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors.

Prerequisites: Be an M.A. student in History; have at least a 3.0 GPA; have completed all required courses; have permission of the graduate director. Students may not take internship credit with an organization for whom the student works full-time.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 760 Seminar: Integration and Application of Research Strategies Presented in Core Courses

This seminar is designed to allow students to pursue an advanced research project in either American, European, or global history. It also serves to prepare students for a comprehensive exam in their chosen area of concentration.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 761 Seminar in the History of Education

This seminar is designed to allow students to pursue an advanced research project in the history of education, either American, European, or global history. Students may choose to investigate issues within the areas of curriculum and instruction that relate to middle school, secondary school, or higher education and/or that focus on a variety of topics within education including gender, race, class, ethnicity, politics, or religion. Alternatively, students may choose to investigate other institutions whose form and function are essentially educational, e.g., museums, settlement houses, and historical sites.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 770 Thesis Direction I

Supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to compose a detailed outline, to write a draft version of the thesis. Research and completion of thesis continues in HIS 771.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 771 Thesis Direction II

Continued supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to compose a detailed outline, to write a draft version of the thesis, followed by the submission of a final version.

Prerequisite: HIS 770.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 775 Thesis Direction for History Educators I

Supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to develop a suitable thesis topic, to prepare a working bibliography and to begin research. Research continues and is completed in HIS 776.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 776 Thesis Direction for History Educators II

Supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to compose a detailed outline, to write a draft version of the thesis, followed by the submission of a final version.

Prerequisite: HIS 775

Number of Credits: 3

Human Capital Development

Program Description

"Aligning People Strategies to Organizational Objectives" is the  focus  of the innovative Online Master of Science in Human Capital Development (HCD) program. The HCD curriculum is designed for human resources practitioners and managers with workforce development responsibilities. It is a cutting-edge alternative to traditional human resources and business administration MBA degrees. This program combines project-based learning theory, hands-on design experience, and management skills to provide learners with a theoretical and intellectual foundation of Human Capital Development principles, methods, and techniques.

The HCD program is offered completely online, because we understand the demands placed on busy working adults. The curriculum was developed primarily for managers and human resources professionals working with managers who demand and expect peak productivity from their workforce, despite a tumultuous economic environment. Accomplishing this objective without diminishing the quality of work for an organization’s employees requires a different type of strategic thinking, which is problem-solving from an organizationally holistic point of view.

The Master of Science in Human Capital Development program will teach learners how to serve as internal or external advisers to management at all levels, especially senior management, working to transform the current workplace into the workforce needed in the future . Students will learn to develop, implement, and measure strategic human capital plans for their organization.

Whether learners are a project manager or regional manager, they will learn how to improve their workforce over time to meet their organization’s future needs. The program will teach participants how to develop organizational solutions that will strategically integrate their organization’s people, mission, goals, and objectives.

This multidisciplinary curriculum is designed for busy adult learners and integrates courses from psychology, management, negotiation theory, and instructional technology to offer learners a blend of theory and practice. Students are able to focus on a specific aspect of human capital development in fields such as education, healthcare, finance, global corporations, not-for-profit, and government. Students also have the option of surveying many different human capital development initiatives throughout the world.

Lynnette Clement, Ed.M.

Program Director

215.991.3682

clementl@lasalle.edu

http://www.lasalle.edu/human-capital-development/

Mission

La Salle University’s Online Master of Science in Human Capital Development program offers students a practical, innovative curriculum designed to align people strategies with organizational objectives. Through theory, meaningful research, and practical application, students are exposed to integrated business education and gain necessary skills for developing, implementing, and leading organizational strategic human capital strategies and performance. Faculty and students engage in scholarly discussion, applied research, and project-based learning methods. La Salle is a Roman Catholic institution of higher education and ensures teaching and learning enriched by the traditions of the De La Salle Christian Brothers.

Program Goals

  • To provide students with a theoretical and intellectual understanding of how HCD is strategically integrated with an organization’s people, mission, goals, and objectives.
  • To provide students with a comprehensive understanding of how a HCD framework links the organization’s workforce with its bottom line.
  • To provide students with functioning insight into the legal environment under which HCD professionals operate.
  • To teach how organizations invest in their human capital, ethically manage knowledge, and measure the development process against their bottom line.
  • To create a realistic understanding of how to either tactically direct organizational conflict toward meeting organizational goals, or to mitigate the destructive impact of such conflict.
  • To enable program participants to both diagnose complex strategic challenges facing HCD professionals and develop innovative solutions to those challenges.
  • To develop a strategic leadership aptitude in HCD decision-making that is ethical and results-oriented.
  • To develop superior communication skills with philosophically and culturally diverse internal and external individuals in the performance of HCD functions.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the program, students will be able to do the following:

  • Explain contemporary human capital development (HCD) theory and how it is strategically integrated with the organization’s people, mission, goals, and objectives;
  • Identify the link between human capital development and the organization’s bottom line;
  • Analyze the human capital development process within organizations;
  • Demonstrate strategic HCD decision making that is both legal and ethical;
  • Formulate message strategies that demonstrate effective communication with diverse situations and audiences;
  • Diagnose complex challenges facing human capital development professionals and generate innovative solutions.

Admission Requirements

The Human Capital Development program admissions committee is concerned with each applicant’s interests, aptitude, and potential for achievement in graduate studies. Program applications are reviewed on a rolling basis. Students may enter the program in the fall, spring, or summer. All candidates must have completed a four-year undergraduate degree or its equivalent from an accredited institution of higher learning to qualify for admission. Because oral and written communication are an integral part of many courses, students must have the ability to communicate clearly in English.

To be considered for admission, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at https://www.lasalle.edu/grad/apply/ accompanied by the application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
  3. Request an official transcript with the degree conferral date from the accredited institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
  4. Provide a professional résumé.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professionals who can address the candidate's ability and motivation for enrollment.
  6. Provide a 500-word essay stating why he/she is interested in the program and what his/her goals are related to this program.

*The GRE or GMAT are not requirements for this program.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

Most application information can be uploaded during the online application process.

All other documents should be submitted to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University
1900 W. Olney Avenue, Box 826
Philadelphia, PA 19141-1199
215.951.1100 / Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Application Deadlines

Although, there are no formal application deadlines, we recommend that all information is received in the Graduate Admission Office by July 15 for fall admission, November 15 for spring admission, and April 15 for summer admission. International applicants should consider having their applications filed two months prior to the dates listed above.

Selection Criteria

Because each applicant’s background and profile is unique, the Admission Committee does not establish specific quantitative minimum requirements for admission. The University's Nondiscrimination policy is stated in the Introduction section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon an applicant’s qualifications.

Progression through the Program

La Salle’s Online M.S. in Human Capital Development program will follow the academic calendar at La Salle. A full-time graduate student is one who is matriculated and registered for six or more credit hours per semester. Completion of this program will generally take two years (for students who successfully complete two courses each semester).  The courses will be completely online; they could meet both synchronously (live online) and asynchronously (based on the individuals schedule) and will not follow traditional classroom hours. All courses earn three credits. Students will be required to participate in discussion forums, which will take the place of classroom meetings. Currently, the fall, and spring terms are 8 weeks, and the summer term is 12 weeks, with the exception of the Senior Capstone course, which runs for 15 weeks.

La Salle also offers the Human Capital Development program as a Certificate program.  Students in the HCD Certificate program must apply to the Certificate program and successfully complete the following six (6) HCD courses for a total of 18 credits in the program:

HCD 670   Human Resource Development
HCD 675 
  Theories of Conflict Analysis and Resolution
HCD 680
   Advanced Negotiation Theory and Practice
HCD 710   Investing in Human Capital
HCD 720   Legal Environment of HCD
HCD 730   Strategic Approaches to Human Capital

(The HCD Certificate courses are transferrable into the M.S. in HCD program)

To earn the M.S. in HCD degree, students must successfully complete the following twelve (12) courses for a total of 36 credits in the program:

HCD 630   Client Communications and Consulting
HCD 645   Training a Global Workforce

HCD 652   Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

HCD 665   Organizational Development and Consulting Process

HCD 670   Human Resource Development
HCD 675 
  Theories of Conflict Analysis and Resolution

HCD 710   Investing in Human Capital
HCD 720   Legal Environment of HCD
HCD 730   Strategic Approaches to Human Capital

HCD 680   Advanced Negotiation Theory and Practice

HCD 685   Organizational Interventions
HCD 900   Capstone Project

When an applicant is accepted into the program and enrolls in his or her first course, a maximum of seven years will be allowed for the successful completion of the program. Only in extreme circumstances will a leave of absence be granted. When a leave of absence is granted, it will not exceed a maximum of one year; and the period of leave granted will not count toward the maximum seven years permitted to complete the program.  To graduate from the program all students must complete the required courses and have at least a 3.0 GPA.

Method of Graduate Instruction/Nature of Research Requirements

Courses are scheduled online to allow students to fulfill their employment or other obligations. Some instructors incorporate synchronous components (live, real-time) lectures and video that are also recorded and archived for later viewing. Course syllabi specify program expectations and instructional methods for each course in the program.  Course offerings can change each semester and will run based upon sufficient student enrollment.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition: $760 (per credit hour)
General University Fee: $135 (per semester)
Technology Fee: $150 (per semester)
Graduation Fee: $100 (one-time payment)

Tuition Assistance

For information about financial aid (FAFSA and Web Institutional Data Form), please contact the Director of Student Financial Services at 215.951.1070 or finserv@lasalle.edu.  You can also visit the website at http://www.lasalle.edu/financialaid/.

For information about tuition payment options and the graduate deferred payment plan, please contact the Student and Accounts Receivable Office at 215.951.1055 or bursacct@lasalle.edu. You can also visit their website at http://www.lasalle.edu/studentaccounts/.

Faculty

Program Director: Lynnette Clement
Lecturers: Burton, Falcone, Smith, Ugras

Course Descriptions

HCD 630 Client Communication and Consulting

This course provides students with the skills needed to effectively communicate with clients, including those of large and small corporations, working with global partners, coaching, and widespread teams. Drawing on real-world case studies, students will learn how to do comprehensive needs analysis for any potential client, the art of persuasion, as well as how to satisfy a client despite budget and methodology restrictions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

HCD 645 Training a Global Workforce

This course will explore the current globalization and market forces that will affect training and development in future multinational corporations. Students will learn how to use communication tools to meet with a global team and gain knowledge about cultural differences that may affect how training is designed and implemented. Students will gain a richer understanding of the barriers that still impact training global employees and customers.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

HCD 652 Leadership Assessment And Evaluation

This experiential course is focused on helping students expand their leadership/management capability through systematic assessment of their existing competencies, targeted skill development, and by providing practice in applying the newly acquired skills.  A five-step learning framework is used to “drive” this skill acquisition process.  During the skill development process, the student receives feedback from self-assessment results, faculty, other participants and co-workers.  Topics will include:  self-awareness, time and stress management, individual and group problem solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, team leadership, and leading positive change.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

HCD 665 Organizational Development and the Consulting Process

This course provides practicing and potential managers and consultants with an exposure to organizational change programs. It focuses on the change process by addressing organizational diagnosis, implementation of change, and the evaluation process.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

HCD 670 Human Resources Development

This course reviews a variety of approaches to developing human resources in organizations. There is special emphasis on needs analysis as well as the design, delivery, and evaluation of training programs or development initiatives. The role of performance and behavioral feedback in development is also discussed. The course includes hands-on experience in the design of training programs or development initiatives. Students may also examine special topics (for example, Web-based training, coaching, expatriate training, or executive development).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

HCD 675 Theories of Conflict Analysis and Resolution

This course begins with a study of the fundamental reasons for constructive and destructive conflict in workplaces, neighborhoods, classrooms, homes, and religious institutions. The course covers conflict resolution through the use of different dispute resolution models, including arbitration, mediation, peer review, assisted negotiation, ombuds, mini-trial, , and other dispute resolution approaches collectively called Alternative Dispute Resolution, or ADR. The class places an emphasis on resolving conflict through mediation and mediation techniques.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

HCD 680 Advanced Negotiation Theories and Practice

This course explores the theory and practice of negotiation. Successful negotiators adapt their negotiation strategies to match ever-changing circumstances. They must know when to apply a competitive, winner-take-all negotiation strategy as well as when to use a cooperative, win-win approach. The former, distributive bargaining focuses on goals exclusively, while the latter, integrative bargaining, strongly considers relationships in developing interest-based solutions. Negotiation practitioners must correctly apply the proper distributive or integrative approach to a negotiation. This in-depth study of negotiation methodologies with practical application will equip learners with superior negotiation skills for dispute resolution and deal-making.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

HCD 685 Organizational Interventions

This course is designed to assist individuals interested in a career in industrial/organizational psychology in learning about the issues involved in implementing organizational change and development programs. These issues include engaging employees in the change process, diagnosing organizational problems, effective methods for implementing change programs, and the techniques needed to evaluate the entire process.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

HCD 710 Investing in Human Capital

This course will evaluate the tangible and intangible costs associated with developing people within an organization from a 360-degree perspective. Students will focus on continuous improvement of the talent management within an organization through long-term investment in leadership. Participants will learn to distinguish between management and mismanagement of human assets and then develop measurable criteria to accentuate positive practices within an organization. Calculating profit per employee (PPE) will be considered along with other measurement tools. This course will also link human capital knowledge with the strategic business activities of the organization from both theoretical and pragmatic perspectives, using case studies. Students will develop a workable theory of knowledge management concepts and tools unique to the individual's field of interest. Recognizing opportunities where knowledge management can best be enhanced within a business community and learn how to effectively share knowledge across the organization.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

Drawing on real-world case studies and current events, this course will provide students with a working knowledge of the HCD legal environment. This course covers employment law for managers and human capital strategists, including employment discrimination, agency, independent contractors, employment-at-will, privacy expectations, and related trends. Understanding the distinctions between legal and ethical HCD decision making is only the beginning of the decision-making process. Fashioning a sound legal and ethical strategy from competing priorities will be addressed. Appreciating both the global diversity and conflicting nature of legal environments under which HCD decisions are made will be emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

HCD 730 Strategic Approaches to Human Capital

Accurately assessing and adjusting HCD policies, processes, and practices will be the focus of this course. Connecting individual and organizational learning to improve not just the organizations "bottom line," but also the sustainability of highly competent talent. This includes reshaping human capital goals to meet continuously changing global political, social, and economic environments. Advancing alternative solutions that are both tactical and ethical to long-established talent management practices will be emphasized. Creating strategic environments that will turn organizational talent into a long-term competitive advantage will be addressed from pragmatic and theoretical perspectives.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

HCD 900 Senior Capstone Project

The capstone project demonstrates the learner's acquisition of knowledge from this program and ability to apply this knowledge strategically in real world situations. It is an independent exploration of a career-related aspect of human capital development that is of strong interest to the individual learner. The project is intended to stretch participants beyond what they have previously learned and to build on their skills and knowledge in ways that are relevant to their professional career goals. Participants will complete a major project such as a scholarly research paper, training manual, program design or evaluation, and final presentation. Each student presents his or her findings in an oral presentation as well as written format. In addition to working one-on-one with the capstone instructor, who provides learners with guidance and constructive feedback on their capstone project, learners will also work with each other during the stages of development of the capstone project, offering ongoing peer feedback throughout the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: At least 27 total HCD credits completed

Information Technology Leadership

Program Description

In the Master of Science in Information Technology Leadership (M.S. in ITL) program, students examine the foundation of information technology and the leadership skills needed for mid- to high-level information technology or systems managers. There is ample evidence that companies have a significant need for such leaders with the widespread use of information technology. Industry studies report that it is important for both the technical and the business sides to better understand each other’s jobs and functions, especially as technical people assume project management roles.

Recommended by industry leaders, the program’s curriculum in information technologies and management of human and technology resources is meant for professionals who wish to become leaders in information technology. The program builds upon the strengths of the University’s M.S. in Computer Information Science and MBA programs, enabling students to acquire the foundation of leadership skills and technology concepts.

The M.S. in Information Technology Leadership program focuses on three main competency areas:

  • Managerial Competencies: leadership, human resource management, and process management
  • Technical Competencies: architecture, data communication, application development, data management, and security
  • Technology Management Competencies: Policy and Organizational Competencies—mapping IT to mission, budget process, and organizational processes; capital planning competencies, investment assessment, and acquisition; and implementation, legacy, migration, and integration issues and performance measures.

Additionally, these areas are extended through electives in emerging technologies or management. Finally, the program is completed with an integrative capstone experience.

The program emphasizes teamwork, interpersonal communication, and presentations. To address the dynamic nature of the field and the realization that there will always be a need for some self-training, this program encourages active student involvement and collaborative learning. Students are expected to participate in class discussions, to evaluate new software packages, to make formal presentations, and to do independent projects. The program prepares individuals for end-user computing services by addressing both technical challenges and management skills. The program promotes the professional development of the student in the field of Information Technology Leadership.

A strength of the program is its practical focus, built upon a strong conceptual foundation.
 

The program is offered mainly in an online format and follows the traditional academic calendar of a fall and spring semester and a shorter summer semester. The fall and spring semesters are divided into two 8 week terms.  A full-time graduate student carries a minimum of 6 semester credit hours. Some courses may require more hours per week in some areas of instruction. All courses are online and 3 credits in the length. The courses will meet both synchronously (optional) and asynchronously. Students are required to participate in chat sessions and/or discussion boards, which will take the place of classroom meetings.  Synchronous sessions will be recorded for students who are not able to attend the actual session.  Students who are not able to attend the synchronous sessions will be asked to complete a short assignment related to the recorded session. Depending on their personal schedules, students may elect to take courses every term or wait for the next term to continue studies.  Courses in the summer are also 8 weeks in length.  If a student decides to take two courses during the summer session, they will overlap in the time frame.

Mission Statement

Graduate education in Computer Information Science will provide a forum for the study, investigation, discussion, and presentation of how technical solutions may be used to improve an individual’s productivity and to enhance departmental and corporate systems. In order to prepare computing professionals who will be able to keep pace with the dynamic nature of the discipline and contribute to its growth, this program will emphasize individual and group effort, as well as lecture and hands-on training. The approach will be consistent will the philosophy of graduate education at La Salle.

Program Goals

  1. Prepare students to create, implement, manage and review a technical solution to a real world problem through all phases of the problem resolution
  2. Prepare students to use problem solving techniques and skills to analyze, design, and develop technical solutions using software engineering methodologies.
  3. Manage the problem solution through the gathering of requirements, problem refinement, design modeling, implementation, and user testing
  4. Prepare students to collaborate on problem solutions
  5. Prepare students for professional workforce.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain and differentiate between software engineering methodologies.
  2. Create a plan to implement a proposed solution.
  3. Analyze and design a technical problem solution.
  4. Implement and test a software solution.
  5. Facilitate groups on problem definitions and solution designs.
  6. Present problem requirements and solution proposals.
  7. Prepare professional written reports.
  8. Create solutions specific to current technologies (such as mobile development, database services, and web services.

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in the completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education with an appropriate major. Appropriate undergraduate majors include, but are not limited to, management science, business administration, electrical engineering, systems engineering, mathematics, or computer science. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 will normally be required.
  3. Provide official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate colleges and universities he/she has attended. For students whose undergraduate transcripts are from institutions outside the U.S.: Transcripts/marksheets must be sent to the World Education Service (www.wes.org) for a course-by-course evaluation. An appropriate background in management science, systems analysis and design, computer science, or a related discipline, or other equivalent training is required. On the basis of admissions credentials, students may be required to complete a few foundation courses.
  4. Provide a professional resume addressing one’s educational and professional background.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professors or supervisors who can address the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrolling in the program.
  6. Attend an interview with member(s) of the admission committee. These are typically telephone interviews.

 

The application package is viewed as a whole, and the prevailing criterion is the applicant’s capacity for completing the program successfully.

The University’s Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Because oral and written communication is an integral part of many courses, students must communicate clearly in English. Since this program is offered in an online format, it does not meet the requirement for a U.S. student visa.

A maximum of six hours of transfer credit may be granted for graduate work at another institution. The student must supply a course description and syllabus in order to facilitate the transfer of credit. After matriculation at La Salle, students must have a course pre-approved by the director (in conjunction with the appropriate faculty member(s)) for it to be considered for transfer purposes.

 

 All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelphia, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Progression Through the Program

Students must complete between 36 and 42 graduate credits in the program to complete the M.S. I.T.Leadership degree. Each student is required to complete up to two foundation courses, nine core competencies courses, two elective courses, and the capstone experience. The total number of credits to fulfill the requirements depends upon the student’s academic and professional background.

The design of this program assumes that the student has a background in information science, information systems, or business administration. Some students may be required to take one or two foundation courses to supplement their experience.

 

Master's Degree Requirements

Twelve to 14 courses (at least 36 graduate credits) are required for the degree. The following outline specifies the program requirements regarding the foundation, core, electives, and capstone courses. Individual plans for progression will be determined for each student in consultation with the Program Director.

Foundation Courses

The purpose of the foundation courses is to provide students with a
broad-based background in research and writing, networks, databases, and statistics. The following four courses (three credits each) are required but may be waived based on a student’s academic and professional training.

Databases

CIS 523 Data Processing and Database Management 

Networks

CIS 540 Network Theory

Core Competencies Courses

The core curriculum focuses on managerial, technical, and technology management competencies. Students are required to take a total of nine courses in these core competencies: three courses from the Managerial Competencies area, three courses selected by the student from the Technical Competencies area, and three courses from the Technology Management area.

Managerial Competencies (all three required)

CIS 612   Ethics, Issues, and Government Regulations
CIS 615   Project Management
INL 652  Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

Technical Competencies (three courses; one required and two selected)

INL 631   Technology Architecture or
INL 653 Web Services
CIS 624   Data Warehouses
INL 644   Information Security
INL 650   User-Interface Technologies

Technology Management (all three required)

INL 632   Technology Development Management
INL 660   Effective Strategic IS/IT Planning or
NPL 625 Strategic Planning
INL 736   Organizational Effectiveness: Beyond the Fads or
HCD 730 Strategic Approaches to Human Capital (for online students)

Electives (two selected)

Electives provide the framework for keeping pace with the rapid advancements in technology. Students are required to take two elective courses in new technologies.

CIS 658     Data Mining
INL 635     Digital Media Content Development
INL 665     Computer Digital Forensics
INL 668     Computer and Network Security
INL 743     Entrepreneurship
INL 760     IS/IT Human Resource Management
 

Capstone Experience (one course)

Students culminate their study with an integrative three-credit capstone experience, taken in the final semester of the program. This course is completed with a team of students and provides the opportunity to integrate what has been learned in the core and elective courses.

INL 880 IT/IS Capstone Experience

Five-Year Bachelor's in Computer Science or Information Technology to Master's in Information Technology Leadership

Students may earn both a B.A. in Computer Science and a M.S. in Information Technology Leadership, or a B.S. in Computer Science and a M.S. in Information Technology Leadership, or a B.A. in Information Technology and a M.S. in Information Technology Leadership, or a B.S. in Information Technology and a M.S. in Information Technology Leadership by participating in the University's Five-Year Program. Students would satisfy the undergraduate computer science or information technology major requirements during their first four years at the Univeristy, earning a minimum of 120 credits, while maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better. Upon completion of a bachelor's degree, students may then enter the M.S. in Information Technology Leadership by completing the remainder of the full degree requirements.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference Section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Partial scholarship grants are offered on the basis of academic credentials and financial need.

Information about other financial aid, payment options, and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Program Director: Margaret M. McCoey, M.S.
Associate Professors: Blum, Highley, Redmond, Wang
Assistant Professors: McCoey
Lecturers: Casey, Cerenzio, Crossen, Henry, McGinley, McManus, Monaghan, Wacey

Course Descriptions

INL 631 Technology Architecture

This course examines the relationships among business models and processes, communications architectures and infrastructures, applications architectures, security architectures, and the data/information/knowledge/content that supports all aspects of transaction processing. It examines alternative computing and communications platforms, major support technologies, and the issues connected with aligning technology with business goals, as well as issues associated with legacy systems, migration, and integration. Student work includes class presentations and plans to implement, modify, or supplement technology infrastructures.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 632 Technology Development Management

This course examines technology development and maintenance methodologies, including testing, configuration management, and quality assurance strategies used to manage IT projects. Discussion topics include the business value of the project, as well as the development, collection, and analysis of metrics for technology management. Students investigate development methodologies, such as Waterfall and Rapid Application Development (RAD), technology maintenance, and evolution planning. Case studies are used to evaluate technology management strategy in specific business areas.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 644 Information Security

This course explores all aspects of computing and communications security, including policy, authentication, authorization, administration, and business resumption planning. It examines key security technologies, such as encryption, firewalls, public-key infrastructures, smart cards, and related technologies that support the development of an overall security architecture. Coursework includes plans for developing and implementing a technology security strategy focused on business needs.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 650 User-Interface Technologies

This course will examine the issues associated with human-computer interaction, including interface-design principles, human-computer task allocation, and interface technologies, such as GUIs, speech, virtual reality, body interfaces, and mimetics. It will also address how to design interfaces likely to enhance performance. Discussion of interface technologies support for good interface design, so technology managers can understand interface issues in technology choice. Evaluation methods will also be examined, so UI designers can determine if their interfaces are enhancing or degrading human performance. Course work will include a significant team project in which end-user needs are understood, a prototype is developed using a chosen user-interface technology, and persuasive presentation is delivered.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 652 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

This experiential course emphasizes the importance of feedback and self- assessment for leadership development. It includes extensive assessment of each participant’s management style and skills based on self-evaluations (using structured questionnaires) and feedback from coworkers, faculty, and other participants. Leadership development experiences emphasize time and stress management, individual and group problem-solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, and team leadership. Each participant identifies skills he or she needs to develop and reports on efforts to develop those skills.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 653 Web Services

This course explores current Web services and solutions used in technology projects. Case studies are used to identify technology options and explore solution alternatives, including the use of open source technologies, and packages. Students investigate case studies to propose interface solutions and alternatives with standard frameworks (i.e., Windows and Linux).  Students work in groups to analyze case solutions for controlling the application development, deployment, and maintenance for a real-world problem.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 660 Effective Strategic IS/IT Planning

This course discusses the management of the development, planning, and utilization of IT business systems within an organization. This course addresses business models, organizational impact, IT infrastructure, secure IT services, and delivery. Students complete online reading, discussions and participation, and assignments, as well as written and oral presentations.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 665 Computer Digitial Forensics

This course examines techniques used to conduct computer crime investigations and gather probative evidence to secure a conviction under state and federal laws. Students will simulate a computer forensic investigation: developing an investigation plan, securing the crime scene, analyzing evidence, preparing the case for court, and testifying in a moot court situation.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 668 Computer and Network Security

Students will study and implement basic computer and network security strategies on Window and Linux networks. Students examine and analyze network traffic, including investigating wireless transmission, install firewalls and define Internet Protocol Security Controls (IPSEC). Labs include system hardening, dissecting network packet structure and creating encryption formats; managing authentication and access controls. Students study implementing a public key infrastructure and best strategies for using intrusion detection systems.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 736 Organizational Design: Beyond the Fads

This course examines various factors that managers should consider when structuring (or restructuring) their organizations, including employees' skill levels and engagement, as well as the organization's size, external environment, competitive strategy, international expansion, technologies, and alliances with other organizations. It also explores the impact that managers' own values and preferences have on the creation of control systems and structures, and on employees' reactions to them. Case assignments require students to apply what they have learned to improve organizational functioning.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 760 IS/IT Human Resource Administration

This survey course provides an overview of the major areas of human resource management, including HR strategy and planning, EEO laws, job analysis and competency models, recruiting, selection, training, performance appraisal and management, job design, compensation, benefits, and labor relations. The focus is on both the line manager's and the human resource professional's role in creating a culture that attracts, rewards, and retains the talent necessary to ensure a business' success.

Number of Credits: 3

INL 880 Integrative Capstone

The capstone experience provides an opportunity for students to work in a team to apply the leadership skills and tools learned in other required courses to analyze, design, and evaluate a solution for an information technology management environment. Students work in a team, in partnership with an external company. This course requires a paper or report and a presentation. Further guidelines can be found on the program Web page.

Number of Credits: 3

Instructional Technology Management

Program Description

The future of learning is online or on a screen or device. Learning and training organizations require managerial leadership that can devise and implement enterprise solutions. Learning executives, instructional architects, and designers occupy many roles within a company. They assess performance goals; develop learning objectives; design instructional materials; deliver curriculum in classrooms, online, and in blended environments; and use new and ever-evolving technologies to reduce costs. These are the people who are responsible for the ongoing training and development required to develop human talent and increase profitability.

La Salle’s M.S. in Instructional Technology Management (ITM) program combines theory, hands-on design experience, and management skills to provide learners with a theoretical and intellectual foundation of instructional design principles, methods, and techniques. ITM is focused on adult learning theories and methods in the context of the corporate, organizational and institutional training environment. This program provides opportunities to design, build, and implement multimedia and online projects for e-learning, mobile learning, blended, ubiquitous learning in corporate, government, or educational settings. It also equips the learner with the leadership skills necessary to provide the vision, strategies, and solutions needed to create and sustain a learning culture. The outcomes of this program are designed to support learning leaders in the context of a virtual global workforce.

Graduate education at La Salle emphasizes students’ ability to apply universals and specifics to actual situations, to distinguish relationships, to analyze critically, to rearrange component ideas into new wholes, and to make judgments based on external criteria. The M.S. in ITM is offered through the College of Professional and Continuing Studies because it is a field that attracts people of many backgrounds and experiences, as well as those who are looking to enter into a new field. The field of instructional technology supports La Salle’s mission that education should be useful and of service by placing individuals in positions in corporations where they will have the means to develop an educated, able, as well as productive national and international workforce.

The ITM program uses an online experiential learning model integrating technologies and replicating the types of learning that graduates of the program in their respective fields will use in the workplace. Learners will take courses incorporating the latest learning technologies. This approach strengthens teamwork, communication, and professional bonding. The entire curriculum “walks the walk” and uses the ADDIE model as a base for each course and evaluation.

La Salle’s ITM is unique and highly regarded internationally for its focus on the 21st century workplace learning and leadership, providing learners with access to state-of-the-art multimedia video and audio integration opportunities in the Communication Department’s production studios and media arts laboratories as well as offering expertise regarding management and leadership development. In addition, highly successful professionals experienced in working in multi-national corporations teach courses that provide learners with real insight into the field. 

The strength of the program is its emphasis on practical and authentic learning assessment and application, built on a strong foundation in which students learn by hands-on experience.

If you have any questions regarding the Instructional Technology Management program, please contact:

itm@lasalle.edu

Mission

Mission of the M.S. in ITM

Consistent with Lasallian values, the Mission of the Instructional Technology Management M.S. program is to provide an excellent scholar practitioner education in instruction, design, and technologies to serve corporations, organizations, institutions and government.

Program Goals

Theory

Goal 1:

To provide learners with a theoretical and intellectual foundation of instructional design principles, methods, and techniques.

Goal 2:

To provide learners with a practical and applicable understanding of adult learning theories as they relate to corporate and global workforces.

Hands-on Design Experience

Goal 3:

To enable learners with opportunities to evaluate instruction, conduct assessment and evaluations of products, programs, and methods in the context of the corporate training environment.

Goal 4:

To provide learners opportunities to design, build, and implement multimedia and online projects for e-learning in corporate, government, or educational settings.

Goal 5:

To provide learners with an understanding of assessment and evaluation techniques commonly used in the field by instructional designers.

Goal 6:

To prepare learners with the ability to design and recognize the design of quality instruction geared toward continuous learning and leadership development for a global workforce.

Management

Goal 7:

To enable learners to understand the challenges that face instructional designers working in a corporate environment and to be able to work successfully to meet the training needs of any business.

Goal 8:

To develop the leadership capacities of learners.

Goal 9:

To develop learner communication skills necessary for a position as an instructional designer consultant or manager working with large teams within multinational companies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to:

  1. Design and select curriculum for the adult learner
  2. Examine theory to practice situations and identify e-learning techniques
  3. Design and select appropriate delivery methods for the adult learner
  4. Evaluate the needs of a particular group of adult learners
  5. Assess and implement collaborative online and social networking applications
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of current project management practices as they apply to the development of e-learning
  7. Produce, edit and manage the process of professional media production
  8. Create an e-portfolio demonstrating a variety of instructional e-learning approaches

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
  3. Provide official transcripts from the accredited institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
  4. Provide a professional résumé.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professional references (optional).

For international student applicants, an acceptable TOEFL test score with a statement of financial responsibility and official documentation from the student’s sponsor’s financial institution. La Salle University also requires that the student applicant sends his or her transcripts/ marksheets to the World Education Services (www.wes.org) or a similar credential evaluation service for a transcript evaluation report.

The GRE or GMAT are not requirements for this program.

The University’s Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Because oral communication is an integral part of many courses, students must communicate clearly in English.

This program is designed to be a terminal program and is not designed solely to prepare learners for doctoral programs. This program leads to a professional degree intended to position graduates in corporations, organizations, institutions, or business enterprises in the area of instructional technology management.

 

 All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelphia, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Progression through the Program

La Salle’s M.S. in Instructional Technology Management (ITM) program follows the traditional academic calendar at La Salle. The typical length of the semester is 15 weeks. A full-time graduate student carries a minimum of 6 semester credit hours. Some courses may require more hours per week in some areas of instruction. All courses are three credits, online courses that will meet both synchronously (optional) and asynchronously. Students will be required to participate in chat sessions and/or discussion boards, which will take the place of classroom meetings and may be frequented by students depending on their personal schedules. The fall and spring terms are 15 weeks, and the summer sessions are 12 weeks.

In order to earn the degree, students must successfully complete all 12 ITM courses for a total of 36 credits in the program. Once an applicant is accepted into the program and registers for his or her first course, a maximum of seven years will be allowed for the successful completion of the program. Only in extreme circumstances will a leave of absence be granted. When a leave of absence is granted, it will not exceed a maximum of one year, and the period of leave granted will not count toward the maximum seven years permitted to complete the program. All students must complete the program with a minimum GPA of 3.0 or above.

Course Sequence:

ITM 600 Principles of Instructional Design
ITM 605 The Adult as Learner
ITM 615 Web Design, Usability, and Visual Literacy
ITM 620/COM 675 Professional Media Production
ITM 625 E-Learning in the Corporate Environment
ITM 635 Evaluation and Assessment of Learning Programs
ITM 630 Client Communications and Consulting
ITM 645 Training a Global Workforce
ITM 610/CIS 615 Project Management
ITM 640 E-Collaboration for Instructional Technology
ITM 650/MBA 810 Self-Assessment for Leadership
ITM 700 Capstone Project

Method of Graduate Instruction/Nature of Research Requirements

Courses are scheduled online to allow learners the flexibility of fulfilling their employment or other obligations. Course syllabi specify methods for each course in the program.

Certificate Program in Instructional Technology Management

Research shows that the field of e-learning is growing and many new professionals will be needed in the future. The certificate in ITM provides the opportunity for graduates to prepare for many roles within an organization; assessing performance goals, developing learning objectives, designing instructional materials, delivering curriculum in classrooms, online or in blended environments, and using new and ever-evolving technologies to improve human performance and reduce costs.

The certificate requires half number of credits and courses required for the M.S. in ITM (therefore, 18 credit hours/6 courses). Just like the M.S. in ITM, the ITM Certificate program combines theory, hands-on design experience, and management skills to provide learners with a theoretical and intellectual foundation of instructional design principles, methods and techniques. It provides an understanding of adult learning theories and the training to evaluate software, applications, programs, and methods in the context of the corporate training environment. This program provides opportunities to design, build, and implement multimedia and online projects for e-learning in corporate, government, or educational settings with an understanding of assessment and evaluation techniques. This program will also equip the learner with the leadership skills necessary to provide the vision, strategies, and solutions needed to create and sustain a learning culture. This certificate program is designed in the same context as the M.S. in ITM degree and is essential in the global corporate, organizational, or government training environments.

The ITM graduate certificate program provides an entry vehicle for those who want to further their education in ITM, but may not be ready to pursue the M.S. degree.

The certificate includes six courses:

ITM 600    Principles of Instructional Design
OR
ITM 605    The Adult as Learner
AND
ITM 610    Project Management
ITM 615    Web Design, Usability, and Visual Literacy

The other three ITM courses are elective requirements and can include any ITM course, except ITM 700, which is the M.S. Capstone project.

The tuition and fees for the ITM Certificate program are the same tuition and fees for the M.S. in ITM program.

Certificate Mission

Consistent with Lasallian values, the Mission of the Instructional Technology Management certificate program is to provide an introduction to training and learning using instruction, design and technologies to serve corporations, organizations, institutions and government.

Certificate Program Goals

Goal 1:

To provide learners with a theoretical and intellectual foundation of adult learning or instructional design principles, methods, and techniques.

Goal 2:

To provide learners with an understanding of good visual design and interface techniques commonly used in the field by instructional designers.

Goal 3:

To provide learners with an understanding of project management commonly used in the development of corporate e-learning.

Goal 4:

To provide learners with an introduction to the instructional technology management field.

Certificate Program Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, the student will be able to do he following:

  1. Discuss the challenges of working in a corporate environment and be able to work successfully to meet the training needs of any business. 
  2. Evaluate the foundation of adult learning and instructional design principles, methods, and techniques. 
  3. Evaluate software, applications, programs, and methods in the context of the corporate training environment. 
  4. Understand the application of project management techniques for the training and learning environment.

Certificate Admission Requirements

Certificate in Instructional Technology Management

To be accepted for admission into the program, a student must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
  3. Provide official transcripts from the accredited institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
  4. Provide a professional résumé.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professional references (optional).

For international student applicants, an acceptable TOEFL test score with a statement of financial responsibility and official documentation from the student’s sponsor’s financial institution. La Salle University also requires that the student applicant sends his or her transcripts/ mark sheets to the World Education Services (www.wes.org) or a similar credential evaluation service for a transcript evaluation report.

The GRE or GMAT are not requirements for this program.

The University’s Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Because oral communication is an integral part of many courses, students must communicate clearly in English.

This program is designed to be a terminal program and is not designed solely to prepare learners for doctoral programs. This program leads to a professional degree intended to position graduates in corporations, organizations, institutions, or business enterprises in the area of instructional technology management.

 

 All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Capstone Project

ITM 700, the capstone course, provides learners with a chance to integrate the principles of instructional design that they have learned over the course of two years with real life, industry specific instructional design problems.  Using guest lecturers from various regional industries, learners analyze a problem and work together to come up with a plausible training solution. Either through interning or through collaborative discussions with those in the field, learners select a training problem of interest to them and complete an instructional design process, whereby they assess the situation, develop a strategic plan, design the type of training, and begin implementation of the training. Additionally, the capstone is taught entirely online so that learners may have flexibility in their schedules to intern at a corporate office. As an online course, the capstone itself is a basis for learners to consider new ideas in online learning and discover for themselves what works and what does not work. The online guest speakers, as well as the readings and discussions, offer learners a chance to explore critical topics in the field that may impact the design of their projects.

Tuition

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog. 

Tuition Assistance

Questions and information about financial aid (FAFSA form and Web Institutional Data Form) should be directed to the Director of Student Financial Services at 215.951.1070 or finserv@lasalle.edu

Payment plans and deferred payment option questions, should be directed to Student and Accounts Receivable at 215.951.1055 or bursar@lasalle.edu

Faculty

Program Director, Margaret McCoey

Associate Professor: Ugras

Lecturers:  Caputo, Defelice, Ellis, Georgo, Lombardozzi, Longstreth, McManus, Place, Smith

Course Descriptions

ITM 600 Principles of Instructional Design

Overwhelmingly, corporations are interested in managers of learning and training with strong backgrounds in principles of instructional design, and they want their employees to be able to tie learning outcomes to productivity rates and product growth. This course will begin with instructional design's background in developmental psychology and will cover several working instructional theories, such as the Dick and Carey, ISD,RPD, and the ADDIE models, as well as cognitive, social, behavioral, and constructivist learning theories as they apply.

ITM 605 The Adult as Learner

This course focuses on adult learners as they exist in the workforce. Using a scholar practitioner approach, learners will design curriculum for adults and practice teaching techniques to engage adult learners. Tracing the history of adult developmental psychology, this course addresses the wide range of adult-learner audiences that an organization might have to provide training for, including top management, support personnel, and potential customers.

ITM 615 Web Design, Usability, and Visual Literacy

This course is a survey course intended to provide learners with generalized knowledge of Web design, aspects of visual literacy, and usability as well as accessibility concerns. With more online learning opportunities, and customized learning built into Learning Management Systems, this course will provide learners with an understanding of usability principles to be able to communicate with Web designers and build their own pages. Knowledge of file structure and types, images, tables, and use of industry-standard software, such as Dreamweaver, will be covered. Learners will gain basic knowledge of HTML in order to develop learning programs online. This course will discuss how visual media is used to convey messages, both in print and online, and the differences inherent in them. Learners will finish the course with ample practice in production, selection, and use of visual imagery, associated software, and file types.

ITM 620 Professional Media Production

This course presents current audio and video practices and technologies used in corporate and institutional communications. Learners will implement these pre-production, production, and post-production practices in developing messages for corporate and institutional audiences. Learners will gain a general understanding of script-writing, lighting, audio, and editing tools used in media production to enable them to best communicate with professional videographers and audio technicians.

ITM 625 Developing and Teaching in Online Distance Education

ITM 630 Client Communications and Consulting

This course provides learners with the skills needed to effectively communicate with clients, including those of large and small corporations, working with global partners and widespread teams. Drawing on real-world case studies, students will learn how to do a comprehensive needs analysis for any potential client, the art of persuasion, and how to satisfy a client despite budget and methodology restrictions.

ITM 635 Evaluation and Assessment of Learning Programs

Assessment and evaluation of curriculum, multimedia, and programs developed for learning are constantly tied to corporate performance outcomes and, ultimately, pay and profits. This course covers criterion-based formative and summative evaluations of learning products and curriculum. Learners will use real-life examples to create a job analysis or program by conducting focus groups, developing criterion-based instruments, analyzing the findings, and presenting suggestions for improvements. Learners compare and contrast many of the evaluation theories currently used in the workplace and develop a functional training and performance evaluation model of their own.

ITM 640 E-Collaboration for Instructional Technology

This course provides an overview of electronic collaboration processes, design, issues, and applications. This course will consider the usage of electronic collaboration tools both for instructional design and as courseware. Students critique these different types of tools, which include electronic mail, intranets, portals, online communities, Web blogs, dashboards, conferencing, forums, meeting rooms, learning management, calendars, social media, workflow, and knowledge management.

ITM 700 Capstone

Students use the capstone to select a real-life, industry-specific instructional challenge. Then they execute the instructional design process, conduct a needs assessment, develop a strategic plan, design a prototype of the training, implement the training, and evaluate the results. They may work in collaboration with or intern at a specific company or organization to gain experience in the field.

Number of Credits: 3

Nonprofit Leadership

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education. An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 is recommended.
  3. Provide official transcripts of all university-level work attempted or completed.
  4. Provide a current professional résumé.
  5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professional or academic references.
  6. Provide a personal statement explaining the applicant’s interest in and goals for pursuit of this degree.
  7. Attend a face-to face or virtual interview with the Director of the program, if requested.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelphia, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Description of the Program

The Master’s in Nonprofit Leadership is an interdisciplinary program intended for both those already working in the nonprofit sector as either a paid employee or a volunteer, as well as those who wish to move into the nonprofit sector.  Preparing leaders for the nonprofit world of the 21st century requires competency in many different disciplines. Thus, the program draws from the disciplines of finance, marketing, planning, evaluation, and more, in order for students to develop the understanding needed to be a successful nonprofit leader and run a successful nonprofit business (understanding that nonprofits are businesses).  Graduates of this program, however, will not only have gained that interdisciplinary framework and knowledge needed to lead, they will also have had an opportunity to apply that knowledge and learn the challenges of aligning theory and practice.

The program adheres to the crucial goals of Lasallian graduate education.

  1. Scholarly inquiry in the pursuit of truth, evidenced by its faculty and students alike.

    Whether relying on real life case studies, the revelations of current research and/or the assessment of real life events, students and faculty in the program will dissect the data to understand better the past and prepare for the future.

  2. Through their research and professional components graduate programs prepare students for academic and professional careers as well as service to the community.

    Through an integrated approach used in all classes, the program will equip students with the ability to balance theory and reality, a constant need in the real work world.  It aims to prepare students to be successful paid leaders in the nonprofit sector, as well as very knowledgeable volunteers, should they choose to serve on a nonprofit board or board committee.

  3. Graduate programs promote lifelong learning in response to the changing and diverse needs of the 21st century workplace and the global community.

    The current workforce will need more nonprofit employees in general, and leaders in particular.  In the past twelve years, the nonprofit sector has grown between 17%-24%%, while the for-profit sector declined by 5%. We are now seeing the exodus of Baby Boomer executive directors who delayed their retirement because of the Great Recession.  This rate of growth and retirement of executive directors combine to create a need for new leaders that well exceed 500,000.  Directly and indirectly, the program curriculum will teach students the importance of bringing research and theory into their daily practice to ensure that they are driving their program or organization on the good-better-best practices continuum, aiming always for best practices.

Laura Otten, Ph.D.

Director

215. 951.1118

otten@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/nonprofitleadership

If you have any questions regarding the Nonprofit Leadership program, please contact:

npl@lasalle.edu 

Mission

The mission of the Master’s in Nonprofit Leadership is to educate those who seek a leadership position anywhere in the nonprofit sector and provide them with the knowledge, theory, skills, and approaches necessary to guide an organization successfully through the ever changing and complex environment in which we all operate in order to best fulfill the promises of all nonprofits: to improve the quality of lives of all and enrich the communities in which we live.

Program Goals

The program has the following three broad goals:

  1. to give students a theoretically based, practice-oriented, best practices framework for leading in the nonprofit sector of the 21st century, which translates into competencies in finance, fund development, governance, human resources, marketing, and planning;
  2. to emphasize the practical and real time application of knowledge gained, to ensure that students don’t just learn ideas about leading a nonprofit but also have experienced how to organize and assess them in the real world under the tutelage of an experienced professional; and
  3. to ensure that both the knowledge and experience gained are solidly rooted in ethical practice.  Thus, while there is a course focused on the law and ethics of nonprofits, ethical practice will run continuously through each class in the curriculum.

The nonprofit sector is extremely diverse, from social service organizations to arts and culture to environment to social justice and more.  The National Taxonomy of Exempt Organizations, used by the IRS and others, identifies 26 major categories of nonprofits, and 655 detailed categories. Variety aside, the majority of the task of leading a nonprofit varies little from category to category.  Thus, the program will prepare students to work anywhere in the sector.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of this program, the student will be able to do the following:

  • Have the skills to assume a leadership position or strengthen their performance in a current leadership position in a nonprofit;
  • Analyze, critique, and solve problems in a nonprofit environment;
  • Apply newly attained ideas and strategies;
  • Explore topics and issues relevant to their daily, nonprofit lives through case studies, research, and data collection of various types;
  • Understand what it means to be an ethical leader and steward of a nonprofit that operates both legally and ethically;
  • Determine through self-assessment and conversation with others, their most appropriate role in the nonprofit sector.

Faculty

Program Director, Laura Otten, Ph.D.

Lecturers: Otten, Piff, M. Reilly, Scurto-Davis, Simmons, Smith, Trimarco

Graduation Requirements

Successful completion of all required courses within a 7-year period is required for graduation.  Additionally and importantly, all students must have a cumulative minimum grade point average of 3.0 to graduate.

Progression through the Program

The Masters in Nonprofit Leadership requires a minimum of 33 credit hours for graduation.  Students will be allowed to take up to six credits a semester.  A sample roster for a student taking six credits during fall and spring semesters and three credits over the summer could, as suggested below in the model roster, complete the degree in as few as seven semesters.  A student will, however, have a maximum of seven years to complete the degree, should s/he desire.

 

First Year

Fall

Session I:  NPL 605/MGT 730 Nonprofit Management

SessionII:  NPL 615 Nonprofit Finance

Spring

Session I:  NPL 620 Fund Development for Nonprofits

Session II:  NPL 625 Strategic Planning for Nonprofits

Summer (there is only one eight-week session over the summer)

NPL 652/MBA 810 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation/Self-Assessment for Leadership

 

Second Year

Fall

Session I:  NPL 630  Law and Ethics in the Nonprofit Sector

Session II:  NPL 645 Marketing for Nonprofits

Spring

Session I:  NPL 635 Program Evaluation for Nonprofit Leaders

Session II:  NPL 610 Governance and Leadership

Summer

NPL 650 Issues and Trends in the Nonprofit Sector

 

Third Year

Fall

NPL 700 Capstone (this is the only class in the program that is a full semester)

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Course Descriptions

NPL 605/MGT 730 Nonprofit Management

This introductory course provides an examination of the management, operations and governance principles and practices of nonprofits in the United States. Directly and indirectly, students will learn the answers to the following questions—and more: How should and do nonprofits operate? What makes them tick? How are nonprofits similar to and different from for-profit organizations? What are the myths versus the truths about nonprofits? What are the challenges facing nonprofits now and in the near future? And so much more.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 610 Governance and Leadership

This course is designed to provide students with a full understanding of the roles and responsibilities of American nonprofit boards, individual board members and executive leadership, as well as the interplay of all, and alternative model(s). Through class, readings and assignments, students will learn the theory and the ideal and compare it with the reality. As a result, they will be able to formulate a strong board, devise a strong governance-leadership relationship, evaluate ongoing performance, and support ongoing positive outcomes.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 615 Nonprofit Finance

This course is designed to provide the skills and knowledge to plan an organizational budget, to implement best practices in financial policies and procedures, to evaluate financial statements, to make financial decisions, and to comply with the legal reporting requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 620 Fund Development for Nonprofits

This class offers an overview of fundraising trends, concepts, and strategies. Students will gain an understanding of how fundraising works, and learn how to design contributed revenue programs for charitable nonprofit organizations. Major topics include donor motivation, communicating your organization's worth to donors, and selecting effective fundraising strategies based on an organization's individual circumstances. Students will learn how to raise funds from individuals, foundations, and corporations. Issues of ethics in fundraising will also be explored.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 625 Strategic Planning for Nonprofits

This class focuses upon strategic planning/strategic management, essential skill areas for the 21st century leader. The course highlights planning models as well as key planning functions. The course is "Grounded in theory; anchored in application." Students will learn and apply a set of well-established planning tools and techniques. This course is collaborative, placing shared responsibility for learning upon all participants, students and instructor alike. This course is interactive, featuring a variety of learning tools and approaches. Real work samples are introduced and multiple learning techniques employed.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 630 Law and Ethics in the Nonprofit Sector

This class is about both law and ethics, underscoring that they are not synonymous. Students will gain an understanding of the legal requirements and ethical considerations surrounding everything from starting and dissolving a nonprofit to the laws of fundraising and lobbying. As a class for nonprofit leaders, not lawyers, the course is designed to allow students to appraise and interpret the legal and ethical frameworks necessary to ensure compliance and the ability to construct the right questions to ask of an attorney, the right ethical challenges to propose to staff and board and the tools and knowledge needed to design an organization that is not only legally compliant but ethically run.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 635 Program Evaluation for Nonprofit Leaders

Program Evaluation for Nonprofit Leaders recognizes that the nonprofit sector has entered the "Age of Assessment." This course covers both quantitative and qualitative theories and approaches to evaluation with special accent upon measuring program outcomes. The course utilizes a well respected, time tested evaluation model for evaluation and a hands-on approach to apply concrete, practical tools and techniques. Applications range from preparing an evaluation design to demonstrating specific skills such as developing logic models, survey design, and focus group facilitation. The course does not emphasize statistical or technological applications.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 645 Marketing for Nonprofits

The course will enable participants to understand the advanced principles of marketing and public relations with the purpose of applying them as part of the strategic planning knowledge base required of any high- level nonprofit executive. By the end of the course, participants will be proficient in preparing a marketing plan and putting these principles into practice.

Number of Credits: 3

This course is designed to do two things:  to explore some of the current trends and issues operating in the nonprofit sector at this time and to help students gain a comfort with understanding the research of others so that they may become better consumers of research, if not also better researchers.  This class explores together three specific, current issues/trends of which nonprofit leaders should be aware because of their potential impact, be it positive, negative or even neutral.  The trends explored change with each offering of the class, but two are selected by the profession and the third by the class.  In addition, each student will investigate, and share with the rest of the class, an issue/trend of interest to him/her.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 652 Leadership Assessment and Evaluation

This experiential course is focused on helping students expand their leadership/management capability through systematic assessment of their existing competencies, targeted skill development, and by providing practice in applying the newly acquired skills. A five-step learning framework is used to “drive” this skill acquisition process. During this skill development process, the student receives feedback from self-assessment results, faculty, other participants and co-workers.  Topics will include: self-awareness, time and stress management, individual and group problem solving, communication, power and influence, motivation, conflict management, empowerment, and team leadership, and leading positive change.

Number of Credits: 3

NPL 700 Capstone

The Capstone Project is a semester-long, independent learning experience focused on a specific aspect of nonprofit leadership based on a student’s interests. The capstone is intended as an opportunity both to integrate all that has been learned throughout the course of the degree program and to explore more deeply a particular subject matter tied to a student’s professional development. A student works closely with a faculty advisor, and is required to present her/his capstone project both orally and in written form. 

Number of Credits: 3

Nursing

Program Description

The program of study may be completed in any of ten tracks:

Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist,

Clinical Nurse Leader,

Nursing Administration/MBA (dual degree),

Nursing Service Administration (for those with a prior MBA),

Nursing Administration,

Nurse Anesthetist,

Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner,

Family Primary Care Primary Care Nurse Practitioner,

Public Health Nursing,

Public Health Nursing/MPH (dual degree).

The curriculum reflects a balance between liberal and professional education and is designed to foster intellectual inquisitiveness, analytical thinking, critical judgment, creativity, and self-direction under the guidance of quality faculty. Students are adult learners from diverse backgrounds who participate in the development of their own agendas for learning within a planned program of studies.

Patricia A. Dillon, Ph.D., R.N.

Chair

215.951.1322

dillonp@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/gradnursing

 

If you have any questions regarding the Nursing program, please contact:

msnapn@lasalle.edu

Mission

Mission

Consistent with Lasallian values, the Mission of the Nursing Programs is to provide excellent nursing education programs, with theoretical and clinical learning opportunities designed to promote the development of clinically competent, caring nursing professionals, who are prepared for a life of service, continued learning, leadership, and scholarship.

Vision

The academic, service, and research activities of the Nursing Programs’ faculty mobilize resources to educate students to deliver care to all populations, emphasizing vulnerable, underserved, and diverse communities.

Philosophy for Nursing Programs

Nursing is an art, science, and practice profession that provides nursing services to diverse individuals and groups. Nurses value collaborative relationships with professionals who deliver health care services and with people who are the recipients of such services. Nursing services aim at facilitating the health of people in many settings, thus fulfilling a contract between society and the profession. Nurses’ primary interests are human responses to health, illness, and healing. Nurses carry out many roles when providing safe and quality nursing interventions based on evidence.

The nursing community at La Salle respects the humanity of the people they serve and recognizes the potential for healing within the person, integrating mind, body, and spirit. Students bring their experience to the learning environment while actively engaging in a transformative process of continuing development as ethical, caring practitioners. The teaching-learning environment fosters scholarship, collegiality, respect, and collaboration among learners and teachers, resulting in informed service to others and the profession.

rev. Spring 1998; approved 5/98; rev. 2/01; approved 3/01; rev. 5/01; rev. 2/02; rev. 5/03; rev.& approved 5/15/08; distributed to NUR faculty 3/27/09; 6/11/09; reviewed Fall 2011;  awaiting approval 2/12; approved: 4/21/12; rev. 5/1/12; 5/4/12; 5/7/12; 5/9/12.

Program Goals

Educate baccalaureate prepared nurses for leadership roles in clinical nursing, advanced practice, nursing education, or administration.

Meet the health needs of diverse individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations across various environments.

Support faculty and student scholarly activity that informs quality and safety in healthcare systems.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the program the student will be able to do the following:

1. Integrate advanced theoretical, research-based, scientific, and clinical knowledge into clinical practice to provide nursing care to diverse clients. (Essential 1)

2. Practice independently and collaboratively with an inter-professional team while delivering direct and indirect care services in various types of health care systems. (Essential 2, 7, 9, 10)

3. Use research findings from nursing and other disciplines as a basis for clinical decision-making to improve practice and to formulate health policy. (Essential 4, 6)

4. Use ethical decision-making to promote the well-being of individuals, families, health care professionals in local, national, and international communities. (Essential 6)

5. Utilize evidence-based practice recommendations and professional standards of care to promote health, prevent disease and improve the health status of individuals, families, groups, communities, and populations. (Essential 4, 8)

6. Demonstrate communication skills, including health information management to enhance the quality of care provided at individual and aggregate levels. (Essential 5)

7. Demonstrate safe, effective assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation skills in caring for individuals and groups while working in inter-professional collaborative relationships. (Essential 3, 4, 7, 9)

8. Provide culturally competent care to all persons regardless of race, sex, sexual orientation, age, socioeconomic status, culture, health care beliefs, and religion. (Essential 7, 8)

9. Function as a leader and change agent in nursing and in health care delivery systems particularly to insure quality care for vulnerable and underserved populations. (Essential 7, 8)

10. Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for on-going professional developtment (Essential 9).

Accreditation

The Master of Science in Nursing degree program is accredited by the
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waved for applications submitted online.
2. Provide Evidence of successful academic achievement in completing a baccalaureate degree in nursing from an NLNAC- or CCNE-accredited program or the MSN Bridge program for those R.N.s with a non-nursing baccalaureate degree. Undergraduate coursework must include an introductory statistics course (including inferential and descriptive) and an undergraduate nursing research course. Students who have earned a GPA of 3.2 or higher in their undergraduate program may be formally accepted into the Master of Science program upon receipt of all required documents for admission and a review by the Graduate Nursing Admissions and Progressions committee.
3. Students with an undergraduate BSN GPA of less than 3.2 are required to present test scores from the GRE (Graduate Record Exam), MAT (Miller Analogies Test) or GMAT (Graduate Management Aptitude Test), to be considered for admission into the program. Students should aim for a score above the 50th percentile for the verbal and quantitative sections. Please submit the GREs or MATs scores with your application.
4. Provide a professional résumé.
5. Provide two letters of reference from professors or supervisors. At least one reference must be an academic reference.
6. Provide evidence of current R.N. licensure in the United States.
7. Provide evidence of one year of relevant clinical experience as a registered nurse.
8. Part of the application process includes an interview. Interviews with selected candidates are scheduled following committee review of the completed application.  During the interview, you will be asked to write a one page philosophy statement articulating your professional values, future educational goals, and the reason for your track selection.

Please note that the completed application needs to be submitted for consideration.
The application deadline dates are:
Summer Semester start – April 1st
Fall Semester start  – July 15th
Spring Semester start – December 1st

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

 All documents should be sent to the following:
 Office of Graduate Enrollment
 La Salle University- Box 826
 1900 W. Olney Avenue

  Philadelphia, PA 19141

 215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
 grad@lasalle.edu

Progression through the Program

The following is presented as a model for progression through the Master of Science in Nursing program. Individual plans for progression will be determined for each student in consultation with the Program Chair. Please see the Nursing Student Handbook, the University Student Handbook, and Student Guide to Rights and Responsibilities for additional information. These handbooks are both available on the University Web site and in print.

Required for all MSN Degrees: 34 to 59 graduate credits (depending on track)

Core: Required of students in all tracks (12 credits)
NUR 604   Research for Evidence-based Practice I
NUR 605   Research for Evidence-based Practice II
NUR 607   Advanced Nursing Roles in Healthcare
NUR 608   Advanced Education Nursing: Population-Based Care

Track: Requirements vary with specialization chosen.

Clinical Nurse Leader
NUR 512
NUR 616
NUR 617
NUR 618
NUR 631
NUR 633
NUR 634

Total Credits: 34

Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist
NUR 512
NUR 616
NUR 617
NUR 618
NUR 620
NUR 621
NUR 625
NUR 626
one elective

Total Credits: 41

Nurse Anesthetist
NUR 616
NUR 617
NUR 618
NUR 681
NUR 682
NUR 683
NUR 684
NUR 685
NUR 686
NUR 687
NUR 688
NUR 689
NUR 690 (elective)
NUR 691

Total Credits: 54-57

Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner
NUR 615
NUR 616 
NUR 617 
NUR 618 
NUR 660 

NUR 661
NUR 665
NUR 666
One elective

Total credits: 41

Family Primary Care Nurse Practitioner
NUR 615
NUR 616
NUR 617
NUR 618
NUR 660
NUR 661

NUR 663
NUR 664
NUR 665
NUR 667
NUR 668
NUR 669

Total Credits: 45

Public Health Nursing
NUR 610 or NUR 611
NUR 635
NUR 637
NUR 650 
NUR 651

NUR 655
NUR 656
Two electives

Total Credits: 41

Nursing Service Administration (with prior MBA)
MBA (transfer 9 credits)
NUR 512
NUR 565
NUR 635
NUR 640

NUR 645
NUR 646

Total Credits: 41

Nursing Administration
NUR 512
NUR 565

NUR 640
NUR 641
NUR 645
NUR 646

MBA 615
MBA 691
MBA 810

no electives

Total Credits: 41
 

Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business Administration (MSN/MBA)

This dual-degree program prepares nurses for leadership positions in a reformed health-care system in all types of nursing and health-care practice settings. The curriculum focuses on the disciplines of nursing, management, and business and emphasizes the delivery of quality health- care services. Graduates participate fully in the strategic and operational activities of health-care agencies.

MSN/MBA Courses
NUR 604
NUR 605
NUR 607
NUR 608
NUR 640
NUR 645
NUR 646
MBA 610
MBA 615
MBA 625
MBA 630
MBA 690
MBA 691
MBA 692
MBA 810
MBA 820
MBA 830
MBA 901

MBA 902

Total Credits: 59

Master of Science in Public Health Nursing/Master of Public Health (MSN/MPH) Track

This dual degree track prepares public health nurses to meet health needs of diverse populations through community assessment, program planning, and policy development and provides opportunities for knowledge and skill development to solve public health problems, with particular emphasis on health disparities in urban communities. The strategies of consumer advocacy and resource utilization are important components of the track. Graduates are prepared to integrate the fields of nursing, community development, politics, administration, education, public policy, epidemiology, sociology, and research in urban as well as rural settings.

MSN/MPH Courses

PHLT 520

NUR 604

NUR 605

NUR 607

NUR 608

PHLT 704

PHLT 705

PHLT 500

PHLT 530

PHLT 540

NUR 610 or PHLT 512

NUR/PHLT 635

NUR/PHLT 637

PHLT 696

NUR 650

NUR 655

NUR 651

NUR 656

PHLT 752

PHLT 753

Total Credits:  62

Transfer Credit

With approval of the program director,  students may transfer up to  6 hours of graduate work  into graduate programs that are 36 credit  or less.Students may transfer upto 9 hours of graduate level work in programs that are greater than 36 credits in length. Course credit may only be transferred from graduate programs at accredited intituitions, and only courses with a grade of "B" or better can be transferred.

Dual Degree Information

Dual degree programs are offered for:

MSN/MPH and MSN/MBA

MSN/MPH

This dual degree track prepares public health nurses to meet health needs of diverse populations through community assessment, program planning, and policy development and with opportunities for knowledge and skill development to solve public health problems, with particular emphasis on health disparities in urban communities. The strategies of consumer advocacy and resource utilization are important components of the track. Graduates are prepared to integrate the fields of nursing, community development, politics, administration, education, public policy, epidemiology, sociology, and research in urban as well as rural settings.

This track requires a total of 500 clinical hours. The clinical experiences are in NUR 655 and NUR 656.

MSN/MBA

This dual degree program prepares nurses for leadership positions in a reformed health care system in all types of nursing and health care practice settings. The curriculum focuses on the disciplines of nursing, management, and business and emphasizes the delivery of quality health care services. Graduates participate fully in the strategic and operational activities of health care agencies. Students in the MSN/MBA track must take the GMAT standardized test to be accepted. Students must also be accepted by the MBA program mba@lasalle.edu.

This track requires a total of 250 clinical hours in two of the nursing courses. The clinical experiences are in NUR 645 and NUR 646. There are additional field work requirements in selected MBA courses.

Pre-program Basic Skills** 3 Courses (1 credit each)
MBA 501 The Executive Communicator: Presentation Module
MBA 502 Computer Literacy for the Contemporary Business Environment
MBA 503 Mathematical Methods Module*
*not required
**not required for most students

Nursing Certificates

Post-Graduate Certficate Programs are available for the following tracks:

Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist

This post-master's certificate option is available for nurses who hold a Master of Science in Nursing degree.

The track for a clinical nurse specialist prepares a professional for overseeing nursing care for a group of well or ill clients in hospitals, homes, and primary care settings, acting as a program director in some positions. Two major areas of responsibility include direct and indirect patient care. This nurse moves in and out of direct care situations when expert skill and knowledge are required. The clinical nurse specialist is accountable to patients, advocates for them, and evaluates the quality of nursing services. In indirect care, this nurse's responsibility is primarily to a nursing staff, serving as a consultant, bringing expert clinical knowledge to health care providers on a system-wide basis, and applying current research findings to patient care. This nurse's expertise contributes greatly to the plan of care for patients.

This track requires a total of 512 clinical hours. The clinical experiences are in NUR 625 and NUR 626.

Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

This post-master's certificate option is available for nurses who hold a Master of Science in Nursing degree.

This track prepares students to provide direct care and to take leadership in the primary care of young adults, adults and older adults. Primary care sites include outpatient clinics, work sites, college health services, emergency rooms, home health and other community-based settings. Upon completion of this track, students are eligible for licensure in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and for national certification as an Adult Practitioner.

This track requires a total of 512 clinical hours. The clinical experiences are in NUR 665 and NUR 666.

Family Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

This post-master's certificate option is available for nurses who hold a Master of Science in Nursing degree.

This track builds upon the Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Track and prepares students to provide direct care and to take leadership in the primary care of families. Primary care sites include outpatient clinics, work sites, college health services, emergency rooms, home health and other community-based settings. Upon completion of this track, students are eligible for certification in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and for national certification as a Family Primary Care Nurse Practitioner.

This track requires a total of 692 clinical hours. The clinical experiences are in NUR 665, NUR 667, NUR 668, NUR 669.

For post master’s certificate students who are already adult nurse practitioners, the clinical requirements are 306 hours.

Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business Administration (MSN/MBA)

This dual-degree program prepares nurses for leadership positions in a reformed health-care system in all types of nursing and health-care practice settings. The curriculum focuses on the disciplines of nursing, management, and business and emphasizes the delivery of quality health- care services. Graduates participate fully in the strategic and operational activities of health-care agencies.

Nursing Courses
NUR 604
NUR 605
NUR 607
NUR 608
NUR 640
NUR 645
NUR 646
MBA 810
MBA 820
MBA 830
MBA 901
MBA 902
Total Credits: 59
MBA Courses
MBA 610
MBA 615
MBA 625
MBA 630
MBA 690
MBA 691
MBA 692

Master of Science in Public Health Nursing/Master of Public Health (MSN/MPH) Track

This dual degree track prepares public health nurses to meet health needs of diverse populations through community assessment, program planning, and policy development and provides opportunities for knowledge and skill development to solve public health problems, with particular emphasis on health disparities in urban communities. The strategies of consumer advocacy and resource utilization are important components of the track. Graduates are prepared to integrate the fields of nursing, community development, politics, administration, education, public policy, epidemiology, sociology, and research in urban as well as rural settings.

MSN Core–PHLT Core Knowledge (21 credits)

PHLT 520 Environmental Health and Program Design
NUR 604 Research for Evidence-Based Practice I
NUR 605 Research for Evidence-Based Practice II
NUR 607 Advanced Nursing Roles in Health Care
NUR 608 Advanced Nursing Practice in Population-Based Care
PHLT 704 Statistics and Biostatistics
PHLT 705 Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health

MSN Advanced Core–PHLT Cross-Cutting Knowledge (21 credits)

PHLT 500 The Ethical Basis of the Practice of Public Health
PHLT 530 Health Care Administration
PHLT 540 Intro to Public Health
NUR/PHLT 635 Health and Poicy and Program Planning and Evaluation
NUR/PHLT 637 Epidemiology
NUR 610 Nursing and Health Education or
PHLT 512 Informatics
PHLT 696 Grant Writing Seminar

Specialized Track (20 Credits)

NUR 650 Public Health Nursing I
NUR 651 Public Health Nursing II
NUR 655 Field Study I (256 clinical practicum hours) (4 credits)
NUR 656 Field Study II (256 clinical practicum hours) (4 credits)
PHLT 752 Capstone I
PHLT 753 Capstone II

Total Credits: 62

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Grant funding and Graduate Assistantships might be available. Consult with the Director of the Graduate Nursing Program regarding eligibility.

Information about financial aid and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141, 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Chair: Patricia A. Dillon, Ph.D, R.N.

Professors: Wolf, Kurz
Associate Professors:  Czekanski, Dillon, Donohue-Smith, Frizzell

Assistant Professors:  Hoerst, Kinder, Piper, Townsend, Uribe, Wilby

Course Descriptions

NUR 512 Informatics

This course provides an overview of informatics and other technologies used to enhance and improve patient care. The application of communication technology to integrate and coordinate care is examined. Data management and electronic health records are explored. Access to current literature through search processes using technology is linked to evidence-based health education and other patient care interventions.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 565 Safety Strategies for Health Care Delivery Systems

This course explores medication errors and other health-care errors that threaten patient safety. The impact of health-care errors is examined from the perspectives of consumers, health-care providers, professional organizations, legislators, hospitals, and other health-care delivery agencies. Systems improvement initiatives are investigated with the goal of preventing health-care errors. Interdisciplinary and collaborative roles of consumers, legal counsel, and health-care providers, including nurses, pharmacists, and physicians are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 581 The School Nurse and the Exceptional Child

This course examines the principles of school nursing applied to children with special education and health-related needs. Students explore the practical applications of laws, rules, and regulations that form the basis for accommodating the needs of exceptional children. Emphasis is placed on identifying common health problems and disabilities, nursing care management, and interdisciplinary decision-making. This course addresses Knowledge of Content (IA-ID), Performances, and Professionalism (IIIA-IIID) specified in the School Nurse Guidelines of the Pennsylvania Department of Education Standards.

Prerequisite: None

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 582 School Nurse Practicum

This course provides the student with a practicum in school nursing to meet the entry criteria for school nurse certification in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and meets Standards IV, V, VI, and VII of the Pennsylvania Department of Education General Standards and School Nurse Guidelines I.A., I.B., I.C., I.D., II, III.B., III.C., and III.D. Practicum students will demonstrate the school nurse role under the supervision of a certified school nurse mentor. Students applying to take course will present a dossier detailing previous work experience and professional academic experience for evaluation by the School of Nursing.

Prerequisite: NUR 581

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 605 Research for Evidence-Based Practice II

This course is a continuation of Research for Evidence-Based Practice I (NUR 604). Students develop research proposals, generated by research questions and the literature review, completed in NUR 604. They also examine research design, treatment of variables, sampling, measurement theory, probability theory, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and the use of the computer in data analysis. Ethical and legal principles related to the conduct of nursing research will be discussed. Students employ evidence-based practice strategies to inform clinical practice decisions. Prerequisite: NUR 604

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 607 Advanced Nursing Roles in Healthcare

This course examines the evolution of advanced education nursing in the context of changing health-care delivery systems. Students explore health-care policy development and examine systems of delivering patient care in relation to financial, ethical, legal, socio-cultural, legislative-political, and professional concerns. Program development, informatics, fiscal management of health-care services, budgeting, and reimbursement issues are emphasized. Students practice interdisciplinary networking and coalition-building skills in leadership roles extending beyond the traditional health-care environment.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 608 Advanced Nursing Practice for Population-Based Care

In this course, students develop cultural competence regarding the role of the advanced practice nurse by meeting the health-care needs of diverse groups and populations. Health promotion, disease prevention, resource utilization, and health education responsibilities are examined. Students utilize basic epidemiological concepts, group theories, and needs-assessment approaches for vulnerable populations. They explore the varying needs of diverse groups in community settings through a cultural blueprint.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 615 Family System Concepts for Primary Care

This course explores theoretical perspectives on individuals' health within the family system, emphasizing vulnerable and underserved populations. Societal-level patterns of aging are investigated, including issues affecting family systems at the national and global levels. Family assessment, human development, and life transitions theory are introduced to prepare students to provide anticipatory guidance and advance care planning. Family responses to and coping mechanisms associated with acute, chronic, and terminal illness are scrutinized. Principles of cultural competence and leadership/change agency are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 616 Advanced Health Assessment

This course addresses the health assessment of individuals across their lifespan using a framework of physiologic, psychological, socio-cultural, and physical examination data. Students explore history-taking methods, principles of physical assessment, and concepts of clinical diagnosis to determine patients' potential and actual health problems. The course enables students to develop skills necessary to evaluate the comprehensive health status of individuals through assessment of normal and abnormal physical findings. Students combine principles of nursing and other related sciences to analyze clinical problems and provide safe, competent patient care. Students advance in theoretical knowledge, clinical judgment, differential diagnosis, and decision-making skills. Prerequisites: Core, NUR 617, NUR 618

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 617 Advanced Pharmacology

This course expands the study of the actions and effects of drugs in the human system across an individual's lifespan. Students synthesize legal and professional nursing responsibilities related to pharmacotherapy for health promotion, pathological syndromes, and clinical disorders in advanced practice nursing roles. Students appraise principles of drug therapy, mechanisms of action, and selection of appropriate pharmacological agents in clinical prescribing. Prerequisite/Corequisite: NUR 618

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 618 Advanced Pathophysiology

This course integrates physiological principles, clinical manifestations, and advanced nursing practice implications with the clinical decision-making process. Common pathological syndromes and disorders are explored across an individual's lifespan. Students interpret physiologic, pathophysiologic, psychological, and sociocultural data utilizing information to formulate culturally appropriate advanced nursing practice. Students focus on differentiating normal, variations of normal and abnormal changes of syndromes, and constellations of symptoms with a selection of pertinent diagnostic testing. Prerequisite: Core

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 620 Biopsychosocial Processes: Nursing Care of Adults in Health and Illness

This course explores biopsychosocial and cultural processes in relation to health, illness, and healing in diverse human systems, especially those from vulnerable and under-served populations. Students evaluate significant health problems that represent leading causes of mortality and morbidity for adults from early adulthood through senescence. Evidence- based nursing interventions for adult and geriatric patients with varied health problems ranging from primary to acute concerns are evaluated from the Clinical Nurse Specialist's caring perspective. The National Association for Clinical Nurse Specialists' (NACNS) Statement on Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice and Education, the Clinical Nurse Specialist Core Competencies, and Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist Competencies provide the role context for the course with adult-gerontology population content provided using relevant resources to achieve nationally validated competencies with an emphasis on quality improvement, outcomes management, research, and evidence-based practice.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 621 Biopsychosocial Processes II: Nursing Care of Adults in Health and Illness

This course is a continuation of NUR 620 which explores biopsychosocial and cultural processes in relation to health and healing in human systems especially those from vulnerable and under-served populations. Students evaluate significant health problems which represent the leading causes of mortality and morbidity for adults in the United States. Nursing interventions for adults with these problems are evaluated from the Clinical Nurse Specialist's caring perspective and from the service
orientations of culturally competent health promotion, disease prevention, health maintenance, and health restoration. The National Association for Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) practice and education standards are emphasized. (Under revision)

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 625 Field Study in Adult Health and Illness I

This seminar and preceptored practicum course is designed to integrate theory, practice, and research as the basis for advanced clinical practice for clinical nurse specialists (CNS). Nursing care needs of adults and their responses to health and illness are explored within the context of health promotion, maintenance, and restoration health-care services. Clinical practica are structured according to the needs of the graduate student. The seminars provide a forum for discussion of the roles of the advanced practitioner. Practica and seminars enhance knowledge, skills, and attitudes relevant to advanced nursing practice in a variety of settings. This course requires 250 hours of clinical practicum.
Pre-requisites: NUR 616, Core
Co-requisite: NUR 621

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 626 Field Study in Adult Gerontology Health and Illness II

A continuation of NUR 625 in which graduate students explore the needs and responses of diverse healthy and ill adults during preceptored clinical practica and seminars. The course views theory and research as foundations of nursing practice. Advanced nursing practice is examined within the context of health promotion, maintenance, and restoration services. Students investigate the characteristics and functions of the clinical nurse specialist role in relation to clinical problems. Practica are structured according to the needs of graduate students. The seminars provide a forum for discussion of various roles and clinical issues of advanced nursing practice in clinical nurse specialist roles in diverse settings. The practica and seminars enable students to expand knowledge, skills, and attitudes relevant to culturally competent advanced nursing practice for diverse clients. The practice and education standards of the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) are integrated. This course requires 250 hours of clinical practicum.
Prerequisite: NUR 625
Co-requisite: NUR 621

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 631 Clinical Outcomes Management

This course addresses clinical decision-making, management of patient care, evidence-based practice, and outcomes management. Students participate in the process of developing best practice guidelines for promoting, maintaining, and restoring health. Quality assurance, safety and risk reduction will be examined. Students begin to develop a leadership portfolio.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 633 Care Environment Management

This course investigates knowledge of complex health care systems including health care delivery models, financing, organization of health care systems, legislation affecting health care, and the role of professional nursing organizations in the health care environment. Students analyze the role of the CNL in health care systems.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 634 Field Study in Clinical Nurse Leadership

This course provides students the opportunity to participate in a leadership practicum with a mentor from a practice setting. Students complete their leadership portfolio that includes a capstone project demonstrating implementation of the leadership skills they have developed during their course of study.

NUR 635 Health Policy and Program Planning and Evaluation

This seminar course introduces students to health policy, program planning, and evaluation in the public health context, especially as they relate to vulnerable and under-served populations. Special emphasis is placed on students' strengthening and developing their skills in policy formulation and implementation. The social, economic, legal, ethical, cultural, and political environments that influence public policy, planning, and evaluation are explored. Students acquire familiarity with strategies for health planning and evaluation through selected applied learning activities.
Prerequisites: Core

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 640 Nursing Management/Administration I: The Content and Context of Nursing Administration

This course focuses on the practice of nursing administration and provides students with the opportunity to critically examine the role of the nurse administrator. Students examine theories and principles regarding management of organizational systems within diverse health-care settings. Delivery of nursing care and services in relation to structure, process, and outcomes within small and large organizational systems is emphasized. Organizational design, administrative processes, and measurement of organizational effectiveness within nursing systems are emphasized. The professional, research, managerial, leadership, and change agency aspects of the nurse administrator role are explored in relation to the practice of nursing administration.
Prerequisites: Core, MBA Foundation, MBA Executive Perspectives, and acceptance into the MBA program.
Co-requisite: NUR 645

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 641 Nursing Management/Administration II

The emphasis of this course is on the role of the nurse administrator in developing and managing human resources within the health care delivery system. Theories and principles related to the development of an organizational climate that fosters staff satisfaction and productivity are explored. The Magnet Program is discussed and reviewed. Principles of personnel administration, employee relations, legal guidelines and collective bargaining are examined throughout the course.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 645 Field Study in Nursing Management/Administration I

This is the first of two preceptored field experiences designed to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate administration theory, operations, and research in a variety of health-care settings in order to positively influence the quality of patient care. With faculty guidance, students select and participate in a variety of experiences that focus on nursing management within diverse health-care settings. Seminars provide students with experiences in developing the skills necessary for the nurse administrator to influence change, to work with teams, and to manage resources. Trends, ethics, standards, and research in the area of nursing management are also examined. Emphasis is placed on the student's articulation of the philosophical and theoretical basis of the practicum issues and on the development, refinement, and evaluation of effective management strategies. Clinical practica are structured according to the individual student's knowledge and skill needs. This course requires 125 hours of clinical practicum.
Prerequisite: MBA Core, MBA Foundation, MBA Executive Perspectives
Co-requisite: NUR 640

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 646 Field Study in Nursing Management/Administration II

In this preceptored field experience, students select opportunities to participate in strategic and financial management operations in a variety of settings. Seminars examine the impact of prospective payment, managed care, and uncompensated care on health-care organizations and nursing systems, especially those serving vulnerable and under-served populations. Students explore intrapreneurial and entrepreneurial roles of nursing administrators. Seminars provide students with the opportunity to share and process weekly practicum experiences and to receive feedback from students and faculty colleagues. Students articulate the philosophical and theoretical basis of practicum issues and the development, refinement, and evaluation of effective management strategies to effect positive changes in patient-care delivery systems. Students are encouraged to seek practica in alternative care delivery sites such as, but not limited to, Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), primary-care health centers, assisted living centers, nursing homes, and hospitals and with diverse client populations, especially the vulnerable and underserved. This course requires 125 hours of clinical practicum.
Prerequisite: NUR 645
Required MBA courses are previously listed and described elsewhere in this catalog.

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 650 Public Health Nursing I

This is the first of two courses designed to provide the theoretical foundations necessary for advanced public health nursing practice. Health behaviors and change strategies will be discussed as the bases for effective public health interventions. A variety of community assessment models from nursing, public health, public policy, and the social sciences will be examined. Current writings from the humanities provide an opportunity to apply and critique assessment models. Content includes the scope and standards of practice for public health nursing and exploration of significant public health problems.
Prerequisites: Core, NUR 635, NUR 637
Co-requisite: NUR 655

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 651 Public Health Nursing II

This is the second of two courses designed to provide the theoretical foundations necessary for advanced public health nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on intervention and evaluation strategies. Content includes public health services models that support primary, secondary, and tertiary health-care initiatives both in traditional and non-traditional settings. Financial, ethical, cultural, and political factors in aggregate interventions are explored. Models for intervention and evaluation from nursing and other disciplines are analyzed for their utility in advanced practice nursing. Popular works of non-fiction are used to highlight the benefits and limitations of theoretical models in public health nursing. The synthesis of ideas, models, and research from a variety of sources are emphasized as a critical component of public health nursing.
Prerequisites: NUR 650, NUR 655
Co-requisite: NUR 656

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 655 Field Study in Public Health Nursing I

This seminar and preceptored practicum course integrates theory, practice, and applied research. Through seminars and clinical applications, students develop the initial phases of a community health project with targeted populations. Emphasis is placed on leadership roles that optimize the
health of families, groups, and communities through an assessment of the health status of an aggregate or community and a proposed plan of action based on priority needs and resources of the target population. The final phases of this project (implementation, evaluation, and
recommendations) will be completed in the Spring Semester (NUR 656). The course builds on public health principles and culturally competent interventions engaging at-risk urban populations. Healthy People 2010 guides the student's advanced practice opportunities through collaborative, multidisciplinary, client-oriented work in community settings. This course requires 256 hours of clinical practicum.
Prerequisites: NUR 635, NUR 637, HCA 731, or MBA 610
Co-requisite: NUR 650

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 656 Field Study in Public Health Nursing II

This seminar and preceptored practice course further integrates theory, practice, and program evaluation perspectives into advanced practice public health nursing. The course supports the implementation and evaluation phases of the student's ongoing public health project/practicum. Emphasis is placed on expanding professional and community roles, responsibilities and requisite skills to sustain and promote population-focused health within the framework of Healthy People 2010. The course focuses on culturally competent public health nursing interventions and leadership opportunities in diverse urban settings. Innovative health communication, education, and outreach strategies addressing public health needs in the 21st century are essential components of the course. This course requires 256 hours of clinical practicum.

Prerequisites: NUR 650, NUR 655
Co-requisite: NUR 651

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 660 Adult-Gerontology Primary Care I

This course focuses on the primary care health concerns of diverse young adults, adults, and older adults and facilitates student development in the nurse practitioner role. Using national health-care guidelines and professional standards, students assess health behaviors, plan and implement culturally appropriate and evidence-based practice strategies for health promotion and disease prevention, and evaluate health outcomes. Health maintenance and health restoration are explored in light of contemporary health-care environments, especially for underserved and vulnerable populations. Patient education and counseling techniques relevant to advanced nursing practice are emphasized. Prerequisites: Core, NUR 616, NUR 617, NUR 618; co-requisite: NUR 665

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 661 Adult-Gerontology Primary Care II

This course focuses on theories, principles, and processes necessary to diagnose and manage primary care health problems of young adults, adults, and older adults. Evidence-based practice standards and professional ethics are emphasized as students acquire knowledge necessary to evaluate and manage diverse patient populations with complex primary care health needs ranging from acuity to chronicity, including palliative and end-of-life care. Students explore health risks and behaviors, health promotion strategies, disease prevention, and health restoration in the context of contemporary health-care environments. Legal, ethical, financial, and cultural concepts related to advanced-practice nursing and professional credentialing are integrated. Patient education and counseling techniques relevant to the advanced-practice nursing role are addressed. Prerequisite: NUR 660; co-requisite: NUR 666 or NUR 667

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 663 Primary Care of Women

This course presents the principles of primary care, emphasizing health promotion, and disease prevention for both the pregnant and non- pregnant woman. Pathophysiologic alterations will be addressed as well as developmental stages, family, cultural, and societal influences. Primary care management of common health problems of adult women will be discussed. Students will develop increased clinical reasoning skills with the goal of managing the female patient in the ambulatory care setting.
Prerequisites: NUR 616, 617, 618, 660, 665
Co-requisite: NUR 668

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 664 Primary Care of Children

This course presents the principles of primary care, emphasizing health promotion, and disease prevention for the child from birth to adolescence. Pathophysiologic alterations will be addressed as well as developmental stages, family, cultural, and societal influences. Primary care management of common health problems of children will be discussed. Students will develop increased clinical reasoning skills with the goal of managing the pediatric patient in the ambulatory care setting.

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 665 Field Study: Adult-Gerontology Primary Care I

This seminar course focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to provide safe and effective primary care to young adults, adults, and older adults. Seminars focus on the application of physiologic, pharmacologic, and psychosocial principles in the professional role of the nurse practitioner within the health-care delivery system. Students integrate research-based knowledge of health assessment, health promotion, and disease prevention, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and family theory into preceptored clinical experiences in primary care settings. Course assignments focus on the process of clinical reasoning for accurate diagnosis and management of illness. (256 preceptored clinical hours) Co-requisite: NUR 660

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 666 Field Study in Primary Care of Adults I

This course allows students to further develop and refine necessary skills for the adult-gerontology nurse practitioner. Students build on competencies achieved in NUR 665 and continue to integrate evidence from advanced practice nursing and related disciplines in classroom and clinical activities to prepare for the role of the nurse practitioner. Students apply knowledge of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to provide safe and effective health care in the delivery of primary care. (256 peceptored clinical hours) Prerequisite: NUR 665; co-requisite: NUR 661; prerequisites: Core, NUR 616, NUR 617, NUR 618

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 667 Field Study: Adult Gerontology Primary Care II for the FNP Student

This course allows students to further develop and refine necessary skills for the family nurse practitioner. Students build on competencies achieved in NUR 665 and continue to integrate evidence from advanced-practice nursing and related disciplines in classroom and clinical activities to prepare for the role of the nurse practitioner. Students apply knowledge of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to provide safe and effective health care in the delivery of primary care. (128 peceptored clinical hours) Prerequisite: NUR 665; co-requisite: NUR 661; prerequisites: Core, NUR 616, NUR 617, NUR 618

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 668 Field Study in Primary Care of Women

This course provides the opportunity for further development and refinement of primary care skills and clinical judgment of the nurse practitioner student. Students build on beginning competencies to develop greater skill in primary care activities with the pregnant and non pregnant woman through integration of theory and principles of nursing and other related fields and supervised clinical activities. Clinical reasoning skills are refined through clinical practice, case presentations, mentoring and role modeling. Students apply evidence-based research related to pharmacology and clinical management theory and techniques to effectively manage health and disease within diverse primary care settings. Student presentations develop the process of clinical reasoning for accurate diagnosis and management of illness and management of pregnant and non pregnant women.

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 669 Fnp Field Study II

This course provides the opportunity for further development and refinement of primary care skills and clinical judgment of the nurse practitioner student. Students build on beginning competencies to develop greater skill in primary care activities with the pediatric client through integration of theory and principles of nursing and other related fields and supervised clinical activities. Clinical reasoning skills are refined through clinical practice, case presentations, mentoring and role modeling. Students apply evidence-based research related to pharmacology and clinical management theory and techniques to effectively manage health and disease within diverse primary care settings. Student presentations develop the process of clinical reasoning for accurate diagnosis and management of illness and management of pediatric client.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 681 Orientation to Study and Practice of Anesthesia

This orientation course is required for all students enrolled in the nurse anesthesia track. It is designed to familiarize students with department management, policies, and procedures, the history of nurse anesthesia, the role of the anesthesiologist as an anesthesia care team member, the history of anesthesia, and issues related to anesthesia administration. In addition, this course acquaints students with the physical plant, surgical suite, and critical care area. Program requirements and accreditation requirements of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs are presented. A broad field orientation to clinical practice includes legal implications of anesthesia care, preoperative patient assessment, airway management, and patient positioning. This course provides the basis for meeting the anesthesia-related needs of culturally diverse patients in acute-care settings. Topics included are: (1) Orientation to Anesthesia Department, Care Plans, and Records, (2) Orientation to the Operating Room, (3) Preoperative Patient Assessment, (4) Substance Abuse, Application to Nurse Anesthesia Practice, (5) Airway Management, (6) Patient Positioning, and (7) Basic Principles of Anesthesia Practice.
Prerequisite: Graduate Core, Advanced Core, special permission

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 682 Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I

Nurse Anesthesia students are presented with specific anatomic and physiologic considerations of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and fluid/ electrolyte systems. Cellular physiology as it applies to Nurse Anesthesia practice is presented. Cardiovascular segments provide monitoring modalities, cardiovascular pharmacology, and the effects of the anesthetic agents on the cardiovascular system. The respiratory segment provides an in-depth examination of anatomy, physiology, respiratory reflexes, lung volumes, respiratory sounds, rates, and types as they apply to anesthesia. Pathophysiologic disease processes associated with culturally diverse patient populations are presented and clinically applied. Topics included are (1) Cell Physiology, (2) Respiratory I, and (3) Cardiovascular I.

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 683 Pharmacology I

The purpose of this course is to help students understand the actions and effects of specific anesthetic medications on the human system. Students analyze the nursing responsibilities related to anesthetic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for the advanced practice nurse. Students study principles of drug therapy, mechanisms of action, and selection of pharmacologic agents specific to anesthesia practice. Regional anesthetics, intravenous and inhalational anesthetic agents, and their clinical applications are incorporated. In addition, students examine pharmacologic considerations associated with diverse patient populations, especially those in urban medically under-served areas. Topics included are (1) Introduction to Pharmacology, (2) Regional Anesthesia, and (3) Inhalational Anesthesia.

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 684 Physics and Chemistry I

This course introduces the student to the principles of inorganic chemistry that are applicable to anesthesia practice. The core portion of this course encompasses the critical elements of design, purpose, operation, and safety principles associated with anesthesia machine use. The FDA checklist is incorporated into the didactic portion of the curriculum. Topics included are (1) Anesthesia Machine and (2) Patient Monitoring.

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 685 Pharmacology II

The purpose of the course is to expand students' pharmacologic knowledge base related specifically to nurse anesthesia practice while continuing to build on the principles of NUR 683. Students continue to build on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics related to local anesthetics, muscle relaxants, and intravenous anesthetic agents. The course continues to focus on the pharmacologic considerations and pathophysiologic disease processes of persons in medically under-served areas and with high-risk urban populations. Topics included are (1) Local Anesthesia, (2) Muscle Relaxants, and (3) Intravenous Anesthesia Agents.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 686 Anatomy Physiology and Pathophysiology II

The anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are expanded upon from NUR 682. In addition, the physiology, anatomy, and pathophysiology of the hepatic, endocrine, excretory, and autonomic nervous systems are presented. The effects of the inhalational and intravenous anesthetic agents on the hepatic, renal, and endocrine systems are featured with a focus on biotransformation and excretory processes. Pathophysiologic disease processes specific to culturally and racially diverse patient populations are applied. Topics included are (1) Cardiovascular II, (2) Respiratory II, (3) Hepatic System, (4) Endocrine System, (5) Excretory System, and (6) Autonomic Nervous System.

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 687 Chemistry and Physics II

The physical laws of physics as they apply to anesthesia practice are presented. Organic and inorganic chemistry principles as they apply to nurse anesthesia practice are examined. Electrical safety and electrical principles related to the physical environment and surgical suite are integrated into this dynamic course.

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 688 Advanced Principles of Practice

An in-depth presentation of the respective anesthesia subspecialties is presented. Surgical subspecialties explored include obstetrics, pediatrics, CT surgery, geriatrics, neuroanesthesia, trauma, burns, orthopedics, ENT, plastic surgery, GI surgery, pain management, laser surgery, and hematology. Specific techniques, monitoring devices, complications, physiologic alterations, and anesthesia provider considerations associated with each subspecialty are extensively reviewed and applied clinically. Subspecialty practice applicable to the medically under-served is
included in conjunction with cultural issues that affect health care in the urban setting. Topics included are (1) Obstetrics, (2) Pediatrics, (3) Cardiothoracic, (4) Geriatrics, (5) Neuroanesthesia, (6) Trauma/ Burns, (7) Orthopedics, (8) ENT/Plastics, (9) GI Surgery, (10) Pain Management, (11) Laser Surgery, and (12) Hematology.

Number of Credits: 4

NUR 689 Professional Aspects

This culminating course is designed to prepare students for the professional responsibilities they will assume as nurse anesthetists following graduation. Medical-legal considerations associated with nurse anesthesia are incorporated and selected medical malpractice cases are analyzed. This course provides students with the ability to evaluate journal clubs and prepare professional reports for presentation. Topics included are (1) Medical-Legal Considerations in Anesthesia Practice, (2) Seminar Workshop, Educational Meetings, Morbidity, and Mortality Conferences, and (3) Journal Club.

Number of Credits: 2

NUR 690 Clinical Practicum I

This clinical practicum is developed to allow the student to gain exposure to the induction, maintenance, and emergence phases of anesthesia. Students focus on pre-anesthesia assessment, anesthesia induction techniques, emergence, and proper postprocedure care. This is a Pass/Fail course. Objectives included are (1) Room Preparation, (2) Pre-Anesthetic Assessment, (3) Anesthesia Record, (4) Induction, (5) Maintenance, Emergence, and Post-operative Periods, and (6) Interpersonal Behavior.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 691 Clinical Practicum II

This clinical capstone course is the final culmination of the student's clinical experience. Senior nurse anesthesia students utilize their didactic preparation and clinical anesthesia foundation from the preceding six semesters. Topics included are (1) Room Preparation, (2) Preanesthetic induction, (3) Anesthesia Record, (4) Induction, (5) Maintenance, Embergence, and Post-operative rounds, and (6) Interpersonal Behavior.

Number of Credits: 6

NUR 709 Nursing Research for Evidence Based Practice

Students examine nursing research as applied to the profession’s clinical nursing problems by examining the major parts, processes, and principles of quality investigations. They critique studies on a clinical problem and compare research designs, purposes, and methods. The fit of data analysis approaches with research questions and methods is also evaluated.

Restrictions: For MSN and CRNA students only

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

Public Health

Program Description

The Master of Public Health (MPH) Program at La Salle University provides students with opportunities for knowledge and skill development to solve public health problems, with particular emphasis on health disparities in urban communities. Students collaborate with community members and other professionals to create and evaluate health promotion and disease prevention programs. The curriculum includes a practice immersion and a capstone project that emphasize case findings, health education, and disease prevention. The MPH curriculum is designed to ensure that upon graduation students have attained knowledge in the broad field of public health as well as knowledge related to health disparities in urban communities.  MPH students complete their public health practice hours in communities identified as medically underserved or vulnerable. Students bring the knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained in core and cross-cutting competency, elective, practice, and capstone courses to the practice site that meet the public health needs of urban communities.

Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH
Program Director
215-951-5032
robertsonjames@lasalle.edu

www.lasalle.edu/mph

 

If you have any questions regarding the Public Health program, please contact:

mph@lasalle.edu

Mission

The mission of the La Salle University Master of Public Health (MPH) Program, which is rooted in the larger University mission, is to educate individuals from diverse disciplines and backgrounds in core public health knowledge areas so that they are equipped to help prevent disease and promote physical and mental health and social well-being through public health practice, leadership, and research.

Values

The La Salle Master of Public Health (MPH) Program’s values stem from the broader University’s values, including teaching excellence, the importance of community, service to the poor, and education that fosters spiritual development. Specifically, the Program’s values include:

  1. Excellence in teaching that fosters idealism, creativity, and innovation.
  2. Service to marginalized and underserved populations which helps to promote health and prevent disease.
  3. Research and scholarship that engages communities as partners in improving the environmental and social conditions necessary to achieve physical and mental health and social well-being.
  4. Ethical decision making that considers social justice and health equity.
  5. Respect for cultural and religious values at the individual, family, community, and societal levels.
  6. Equality for individuals and communities regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, or ability. 
  7. Commitment to lifelong professional and personal development.

Program Goals

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS

Goal 1. Graduates are competent in the 5 core public health knowledge areas and are able to address issues associated with health disparities in urban communities.

Goal 2. Faculty will have expertise in public health, especially public health in urban communities, and will convey this expertise via effective teaching and student advising.

RESEARCH GOAL

Goal 3. Students and faculty will engage in public health research and scholarly activities.

SERVICE GOAL

Goal 4. Students and faculty will engage in service activities within the University and for the larger community.  Particular emphasis is placed on service opportunities addressing the needs of urban communities.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT GOAL

Goal 5. The Program will provide training and workforce development opportunities that meet the needs of the public health workforce working in urban communities.

DIVERSITY GOAL

Goal 6.  Within the available applicant pool, the Program will strive to increase or maintain the proportion of underrepresented racial/ethnic groups in program faculty and students.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the MPH program, graduates will be able to:

  • Analyze determinants of health and disease using an ecological framework.
  • Apply epidemiologic methods to address scientific, ethical, economic, and political discussions related to public health issues.
  • Apply descriptive and inferential statistical methods to inform public health research, practice, and policy.
  • Identify genetic, physiologic, and psychosocial factors that affect susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to environmental hazards.
  • Describe the legal and ethical bases for public health and health services.
  • Apply the principles of program planning, development, budgeting, management, and evaluation in organizational and community initiatives.
  • Compare basic theories, concepts, and models from a range of social and behavioral disciplines used in public health research and practice.
  • Apply informatics and communication methods and resources as strategic tools to promote public health.
  • Apply basic principles of ethical analysis (e.g. the Public Health Code of Ethics, human rights framework, and other moral theories) to issues of public health practice and policy.

Council on Education for Public Health Competencies

Evidence Based Approaches to Public Health

  • Apply epidemiological methods to the breadth of settings and situations in public health practice
  • Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context  
  • Analyze quantitative and qualitative data using biostatistics, informatics, computer-based programming and software, as appropriate  
  • Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice

Public Health & Health Care Systems

  • Compare the organization, structure and function of health care, public health and regulatory systems across national and international settings  
  • Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels

Planning & Management to Promote Health

  • Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities’ health  
  • Apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs   
  • Design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention  
  • Explain basic principles and tools of budget and resource management  
  • Select methods to evaluate public health programs

Policy in Public Health

  • Discuss multiple dimensions of the policy-making process, including the roles of ethics and evidence   
  • Propose strategies to identify stakeholders and build coalitions and partnerships for influencing public health outcomes  
  • Advocate for political, social or economic policies and programs that will improve health in diverse populations  
  • Evaluate policies for their impact on public health and health equity

Leadership

  • Apply principles of leadership, governance and management, which include creating a vision, empowering others, fostering collaboration and guiding decision making   
  • Apply negotiation and mediation skills to address organizational or community challenges  

Communication

  • Select communication strategies for different audiences and sectors   
  • Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation  
  • Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content  

Interprofessional Practice

  • Perform effectively on interprofessional teams

Systems Thinking  

  • Apply systems thinking tools to a public health issue  

Health Disparities in Urban Communities Competencies

  • Investigate the socioeconomic and cultural factors that impact human health and result in common health disparities affecting urban communities
  • Analyze ethical issues surrounding research, risk, and public health interventions involving vulnerable and marginalized populations living and working in urban communities
  • Evaluate the extent to which principles of community based participatory research (CBPR) have been used in planning, development, and evaluation of public health programs and research with diverse populations.
  • Demonstrate collaboration with community partners to prioritize individual, organizational, and community concerns related to reducing health disparities in urban communities
  • Evaluate how moral and ethical values shape and influence decision making, policy development, and health outcomes in urban communities
  • Assess the degree to which community based public health programs and strategies address health disparities in diverse urban communities.

Public Health Practice Experience

Placement in the public health practice experience is established by an affiliation agreement with a non-profit agency or organization invested in health-related programs. Students identify public health practice sites based on academic and prior work experience, individual interest, and professional goals. Students must complete 200 practice hours to successfully complete the practice requirement.

Admission Requirements

Applicants may apply to the MPH program with the following earned degrees from a regionally accredited college or university: Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Public Health, Bachelor of Social Work, Bachelor of Science in Nutrition. They may also apply with a Master of Science in Nursing, other master degrees, professional doctoral degree, or research doctoral degree.

To be accepted for admission to the MPH Program, a candidate must:

  • Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  • Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completing baccalaureate, master’s, and/or doctoral degrees, with a minimum scholastic GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Students with an undergraduate or graduate GPA of less than 3.0 might be provisionally accepted and may take up to two courses. Students who are provisionally accepted must achieve a B or better in each of their first two MPH courses in order to be considered for formal acceptance.
  • Provide official transcripts from the institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
  • Provide a current résumé or curriculum vitae.
  • Provide two letters of reference, one from a professor (academic reference).
  • Attend an interview with the Director of the program or designee (at the discretion of the Program Director).
  • Provide a personal statement (600 words or less) addressing the applicant’s reasons for wanting to enroll in the MPH program and his or her career plans upon completion of the program at La Salle School of Nursing and Health Sciences. An applicant should note any relevant strengths or weaknesses in his or her background or ability to carry out professional responsibilities.
  • Complete an introductory statistics course (including inferential and descriptive), earning a B or better.

Important: Without exception, students may not begin practicum courses without submitting:

  • Criminal and child abuse clearances; FBI background check.
  • Health and physical examination documents (including current immunization/titers)

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

All documents should be sent to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University- Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141
215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Transfer of Credit

Students may transfer up to nine hours of graduate-level work at the discretion of the Program Director.

Application Deadlines

The Master of Public Health Program admits students for the Fall term only. All documents should be submitted by August 1st for consideration. International student applications should be completed at least two months prior to the date listed above.

Students desiring to audit courses or take a course as a non-degree student must apply for admission in the same manner as MPH candidates. Students who are accepted provisionally will be evaluated by the Master of Public Health Program Admissions Committee after two courses.

Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH
Director, MPH Program
La Salle University
Philadelphia, PA 19141
215-951-5032
robertsonjames@lasalle.edu

All documents should be sent to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University – Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141-1199
215.951.1100 / Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Progression in the MPH Program

Students complete 48 semester hours of degree requirements. This coursework includes successful completion of all core and cross-cutting competency, elective, practice, and Capstone courses. The cumulative GPA in the MPH Program must be a 3.0 or better in order to graduate.

Scope and Sequence of Master of Public Health Program
The MPH curriculum incorporates several elements: core and cross-cutting competencies, electives, practice, and two capstone courses. The curriculum addresses all of the criteria and comptencies outlined by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). Courses generally run over 15 weeks in the fall and spring semesters and 11 weeks in the summer session. The following section details the length of the academic units in courses and credit hours organized in the curricular structures of core and cross-cutting competency, elective, practice, and capstone courses.

All courses listed below are 3 credits, unless otherwise noted.

Core Competencies (21 credits)
PHLT 520 Environmental Health
PHLT 530 Public Health Ethics, Leadership and Management

PHLT 600 Research Methods for Public Health
PHLT 635 Health Policy
PHLT 637 Epidemiology
PHLT 704 Statistics and Biostatistics
PHLT 705 Frameworks in Public Health Practice

Cross-Cutting Competencies (9 credits)
PHLT 513 GIS Applications for Public Health
PHLT 540 Introduction to Public Health: Concepts of Health and Disease
PHLT 696 Grant Writing Seminar
 

Electives (Choose 2 electives — 6 credits)*
PHLT 551  Urban Men’s Health
PHLT 554  Public Health, AIDS, and Society
PHLT 556  Reproductive Health for the Public Health Practitioner
PHLT 557  Women, Gender, and Public Health
PHLT 558  Adolescent Health: Public Health Issues, Programs, and Policies
PHLT 615  Violence Prevention and Control
PHLT 630  Race, Ethnicity, and Public Health

*Additional public health-related courses may be used as electives with permission of the MPH Program Director. 

Public Health Practice (6 credits)
PHLT 750 Public Health Practice Experience I
PHLT 751 Public Health Practice Experience II

Capstone (6 credits)
PHLT 752 Public Health Capstone/Culminating Experience I
PHLT 753 Public Health Capstone/Culminating Experience II

Plan of Study

Plan of Study 

MPH students can complete the degree requirements over two (2) or three (3) years, as noted below. MPH students have seven (7) years to complete the MPH degree requirements. 

3 YEAR OPTION

Year 1

Fall (6 credits)

PHLT 540: Intro to Public Health: Concepts of Health & Disease
PHLT 704: Statistics and Biostatistics

Spring (6 credits)

PHLT 513: GIS Applications for Public Health
PHLT 637: Epidemiology

Summer (6 credits)

PHLT 600: Research Methods for Public Health
Elective 1

Year 2

Fall (6 credits)

PHLT 530: Public Health Ethics, Leadership and Management
PHLT 705: Frameworks in Public Health Practice

Spring (6 credits)

PHLT 635: Health Policy
Elective 2

Summer (6 credits)

PHLT 696: Grant Writing Seminar
PHLT 520: Environmental Health

Year 3

Fall (6 credits)

PHLT 750: Public Health Practice Experience I (100 hours)
PHLT 752: Public Health Capstone/Culminating Experience I 
- Comprehensive Exam

Spring (6 credits)

PHLT 751: Public Health Practice Experience II (100 hours)
PHLT 753: Public Health Capstone/Culminating Experience II
*2 elective courses required

 

2 YEAR OPTION

Year 1

Fall (9 credits)

PHLT 540: Intro to Public Health: Concepts of Health & Disease
PHLT 704: Statistics and Biostatistics
PHLT 705: Frameworks in Public Health Practice

Spring (9 credits)

PHLT 513: GIS Applications for Public Health
PHLT 637: Epidemiology
PHLT 635: Health Policy

Summer (9 credits)

PHLT 520: Environmental Health
PHLT 600: Research Methods for Public Health
PHLT 696: Grant Writing Seminar

Year 2

Fall (12 credits)

Elective 1
PHLT 530
: Public Health Ethics Leadership and Management
PHLT 750: Public Health Practice Experience I (100 hours)
PHLT 752: Public Health Capstone/Culminating Experience I
- Comprehensive Exam

Spring (9 credits)

Elective 2
PHLT 751: Public Health Practice Experience II (100 hours)
PHLT 753: Public Health Capstone/Culminating Experience II
*2 elective courses required

Capstone

The purpose of the capstone (also referred to as a culminating experience) is to have MPH students demonstrate the application and mastery of the MPH program competencies. This culminating experience is required by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), the accrediting agency for programs of public health. The capstone thesis allows students to demonstrate proficiency in the public health competencies by conducting a comprehensive review of the scientific evidence related to a public health issue, concern, or intervention over two semesters. Students work closely with Public Health faculty members to identify a meaningful and scholarly capstone thesis that will contribute to the discipline of public health. Students develop their capstone thesis based on their academic interests and their future career goals.  The successful completion and presentation of the capstone thesis as well as the successful completion of a comprehensive written examination signifies that the MPH student is prepared to be a public health practitioner.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Information about financial aid and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141, 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Director: Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH

Professor: Daniel Rodriguez, PhD, Meredith Kneavel, PhD
Associate Professor: Holly Harner, PhD, MBA, MPH, RN, WHCNP-BC, FAAN,
Assistant Professors: Sara Shuman, PhD, Christen Rexing, PhD, MPH

Course Descriptions

PHLT 513 GIS Applications for Public Health

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology in public health. As part of a toolkit for public health professionals, ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information to a broader audience. Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data. Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology. Finally, students reflect on community and individual ethical considerations, including use of sensitive electronic information, a public health professional must weigh when using information discovered about a community or individual through GIS-based manipulations. This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 520 Environmental Health

This course addresses environmental factors that impact human health. Local and regional conditions such as air, water, and soil contamination are scrutinized as are global threats, increasing population pressures, poverty, and emerging threats to populations. Students integrate tools of ecological analysis, epidemiology, and toxicology and use risk assessment to define and weigh human exposures to a range of toxicants. Students also examine the impact of environmental conditions including disaster preparedness, occupational health, community health, and health conditions in the home. Furthermore, students consider biological, physical, and chemical factors affecting the health of communities and analyze direct and indirect effects of environmental and occupational agents and outcomes associated with exposure to hazards. The responsibility of public health professionals for the human safety and health of communities through federal, state, and community regulations and agencies is also explored.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 530 Public Health Ethics, Leadership and Management

Students explore the role of leaders and managers working in organizations focused on the delivery of public health programs, interventions, and outreach. Principles of effective leadership, including fostering collaboration, guiding decision making, effective communication, workforce development, consensus building, negotiation, collaborative problem solving, and conflict management are reviewed. Students address principles of team development and roles and practices of effective teams. This course also explores the ethical and philosophical basis of public health research, practice, and policy. Ethical theories are explored and critically examined, with a focus on their application to public health. Emphasis is placed on health disparities, health equity, and social justice, particularly as these concepts relate to urban communities. The course draws on students' experiences to promote moral reflection of personal values with regard to contemporary public health challenges and examines current and emerging issues as influenced by emerging technological, clinical, political, legal, socio-economic, and fiscal factors. (edited from catalog description)

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 540 Introduction to Public Health: Concepts of Health and Disease

This introductory course exposes students to foundational public health content including Epidemiology, Social and Behavioral Science, Environmental Health, Health Policy and Management, and Biostatistics. Topics addressed in this course include: the structure, function, and history of public health, the biomedical basis of public health, the public health core functions and essential services, the role of public health ethics and values, and future challenges to public health. Socio-economic and cultural factors that impact human health are examined through exposure to current research and analysis of current events. Databases are surveyed to reveal vital statistics and public health records that inform evidence based decision-making and support public health programs, especially programs that address health disparities and inequities in urban communities. Health priorities, major diseases, and disease burden are examined.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 550 Global Health

This course explores world heath issues and policies by examining selected threats to global health. Students ascertain the global interconnectedness of humanity and investigate the effect of economic globalization on health issues. Global warming, cross border pollution, the spread of infectious diseases, and international crime are considered. Current health threats, global health indicators, ethical considerations of global initiatives, and solutions are elevated.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 551 Urban Men's Health

This course explores the growing disparities among disenfranchised and vulnerable populations in our society. Students examine the predicament of fragile populations with a focus on the unique health status of the urban male. This course recognizes that the trait masculinity, gender roles, employment, and psychosocial factors influence the way men care for themselves and others. Students experience health promotion activities in environments demonstrating the challenges urban men face when seeking access to health care.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 554 Public Health, Aids, and Society

This course provides in-depth study of the most critical public health issue facing society.
Topics include current HIV/AIDS information and an exploration of issues including the history of HIV, transmission and risk factors for infection, local and global disparities in HIV infection, trends in research programs, international/political implications of research and prevention efforts, and the experiences of people living with HIV/AIDS.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 556 Reproductive Health for the Public Health Practitioner

Course content emphasizes theories of reproductive health, sexual development, and factors influencing sexual behavior within the continuum of health and illness. Common sexual practices and reproductive health issues of people are studied within the context of lifestyle and situational life crises. Concepts of normal sexual function and dysfunction are examined. Contemporary sexual health and reproductive issues are explored. Theoretical foundations of the medical, psychological, socio-cultural, political, and biological determinants of human sexual behavior and reproductive health will be explored. Issues of biology related to sex, gender identity, social sex role, and sexual orientation will be discussed. Contemporary issues of sexual risk behaviors, sexually transmitted infections, and safer sex practices will be examined, in addition to those issues of chronic illness, disability, and sexual coercion.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 557 Women, Gender, and Public Health

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions people ask about, and explanations and interventions they offer for, societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrate ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples. In all cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms
of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 558 Adolescent Health: Public Health Issues, Programs, and Policies

This course focuses on the major public health issues of adolescents in the United States and the programs and policies that improve the health and well-being of this population. The students examine the prevalence and etiology of health and wellness indicators for youth and explore a variety of aspects of adolescence and adolescent health. They will analyze adolescent health concerns through conceptual frameworks and recommend effective solutions through interventions.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 600 Research Methods for Public Health

This course provides an overview to research methods for public health practice, research and evaluation. A variety of theoretical and methodological approaches will be investigated. Quantitative and qualitative approaches to research as well as mixed methods and community participatory approaches to research and evaluation are explored. A variety of data collection processes will be investigated. Students will critique various methodologies, evaluate published public health research studies and assess best practices. Students will also explore the role of cultural competence, collaboration and ethics in public health research

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 615 Violence Prevention and Control

Students review theories of violence causation and epidemiologic patterns of violence in urban settings. An ecological framework will be used to guide critical thinking about risk and protective factors regarding violence. Students explore secondary data sources important to public health practitioners working in the area of violence prevention and control. Programs aimed at preventing violence and injury in urban settings will be examined and critically evaluated.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 635 Health Policy

This course provides an introduction to health policy, program planning, and evaluation in the public health context and allows students to strengthen and develop their skills in policy formulation and implementation. The social, economic, legal, regulatory, ethical, and political environments that influence healthcare and public health policy are explored. Specific policy areas explored in this course include: The Affordable Care Act; Health Insurance, HMOs, and Managed Care; Medicare; Medicaid; Children's Health Insurance Program; Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Health Policy; and Health Policy and Leadership. Students also acquire familiarity with strategies for health planning, evaluation, and healthcare funding.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 639 Race, Ethnicity, and Public Health

This course provides students with an understanding of racial and ethnic influences on health status and the societal factors that shape them. Students examine the concepts of race and ethnicity and distinguish between categories of biological and social constructionist perspectives. They define and describe racial and ethnic health inequities, discuss mechanisms underlying inequities, and think critically about existing health research on health inequities. Students explore theoretical frameworks for interpreting inequities in health and examine approaches for elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 696 Grant Writing Seminar

In this course, students develop and critique a public health related grant proposal for a public health project, program, or intervention, including developing a budget. Students investigate private and governmental requests for proposals, grants databases, and grant elements with an emphasis on the introduction, proposal summary, problem statement, program goals and objectives, evaluation, personnel, equipment, consultants, budget, and timeline. Students also build a solid foundation in grants management, including required reporting. Requests for proposals from funding entities are also compared.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 705 Frameworks in Public Health Practice

Students analyze the contribution of social and behavioral factors to health and illness, including risk behavior and health inequities. Health behavior programs and interventions are explored. Theories of health promotion, health behavioral change, and health education are examined and applied to a health promotion project for a vulnerable and diverse community.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 706 Multivariate Statistics

This course introduces multivariate data analysis methods. The course begins with an introduction to multivariate statistics, including matrix algebra. The course next focuses on multiple regression analysis, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA), along with Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA), and repeated measures designs. It will also cover exploratory factor analysis, and introduce structural equation modeling. Students will receive extensive experience with data entry and analysis using SPSS and Mplus statistical computer packages.

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 704

PHLT 750 Public Health Practice Experience I

The goals of the practicum course are to broaden students' exposure to public health practice, facilitate valuable work experience, and increase students' knowledge of specific career opportunities. Practice placements are two semesters long (approximately 100 hours/semester) and provide students with the opportunity to observe a public health professional in practice, complete a public health project that is mutually beneficial to the student and the organization, and synthesize knowledge and skills into public health practice. Students attend mandatory seminars where the principles and practices of public health are examined and students' awareness of the needs, challenges, and career opportunities in the field are further broadened.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 751 Public Health Practice Experience II

This second course allows students to continue to link public health concepts and ideas presented in the classroom to real world experiences in the public health practice setting. Students learn public health program evaluation as well as focus on public health workforce development, leadership, professional development, and preparation for entry into the public health workforce. Students continue their practice experiences and complete approximately 100 hours in an underserved community setting. Seminar meetings are conducted in which students discuss both their practicum projects and the continuing challenges of program development, evaluation, and implementation.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 752 Public Health Capstone I: Seminar

The Capstone two-part course sequence provides a culminating experience for students completing the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree. Students enter the Capstone with a solid foundation of theory, concepts, constructs, models, processes, and systems studied throughout the MPH Program. Additionally, students have sharpened their analytic and critical thinking skills through discussions, activities, and assignments in prior MPH courses. Part one of this two-part course sequence facilitates initial development and planning for the MPH student's Capstone thesis (also known as the culminating project). The culminating project is required for MPH programs by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). Students conduct a comprehensive review of the scientific evidence related to a public health issue, concern, or intervention over two semesters. Students begin their Capstone thesis during the first Capstone course (PHLT 752) and complete their thesis and present their corresponding scientific poster during the second course (PHLT 753). Students also complete a comprehensive examination during PHLT 752 that addresses their knowledge of the public health competencies.

Number of Credits: 3

PHLT 753 Capstone II: Seminar

The Capstone two-part course sequence provides a culminating experience for students completing the Master of Public Health (MPH) Program. Students enter the Capstone with a solid foundation of theory, concepts, constructs, models, processes, and systems studied throughout the MPH Program. Additionally, students have sharpened their analytic and critical thinking skills through discussions, activities, and assignments in prior MPH courses. Part two of this two-part course sequence continues the development and brings to completion the MPH Capstone thesis (also known as the culminating project). A culminating project is a required component in MPH programs by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). Students complete their Capstone thesis and present their corresponding scientific poster in this final course.

Number of Credits: 3

RN-BSN to MSN

Program Description

La Salle’s R.N.-BSN to MSN Program is designed for the registered nurse who is committed to pursuing a Master of Science degree in Nursing. The program accelerates the student through the R.N.-BSN Program by permitting enrollment in selected graduate-level courses while completing the BSN. Specific MSN-level courses are substituted for nine credits of undergraduate work (NUR 607, NUR 608, and any NUR 500-level and above course). The R.N.-BSN to M.S.N. Program is for graduates of diploma and associate degree nursing programs who have made the decision to pursue master’s level education to meet career goals.

Admission Requirements

Registered nurses can be admitted to the program through two routes.

The R.N. student completes an Evening and Weekend Program Application.

  1. The R.N. student must provide official copies of transcripts from high school and college and/or university programs. The student must provide a copy of a current R.N. license. The R.N. student who is currently enrolled in the R.N.-BSN Program and decides to pursue the R.N.-BSN to MSN option should submit an MSN application during the final semester of the BSN program. Please refer to the Graduate Nursing Web site for admission and schedule an appointment with the Graduate Nursing Director.
  2. The R.N. student who is new to La Salle should complete all requirements for admission to the MSN program (see MSN brochure).

Students should be aware that the School of Nursing and Health Sciences' undergraduate nursing grading system is different from that of the general University. Please refer to the School of Nursing and Health Sciences' Undergraduate and Graduate Handbook for details.

Course Descriptions

NUR 301 Professional Nursing Practice and Health Information Systems

This course examines professional nursing practice and clinical practice competencies using standards of professional nursing organizations. Students sel-assess cultural competence and analyze the influence of informatics on patient and health care provider safety and patient-centered care systems and nursing theories. Professional writing, electronic portfolio development, and informatics skills are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

NUR 314 Health Assessment

The purpose of this course is to refine and expand the skills of history and taking and physical assessment of the human system in health. Students analyze qualitative and quantitative data to determine health deviations from the normal healthy state. They collect data systematically using appropriate assessment techniques and tools to complete a physical assessment. The course stresses the documentation of findings using appropriate terminology for each system. There is emphasis on the communication of findings to both the client and other health-care professionals. Course objectives and clinical evaluations are based on ANA Standards of Practice. Prerequisite: NUR 301.

Number of Credits: 3

NUR 318 Developments and Controversies in Pathophysiology and Pharmacology

~~This course is designed for the RN student to build upon and expand pathophysiological and pharmacological knowledge. The course integrates pathophysiology, clinical manifestations of illness, diagnostic studies, and typical pharmacotherapeutics. The underlying principles of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, drug actions and interactions will also be included. Factors influencing health and illness such as genetics, ethnicity and environment will also be discussed in relation to disease occurrence and treatment. Medical, surgical and alternative therapies to specific and difficult developmental pathologies are highlighted. Economic and ethical issues in pharmacology are integrated into the course lectures and assignments. Emphasis is placed on updating pharmacological knowledge. Nursing implications for care of patients across the life span with also be integrated into the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 301

NUR 408 Nursing Research

The purpose of this course is to stimulate a refinement and appreciation of the potential of the research process in the development of nursing, client, and health-care systems. This course emphasizes the research approach in nursing and the necessity for theory-based and evidence-based practice. Problem identification, literature review, hypothesis formulation, research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis will be explored. Students will be required to identify a problem in the nursing or client system, propose a method for its investigation, and present the proposal for critique by peers. Emphasis will be placed on critique of published nursing research and on the notion that an applied discipline is only as strong as its research and theoretical base.
Prerequisites: HSC 217 and all NUR 300-level nursing courses

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: HSC 217 all NUR 300 -level nursing courses

NUR 410 Evidence-Based Practice

This course focuses on theory and method in the problem-solving approach of care delivery integrating personal clinical judgment, patient or client preference and values, and the best clinical evidence. Models of EBP are described. Students develop a researchable question, search and appraise the literature, and integrate the findings into a plan of care based on patient/client preferences and values. Evaluation of the process and dissemination of conclusions is presented.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 408

NUR 413 International Public Health Nursing

This course expands the theoretical and experiential base gained in prior nursing and non-nursing courses by introducing students to populationbased nursing with a special focus on global and international health issues. Emphasis is placed on identifying trends in the health and health care of populations as well as exploring strategies to address health promotion, primary, secondary and tertiary disease prevention, and protection goals for particular at-risk and high-risk population groups throughout the world. The course orients the student to health-care needs and interests of families, aggregates, communities, and nations as a whole, rather than solely focusing on needs and interests of individual clients. Health-care strategies, population-level interventions, community resources, and opportunities for interdisciplinary and interagency collaboration are identified. Relevant political, economic, social, and ethical implications of particular healthcare strategies are examined. Specific countries and public health issues will be selected to compare and contrast with the U.S. health-care-delivery system. Students reflect upon contemporary literature related to national and international public health issues.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 301

NUR 418 Nursing Leadership, Management, and Organizational Dynamics

Students explore the political, organizational, social, cultural, and economic factors affecting nursing practice. Acute care, long-term care, and community-based settings are examined regarding their organizational structures, health-care financing, and reimbursement challengers. Budgeting principles are analyzed with an emphasis on creating a budget on a spreadsheet for a program of nursing services. Clinical data repositories and interdisciplinary efforts are scrutinized within the context of patient-centered, safe care, and process improvement initiatives. Prerequisite: NUR 301.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

NUR 465 Safety Strategies for Healthcare Delivery Systems

This course explores medication and other health-care errors that threaten patient safety. The impact of health-care errors is examined from the perspectives of consumers, health-care providers, professional organizations, legislators, hospitals, and health-care delivery agencies. Systems improvement initiatives are investigated with the goal of preventing health-care errors. Interdisciplinary and collaborative roles of consumers, legal counsel, and health-care providers, including nurses, pharmacists, and physicians, are emphasized.
Prerequisite: NUR 301

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 301

NUR 607 Advanced Practice Nursing Administration in Health Care Delivery Systems

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

NUR 608 Population-Based Care and Advanced Practic Nursing

Nursing major courses at the BSN level consist of 52 credits. The R.N. student can articulate 25 of the 52 credits. For the student in the R.N.-MSN Program, nine credits of graduate-level coursework will be applied to the remaining 27 undergraduate nursing credits. The BSN is awarded after the R.N. student has earned 121 credits.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

NUR ELECTIVE General Elective

Graduate Courses may be taken with the permission of the academic adviser.

RN to MSN Bridge

Program Description

The bridge program is intended for registered nurses with a non-nursing baccalaureate degree who are interested in pursuing a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). Interested applicants would need to fulfill undergraduate evening admission requirements.

Admission requirements include the following:

  • completing an Evening and Weekend Program Application
  • providing official copies of transcripts from nursing program, colleges, and/or universities
  • providing a copy of current R.N. license

When accepted by the Admission Office, the student would need to successfully complete four courses at the undergraduate level:

  • NUR 314 Health Assessment
  • NUR 408 Nursing Research
  • NUR 413 International Public Health Nursing
  • Statistics

After successful completion of the above courses with a GPA of 3.2 or above, the applicant would be eligible to apply to the MSN program.

Students should be aware that the School of Nursing and Health Sciences' undergraduate nursing grading system is different from that of the general University

Speech-Language Pathology

Program Description

La Salle University’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders offers a Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology for students who have an undergraduate degree in communication sciences and disorders, speech-language pathology, or speech-language-hearing science. In addition, those students with an undergraduate degree in a related field can pursue the master’s degree after completing prerequisite courses. See www.lasalle.edu/schools/cpcs/content.php?section=post_bac_certificates&group=preslp&page=index for information about La Salle University’s PreSLP Program.

Speech-language pathologists care for clients and patients of all ages and cultural backgrounds with communication and swallowing disorders. Speech-language pathologists assess, treat, and help to prevent speech, language, cognitive communication, voice, swallowing, fluency, and related disorders.

The program provides personal and professional growth opportunities. The graduate program is a full-time cohort program. It offers classes in the late afternoon and early evening. The clinical practicum experiences at affiliate sites are offered during business hours. Students have the opportunity to gain from diverse, excellent clinical practicum experiences in a variety of professional settings. The faculty share their vast array of clinical experiences with students and care about each student’s success.

Barbara J. Amster, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, ASHA Fellow
Professor, Chair, and Graduate Director
215.951.1986
amster@lasalle.edu
www.lasalle.edu/speech

If you have any questions regarding the Speech-Language Pathology program, please contact: amster@lasalle.edu

Mission Statement

La Salle University’s Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Program provides a research-oriented, clinically-based curriculum grounded in theoretical, ethical, and clinical knowledge in communication sciences and disorders. Students learn to think critically and communicate effectively. They are prepared to meet professional credentialing including American Speech-Language-Hearing Association certification as speech-language pathologists. Students gain knowledge and skills to evaluate, treat, and advocate for individuals with communication and swallowing disorders in a pluralistic society. Students learn to analyze and integrate research into clinical practice and value life-long learning.

Program Goals

The Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology Program at La Salle University is designed to provide an accredited program in which students are prepared to function as qualified speech-language pathologists. The Program provides theoretical and clinical experiences that prepare students for leadership roles to meet the health, educational, and social needs of individuals with communication and swallowing disorders in the contexts of families, communities, and society. The Program is designed to equip students to meet requirements for certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, for licensure by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and as a foundation for doctoral study. Graduates of this program will earn a Master of Science degree.

Student Learning Outcomes

The following objectives reflect entry-level competency in all the basic human communication and swallowing areas, including articulation, fluency, voice and resonance, receptive and expressive language, hearing, including the impact on speech and language, swallowing, cognitive and social aspects of communication, and communication modalities.

The codes listed at the end of each objective refer to the current ASHA Certification Standards

  • Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written communication sufficient for entry into professional practice. (V-A)
  • Apply basic biological/physical science, statistics, and behavioral/social science to the study of communication and swallowing disorders. (IV-A)
  • Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information in the areas of basic human communication and swallowing processes. (IV-B)
  • Contrast basic human communication and swallowing processes with communication and swallowing disorders and differences. (IV-B, IV-C)
  • Demonstrate clinical skill in assessment, intervention, and prevention of human communication and swallowing disorders. (IV-C; IV-D; IV-E; V-B; V-C, V-D)
  • Integrate and demonstrate ethical, legal, and professional standards in the provision of speech-language pathology services. (IV-F; IV-G; V-B)
  • Integrate research with clinical knowledge to improve evaluation and treatment of individuals with communication and swallowing disorders. (IV-B; IV-C; IV-D; IV-E; IV-F; IV-G; V-B; V-C)
  • Critique professional issues in speech-language pathology and advocate for individuals with communication and swallowing disorders. (IV-D; IV-E; IV-F; IV-G)
  • Pursue education and credentials necessary for obtaining/maintaining certification and licensure for ongoing professional development. (IV-G; IV-H; V-C; V-D; V-E; V-F)
  • Implement appropriate assessment and intervention for diverse client populations with communication and swallowing disorders. (IV-B; IV-C; IV-D,V-B; V-C; V-D; V-F)
  • Evaluate individuals with communication and swallowing disorders utilizing appropriate diagnostic tools. (IV-C; IV-D; V-B; V-C; V-D; V-F)
  • Provide intervention for individuals with communication and swallowing disorders utilizing appropriate clinical methods and strategies. (IV-C, IV-D; V-B; V-C; V-D; V-F)
  • Practice independently and collaboratively in various health-care and educational systems with appropriate professional manner. (IV-A through IV-H; V-A through V-F; V-I)

Accreditation

The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders' Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology at La Salle University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), 2200 Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20850-3289, 301.296.5700. ASHA is the national professional, credentialing, and scientific organization for speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech-language-hearing scientists. To practice in most work settings, speech-language pathologists must hold a master’s degree and become certified by ASHA. This certification, called the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC), requires the successful completion of a specific program of coursework and practicum, a supervised Clinical Fellowship (CF), and passing of a national examination. All 50 states require speech-language pathologists to be licensed to practice. Licensure requirements in all 50 states (including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware) mirror ASHA-CCC standards. .

For more information about certification, please contact the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association at 1.800.498.2071 or http://www.asha.org/certification/2005_SLP_FAQ.htm.

La Salle University’s MS in SLP graduate students can also pursue Teacher Certification for Speech and Language impaired / Educational Specialist for Speech & Language Pathology in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. La Salle University’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders has received approval for teacher certification for Speech and Language Impaired and for Educational Specialist for Speech & Language Pathology from the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Either certificate is needed to work in the various school systems in Pennsylvania. Candidates applying for either certificate are required by Pennsylvania State Board regulations to pass the appropriate Praxis Test administered by the Educational Testing Service. Information about the Praxis Series Tests is available http://www.ets.org/praxis/pa .  Other states may also require prospective teachers to take this or other examinations. In addition to all of the requirements for completion of the Master’s degree, candidates for Instructional I certificates must be recommended by the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Faculty.  Recommendations are predicated upon successful completion of all course requirements with the required Grade Point Average (minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CSD courses). 

Clinical Experiences

In accord with ASHA certification requirements, the Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology offers clinical education at various practicum sites. The CSD Department has established strong ties with more than 250 schools, hospitals, private practices, and rehabilitation facilities in the greater Philadelphia area for supervised clinical practicum affiliations. Currently, these include: acute-care hospitals (pediatric and adult); rehabilitation hospitals (pediatric and adult); specialized schools; elementary, middle, and high schools in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware; intermediate units in Pennsylvania and educational services units in New Jersey; private practices in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and New York City; and schools for the deaf.

The National Speech Language and Hearing Association

The National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA) is a pre-professional membership association for students interested in the study of communication sciences and disorders. La Salle University formed an ASHA recognized NSSLHA chapter in 2002. Membership in the La Salle NSSLHA chapter is available to undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the Speech Language-Hearing Science Program.

Student NSSLHA members can increase their involvement in the field by visiting professional work sites, engaging in group outreach programs, attending panel discussions, fundraising, and more. NSSLHA membership allows students to engage in leadership activities locally and nationally by promoting dialogue between students, professionals, and community members.

Adviser: Maureen Costello, costellom3@lasalle.edu

Visit the NSSLHA Web site: www.nsslha.org

Admission Requirements

In order for students to meet current ASHA certification standards, applicants to La Salle University’s Speech-Language Pathology Master of Science Program must have a background in communication sciences and disorders or speech-language-hearing science. Applicants must have transcript gradesfor at least six communication sciences and disorders prerequisite courses before February 1st, 2019.

Applications from students who do not have a background in communication sciences and disorders will not be reviewed. For students who do not have a background in communication sciences and disorders, we offer prerequisite courses through our PreSLP program.

Students must fulfill all prerequisite requirements prior to obtaining the master’s degree. Outstanding coursework must be completed through La Salle University’s PreSLP Program concurrently with graduate coursework.

In addition, all applicants must have a minimum total GPA of 3.0 to apply to the graduate program and to be reviewed by the Admissions Committee. We rely on CSDCAS computation of total GPA.

Official scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within the past five years must be sent directly to CSDCAS, using the designated institution code assigned to La Salle University. This code is 0717.  If you did not indicate this code on your GRE form, please see the CSDCAS portal for directions on sending official La Salle designated GRE scores through CSDCAS. We will not accept GRE scores any other way. Please monitor your application to ensure that the official La Salle designated GRE scores have been posted.

How to Apply

All application materials must be submitted through the CSDCAS Portal. Please do not send any materials directly to La Salle University; they will not be considered as part of your application.  Required materials include the following:

  • Online application through CSDCAS including the CSDCAS processing fee.  La Salle University does not require any supplemental or additional application fees.
  • A personal essay in response to the following prompt: “Being an effective speech-language pathologist is both an art and a science. As a graduate student you will be expected to do well academically and clinically. In no more than 400 words, please describe an experience highlighting the personal qualities you possess illustrating that you will be a successful clinician.”
  • Three letters of recommendation, at least two of which must be provided by someone who taught you during your college career and can speak about the quality of your academic work and your ability to succeed in a graduate program.
  • Official transcript(s) of all undergraduate studies and graduate studies.
  • Official scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within the past five years. GRE scores must be sent directly to CSDCAS, using the designated institution code assigned to La Salle University. This code is 0717.

ALL APPLICATIONS must be verified by CSDCAS by Feb. 1, 2019. Verification means that CSDCAS has authenticated your application and GPA calculation. Applications should be submitted to CSDCAS with payment, official transcripts, and official GRE scores at least four weeks in advance of the deadline date to ensure that it is verified on time. You can view the status of your application by logging on to the CSDCAS site. It is your responsibility to ensure that your application is complete and verified by the deadline.

In fairness to all applicants, La Salle does not review applications before the deadline.  You are responsible for monitoring the completeness of your application through the CSDCAS portal.

CSDCAS customer service is available Monday–Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST to answer any questions.
Phone – 617.612.2030
Email – csdcassinfo@csdcas.org

For more information about our program and data on accepted students in previous years, please visit ASHA’s HES Web site.

Apply online here.

No unverified applications will be considered after the Feb. 1 deadline.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

Model Curriculum

The following is presented as a model for progression through the Master of Science program. Individual plans for progression will be determined for each student in consultation with the student’s adviser and the Program Director.

The Communication Sciences and Disorders Student Handbook contains program-specific guidelines and procedures for progression and is available through the mylasalle Portal.

The model curriculum contains a minimum of 60 credits, which includes clinical practicum requirements and successful completion of the Master’s Comprehensive Examination.

Students must meet with their advisers each semester to discuss registration and to review their progress in meeting the KASA summary forms. The KASA summary forms must be completed, approved, and signed by the Director of the Program to complete graduation requirements. When a graduate student enters his/her final semester of study, the student’s academic and clinical record is examined by the student’s adviser for compliance with La Salle University, SLP Program requirements and ASHA requirements. Typically, the capstone course (COSD 635) is completed during the student’s final semester in the program. Part of the SLP requirements for graduation includes taking the National Examination in Speech-Language Pathology (NESPA) examination while enrolled in the capstone course (COSD 635). Any deviation from this sequence must be approved by the Program Director.

Students are responsible for making sure that they follow ASHA guidelines for course selection. Selection of courses is made with an adviser and includes undergraduate transcript review. If students have deficiencies in undergraduate prerequisites, in accordance with ASHA guidelines, these courses must be completed during the graduate course of study.  Please note: Students must meet the current ASHA Standards for Certification. Please contact the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association at 800.498.2071 or http://www.asha.org/certification/ for more information about certification standards. Graduate students who take longer than three years to finish the M.S. degree will be subject to meeting the curriculum requirements in place at the time of graduation.

Graduate Program Progression to Graduation

Every student in a La Salle University Graduate Program is required to maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic average of “B” (3.0).  In addition, a student whose academic performance falls below this standard is subject to academic review by his/her advisor and the Graduate Director.  Depending upon the degree of the academic deficiency, a student may be given a warning with regard to academic standing.  At the discretion of the faculty, students in academic jeopardy may be dismissed from the Program.

A student with a cumulative grade point average below 3.0 is automatically in academic jeopardy whether or not he or she receives written notification of this status.  A student must have a cumulative average of 3.0 or better to graduate from La Salle University.  (See La Salle University Graduate Catalog for more information)

Graduate Program Grading Standards & Guidelines

  • CSD graduate students must maintain a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA. Refer to La Salle University Graduate Catalog.
  • SLP graduate students may not earn more than two grades below a “B” in CSD courses. Note that a “B-” does not satisfy this requirement.
  • Students who exhibit a lack of improvement on the clinical evaluation tool or receive a grade of a “B-“ or below in a practicum course must participate in a Response to Intervention (RTI) which will include individualized supervision at LSUSLHCC. The student will enroll in COSD 501X, 516X, 521X or 616X for clinical independent study.
  • Students receiving a “B-” or lower in any repeated clinical practicum course are subject to dismissal from the Program.
  • COSD 501 is the introductory clinical practicum course and is prerequisite to COSD 516. A student who receives a grade lower than a “B” may repeat COSD 501 once.  Students who receive agrade below a “B” after retaking the course will be in academic/clinical jeopardy.  At the discretion of the faculty, students in academic jeopardy may be dismissed from the Program.
  • A grade of “F” in any clinical practicum course (COSD 501, COSD 516, COSD 521, and COSD 616) is grounds for immediate dismissal from the program.
  • SLP graduate students are expected to abide by the ASHA Code of Ethics http://www.asha.org/Code-of-Ethics/ The CSD Faculty will determine the degree to which a student fulfills these criteria. If a student is found to be in violation of the ASHA Code of Ethics, dismissal from the Program results.
  • While an SLP graduate student is enrolled at La Salle University, required graduate courses and electives must be taken at La Salle University only. However, up to nine graduate credits completed prior to enrollment at La Salle University may be accepted for transfer into the program at the discretion of the Director of the SLP Graduate Program.
  • Decisions of the CSD Faculty are final but subject to appeal. Refer to La Salle University Graduate Catalog and Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities.

Core: Required for all students

COSD 501 Introduction to Clinical Practicum

COSD 502 Introduction to Aural Habilitation/Rehabilitation

COSD 503 Disorders of Articulation and Phonology

COSD 511 Fluency and Stuttering

COSD 512 Language Disorders in Young Children

COSD 513 Acquired Language Disorders

COSD 514 Language Learning Disabilities in School-Age Children and Adolescents

COSD 515 Voice Disorders

COSD 516 Clinical Practicum and Procedures

COSD 517 Clinical Practicum in Audiology (may be waived if student achieves a minimum of 10 aural habilitation/rehabilitation clinical practicum hours while engaged in  COSD 516,  COSD 616, or  COSD 521)

COSD 518 Research Design in Communication Disorders

COSD 520 Dysphagia

COSD 521: Advanced School Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology

COSD 527 Motor Speech Disorders

COSD 528: Counseling Seminar in Communication Disorders

COSD 614: Clinical Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology

COSD 616 Advanced Clinical Practicum and Case Study

COSD 619:  Medical Speech-Language Pathology

COSD 635 Integrative Capstone in Communication Disorders

Two electives:

COSD 519 COSD 537

COSD 526 COSD 538 COSD  620

 COSD 611 COSD 622

COSD 530 COSD 613 COSD 630

COSD 531 COSD 617 COSD 640

COSD 618

Tuition and Fees

Application Fee – Please see CSDCAS Web site at portal.csdcas.org. La Salle University does not require an additional Application Fee.

Students accepted into the SLP Master's program are required to submit a non- refundable $500 deposit to reserve their place in the class. These funds will be credited to the student’s first invoice upon enrollment.

The University tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Information about financial aid and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141, 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Barbara J. Amster, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Chair,  Graduate Director, Professor
Brian Goldstein, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Provost, Professor 
Evelyn R. Klein, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Professor
Jennifer Kleinow, Ph.D., CCC-SLP,  Professor
Cesar Ruiz, SLP.D., CCC-SLP,  Professor
 
James M. Mancinelli, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Education
Dana Bitetti, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Assistant Professor

Ryan Husak,Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Assistant Professor
Maureen Costello-Yacono, PhD CCC-SLP, Director of the La Salle University Speech-Language-Hearing Community Clinics

Course Descriptions

COSD 501 Introduction to Clinical Practicum

This course is the first supervised clinical speech-language pathology experience in the graduate degree program. Students enrolled in this course complete requirements through a clinical assignment in the La Salle University Speech-Language-Hearing Community Clinics (LSU-SLHCC). Students supervised by an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist apply theoretical knowledge, continue to develop clinical management skills, self-analysis and evaluation abilities, and become familiar with professional practices and issues in the discipline of speech-language pathology in general and in this unique practicum setting. Emphasis is placed on selection and administration of diagnostic instruments. Students write reports and daily progress notes and conduct family/patient counseling. Students may have the opportunity to communicate with other health care and educational professionals as needed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 502 Introduction to Aural Habilation/Rehabilitation

This course examines principles and strategies in management of problems related to hearing impairment in children and adults. Development and maintenance of communication through speech reading, auditory training, and the use of technology in aural habilitation/rehabilitation are investigated.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 503 Disorders of Articulation and Phonology

This course reviews the development of speech sound production and speech perception skills in children. Factors affecting phonological development and auditory-motor learning are discussed. Prominent theories of phonology are reviewed and critiqued and assessment and modification of atypical articulatory patterns are emphasized. The differential diagnosis of oral motor versus phonological disorders is explored. Case studies are used to illustrate methodologies and to plan remediation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 511 Fluency and Stuttering

This course provides information about normal fluency as well as the history, theories, development, nature, and symptomatology of stuttering and other fluency disorders in children and adults. Controversies regarding theoretical explanations about the nature of stuttering that influence management strategies are discussed. Clinical case studies are used to illustrate methodologies and to plan remediation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 512 Language Disorders in Young Children

This course offers a theoretical and applied approach to childhood language disorders from birth through six years. It provides an overview of language development and early assessment and intervention in the field of child language pathology within and across the domains of semantics, pragmatics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. Clinical applications and controversies in case management are emphasized through case presentations, article reviews, and research presentations. Diagnostic information including language sampling, stages of emergent literacy, and stages of play are discussed in relation to early intervention.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and five-year seniors

COSD 513 Acquired Language Disorders

Neuropathology, symptomatology, and speech-language rehabilitation of individuals with aphasia and related disorders due to stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc. are examined in adults and children. Other neurologically based disorders such as dementia, apraxia, and dysarthria are contrasted for differential diagnosis. Evaluation, treatment, and prognosis for recovery are reviewed.

Number of Credits: 3

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 514 Language Learning Disabilities in School-Age Children and Adolescents

This course focuses on language learning disabilities in school-age children and adolescents and the cognitive/linguistic processes involved in the classroom performance of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It explores the role of the speech-language pathologist in the evaluation and treatment of students with language learning disabilities. Prerequisite: COSD 512 or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 512 or permission of instructor.

COSD 515 Voice Disorders

This course investigates the etiology, symptomatology, development, diagnosis, intervention, and prevention of voice disorders in children and adults. Controversies about current treatment strategies are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 516 Clinical Practicum and Procedures

~This clinical practicum course provides observation and supervised clinical experience focusing on the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders, counseling of clients and families, development of treatment plans, and writing of evaluation and progress reports. Emphasis is placed on increasing diagnostic and therapeutic skills with children and adults with communication disorders. COSD 516 takes place in an affiliated, clinic, rehabilitation facility, school, or other appropriate setting under the supervision of an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist. Students meet with the University Clinical Instructor to reflect on and discuss procedures within the clinical experience. Prerequisite: COSD 503 and COSD 512 and permission of Program Director.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

Prerequisites: COSD 503 and COSD 512 and permission of Program Director.

COSD 517 Clinical Practicum in Audiology

This supervised clinical experience focuses on conducting pure-tone air conduction hearing screening and screening tympanometry for the purpose of the initial identification and/or referral of individuals with communication disorders or possible middle ear pathology. Emphasis is also placed on aural rehabilitation and related counseling services for individuals with hearing loss and their families. The role of the speech- language pathologist in the assessment of central auditory processing disorders is discussed. Counseling clients and their families and clinical report writing are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 1

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 518 Research Design in Communication Disorders

~This course explores the relationships among research, theory, and practice. Critique of published research focuses students on literature review and purpose methods and findings of studies with applicability of research to clinical situations. Treatment and outcome variables, sampling, measurement theory, qualitative and quantitative analyses, and the use of computers in data analysis are emphasized. Prerequisite: a statistics course such as HSC 217 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

Prerequisites: a statistics course such as HSC 217 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

COSD 519 Cleft Palate and Other Maxillofacial Disorders

This course focuses on the development of craniofacial structure, classification of clefts, syndromes associated with clefts and other craniofacial anomalies, understanding of the need for surgical repair, and the role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in the diagnosis and treatment of related speech/language disorders.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 520 Dysphagia: Diagnosis and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders

This course examines anatomy and physiology of normal swallowing and respiration and the anatomic and physiologic disturbances affecting swallowing in infants, children, and adults. Radiographic and bedside diagnostic and treatment procedures are presented. Indications and methods for non-oral and modified oral feeding are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 521 Student Teaching in Speech and Language Disabilities

Candidates for the Educational Specialist I School Speech & Language Pathologist PK-12 or the Teacher Instructional Certificate I for Speech and Language Impaired PK-12 engage in an advance school practicum experience in public or private schools in the greater Philadelphia area under the supervision of a school-based ASHA certified speech-language pathologist and a University Supervisor. Students investigate how speech and language affects the child's achievement and functioning in the school environment and assess the child's communication ability in relation to academic achievement with consideration of age appropriate curriculum in the classroom. Students learn Federal and State special education regulations as they relate to developing and modifying the Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) and other legal documents. They also participate in parent-teacher conferences pertaining to the child's communication and education, organize a caseload, and provide appropriate assessment and intervention in areas including speech, language, voice and fluency for children who may range in grade from preschool through high school. Prerequisites: COSD 516 and permission of the Graduate Program Director.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 516

COSD 526 Alternative and Augmentative Communication

~This course investigates theories and practices in clinical management of severely impaired or non-speaking persons. Application of graphics, signs, gestural means of communication, use of aids and devices, development of interactive communication behaviors, and development and use of computer-assisted communication strategies are surveyed. COSD 516

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

Prerequisites: COSD 516

COSD 527 Motor Speech Disorders

~This course provides an overview of the neurological disorders that affect speech production. Procedures for assessing speech disorders associated with neuromotor impairments are investigated. Neuropathology, symptomatology, and speech-language habilitation/rehabilitation of individuals with apraxia and/or dysarthria are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 528 Counseling Seminar in Communication Disorders

This course provides an overview of counseling in communication disorders and in the helping professions. Components of the therapeutic relationship including the interpersonal nature of communication, attending to clients, clinical interviewing, and recognizing communication patterns are surveyed. Counseling theories, goal setting, and strategic interventions with clients and their families are critiqued. This course includes active learning strategies and case study analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 530 Special Topics in Communication Disorders

Current scientific and professional problems and issues in communication disorders are investigated. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 12 credits.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 537 Geriatric Communication Disorders

Speech, hearing, language, and cognitive problems associated with normal aging and/or various pathological conditions are explored. The course emphasizes evaluation and intervention strategies.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 538 Atypical Language Development and Disorders

This course addresses the language learning problems associated with special populations of children. Characteristics of children with specific language impairment, autism spectrum disorder, emotional/behavioral disorders, and cognitive impairments will be analyzed from theoretical and practical perspectives. Current theories and controversies pertaining to clinical application are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 611 Fluency and Stuttering II

This course is an in-depth exploration of controversies and issues in the evaluation and management of persons with fluency disorders and stuttering. The phenomenology of stuttering is explored. The role of the client and the client's environment are addressed as they relate to treatment at various stages of life.
Prerequisite: COSD 511 or permission of instructor

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 613 Acquired Language Disorders II

The course explores the advanced study of aphasia syndromes and neuropathology with an emphasis on theoretical models of normal and disordered language processing, critique of diagnostic testing procedures, and current approaches to treatment.
Prerequisite: COSD 513 or permission of instructor

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 513

COSD 614 Clinical Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology

This course provides advanced knowledge and skills in assessment principles, process, and applied practice. Through a case-based approach, students apply content knowledge to clinical cases in order to improve decision-making across assessments of speech sounds, language, voice, fluency, swallowing, and neurologically-based disorders. Students interact with actual and virtual clients and professionals to measure, analyze, and integrate information for diagnosis and clinical reporting. Clinical decision-making skills and rationale for test selection, administration, diagnosis, interpretation, and recommendations are considered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 616 Advanced Clinical Practicum and Case Study

(repeated as necessary to fulfill ASHA Certification requirements)

This course continues the supervised clinical speech-language pathology experience of COSD 516 necessary to fulfill ASHA Clinical Practicum Requirements. Students enrolled in this course will complete requirements in an affiliated hospital, clinic, rehabilitation facility, school, or other appropriate setting treating patients/clients 18 years or older. Students are supervised by an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and application of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with individuals with a variety of communication disorders. Students meet with the University Clinical Instructor to present and discuss case studies. Feedback and reflection regarding clinical decision-making are emphasized. Prerequisite: COSD 516.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

Prerequisites: COSD 5126

COSD 617 Advanced Pediatric Aural Habilitation for Speech-Language Pathologists

This course provides investigation of theory, research and clinical application of auditory-oral principles for therapeutic intervention with deaf and hard of hearing children. Focus is on the application of theoretical and research-based principles for the development of assessment and treatment plans, including writing of behavioral objectives specific to the needs of this population. Issues related to advances in technology, equipment management, multi-disciplinary collaboration and family counseling are discussed. Emphasis is placed on increasing diagnostic and therapeutic skills with deaf and hard of hearing children in the education setting who are developing oral language skills. The lecture portion of this course is designed to provide a framework for students to increase their knowledge base. Students reflect on and discuss cases, issues and procedures relevant to use of an auditory-oral approach in intervention with deaf and hard of hearing children. Prerequisite: COSD 502 or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

Prerequisites: COSD 502

COSD 619 Medical Speech-Language Pathology

This course introduces the graduate student in speech-language hearing science to medical speech pathology as it is practiced in the acute care setting. The student will be introduced to the five major service areas in the acute care setting that interface most commonly with Speech-Language Pathology Services. Those areas are: Neurology, Radiology, Trauma/Neurosurgery, ENT, and Medicine. The information necessary to interact with these services and treat their patients will be provided. The student will also have the opportunity to do site visits, prepare a detailed case study that will be presented in class, submit a research paper in a selected service area, and spend an entire workday with a Neurologist and an ENT during office hours. A written structured reflection on that experience will be required. Prerequisite: COSD 513 and COSD 520 or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

Prerequisites: COSD 513 and COSD 520

COSD 620 Pediatric Dysphagia

This course provides information about the anatomy and physiology of normal and abnormal pediatric swallowing, and explores its evaluation and treatment in the context of a neuro-developmental approach. The course facilitates the development of skills in the diagnosis and treatment of swallowing and feeding disorders in different pediatric clinical populations. The role of the speech-language pathologist as part of an interdisciplinary management team is emphasized. Problem-based learning and experiential learning are utilized to illustrate the complex medical and social issues related to pediatric dysphagia. Prerequisite: COSD 520 or permission of the instructor

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Student

Prerequisites: COSD 520

COSD 622 Applied Instrumentation in Speech-Language Pathology

This course focuses on the pros and cons of instrumentation in Speech Language Pathology (SLP). Current instrumentation commonly used in the evaluation and treatment of swallowing, voice, and speech disorders will be closely reviewed. A comprehensive review of clinical and theoretical research will be conducted to comprehend the clinical benefits and disadvantages of instrumentations. The instruments being discussed will be available for hands on experience to further enhance comprehension of their applications. The following instruments will be included: Electrical Stimulators (VitalStim), Surface Electromyography (sEMG), Modified Barium Swallow Study (MBS), Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES), Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing and Sensory Testing (FEESST), Computer Speech Lab (CSL), and Videostroboscopy. Emphasis will be given to the instrumentation's purpose, application, risk and management, disinfection, and proper maintenance. Prerequisites:COSD 520 or permission of the instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

Prerequisites: COSD 520

COSD 630 Seminar in Communication Disorders

This seminar investigates current technological applications and controversies as they relate to communication and swallowing disorders. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

COSD 635 Integrative Capstone in Communication Disorders

This seminar course is designed as a comprehensive integration and analysis of the field of Speech-Language Pathology. This course provides a formative and summative evaluation of the students' work. Formatively, students will develop a portfolio that contains pieces of work that exemplify their progress throughout the academic program. Summatively, the course provides students with an opportunity to review clinical research across the discipline and gain new insights to the field. Students formally present information from scholarly investigations. Prerequisite: COSD 514, COSD 515, COSD 518, COSD 527, and COSD 616 or COSD 521 and permission of Program Director.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

Prerequisites: COSD 514, COSD 515, COSD 518, COSD 527, and COSD 616 or COSD 521

COSD 640 Thesis Research in Communication Disorders

This course is an opportunity to pursue descriptive and/or experimental research. This thesis option will result in approved, original, scholarly research within the field of communication disorders under the supervision of a member of the faculty to produce an acceptable thesis. Students present their thesis orally to faculty and students in lieu of the master's comprehensive examination. Prerequisite: COSD 518 and permission of faculty member and program director. Students may re-register for this course until completion of thesis.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD Graduate Students

Prerequisites: COSD 518

Strategic Communication

Program Description

The Master of Arts in Strategic Communication is a 36-credit program for people who wish to improve their communication skills and understanding of communication issues and practices within business and professional organizations. It is designed to be broad in scope but provides sufficient depth for students to explore issues that meet their interests or needs.

Students may elect to complete the M.A. program in one of two ways.  First, students in the One-Year M.A. program complete their degree within 12 months.  Students in the One-Year program may take courses during the day and evening.  Second, the part-time program allows working adults to take classes during the evenings and weekends, progressing through the program at a pace of their own choosing.

Katie Dunleavy, Ph.D.

Director

www.lasalle.edu/gradcomm

If you have any questions regarding the Strategic Communication program, please contact:

gradcomm@lasalle.edu

Mission Statement

Guided by Lasallian values, the Communication Department integrates liberal arts education with theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the communication field, and challenges students to demonstrate communication competence. The Department seeks to develop graduate students who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings.  Beyond assisting students with finding and advancing in meaningful careers, we seek to provide students with the communication knowledge and skills needed/necessary for meaningful personal, professional, and social relationships.

Program Goals

La Salle’s Graduate Program in Strategic Communication embraces five (5) broad educational goals.

  1. Recognize and articulate the communication principles and processes involved in creating and sustaining meaning
  2. Recognize, articulate, and demonstrate the influence and power of messages
  3. Demonstrate effective communication, in both written and spoken form.
  4. Apply theoretical, conceptual, and skills-based course knowledge to experiential learning environment(s) and/or professional situations
  5. Communicate strategically

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. SLO 1:    Students will compare/contrast approaches to organizational communication (e.g., classical, human relations, human resources, systems, cultural, and critical approaches).
  2. SLO 2:    Students will provide systematic understanding of a professional situation by applying communication theory to a case study.
  3. SLO 3:    Through case study analysis, students will identify productive and unproductive communication patterns.
  4. SLO 4:    Students will complete a project in which they assess a professional and business communication challenge and justify an appropriate research method design to gather data related to the challenge.
  5. SLO 5:    Students will individually prepare and deliver an 8 – 10 minute presentation that identifies an organizational challenge and argues for a specific course of action.
  6. SLO 6:    Given the details of a communication challenge, students will be able to formulate recommendations for (re)solution based on communication best practices.

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
2. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in the completion of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education. The student’s record must show a completion of at least 24 credit hours in any combination of communication, humanities, and social science courses, and an overall “B” average (3.0/4.0). International students must possess the equivalent of a four-year bachelor’s degree.
3. Request that official transcripts from the institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
4. Provide a professional résumé.
5. Provide two letters of recommendation from professors and/or supervisors who can address the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrolling in the program. (for students with an undergraduate GPA below 3.25 only)
6. Provide a brief personal statement (about 500 words) describing a student’s reasons for pursuing a graduate degree in Strategic Communication at La Salle University. The Committee is interested in reading about career experiences and goals in the statement. A student may also include any information about himself or herself that will further demonstrate his or her qualifications for the program.
7. Attend an interview with the program director, which will focus on professional goals.

The University’s Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the General Reference section of this catalog. Because oral communication is an integral part of most courses in the program, students must be able to communicate clearly in English. International students must achieve a minimum TOEFL score: CBT 230/PBT 575/IBT 88. A maximum of six credit hours are eligible for transfer from another institution or from another La Salle graduate program.

 All documents should be sent to the following:

 

 Office of Graduate Enrollment
 La Salle University- Box 826
 1900 W. Olney Avenue

  Philadelphia, PA 19141

 215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

  grad@lasalle.edu

Progression Through the One-Year Program

The One-Year Master of Arts in Strategic Communication is a 36-credit program intended to be completed within 12 months, requiring all degree recipients to complete the following:

  1. One 3-credit course during the first summer
  2. Four 3-credit courses during the fall semester
  3. One 3-credit course during the winter intersession
  4. Four 3-credit courses during the spring semester
  5. Two 3-credit courses during the summer session(s) in the second summer

Students must complete the program with a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students may be required to continue their studies beyond one year if they withdraw from a course or if their grades require courses to be repeated. Students complete the program in a cohort, and there will be limited choices in electives.

Core (5.5 courses,  16.5 credits)
COM 600  Applied Communication Theory
COM 601  Professional Communication Ethics (1.5 credits)
COM 602  Effective Presentations
COM 604  Applied Communication Research MethodsCOM 612 Approaches to Organizational Communication
COM 620 Strategic Communication Capstone ( may only be taken after the completion of 27 or more graduate credits and successful completion of COM 600,  COM 604, and COM 612)

Some Possible Electives (6.5 five courses, 19.5 credits)
COM 608   Intercultural Communication and Organizational Life
COM 610   Leadership and Interpersonal Communication
COM 613   Approaches to Public Relations
COM 614   Communication and Conflict
COM 615   Persuasion
COM 616   Group and Team Communication
COM 619   Public Relations Campaigns 
COM 641   Social Media
COM 670-677 Topics in Professional Communication

Progression Through the Part-Time Program

The part-time Master of Arts in Strategic Communication is a 36-credit program requiring all degree recipients to complete the following course:

  1. The core
  2. The completion of 19.5 credits toward electives

Students must complete the program with a minimum 3.0 GPA. They have seven years from their first matriculation to complete all requirements for the degree.

Core and Degree Completion ( 5.5 courses for 16.5 credits)
COM 600  Applied Communication Theory
COM 601  Professional Communication Ethics (1.5 credits)
COM 602  Effective Presentations
COM 604  Applied Communication Research Methods

COM 612 Approaches to Organizational Communication

COM 620 Strategic Communication Capstone (must be taken after completing 27 credits and COM 600, COM 604, and COM 612)

Certificate in Strategic Communication

This program is designed for students with bachelor’s degrees who wish to upgrade their communication skills and understanding of how communication works and can be utilized in the professional and business world.

The certificate is attained by the successful completion of six La Salle University graduate courses in Communication ,with a 3.00 GPA or higher, including COM 601, Professional Communication Ethics; COM 602, Effective Presentations; COM 612 Approaches to Organizational Communication.

Mission

Guided by Lasallian values, the Communication Department integrates liberal arts education with theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the communication field, and challenges students to demonstrate communication competence. The Department seeks to develop graduate students who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings.  Beyond assisting students with finding and advancing in meaningful careers, we seek to provide students with the communication knowledge and skills needed/necessary for meaningful personal, professional, and social relationships.  

Program Goals

  • Recognize, articulate, and demonstrate the influence and power of messages and the ethics of communication
  • Demonstrate effective communication, in both written and spoken form
  • Apply theoretical, conceptual, and skills-based course knowledge to experiential learning environment(s) and/or professional situations
  • Serve as a feeder for the MA in Strategic Communication

Student learning outcomes:

  • Discern ethical dilemmas within communication contexts and evaluate using ethical reasoning
  • Prepare and present oral and written presentations with attention to specific audiences and situations
  • Articulate connections between relevant communication theory, skills, and coursework with authentic learning experiences
  • Apply for and be admitted to the MA program upon graduation from the certificate program

Certificate Requirements:

18 credits (six courses) and a 3.00 GPA

Required (Three courses, 7.5 credits)

COM 601  Professional Communication Ethics (1.5 credits)
COM 602  Effective Presentations
COM 612  Approaches to Organizational Communication

Electives: (10.5 credits)

COM 608  Intercultural Communication and Organizational Life
COM 610  Leadership and Interpersonal Communication

COM 613  Approaches to PR
COM 614  Communication and Conflict
COM 615  Persuasion
COM 616  Group and Team Communication
COM 619  PR Campaigns (prerequisite: COM 613)
COM 621  Communication Training and Development 
COM 623  Public Relations Writing and Media Relations
COM 630-635 Professional Communication Special Topic Modules
COM 640  Professional Media Development
COM 641  Social Media
COM 670-677 Professional Communication Special Topic Courses

Admission Requirements for the Certificate in Strategic Communication

To be accepted into the Certificate Program, the applicant must:

1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.

2. Provide transcripts showing evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution of higher education. Typically students must have at minimum a 3.00 GPA (B average) in undergraduate studies.

3. Provide a professional résumé.

4. Attend an interview with the program director, preferably in person

5. Submit a personal statement (up to 500 words) describing the reasons for pursuing a graduate certificate in Strategic Communication at La Salle University.  The committee is interested in reading about the applicant's career experiences and goals in the statement.  He or she may also include any information about himself or herself which will further demonstrate his or her qualifications for the program.

The University's Nondiscrimination Policy is stated in the Introduction section of this catalog. Because oral communication is an integral part of most courses in the Program, students must be able to communicate well in English.

All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelphia, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Tuition and Fees

Application Fee: $35
Online Application: free
Tuition (per credit hour, part-time program): $815
Tuition (One-year program, full year): $29,340

Tuition Assistance

The program offers three kinds of financial assistance. First, the Strategic Communication program provides scholarship grants for part-time students. These awards are available through the program office on a competitive basis, and pay up to 1/3 of the cost of a course for a student.

Second, graduate assistantship awards are also available for superior full-time M.A. students who are available during the week for a work assignment within the Department. Graduate assistants do not teach, but are used in program administration and promotion.

Finally, full-time students who are also eligible for federal work study are employed in the Department to do professional tasks. Consult the Director of the Strategic Communication program for more details about the scholarships, assistantships, or work study opportunities.

The University also participates in a variety of loan programs. Information about financial aid and application forms may be obtained from the Director of Student Financial Services, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141, 215.951.1070.

Faculty

Director: Katie Dunleavy, Ph.D.

Professors: Dainton, Lannutti
Associate Professors: Dunleavy, M. Smith, Texter, Zelley
Assistant Professors:  Daily, Lashley

Course Descriptions

COM 600 Applied Communication Theory

This course focuses on the nature and function of communication theory. It examines the role of theory in understanding communication events and explores various advanced communication theories as they apply to professional communication.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 601 Professional Communication Ethics

This course is designed to examine and critique a range of ethical theories regarding human behavior in interpersonal, group, professional, and mediated contexts.

Number of Credits: 1.5

COM 602 Effective Presentations

This course focuses on the development and enhancement of public presentation skills. It presents theoretical background for speaking in different types of public situations, but concentrates primarily on speech preparation and skill development. Use of presentation graphics will be included.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 603 Strategies for Professional Writing

This is an advanced writing course designed to show participants how to write the documents commonly usedin business and in the professions. The course is designed to develop writing and editing skills that participants can use in their professional lives. In addition, the course provides practical instruction in how to effectively manage the writing of others.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 604 Applied Communication Research Methods

This course introduces graduate students to qualitative and quantitative research methods, particularly the practical aspects of designing and implementing surveys, focus groups, and content analysis. The course will examine how research can be applied in professional settings.
Prerequisite: COM 600

Number of Credits: 3

COM 608 Intercultural Communication and Organizational Life

This course explores the issues that surround the notion of cultural diversity and form the basis for the study of intercultural communication. Special emphasis will be given to how culture is communicated and interpreted by persons of diverse backgrounds. Within this matrix, the course will explore a variety of communication issues pertinent to professional and organizational life.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 610 Leadership and Interpersonal Communication

This course focuses on the nature and function of interpersonal communication. Content incorporates advanced theories and research on interpersonal communication and their application to the practice of effective interpersonal communication in everyday and professional life.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 612 Approaches to Organizational Communication

This course provides advanced study of the theoretical and conceptual aspects of organizations and organizational communication and of their application to practice. The course explores methods for the analysis and evaluation of organizational communication networks and for the planning and development of communication intervention strategies.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 613 Approaches to Public Relations

This course explores public relations as the management of communication between an organization and its various internal and external stakeholders. It examines theoretical and conceptual frameworks with an eye toward the practical application of appropriate ethics, decision-making, research analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 614 Communication Conflict Management

This course focuses on the nature and function of healthy and unhealthy communication conflict. Content incorporates theories of conflict and the application of effective conflict management techniques.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 615 Persuasion

The ability to win support for ideas and motivate others to action is an essential skill for communication professionals and managers. This course will explore the persuasion process in public, organizational, and interpersonal settings. Students will develop practical skills in message design and other techniques to become ethical persuaders.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 616 Group and Team Communication

This course weds theory of small group interaction with a focus on the practice of participating in groups. Emphasis is placed on factors affecting and affected by symbolic exchanges in task groups. Specific topics include group climate, group decision-making, and leading groups.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 619 Public Relations Campaigns

The course will introduce students to the process of planning and implementing public relations campaigns. Students will examine techniques for developing and managing public relations campaigns for internal and external audiences. Students will also review historic and contemporary public relations campaigns for both their effectiveness and their social implications.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 620 Strategic Communication Capstone

This course prepares students for the role of communication expert for strategic communication management. Students will learn to diagnose communication challenges and propose solutions to address those challenges, synthesizing the knowledge and skills developed throughout the graduate program.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 621 Communication Training and Development

This course provides students with a theoretical and practical overview of training and development. As a complement to the study of organizational communication, students will learn how professionals identify communication needs, and then design, deliver, and assess employee learning, training, and development initiatives.
Prerequisite: COM 612

Number of Credits: 3

COM 623 Public Relations Writing and Media Relations

Number of Credits: 3

COM 630-635 Topics in Professional Development

The field of communication is rapidly changing, with new issues and technologies emerging constantly. Moreover, there are some professional communication topics that require more depth than in a traditional course but do not warrant a full-semester course by themselves (such as crisis communication). It is assumed that the topics covered will relate to each of the tracks or be of general interest to all professional communication students. Students may repeat a module for credit as long as the topic is sufficiently different.

Number of Credits: 1.5

COM 640 Professional Media Development

This course presents current audio and video practices and technologies used in corporate and institutional communications. Students will implement this pre-production, production, and post-production practices in developing messages for corporate and institutional audiences. Students will gain a general understanding of script-writing, lighting, audio, and editing tools used in media production to enable them to best communicate with professional videographers and audio technicians.

COM 641 Social Media

The course will explore the new media landscape in terms of online expression, social networking, identity management, and community building. Central questions include: How is social media changing the way people work and live? What are the implications for individuals and for the organizations they work with? What opportunities and challenges do individuals, news organizations, and businesses face regarding communication, identity/brand management, and community building? This course is grounded in practice, and students will be required to participate in social networks, forums, blogs, wikis, micro-blogs, and other emerging forms of social media.

COM 645 Special Topics in Social and New Media

Given the rapid change in communication technologies, this course provides an opportunity to examine 'state-of-the art' topics in social and new media. Sample topics are Content Development for Mobile Applications, Digital E-vangelism, and Social Media Metrics.

COM 661 Graduate Internship I

This graduate-level course allows students to work in a professional communication position, requiring them to link their graduate coursework with professional communication activities. Students are expected to
work at least 75 hours over the course of the semester. To be permitted to enroll in the internship, students must:

  1. Be an M.A. student in Strategic Communication;
  2. Have at least a 3.0 G.P.A.;
  3. Have completed at least 12 credits of coursework, including Com 602 (Presentation Skills) and Com 603 (Professional Writing);
  4. Have permission of the graduate director.
  5. Students may NOT take internship credit with an organization for whom the student works full-time.

Number of Credits: 1.5

COM 662 Graduate Internship II

This graduate-level course allows students to work in a professional communication position, requiring them to link their graduate coursework with professional communication activities. Students are expected to work at least 75 hours over the course of the semester. This course may be combined with Com 661 to create 3 credits during a single semester, or it may be taken as a second internship during a subsequent semester. To be permitted to enroll in the internship, students must:

  1. Be an M.A. student in Strategic Communication;
  2. Have at least a 3.0 G.P.A.;
  3. Have completed at least 12 credits of coursework, including Com 602 (Presentation Skills) and Com 603 (Professional Writing);
  4. Have permission of the graduate director.
  5. Students may NOT take internship credit with an organization for whom the student works full-time.

Number of Credits: 1.5

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Program Description

Changing national systems and global concerns in an increasingly interdependent world have resulted in a growing demand for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). The Master of Arts program offered by La Salle University is unique in its practical approach to learning, interaction with other cultures, and the integration of community involvement.

The program offers advanced and up-to-date knowledge in ESL/EFL (English as a Second Language and English as a Foreign Language) methodologies, techniques, strategies, critical thinking, and teaching across the curriculum. It also includes the use of multimedia technology in the second language acquisition process as well as the application of multiple forms of assessment.

The program consists of 12 courses of three (3) credits per course, to be taken in a predetermined fashion. Therefore, a total of 36 credits are required to complete the M.A. in TESOL program. There are nine (9) required courses (27 credits) including a Practicum and Masters Project/Thesis, supplemented by three (3) elective courses (9 credits) to be selected from the menu of such courses offered at various times. With most courses being offered at convenient times in the evenings, attendance can be on a full-time or part-time basis.

The program has been designed to complement and expand upon the ESL certification requirements in Pennsylvania and other states.

Note: Students earning the M.A. in TESOL will also receive ESL certification in Pennsylvania—provided that the student meets state requirements. 

Mission

The mission of this program is to meet the growing demand for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) caused by changing national systems and global concerns in an increasingly interdependent world. 

Program Goals

The M.A. in TESOL program at La Salle University has been designed to provide students with the theoretical foundation and contemporary research in linguistics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics (second-language acquisition), and related fields to fulfill the following goals:

  • Offer advanced and up-to-date knowledge in ESL/EFL (English as a Second Language and English as a Foreign Language) methodologies, techniques, strategies, critical thinking, and teaching across the curriculum.
  • Incorporate the use of multimedia technology in the second language acquisition process as well as the application of multiple forms of assessment.
  • Explore research design methods and writing conventions in the field of TESOL.
  • Delve deep into the social, cultural, historical, and very personal arenas within sociolinguistics, educational leadership, and community involvement.
  • Explore the practical foundation in linguistics, and its sub-branches, for teachers who want to apply basic linguistic knowledge and research findings to their practice in the classroom or in course and curricula design.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the program, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature of second-language learning, interpret current research as it applies to language teaching, and develop the capacity to apply principles of language-teaching in a variety of contexts.
  • Critically examine and evaluate his own teaching as well as current language-teaching materials and practices.
  • Demonstrate his/her ability to think creatively about teaching English as a second language in order to provide leadership in the field of language teaching.
  • Critically assess issues around educational changes and cultural identity, as well as second language acquisition and use in multilingual societies and communities. 
  • Identify and explain the components of various levels of communication in cross cultural situations.

Curriculum

A total of thirty-six (36) credits are required to complete the M.A. in TESOL program. The student must maintain a 3.0 GPA throughout the program (see Retention and Completion Requirements for details).

There are a number of core (required/specified) courses and a number of electives where the student may choose from the menu of courses offered in any one semester. The capstone courses (practicum and master's project/thesis) are required at the end of the program. Students are required to complete the following courses first: BLS 600, BLS 601, BLS 605, BLS 606, and EDC 650 (see below for course descriptions). Completion of these courses as well as TSOL 701, a practicum/internship, leads to the “ESL Program Specialist Certification” for certified teachers in Pennsylvania.

All courses are three (3) credits each.

CORE COURSES

All students must take these courses and meet any prerequisite indicated.

  • BLS 600    Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communications
  • BLS 601    Techniques of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
  • BLS 605    Curriculum and Development of Bilingual Programs
  • BLS 606    Making Language Connections Through Content in ESOL and Bilingual Classroom    
  • TSOL 608  Research Methods in TESOL
  • TSOL 609  Language Study for Educators
  • EDC 650   Language Assessment and Special Education of ESL Learners

Total required core courses: 21 credits

ELECTIVE COURSES

  • BLS 604    Cultural Pluralism and Problems of Minority Groups in the U.S.A.
  • TSOL 610  Teaching Second Language Writing in TESOL
  • TSOL 611  Multimedia Approaches to TESOL
  • TSOL 612  Sociolinguistics for Educators
  • TSOL 613  Special Projects in English Education

Three (3) elective courses required: Nine (9) credits

PRACTICUM (REQUIRED):

  • TSOL 701  M.A. in TESOL Practicum/Field Experience

All students are required to take this course: 3 credits

MASTER'S THESIS/PROJECT (REQUIRED)

  • TSOL 751  M.A. in TESOL Master's Project/Thesis

All students are required to take this course: 3 credits
 

Total required credits for program: 36 credits

Faculty

Director: Guadalupe Da Costa Montesinos, M.A.
Associate Professors: Biehl, Ossa
Lecturers: , Fischetti, Kopec, Zucker, Li

Translation and Interpretation

Program Description

The curriculum for this program is designed to address three (3) of the principal environments where translation and interpretation (English-Spanish and Spanish-English) are currently needed and will be more intensely needed in the future; that is, legal, health-care and business environments. In addition, governing translation/interpretation principles are also studied for application to language environments covered and not covered by the program.

The program consists of 15 courses (three credits each) to be taken in a predetermined fashion. Therefore, a total of 45 credits are required to complete the M.A. in Translation and Interpretation.

As part of the program requirements, the student will complete the following:

  • A 100-hour internship with the state courts, a health-care institution, or a translation or interpretation company
  • A final master's project, which may take the form of a thesis, under the supervision of an assigned faculty adviser

Mission Statement

The Masters in Translation and Interpretation will establish a new standard for translators and interpreters in this geographic area and the nation by training individuals for multi-competency employment so as to aid/keep pace with the need for multilingual capabilities in the marketplace. The program seeks to educate the public on the importance of training and employing professional translators and interpreters.

Program Goals

  • Acquaint participants with the relatively new concept of translation and interpretation studies by reading informed criticism in the theoretical field, thereby contextualizing the disciplines in general terms.
  • Educate individuals for multi-competency employment.
  • Participants will develop awareness of current issues in translation and interpretation studies and practice, and of the importance of professionalizing these occupations.
  • Provide a foundation in the standards of ethics and practice in the profession of translation and interpretation.
  • Offer credits representing academic achievement in a field that is currently seeking professionalization.
  • Keep pace with the need for linguistic specialists in the Philadelphia region and the nation.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the students will be able to:

  • Develop and demonstrate the same level of proficiency as educated native speakers of Spanish and English and transfer messages from one language to another accurately and fluently.
  • Recognize and apply the standards of court, health-care, or conference interpreters, as established by nationally recognized associations in those fields. This includes a foundation in the standards of ethics and practice in the respective areas.
  • Demonstrate expertise in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting and sight translation, in the legal, healthcare, and business fields.
  • Provide training in order to allow students to perform to the standards of court, healthcare, or conference interpreters as established by nationally recognized associations in those fields.
  • Apply what has been learned in the classroom to real-life working environments through guest speakers, on-site visits, in-class simulations, and the internship experience.
  • Identify ways to continue learning on their own by the use of self-assessment techniques and reflective practice skills.
  • Develop and enhance their linguistic competence and cultural awareness.

Curriculum

A minimum of forty - five (45) credits is required for the degree. All courses are three (3) credits each.

Translation segment

BLS 617: Technology: Applications in Translation and Interpretation
BLS 639: Advanced Grammar and Syntax
BLS 640: Translation Studies: Theory and Practice
BLS 641: Professional Uses of Spanish: Health Care
BLS 642: Professional Uses of Spanish: Business
BLS 643: Professional Uses of Spanish: Legal

Interpretation segment

BLS 610: Comparative Analysis English/Spanish
BLS 611: Fundamentals of Interpretation
BLS 612: Consecutive Interpretation and Sight Translation
BLS 613: Simultaneous Interpretation
BLS 614: Legal Interpretation
BLS 615: Health-care Interpretation
BLS 616: Business Interpretation

Capstone Project/Experience

BLS 701: Internship
BLS 702: Master Thesis/Project

For the translation segment, BLS 639, 640, and 617 should be successfully completed before the “specialties” (BLS 641, 642, and 643) may be taken. BLS 639, 640, and 617 may be taken simultaneously. The specialties may be taken in any order, but no more than two specialties should be taken in a semester.

For the interpretation segment, the successful completion of BLS 610 and BLS 611 is a requirement to continue with the segment. The first four courses (BLS 610, 611, 612, and 613) should be taken in the order listed (except as noted later); the remaining three “specialties” (BLS 614, 615, and 616) may be taken in any order. A student may take the first two courses (BLS 610 and 611) simultaneously. Equally, the following two courses (BLS 612 and 613) may also be taken simultaneously. No more than two specialty courses should be taken during the same semester.

Faculty

Director: Guadalupe Da Costa Montesinos, M.A.
Associate Professors: Biehl,  Ossa
Lecturers: Ezquerra-Hasbun, Fischetti, Hain-Poorman, Natalini, Tellez

Certificates

Autism Spectrum Disorders (Endorsement)

This is a unique, 12-credit program leading to an Endorsement issued by the PA Dept. of Education. This program is for certified teachers who are interested in learning and gaining additional experience in autism spectrum disorders. Master’s degree candidates interested in specializing in autism can apply these courses as electives to the program.

Course Sequence:
EDC 655   Dimensions of Autism
EDC 657   Systems Approach with Families and Educators
EDC 665   Communication Strategies for Teachers of ASD Children and Youth
EDC 667   Implementing the IEP in the Inclusive Classroom

Cybersecurity (Certificate)

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/.  The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.

2. Provide official transcripts showing evidence of all previous college work.  For work completed outside the US, the transcripts need to be evaluated by World Testing Organization (WES).

3. Provide a professional résumé addressing one’s educational and professional background.

4. Submit a personal statement (up to 300 words) describing their intent for this certificate.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

This program is offered in an online format.  Students in this program are not eligible for a US Student Visa because of the program format.

 

All documents should be sent to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment

La Salle University- Box 826

1900 W. Olney Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19141

215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

grad@lasalle.edu

Description of the Program

The certificate prepares individuals to assess the security and risk needs of computer and network systems, recommend safeguard solutions, and manage the implementation and maintenance of security devices, systems, and procedures.

Mission Statement

The graduate program in M.S. Cybersecurity educates students in practical knowledge of cybersecurity.  The program develops competencies in cybersecurity management as well as breach detection, mitigation and prevention.

Program Goals

The goals of the program are:

  1. Prepare students to explain Internet infrastructure and enterprise network connections.
  2. Prepare students to enter specialized careers in cybersecurity.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain Internet structures, enterprise network structures, and consulting services related to network infrastructures
  2. Assess security gaps in organizational policies and plans.
  3. Differentiate between cybercrime, cyber espionage, and cyberwar.

Faculty

Director: Margaret M. McCoey, M.S.
Associate Professors: Blum, Redmond, Wang
Assistant Professors: McCoey
Lecturers: Casey, Henry, Hilkowitz, Monahan, Walters

Progression through the Program

Proposed Course Rotation Schedule

Fall Spring Summer
CYB 644 (Information Security) CYB 612 (Corporate Ethics and Compliance) CYB 604 (The Computer and Internet Crime)
CYB 628 (Cybercrime, Cyber espionage, and Cyberwar) CYB 665 (Computer Digital Forensics)  

Tuition and Fees

These are published on the University website.

Fraud and Forensic Accounting (Certificate)

Program Description

The certificate prepares students for a career in the field of forensic accounting by providing them with skills and tools to both prevent fraud from occurring and discovering fraud after it has occurred.

Mission

The certificate in Fraud and Forensic Accounting, consistent with the mission of Graduate Studies, prepares students to enter the field of forensic accounting.

Program Goals

The program has the following goals:

  • Prepare students to participate ethically and professionally in a global market.
  • Prepare students to enter the field of forensic accounting.

Student Learning Outcomes

The student learning outcomes for the certificate are

  • Evaluate and support accounting and auditing concepts related to the causation of corporate economic crime.
  • Devise plans and processes to prevent and deter economic crime.

Admission Requirements

Certificate in Fraud and Forensic Accounting

To be accepted for admission into the program, the applicant must:

  • Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at  http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University. The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  • Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in the completion of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education. 
  • Provide official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work, if any.
  • Provide a professional résumé.
  • Provide a 200-word essay describing the student’s reasons for seeking this certificate.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment
            La Salle University- Box 826
            1900 W. Olney Avenue
             Philadelphia, PA 19141
            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
            grad@lasalle.edu

Curriculum

A foundation course may be required based on the student’s background.

MBA 615 Managerial and Financial Accounting

FACC 701 Fraud Examination: Principles and Practice

FACC 702 Financial Statement Fraud

FACC 703 Occupational Fraud and Abuse

FACC 704 The Computer and Internet Fraud

FACC 705 Fraud Detection and Prevention: Special Cases or FACC 708 White Collar Crime

Course Descriptions

FACC 701 Fraud Examination: Principles and Practices

This course will provide students the weapons to fight fraud by focusing on basic fraud schemes, information and evidence gathering, criminal and civil prosecution, and criminology and ethics. The objective of this course is to provide students with methodologies for resolving fraud allegations from inception to disposition. Students taking this course gain an understanding of the different types of fraud, the legal environment of fraud, and the ways to obtain evidence and assist in the detection and prevention of fraud.

Number of Credits: 3

FACC 702 Financial Statement Fraud

Financial statement fraud involves intentional misstatements or omissions of financial statement amounts or disclosures to deceive users of the statements. This topic, commonly known as “cooking the books,” will introduce students to management's motives and pressures to achieve desired financial results as opposed to true economic financial results. This course will enable students to both understand and detect the creative accounting methods management employs to “cook the books,” along with related fraud prevention strategies..

Number of Credits: 3

FACC 703 Occupational Fraud and Abuse

Occupational fraud and abuse is described as the use of one’s occupation for personal enrichment through the deliberate misuse or misapplication of one’s employing organization’s resources or assets. Through the use of real-life case examples, this course will focus on the types of persons most likely to perpetrate occupational fraud, the conditions under which fraud might be committed, and the specific schemes used to defraud organizations of amounts ranging from hundreds to millions of dollars.

Number of Credits: 3

FACC 704 The Computer and Internet Fraud

Computers have made organizations easier to run. All accounting information, inventory records, customer data, and intellectual property that an organization possesses is contained somewhere in an electronic file. As such, these electronic files are vulnerable to attacks from both employees and outsiders from around the world. This course will provide the student with an understanding of how computer fraud and manipulation is accomplished and what security measures should be instituted to prevent it.

Number of Credits: 3

FACC 705 Fraud Detection and Prevention: Special Cases

The opportunity to commit and conceal fraud exists only when there are assets susceptible to misappropriation and a lack of internal controls to prevent or detect fraud. This course will focus on the high-risk fraud environments wherein assets are more vulnerable to misappropriation and fraud because of either a lack of, or non-functioning of, internal controls. The study of various fraud investigative methods and the process for communicating an expert report will be an essential part of this course.

Number of Credits: 3

FACC 708 White Collar Crime

This course focuses on the battle between personal gain and individual integrity and provides a comprehensive analysis of white-collar crime in American society. The course presents a picture of all types of white-collar crime, and includes discussion of high-profile cases, trends in criminal activity, consequences of criminal behavior, and the impact on victims. The course addresses the economic crisis, its causes, cases and participants, and the impact of white-collar crime.

Number of Credits: 3

History (Certificate)

Program Description

Non-matriculating degree students will have the option of enrolling in a series of courses leading to a certificate in one of three areas:

  • European History
  • American History
  • World History

The Certificate option will appeal especially— but not exclusively—to those educators already well along in their teaching careers and interested in qualifying for either Act 48 or “Highly Qualified” status.

For more information, contact the Program Director, Dr. George Stow, at 215.951.1097.

Mission

Consistent with the mission statement for the graduate program in History per se, the Certification Option aims to “help students to correlate and synthesize information from various fields, to relate the theoretical to the practical, and to develop values in the liberal arts tradition.” They are thus in a position to pursue advanced studies in history, or to advance in their current positions.

Program Goals

The goals of each certificate are the following:

  • To provide an overview of a particular area with the objective of comprehending an understanding of the area of concentration
  • To enable students to apply the certificate toward further studies

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the students will be able to:

  • Be able to read primary source historical documents in their area of specialty
  • Contextualize historical events using different analytical methods
  • Apply information to current job placements

Admission Requirements

History Certificate Option (12 credits)

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

1. Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University.  The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.

2.  Provide official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work

3.  Provide a Professional Résumé.

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications.

* NOTE: The stated admission requirements are construed as guidelines; the graduate admissions committee fully recognizes that some candidates may present either credentials or prior experiences that lie beyond the parameters described above.

All documents should be sent to the following:

            Office of Graduate Enrollment

            La Salle University- Box 826

            1900 W. Olney Avenue

            Philadelphia, PA 19141

            215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

            grad@lasalle.edu

Curriculum

Students will complete four courses (12 credits):

  • HIS 510 Historiography
  • A readings course appropriate to the area
    • HIS 610 Readings in American History OR
    • HIS 620 Readings in European History OR
    • HIS 630 Readings in World History
  • Two appropriate graduate History electives

Human Capital Development (Certificate)

Description of the Program

The Online Human Capital Development Certificate Program is a graduate certificate program that prepares participants for careers in the exciting field of human capital development by providing them with the skills and tools to better leverage their organizations’ human capital and improve their workforce over time to meet future needs.

Online learning at La Salle offers the same rigorous curriculum as face-to-face learning with increased flexibility for those juggling busy schedules. Courses will meet both asynchronously, using discussion forums and course assignments, , and synchronously, using programs that allow real-time chat and video or audio web conferencing to help you stay connected with your instructors and classmates.

Learning Goals

Theory: Students will gain a theoretical and intellectual understanding of how HCD is strategically integrated with an organization’s ever-changing people, mission, goals, and objectives. This will include a comprehensive understanding of how a HCD framework links the organizations workforce to its bottom line.

Practical Experience: Through faculty-practitioners, the focus will be on strategic initiatives, and gaining a realistic understanding of how organizations invest in their human capital, ethically manage knowledge, measure the development process against their bottom line, and apply those strategies in real world situations.

Workforce Development: Program participants will learn how to diagnose complex strategic challenges facing HCD professionals and then develop innovative solutions to those challenges.

Curriculum

All accepted students are required to successfully complete the following six courses:

HCD 670 Human Resource Development
HCD 675 Theories of Conflict Analysis and Resolution
HCD 680 Advanced Negotiation Theory and Practice
HCD 710 Investing in Human Capital
HCD 720 Legal Environment of HCD
HCD 730 Strategic Approaches to Human Capital

Instructional Leadership (Endorsement)

This is a 12-credit program for certified teachers who desire to learn more about how to be instructional leaders or teacher leaders in their schools. The program starts with a summer practicum experience and culminates with action research and professional development projects. Regardless of whether the teacher pursues roles as leaders in schools, this program will enhance a teacher’s understanding of advanced instructional strategies through coursework and action research. Master’s candidates may apply these courses to their programs as electives.

Course Sequence:
EDC 505   Introduction to Instructional Leadership
EDC 615   Advanced Instructional Design
EDC 652   Leadership and Educational Change I
EDC 653   Leadership and Educational Change II

Interpretation: English/Spanish-Spanish/English (Certificate)

Program Description

The Certificate in Interpretation address the legal, healthcare, and business environments. 

The program consists of seven (3 credits each) courses to be taken in a predetermined fashion. Therefore, a total of 21 credits is required to complete the certificate.

All courses are offered in the evenings. All courses (fall and spring) require a minimum of three hours of class time per week. The fall and spring semesters have a 14-week duration. Summer sessions have a 5.5-week duration and require a minimum of six hours of class time per week.

Mission

The mission of the Certificate in Interpretation program is to serve the interpretation needs of Hispanics in the Philadelphia region and beyond in legal, healthcare, and business environments.

Program Goals

  • Offer credits representing academic achievement.
  • Educate individuals for multi-competency employment.
  • Keep pace with the need for linguistic specialists.
  • Enhance students’ linguistic competence in Spanish and English and cultural awareness of contrasting elements between the dominant culture and those cultures of various Hispanic groups.
  • Add La Salle University and its students to the national educational community of Translation and Interpretation Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this certificate, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the relatively new concept of Interpretation Studies by reading informed criticism in the theoretical field, thereby contextualizing the discipline in general terms.
  • Develop and demonstrate the same level of proficiency as educated native speakers of Spanish and English and transfer messages from one language to another accurately and fluently.
  • Demonstrate expertise in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting and sight translation, in the legal, healthcare, and business fields.
  • Recognize and apply the standards of court, healthcare, or conference interpreters, as established by nationally-recognized associations in those fields, including a foundation in the standards of ethics and practice in respective areas.
  • Develop awareness of current issues in interpreting studies and practice, and of the importance of professionalizing this occupation as well as educating the public on the importance of and methods for using professional interpreters.
  • Apply what they have learned in the classroom to real-life working environments through guest speakers, on-site visits, and in-class simulations.
  • Identify ways to continue learning on their own by the use of self-assessment techniques and reflective practice skills.
  • Develop and enhance their linguistic competence and cultural awareness.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Curriculum

There are seven (7) courses, three (3) credits each, and all are required, for a total of 21 credits. The minimum grade point average required for certification is 3.0, and the time limit for completion of all courses is four years. The recommended pace is one to two courses per semester/summer session so as to finish in four to six semesters/summer sessions, but the actual pace may be individually driven within the limits set.

The required courses are as follows:

  • BLS 610: Comparative Analysis English/Spanish
  • BLS 611: Fundamentals of Interpretation
  • BLS 612: Consecutive Interpretation and Sight Translation
  • BLS 613: Simultaneous Interpretation
  • BLS 614: Legal Interpretation
  • BLS 615: Health-care Interpretation
  • BLS 616: Business Interpretation

The successful completion of BLS 610 and BLS 611 is a requirement to continue with the program. The first four courses (BLS 610, 611, 612, and 613) must be taken sequentially or simultaneously in pairs: BLS 610-611 and BLS 612-613; the remaining three courses (BLS 614, 615, and 616) can be taken in any order.

The rationale for the sequence is that basic interpreting skills and a theoretical base in interpreting should be acquired in order to further develop skills in the specific areas of legal, health-care, and business interpreting. All courses focus on the language combination English-Spanish.

Faculty

Director: Guadalupe Da Costa Montesinos
Associate Professors: Biehl, Ossa
Lecturers: Ezquerra-Hasbun, Fischetti, Hain-Poorman, Natalini, Tellez

Pre Speech-Language Pathology

Program Description

The PreSLP program provides post-baccalaureate students who do not have the required background in communication sciences and disorders with the prerequisite courses in basic human communication sciences needed to apply to a master’s degree program in speech-language pathology.

This unique program offers 10 to 11 recommended and required courses online, affording students the choice of a flexible schedule to pursue the needed prerequisites for a master’s program in speech-language pathology.

Upon completing the PreSLP program, students demonstrate knowledge of basic human communication and swallowing processes, including their biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, linguistic, and cultural bases.

Students are strongly encouraged to take all PreSLP courses unless their records indicate that they have taken equivalent courses and earned a B or higher in those courses. By completing the PreSLP program, students are prepared to apply to a graduate program in speech-language pathology. However, entrance into the PreSLP program does not guarantee acceptance into La Salle’s graduate Speech-Language Pathology Program.

The following courses are the recommended PreSLP courses and will be offered online. Note that W indicates online and P W courses are limited to students enrolled in the PreSLP program:

  • COSD 100P W
  • COSD 102P W
  • COSD 200P W
  • COSD 202P W
  • COSD 203P W
  • COSD 211P W
  • COSD 304P W
  • COSD 306P W
  • COSD 308P W
  • COSD 314P W

General ASHA Certification Requirements

The current ASHA certification guidelines require students to complement their courses in basic human communication sciences with additional courses. These guidelines require students to have a course in biology, physical science (chemistry or physics), and statistics. In addition, students need to have courses in the social and behavioral sciences. Currently, La Salle does not offer most of these courses online. Students who have not completed these requirements on the undergraduate level may have to take these courses on either La Salle’s campus or another institution to gain the credits needed to be accepted into a master’s program.

To fulfill these requirements, La Salle University suggests the following:

  • BIO 164 WB Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology (Biological Sciences)
  • PHY 270 Essentials of Physics for Health Sciences  or CHM 161 Chemistry of the Life Sciences and CHL 161 Laboratory (Physical Sciences)
  • HSC 217   Statistics for the Health Sciences (Statistics)
  • PSY 155    Introduction to Psychology  (Social and Behavioral sciences)

Course Descriptions

COSD 100P W Introduction to Language and Communication

This course is an introduction to the study of the grammar and sound systems of natural languages with an emphasis on English. Historical and present-day controversies on linguistic theories and the nature of language are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

COSD 102P W Introduction to Communication Disorders

This course is an introductory survey of normal processes and disorders of speech, language, and hearing. The behavioral and social consequences of communication disorders in people throughout the life span are presented. Different categories, symptoms, and causes of communication disorders are examined. The roles of the speech-language pathologist and audiologist in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders are discussed. Preferred American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) practice patterns pertaining to a variety of professional situations are surveyed.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

COSD 200P W Phonetics

This course involves the exploration and study of American English pronunciation through the application of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students will be trained in transcription of English phonemes and allophones and introduced to distinctive feature analysis, phonological rules, prosodic features, dynamics of articulation, American dialectical variants, and developmental phonology.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

COSD 202P W Anatomy And Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the structural organization (anatomy), function (physiology), and neural control for speech production and hearing. The course will emphasize both normal and disordered systems. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 158 or BIO 210 or BIO 161 and BIO 162, or BIO 164P WB, or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

COSD 203P W Language Development

This course explores the specific nature, sequence, and patterns of language development from birth through adolescence and its relation to other aspects of child development. Conditions that place infants and children at risk for speech and language disorders are explored. Patterns of normal language development are discussed as a guide for the evaluation and treatment of children with developmental language disorders. Prerequisite: COSD 100, COSD 100P W, or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

Prerequisites: COSD 100, COSD 100P W, or permission of instructor.

COSD 211P W Acoustic Bases of Speech and Hearing

This course explores the physical characteristics of speech sounds and the psychophysical processes involved in hearing and speech perception. Sound waves, resonance, decibels, and spectrogram reading are discussed. Computer applications with practical implications are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

COSD 304P W Introduction to Audiology

This course is a survey of the field of audiology, including the measurement of hearing and the nature and causes of hearing impairment in infants, children, and adults. Students are introduced to strategies used by audiologists and physicians in managing hearing impairment.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

COSD 306P W Neurological Bases of Communication and Behavior

This course is an examination of the structure (neuroanatomy), organization (neurophysiology), and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems as they relate to speech, language, hearing, and cognition. Behavioral manifestations of normal and abnormal brain functioning are contrasted. Prerequisite: COSD 202 or COSD 202P W or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

Prerequisites: COSD 202 or COSD 202P W or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

COSD 308P W Clinical Procedures in Speech and Language Pathology

This course introduces the speech-language-hearing science major to the clinical and supervisory process. Basic information regarding certification, professional standards, and ethics are discussed. Goal setting, lesson planning, methods of observing, describing and recording behavior, informal assessment, and related topics are also discussed. Behavioral observation and computer technology in the measurement and modification of speakerlistener attributes are examined. Students develop clinical writing skills appropriate to various speech-language pathology settings. This course is an introduction to the clinical practicum experience and requires observation of a wide variety of clinical cases.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200, COSD 203, COSD 102P W, COSD 200 P W, COSD 203 P W, or equivalents, or permission of instructor.

COSD 314P W Diagnostic Procedures in Speech and Language Pathology

This course provides the student majoring in speech-language-hearing science with a framework for understanding the diagnostic process in speechlanguage pathology. General topics in the area of diagnostics are discussed, including obtaining and interpreting assessment information. Report-writing and presentation of findings are examined. Observations of diagnostic testing by an American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)certified speech-language pathologist are required. Principles and procedures common to the diagnosis of most communication and swallowing disorders are considered. Assessments of culturally and linguistically different individuals are surveyed. The ASHA Code of Ethics is emphasized. Standardized testing as well as alternatives to standardized testing are explored. Prerequisite: COSD 102, COSD 200, COSD 203, COSD 102P W COSD 200P W, COSD 203 P W,or equivalents, or permission of instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Online

Restrictions: For PreSLP Students only. Not available to CSD day students. Students must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200, COSD 203, COSD 102P W COSD 200P W, COSD 203 P W,or equivalents, or permission of instructor.

Special Education (Certificate)

Special Education PreK-8 or 7-12 Certification (24 credits)

Candidates for the special education certification will take eight courses. This program is accredited by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for Special Education Certification (PreK-8 or 7-12). The following courses and relevant practicum experiences are required:

Certification courses (15 credits)
EDC 510   Human Exceptionalities
EDC 619   Literacy Difficulties: Diagnosis and Instruction
EDC 644   Assessing the Abilities of All Learners
EDC 667   Implementing the IEP in the Inclusive Classroom
BLS 601   Techniques of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Inclusion Practicum (nine credits)
EDC 643   Developing and Adjusting Instruction
EDC 645   Planning and Instruction for Students with Special Needs
EDC 661   Teaching Across the Continuum of Student Needs

Master of Arts in Education with Special Education Certification (33 credits)

CORE COURSES

EDC 503                Cognitive, Social and Emotional Development
EDC 655                Dimensions of Autism
EDC 751                Transformative Pedagogy: A Capstone Experience

CERTIFICATION COURSES FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

EDC 510                Human Exceptionalities
EDC 619                Literacy Difficulties: Diagnosis and Instruction
EDC 644                Assessing the Abilities of All Learners
EDC 667                Implementing the IEP in the Inclusive Classroom
BLS 601                 Techniques of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
EDC 643                Developing and Adjusting Instruction
EDC 645                Planning and Instruction for Students with Special Needs
EDC 661                Teaching Across the Continuum of Student Needs

Teaching English as a Second Language (Certificate)

Program Description

Using a schedule that accommodates those already employed as teachers, as well as aspiring new teachers, this program is designed to be responsive to requirements promulgated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (Division of Teacher Education—Bureau of Teacher Certification and Preparation) requiring that teachers of English as a Second Language (ESL) be certified according to specific competencies set forth in the regulations.

Candidates for ESL certification will undergo a predetermined curriculum consisting of six (6) Core courses. These courses will address in depth the areas of expertise that are required by the regulations:

  • English Usage and the Development of Linguistic Awareness, including instruction on the process of first and second language acquisition, the process of literacy development for second language learners, and the required strategies that will assist English Language Learners (ELLs) in the different stages of second language acquisition.
  • English as a Second Language (Instructional Materials and Development), which includes the design and implementation of ESL programs to assist ELLs in the acquisition of English and cognitive academic language skills. The student will be required to learn and be aware of various methods, strategies, research findings, and resources that address the educational needs of ELL in their learning process, including the use of computer technology. The student will also be required to gain very specific knowledge concerning currently accepted/research-based ESL instructional methods and strategies designed to meet the instructional needs of ELLs.
  • Support Services for English Language Learners (ELLs), which provides extensive exposure to knowledge concerning effective assessment, including appropriate tools and practices, for identifying levels of language proficiency, acquisition, and content learning, as well as the means to monitor student progress. The student will be required to obtain extensive knowledge concerning the availability of school support services and the promotion of parental/family involvement in the accomplishment and educational needs of ELLs, as well as a complete familiarity with educational programs and instructional activity adaptation for ELLs that require specially designed instruction pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
  • Development of Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity, where students will be required to become thoroughly informed of behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes of multicultural learners and families. Classroom and research activities will include the incorporation of knowledge of current methods and techniques for teaching English as a Second Language within a culturally/linguistically diverse student/family environment. Further, the student will become aware of techniques that may be employed to promote school staff ’s understanding and sensitivity toward cultures and languages other than the dominant culture/language in the United States.

Mission

The mission of this program is to be responsive to the growing demand for ESL Certification of K-12 teachers caused by changing national systems and global concerns in an increasingly interdependent world. 

Program Goals

The goals of the ESL Certification are the following:

  • Offer advanced and up-to-date knowledge in ESL/EFL (English as a Second Language and English as a Foreign Language) methodologies, techniques, strategies, critical thinking, and teaching across the curriculum.
  • Incorporate the use of multimedia technology in the second language acquisition process as well as the application of multiple forms of assessment.
  • Explore research design methods and writing conventions in the field of TESOL.
  • Delve deep into the social, cultural, historical, and very personal arenas within sociolinguistics, educational leadership, and community involvement.
  • Explore the practical foundation in linguistics, and its sub-branches, for teachers who want to apply basic linguistic knowledge and research findings to their practice in the classroom or in course and curricula design.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the students will be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature of second-language learning, interpret current research as it applies to language teaching, and develop the capacity to apply principles of language-teaching in a variety of contexts.
  • Design and implement ESL programs to assist English Language Learners (ELLs) in the acquisition of English and cognitive academic language skills.
  • Develop cultural awareness and sensitivity to different cultures.
  • Apply current methods, techniques, strategies for teaching English as a Second Language within a culturally/linguistically diverse student/family environment.
  • Understand and critically assess issues related to educational changes, cultural identity, and second language acquisition and its use in multilingual societies and communities.

Admission Requirements

To be accepted for admission into the program, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Provide evidence of successful academic achievement in completion of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
  2. Possess a current and valid teaching certificate in some other area.
    OR
    Have completed an approved teacher preparation program and successfully passed the requisite PRAXIS or PECT exams. 
  3. Complete the Application for Admission online (free of cost).

Note: Students are responsible for ensuring they meet all State requirements for ESL certification. 

All documents should be sent to the following:

Office of Graduate Enrollment
La Salle University- Box 826
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141
215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
grad@lasalle.edu

Curriculum

The Certification for ESL Program Specialist requires a total of six (6) courses (18 credits). All six (6) courses are three-credit core courses.

  • BLS 600   Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communications
  • BLS 601   Techniques of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
  • BLS 605   Curriculum and Development of Bilingual Programs
  • BLS 606   Making Language Connections Through Content in ESOL and Bilingual Classrooms
  • EDC 650   Language Assessment and Special Education of ESL Learners
  • TSOL 701  Practicum/Field Experience

Retention, Completion and Certification Requirements

Every student in La Salle University’s graduate programs is required to maintain a cumulative average of “B.” Therefore, a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required to earn the certificate. A student who at any time falls under this standard is automatically in academic jeopardy and is subject to academic review by the Director of the program. A student falling below the GPA requirements will be allowed the two following semesters to bring his/her GPA to a 3.0 or better. Failure to accomplish this will result in dismissal from the program. In order to earn the certificate, students must successfully complete all required courses: 18 credits for the Certificate in Translation; 21 credits for the Certificate in Interpretation. 

A student accepted into the certificate program will have a total of four (4) academic years to complete the program. Only in extreme circumstances is a leave of absence granted. No leave of absence will be granted for more than one year. When a leave of absence is granted, the time period encompassing the leave of absence will not count toward the maximum completion time of four years.

Faculty

Director: Guadalupe Da Costa Montesinos, M.A.
Associate Professors: Biehl, Ossa
Lecturers:  Fischetti, Kopec, Zucker, Li

Transfer Credit

The Hispanic Institute at La Salle University will accept up to six (6) graduate credits (generally, two courses) from other accredited institutions' graduate programs. For a transferred-in course/credits, the suggested course(s) must be sufficiently similar to a required or available to the applicant's elective course within the program that will receive the transfer. That evaluation as to similarity, and therefore acceptability, with a particular course within the Hispanic Institute's graduate program will be made at the exclusive discretion of the Hispanic Institute's Director.

When an applicant or graduate student desires to have a course considered for transfer into one of the Institute's programs, the applicant/graduate student must provide the Director of the Hispanic Institute the following materials/documents:

  • an official transcript from the graduate program where the suggested transferred-in course was taken and successfully completed;
  • a copy of the graduate catalog from the institution showing the description of the course suggested for transfer-in. If possible, it is very helpful for evaluation purposes to also have the course(s) syllabi, if available.

No course may be transferred-in with a grade of less than B.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and fees for the current year are provided in the General Reference section of this catalog.

Tuition Assistance

Questions and information about financial aid (FAFSA form and Web Institutional Data Form) should be directed to the Director of Student Financial Services at 215.951.1070 or finserv@lasalle.edu.
Payment plans and deferred payment option questions, should be directed to Student and Accounts Receivable at 215.951.1055 or bursar@lasalle.edu.

Partial Scholarships

The Hispanic Institute at La Salle University has a very modest scholarship fund. Students wishing to be considered should write a letter stating why they should be awarded a scholarship. The letter must be addressed to the Director of the Hispanic Institute at La Salle University. The letter may be sent as an e-mail or through regular mail.

Translation: English/Spanish-Spanish/English (Certificate)

Program Description

The curriculum for the CIT (Certificate in Translation) is designed to address three of the principal environments in which translation (English/Spanish-Spanish/English) is currently needed. These are, legal, health care, and business environments. In addition, governing translation principles are also studied for application to language environments not covered by the program.

The program is flexible. A total of 18 credits—six (6) graduate courses—are required to earn the Certificate. The order of the courses is only prescribed at the beginning and the end of the program. Intervening courses may be taken in the order desired by the student.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Certificate in Tranlsation program is to serve the translation needs of Hispanics in the Philadelphia region and beyond in legal, healthcare, and business environments.

Program Goals

The goals of the program are as follows:

  • To familiarize students with the concept of translation studies by reading informed criticism in the theoretical field, thereby contextualizing the discipline in general terms.
  • To enhance the student’s knowledge of Spanish.
  • To provide limited training in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting, as these skills are required in most fields using translators in the United States.
  • To develop the specialized vocabulary and concepts needed to work bilingually in law, business, and medicine.
  • To gain an inside and outside perspective of the Hispanic and Anglo cultures, so as to grasp the translator’s place in a professional setting.
  • To assist in the training of students