Academics: Requirements, Expectations, and Policies

Institutional Learning Outcomes

Anchored in the heritage of the Brothers of the Christian Schools and in the Catholic intellectual tradition, La Salle prepares ethical and engaged graduates committed to the global common good.

Four overarching commitments inform our approach to a La Salle University education:

Broader Identity, Expanded Literacies, Effective Expression, and Active Responsibility. Within these four commitments, we value students as whole persons engaged, in association with others, in a lifelong, dynamic process of growth and development. We recognize that such growth and development are part of a larger, interconnected, and interdependent environment in which we all live.

All La Salle students will develop some common knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes, and values as a result of their experiences at the University. La Salle identifies twelve such institutional learning outcomes (ILOs) that all graduates will have mastered. Each is tied to one of the four commitments.

  • The Broader Identity commitment asks students to examine their own belief systems, gaining a historical perspective on the world and on a variety of intellectual traditions by encountering diverse perspectives, and by engaging in broad and deep experiences with others. Two ILOs are associated with this commitment: Understanding Diverse Perspectives and Reflective Thinking and Valuing.
  • The Expanded Literacies commitment challenges students to read and think critically, to question assumptions, to reason, and to solve significant problems. Five ILOs are associated with this commitment: Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning, Critical Analysis and Reasoning, Information Literacy, Technological Competency, and Health and Financial Literacy.
  • The Effective Expression commitment asks students to test the logical foundations of their messages, to weigh the effect their messages may have on their audiences, and to offer strategies for converting messages that address and facilitate some greater good into action. Two ILOs are associated with this commitment: Oral and Written Communication and Creative and Artistic Expression.
  • Finally, the Active Responsibility commitment necessitates the integration of prior learning to learn from and collaborate with individuals and communities, and to understand diverse perspectives and experiences. Three ILOs are associated with this commitment: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning, Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity, and Collaborative Engagement.

University Core Curriculum

La Salle’s twelve institutional learning outcomes shape students’ experiences in all aspects of their lives at the University. Academically, the impact of these guiding principles is most evident in the University’s Core Curriculum. Through the Core, all students have the opportunity to acquire and demonstrate these common skills.

Because of the two-pronged nature of three of the ILOs, for the purposes of the Core, the twelve ILOs are viewed as having fifteen measurable elements. The Core is intended to be distributed throughout a student’s time at the University, with each ILO having lower-level (Level One) and higher-level (Level Two) objectives.

For Level One of the Core, students select twelve courses from among many options; these courses are open to all majors and do not have any prerequisites. Students also participate in two non-credit modules. The manageable size of this general education portion of the Core easily allows students in all programs, regardless of accreditation requirements, to complete the Core experience. In addition, it encourages the pursuit of double majors and minors by students with multiple areas of interest. One of the highlights of Level One is the First-Year Academic Seminar. In addition, of the remaining eleven courses, all students share a common religion and theology course as well as two common English courses.

Students address Level Two of the Core through their majors, experiencing all four commitments through a capstone course or co-curricular learning experience, a writing-intensive course, and two additional courses or co-curricular learning experiences.

While all La Salle graduates will have mastered the same fifteen measurable elements, they will also have achieved this mastery through unique routes due to the many options from which to choose and the wide variety of disciplines represented within each category.

First-Year Academic Seminar

The First-Year Academic Seminar is a foundational course for entering students. Although topics will vary, each seminar introduces students to a variety of perspectives on a particular issue, context, or problem through university-level reading, writing, and discussion. Students will be challenged to understand the central concept through multiple perspectives, with a particular focus on historical and contemporary points of view. These courses are taught by faculty from across the university. All sections are open to students across all schools; however, the course does not count toward any major or minor.

Majors

Students choose a major when applying to La Salle. It is the student’s responsibility to see that all major requirements are fulfilled.

Any change of major requires the student to complete the “Curriculum Change Form, found in the office of each major/Chair. Students are required to request permission and the signature of the Chair of their new major before submitting the form to The Office of the University Registrar.  This change may require tak­ing approved summer courses or attending La Salle for an addition­al semester(s). Any exceptions to the prescribed program that may be granted must be in writing from the Chair of the major.

La Salle offers majors in the following subjects:

Accounting1, American Studies, Art History, Biochemistry, Biology, Business Administration1 , Business Systems and Analytics, Chemistry, Communication, Computer Science, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Criminal Justice1 , Digit Art & Multi Media Design, Economics, Economics & International Studies, Education 4th thru 8th/Special Ed, Education Grades 4 thru 8, Education Pre-K thru 4th/Special Ed, Education Pre-K thru 4th, English, Environmental Science, Finance, History, Information Technology1, Integrated Science Business Technology, International Business, International Relations, Management & Leadership, Marketing, Mathematics, Nursing1, Nutrition, Organizational Leadership2, Philosophy, Political Science, Political Science/Philosophy/Economics, Psychology1, Public Health, Religion, Secondary Education, Social Work1 , Sociology, Spanish.

  1. These majors are available to students enrolled in the evening program.
  2. Organizational Leadership is only available to evening program students.

Multiple Majors/Degrees Earned

Undergraduates interested in pursuing multiple majors must complete the “Curriculum Change Form” and collect the appropriate approving signatures. This form may be found in the all major Department Offices. Students may declare more than one major after their first semester at La Salle. 

Specific policies regarding requirements for multiple majors may be found in the introduction section of the School under which the major falls. Detailed course requirements for majors are listed in the Undergraduate Majors section of this catalog, under each discipline.

  • Students who complete multiple majors, where each major is within the same degree type, will earn a single degree and one diploma.

Example: A student completes both a Communication major and an English major. Both majors earn a Bachelor of Arts. Students who double major in Communication and English will receive the single degree/diploma of Bachelor of Arts.

  • Students who complete multiple majors, where each major has different degree types, will earn a different degree/diploma for each degree represented differently by the major completed.

Example: A student completes both a Communication major and a Marketing major. Both majors earn different degrees. Students who double major in Communication and Marketing will receive both the degree/diploma for the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.                                               

La Salle will not award the same bachelor’s degree, to a student, more than once. Diplomas reflect the degree earned, not the major(s). The academic transcript will indicate the degree(s) awarded and the majors completed.

Minors

In addition to their major(s), students may complete up to three minors. To satisfy the requirements for a minor, students must complete six courses within a discipline. A minimum of three required courses, within each minor, must be completed at La Salle University.

Specific policies regarding requirements for minors may be found in the introduction section of the School under which the discipline falls. Detailed course requirements for minors are listed in the University Majors and Curricula section of this catalog, under each discipline.

Students wishing to declare a minor must consult and receive approval from the Chair of the department minor.

La Salle offers minors in the following subjects: Accounting1, American Studies, Art Histo­ry, Biology, Business Systems & Analytics, Business Administration1,2, Chemistry, Communication, Communication Management, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Digital Arts & Multimedia Design, Economics, English, Entrepreneurship, Environmental Science, Finance (for Accounting majors only), General Education, History, Health Science, Human Services, Information Technology[1], International Relations, Journalism, Latin American Studies, Leadership & Global Understanding, Life Science, Mass Media, Management & Leadership2 ,  Marketing2 , Mathematics, Nutrition, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology[1], Public Relations, Public Health, Religion[1], Risk Manage­ment & Insurance, Sociology, and Spanish.

  1. These minors are available to students enrolled in the evening program.
  2. These minors are not available to Business majors (ACC, BSA, BUS, FIN, MGTL, MKT) in the day or evening program.

Requirements for Associate In Arts Degree

The Associate in Arts degree is for the Non-Traditional/Evening student only. A candidate for an Associate in Arts degree, will complete the major of Liberal Arts, and must:

  • complete course work equivalent to a minimum of 60 credit hours, at least 30 of which have been fulfilled at La Salle University
  • have not attained more than 84 credit hours
  • have not received a prior associate degree
  • fulfill all course requirements prescribed by the University for the specific associate degree
  • have a cumulative GPA of 2.0
  • file a graduation application for the associate degree at least four months before the completion of the requirements.

The courses which fulfill the requirements for the Associate degree may be applied to the Bachelor’s degree.

Requirements for A Bachelor’s Degree

A candidate for the baccalaureate degree must have completed a minimum of 120 semester credit hours that satisfy curricular requirements and that include at least 38 courses of three-credit hours or more.

Certain curricula may require a number of hours exceeding this minimum. In addition to completing the number of courses and hours needed, the student must also meet the following require­ require­ments:

  1. The student obtains a C average or cumulative index of 2.00 in the total program of studies.
  2. The student fulfills all course requirements controlled by the major department with a C average or a cumulative index of 2.00 in those courses (or higher in some majors).
  3. The student fulfills the core requirements.
  4. The student takes his or her last 30 credits at La Salle.

Requirements for A Second Bachelor’s Degree

La Salle University will award a second bachelor’s degree to a stu­dent who has already earned a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. The student must meet the following conditions:            

  1. If the student holds a bachelor’s degree from La Salle University:
    • The La Salle student must receive written permission from the appropriate Assistant Dean and Chairperson to enter a new bachelor’s degree program.
    • Core requirements may be fulfilled by the student’s first bachelor’s degree.
    • A minimum of 30 credit hours are required as determined at the time the student matriculates in the second degree program.
  • A total of 70 transfer credit hours may be applied to the student’s undergraduate transcript.

All transfer credit must be taken prior to the student taking his or her last 30 credits at La Salle University.*

  1. If the student holds a bachelor’s degree from another institution:
  • The new student must apply to La Salle University.
  • In addition to major, number of credits, and GPA requirements, the student must fulfill the core requirement of REL 100 – Religion Matters. These courses may be included in the 70 transfer credits or completed at La Salle University.
  • A maximum of 70 credit hours may be transferred toward the second degree.
  • All transfer credit must be taken prior to the student taking his or her last 30 credits at La Salle University.*

*Students in the RN-BSN program – all transfer credit must be taken prior to the student taking his or her last 27 credits at La Salle Uni­versity.

Graduation

Students who will complete requirements for a degree in a given semester must make a written application for graduation at the time specified by the Registrar. Commencement exercises are held annu­ally in the spring. Diplomas are issued three times a year – on August 31, January 15, and on the date of the Commencement exercises in May. Students who have three or fewer courses remaining to be fulfilled for their degree requirements will be eligible to participate in May Commencement exercises but will not be awarded a degree. Students receiving diplomas in August or January are invited to par­ticipate formally in the Commencement exercises held the following May.

Graduating with Honors

The bachelor’s degree with honors is conferred on a student who has completed his or her courses at the University with a cumulative GPA not lower than 3.4 and who has not incurred the penalty of loss of good standing for disciplinary reasons.

The candidate for the bachelor’s degree who has earned an average of 3.8 in all courses is graduated with the distinction maxima cum laude.

The candidate who has earned an average of 3.6 is graduated with the distinction magna cum laude.

The candidate who has earned an average of 3.4 is graduated with the distinction cum laude.

Registration

During announced registration periods published on the academic calendar, students should contact their Academic Adviser to create a roster of courses for the upcoming semester. The student may regis­ter for courses via the mylasalle portal or in person during the times specified by the Office of the University Registrar.

  • Students enrolled in Ten through Full Fifteen Week Terms may register through the first full week of classes. A week shall be defined as the period of seven consecutive days; beginning with the official start date of the semester, not the first meeting day of a class or first day of attendance.
  • Students enrolled in Five through Nine Week Terms may register up to and including the second day of the semester, not the second meeting day of a class or second day of attendance.
  • Students enrolled in One through Four Week Terms (includes Intersession) may register up to and including the first day of the semester. The first day of the semester is defined as the official start date of the semester, not the first meeting day of a class or first day of attendance.

A course that is dropped during the registration period will no lon­ger appear on the student’s academic record. After the registration period is over, students may withdraw from a course on or before the withdrawal deadline. Refer to the section titled “Course Withdraw­al”.

Academic Integrity

A student’s matriculation at La Salle University is a voluntary decision that involves acceptance of the responsibility to perform academically and to behave socially in ways consistent with the goals and objectives of the University. Upon enrolling at La Salle, the student accepts University rules and regulations and the authority of the University to exercise academic disciplinary powers, including suspension and dismissal. All students are expected to follow the polices found in the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities .

Additional program-specific guidelines for monitoring students’ academic progress and grades are detailed in the section for each program or in the program’s student handbook. Students are expected to understand and adhere to the individual program standards and handbook policies, as they are amended, and should recognize that these individual program standards may be more specific or rigorous than the overarching university standards.

Students may be expected to undertake research projects as part of their curriculum. Research projects that use human subjects must be approved by the Institutional Research Board.

Attendance Policy

Students are expected to attend classes regularly. Absence beyond the control of the student, such as illness or serious personal or fam­ily situations, should be explained to the instructor. If an absence extends over a protracted period of time, the student should notify the Assistant Dean of the School under which the major falls. Attendance is taken from the first regular class day regardless of the time of reg­istration.

Grades and Grading

The coursework of undergraduate students is graded and recorded at the end of each semester. Mid-semester progress reports for new students are submitted to the Office of the University Registrar by each instructor. All grades may be viewed by the student through the mylasalle portal.

Grades

A Superior
B Very Good
C Average
D Passable
F Failure
I Incomplete
M Military Leave of Absence
S Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory
W Withdrawal
X Audit

The final course grade is determined through diverse evaluation examinations.

The following system of grades is used in measuring the quality of student achievement:

+/- Grading System

In assigning grades, faculty have the option of using A-, B+, B-, C+, C-, or D+. Those faculty who do not want to assign +/- grades are not obligated to do so.

Incomplete

The I grade is a provisional grade given by an instructor to a student who has otherwise maintained throughout the semester a passing grade in the course, but who has failed to take the semester exam­ination or complete the final project for reasons beyond his or her control. All I grades that have not been removed within three weeks of the last regular examination of the semester become Fs. When it is physically impossible for the student to remove this grade with­in the time limit, he or she must obtain a written extension of time from the Assistant Dean of his or her school.

Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory

Students may take up to two free electives under a pass/fail option. Students may request the pass/fail option in their Dean’s office within three weeks of the first day of the semester. The grade for a pass/fail course will be recorded as S or U. Such a grade will not affect the cumulative index, but semester hours graded S will be counted toward the total required for graduation. The purpose of this option is to encourage choice of challenging electives, including those outside the student’s major field.

Withdrawal

The W grade is assigned when a student officially withdraws from a course prior to its completion. The request for withdrawal from a course is filed by the student through his or her Dean’s office. The request must be filed on or before the “Last day to withdrawal from a class,” as published in the Academic Calendar. 

Audit

The X grade is assigned for courses audited. After obtaining permis­sion from the course instructor and the Assistant Dean, a student wishing to audit a course may sign up in the appropriate Dean’s Office before the first day of class.

Courses Repeat

If a student repeats a course, only the higher grade is counted toward graduation requirements and in the calculation of the GPA. A student who wishes to repeat a course should consult with his or her academic adviser prior to registering for the course.

Grade Change

Any change of final grade for a completed course must have the approval of the instructor’s Dean. No grade will be changed after the baccalaureate degree is awarded.

Appeal of Final Grades

If a student believes that his or her final grade was based on an arbi­trary or capricious action or some other inappropriate criteria not linked to academic performance the student must follow the proce­dures fully described in the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities.

The Grade Appeal Process is initiated by the student. This proce­dure applies only to assignment of the final course grade. There is a strong presumption that the faculty member’s course grade is based solely on academic performance and is authoritative. Thus, the bur­den of proof to support the alleged unjust grade remains at all times with the student initiating the process. Overturning a final course grade requires substantiating that the alleged unjust final grade was based on an arbitrary or capricious action or some other inappropri­ate criteria not linked to academic performance.

Scholarship Index

A scholarship index system is used at La Salle to determine a stu­dent’s average grade. In determining the index, each letter grade is ascribed a numerical value, called grade points.

A = 4 grade points
A- = 3.67 grade points
B+ = 3.33 grade points
B = 3.00 grade points
B- = 2.67 grade points
C+ = 2.33 grade points
C = 2.00 grade points
C- = 1.67 grade points
D+ = 1.33 grade points
D = 1.00 grade point
DR = 0.00 grade points
F = 0.00 grade points
FR = 0.00 grade points

A grade point score is calculated for each course by multiplying the numerical equivalent of the letter grade by the number of semes­ter hours. The index, or the average grade of all courses, is found by dividing the sum of the grade point scores for all courses by the total number of semester hours of course work attempted.

Examinations

The last week of each semester is set apart for final examinations. Examinations to measure student progress are usually given at mid-term. Students who, for satisfactory reasons, fail to take a semester examination as scheduled may take a delayed examination with per­mission.

Academic Progress

A full-time student is making adequate progress toward the degree if he or she has:

  1. completed within the academic year (fall, spring, and summer) 18 hours of new course work at satisfactory academic levels as indicated:
    1. completed freshman status 1.50 or above*
    2. completed sophomore status 1.75 or above*
    3. completed junior status 2.00 or above*
    4. within the senior year 2.00 or above*

*See “Class Level” for definition of status.

  1. completed graduation requirements within a maximum of seven years of full-time study. For justifiable reason, exceptions may be determined by the Dean.

Note that guidelines for academic progress for financial aid are defined in the section entitled “Satisfactory Standards of Academic Progress for All Financial Aid.”

Class Level

A full-time student carries a minimum of 12 semester credit hours; and a maximum of 18 credits. A student’s program may require more hours per week in some areas of instruction.

Class level is determined by the number of credit hours earned by the student. Students having completed zero to 23 credit hours are considered freshmen; those who have earned 24 to 53 credits are sophomores; those having earned 54 to 83 hours are juniors; and those with 84 credit hours or more earned are classified as seniors.

Part-time students carry a roster of less than 12 hours per week. Stu­dents in this category will require more than the typical four years to earn a degree.

Students who do not fulfill certain admission requirements may be admitted to follow particular courses and are considered as non-de­gree students. They do not register for a degree-granting program. Credits earned by a non-degree student may be counted toward a degree as soon as he or she has met all the requirements for admis­sion and candidacy for a degree provided that the credits thus earned are applicable to the program of study. A non-degree student cannot hold a scholarship or take part in extracurricular activities.

Deans’ Honor List

Traditional/Day Students

The Dean’s Honor List is published at the end of each fall and spring semester. Students who complete at least 12 cred­its of La Salle University courses with letter grades of A, B, C, or D and earn a semester grade point average of 3.5 and above are placed on the Dean’s Honor List.

Dean’s Honor List students are eligible for courses in the Universi­ty’s Honors Program.

Non-Traditional/Evening Students

The Dean’s Honor List is published at the end of each fall and spring semester. Students enrolled in degree programs who complete at least 3 credits of La Salle University course work and earn a semester grade point average of 3.5 and above are placed on the Dean’s Honor List. An academic convocation is held in the fall.

Academic Censure

Academic censure may assume one of two forms, probation or sus­pension, depending on the student’s academic standing. During the evaluation of student records at the end of each semester, a student will normally be subject to the form of academic censure indicated if the cumulative grade point average (GPA) falls below the levels out­lined below.

NOTE: For purposes of censure, the sum of the number of cred­its transferred from another institution and the number of cred­its attempted at La Salle are used to determine the student’s year. Students having 0 to 23 credits are considered to be in their freshman year; those having 24 to 53 credits are considered to be in their soph­omore year; those having 54 to 83 credits are considered to be in their junior year; those having more than 83 credits are considered to be in their senior year.

  1. Probation

    A student is placed on probation when he or she has attained a cumulative grade point average of (a) less than 1.75 after any term in the freshman year, (b) less that 1.9 after any term in the sophomore year, (c) less than 2.0 after any term in the junior or senior year.

    Note: Undergraduate non-traditional/evening students must also limit their course load to two courses (six credits) in a given semester.

  2. Suspension

    A student is placed on suspension when he or she has attained a cumulative GPA for two or more successive semesters of (a) less than 1.75 during the freshman year, (b) less than 1.9 during the sophomore year (c) less than 2.0 during the junior, or senior year.

    During the suspension period, the student (with exceptions noted) may elect one of the following options, assuming adherence to all other University policies:

  3. He or she does not participate in any academic coursework either at La Salle or any other institution for a one-year period.
  4. He or she takes coursework at La Salle as a non-matriculating student to demonstrate sufficient academic progress as deter­mined by the Dean’s Office. At most, two courses may be taken in one semester. This option is not available to international students since their visas require full-time status. This option may be elected only once in a student’s total academic career. On-campus housing is not guaranteed for “non-matriculating” students. Housing decisions are governed by the housing con­tract, which can be found on-line and in the University catalog. Students with questions should contact Administrative Ser­vices within the Division of Student Affairs.
  5. He or she takes courses at another institution. This option is not available to students who have ten or fewer courses remaining, due to the University’s Residency Requirement that states that students must take their last 30 credits at La Salle. This option may be elected only once in a student’s total aca­demic career and it can take the form of one of the following two time frames.

Time frame #1

For consideration of early return (less than one year), a student must take four courses and a minimum of 12 credits in one semester with the following caveats:

  • No grade in any course can be lower than a C.
  • Course failures at La Salle can be repeated only at La Salle University.
  • Course selection must be pre-approved by the appropriate La Salle Dean’s Office.
  • The GPA for the work undertaken at another institution must be greater than or equal to a 2.5.

Time frame #2

During the year of suspension, a student can take a maximum of four courses at another institution. The courses must meet the following conditions:

  • No grade in any course can be lower than a C.
  • Course failures at La Salle can be repeated only at La Salle.
  • Course selection must be pre-approved by the appropriate La Salle Dean’s Office.

Change in Division

Active Students

Students who have earned fewer than 90 credits and are in good aca­demic standing may change from Traditional/Day to Non-Traditional/Evening status, and vice versa. Students who have more than 90 credits are not permitted to transfer divisions.

The conditions for transfer differ, depending on the originating pro­gram:

  • A student who wishes to transfer from the Non-Traditional/Evening to a Traditional/Day Program should have earned at least 15 credits at La Salle. In addition, the student must have a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 (if 15-30 credits have been earned) or 2.25 (if more than 30 credits have been earned).
  • A student who wishes to transfer from Traditional/Day to Non-Traditional/Evening Program must be transferring to a degree program offered in the evening.

Students wishing to change their division status should see the Assistant Dean of their respective school.

Returning Students

See below.

Leaves of Absence

Non-Academic Leave of Absence Policy

  1. Purpose/Policy Statement
    1. A Leave of Absence (LOA) is a process that allows a student to temporarily leave the University, with the intention of returning. Students approved for an LOA retain their matriculated status at La Salle, and upon return, can complete all curriculum and program requirements that were in place at the time of the LOA. Academic suspension or disciplinary suspensions override an LOA.
  2. Definitions
    1. Immediate Non-Academic Leave of Absence:
      An Immediate Non-Academic LOA is reserved for students who experience a personal, medical or other significant situation that requires an immediate, unplanned leave. Requests for an Immediate LOA can be made anytime between the first day of classes during the semester and the last day of classes. Upon approval of the LOA the Registrar’s Office will withdraw the student from any enrolled courses. If the LOA happens prior to the drop/add deadline for the semester, there will be no withdrawal indicated on the transcript.
    2. Involuntary Leave of Absence:
      In situations where a student is unable or unwilling to carry out substantial self-care obligations, where current medical knowledge and/or the best available objective evidence indicates that a student poses a significant risk to the health or safety of others, where a student poses an actual risk to their own safety not based on mere speculation, stereotypes, or generalizations about individuals with disabilities, or where the student cannot otherwise fulfill the eligibility requirements related to safety that are imposed on all students at La Salle, and the student does not want to pursue an Immediate LOA, the Vice President for Student Affairs has the authority to place the student on an Involuntary LOA. Before placing any student with a disability on an Involuntary LOA, La Salle will do an individualized assessment to determine if there are reasonable accommodations that would permit the student to continue to participate in La Salle’s campus community without taking a leave of absence. Such decision may be appealed in writing to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
  3. Policy Procedure/Substance
    1. Immediate Leave of Absence
      1. A student who is pursuing an Immediate Non-Academic LOA must meet with the Assistant Vice President for Wellness to complete the Request for Voluntary Non-Academic Leave of Absence During the meeting with the Assistant Vice President for Wellness, an LOA Success Plan will be created, with a focus on what the student will do during the time of the LOA and how best to reenter the university at the conclusion of the LOA.
      2. After completing the Request for Voluntary Non-Academic Leave of Absence form and LOA Success Plan, the information will be sent to the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee, who will, with input and collaboration from the university’s Students of Concern committee, determine whether to grant the Immediate Non-Academic LOA. Notice of the decision will then be provided to the student by the Vice President for Student Affairs.
    2. Involuntary Leave of Absence
      1. Before imposing an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA, the Vice President of Student Affairs or designee will ask the student to pursue an Immediate Non-Academic LOA. If the student refuses to pursue the Immediate LOA, or in the event that the student is incapable of responding on his or her own behalf, or if the student elects not to respond to inquiries or directives, the Vice President for Student Affairs has the right to place the student on an Involuntary LOA.
      2. In such a situation, the Vice President for Student Affairs, or designee, would:
        1. Review all documentation and incident reports regarding the student’s behavior, including any relevant medical documentation if available.
        2. Consult with the Students of Concern committee if appropriate.
        3. Seek the cooperation and involvement of parents or guardians of the student, if appropriate and feasible.
        4. Utilize the information gathered to make an individualized assessment regarding the student’s behavior and whether an Involuntary LOA is necessary to address the health and safety concerns or ensure the proper functioning of university programs and services.
      3. If the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee determines that an Involuntary Non- Academic LOA is appropriate, the student will be informed in writing of the decision. The Letter of Notification will include all relevant terms and conditions of the Involuntary LOA as well as terms and conditions for re-enrollment at the end of the Involuntary LOA.
      4. An Involuntary Non-Academic LOA will be noted on a student’s transcript in the same manner as an Immediate LOA.
      5. The student placed on an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA will be subject to the rules regarding financial aid and financial obligations (room, board, tuition, etc.) that apply based upon La Salle’s Refund Policy.
    3. For Immediate and Involuntary Non-Academic LOA’s
      1. During an LOA, a student cannot attend classes, must vacate university housing and are not involved in programmatic or other university activities. La Salle’s Refund Policy will be followed regarding tuition, fees, room and board or any other student financial aid.
      2. A student on an LOA cannot return to the university during the same semester that the LOA was approved and enacted.
      3. If approved for an LOA, the leave cannot exceed three consecutive semesters of non-enrollment. After the three consecutive semesters of non-enrollment, any student who has not returned to the university will be withdrawn.
    4. Returning from an Immediate Non-Academic LOA
      1. When a student is ready to pursue a return to the university, the student must complete a Return from Non-Academic Leave of Absence Form and submit it to the chairperson(s) for the Students of Concern committee for review and approval.
      2. The student must provide any documentation requested that was included as a component of the LOA Success Plan.
      3. If approved for a return to the university, the student will need to contact the appropriate Assistant Dean regarding possible course options to enroll into for the upcoming semester.
      4. If the student is not approved for a return to the university, the student will receive a letter indicating why the return was denied, and what is required for reconsideration. The student then may appeal the decision by submitting an appeal letter to the Vice President for Student Affairs within 10 business days of receiving notice of the decision. The following are the only grounds for appeal:
        1. The decision of the Students of Concern committee was arbitrary or capricious, or
        2. New or additional information is available that was not available at the time the request to return was considered and could reasonably be expected to have altered the decision. The student may also submit any information he or she believes to be relevant to the appeal.
      5. The Vice President of Student Affairs will make a final decision on the student’s request to return. The Vice President’s decision is not appealable.
    5. Returning from an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA
      1. When a student is ready to pursue a return to the university after an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA, the student must reach out to the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness and provide documentation that satisfies the requirements for return listed in the Involuntary LOA letter.
      2. The Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness will convene the Students of Concern committee to review the materials presented and determine whether the student has demonstrated that it is appropriate for the student to return to the University community.
      3. The decision will be communicated to the student in writing. As needed, the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness will notify the appropriate offices and administrators regarding the decision, and any relevant conditions necessary for the student’s successful return.
      4. The student, as they prepare to return to the university, will work with the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness on a success plan to assist the student returning to the university with the support necessary to resume campus life.
      5. If it is determined that the student is not ready to return to the university, the student may appeal the decision to the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee. The student then may appeal the decision by submitting an appeal letter to the Vice President for Student Affairs within 10 business days of receiving notice of the decision. The following are the only grounds for appeal:
        1. The decision of the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness was arbitrary or capricious, or
        2. New or additional information is available that was not available at the time the request to return was considered and could reasonably be expected to have altered the decision. The student may also submit any information he or she believes to be relevant to the appeal.
      6. The Vice President for Student Affairs will review the student’s appeal and all necessary additional information and will then render a decision, which shall be final. The outcome of this appeal will be communicated to the student in writing.

Withdrawal from Course(S)

It is the student’s responsibility to notify the University in the event that he or she needs to withdraw from a course(s).

Students who choose to withdraw from a course(s) prior to its completion must:

  1. Complete a Course Withdrawal form in their Dean’s office on or before the “Last day for withdrawal from classes,” published in the Academic Calendar. After this date, grades will be assigned that reflect the result of the student’s course attendance and performance.
  2. Receive approval from their Assistant Dean.
  3. Contact the offices of Financial Aid and Student Accounts Receivable to determine whether an outstanding balance is due, to inquire about the financial implications of withdrawal, and to make arrangements to meet financial obligations.

Addi­tionally:

  • International students should contact one of the Inter­national Education Associates in the Multicultural and Interna­tional Center
  • Athletes withdrawing below 12 credits should consult with the Director of Academic Support for Ath­letes.
  • Students receiving Veteran’s benefits should consult their Veteran’s Ben­efits Certifying Official to understand how this change in their enrollment status may affect their future aid.

Please be advised that the date of filing the withdrawal notice is considered as the date of withdrawal from the class(es).

Ceasing to attend a class does not constitute a withdrawal; stu­dents must officially withdraw by completing the Course Withdrawal form in their Dean’s office. Ceasing to attend without officially with­drawing will result in the student receiving a grade for the course, possibly a failing grade. A “W” designation will only be assigned upon official withdrawal from a course.

Withdrawal from the University

It is the student’s responsibility to notify the University in the event that he or she needs to withdraw from the University.

Students who choose to withdraw from the University must:

  1. Complete the Withdrawal from the University form and Non-Returning Student Questionnaire in their Dean’s office. Students must withdraw on or before the “Last day for with­drawal from classes,” published in the Academic Calendar. After this date, grades will be assigned that reflect the result of entire semester’s attendance and performance in each course.
  2. Meet with an Assistant Dean in their Dean’s Office. Athletes must first meet with the Director of Academic Support for Ath­letes.
  3. Contact the offices of Financial Aid and Student Accounts Receivable to determine whether an outstanding balance is due, to inquire about the financial implications of withdrawal, and to make arrangements to meet financial obligations.
  4. Contact the Housing Services Coordinator and Food Services, if living on campus or having a meal plan.

Addi­tionally:

  • International students should contact one of the Inter­national Education Associates at the Multicultural and Interna­tional Center
  • Students receiving Veteran’s benefits should consult their Veteran’s Ben­efits Certifying Official to understand how this change in their enrollment status may affect their future aid.

Please be advised that the date of filing the Withdrawal from the University form is considered as the date of withdrawal from the class (es) and the University.

Ceasing to attend classes does not constitute a withdrawal from the University; students must officially withdraw by filling out the Withdrawal from the University form in their Dean’s office. Ceasing to attend without officially withdrawing will result in the student receiving grades for all coursework, possibly failing grades. A “W” designation will only be assigned to coursework upon official withdrawal from the University.

Returning Students

Students who have previously attended La Salle and wish to return to continue their studies should contact the Dean’s Office of the major they last pursued.

Change in Division Returning Students

La Salle undergraduate day students with 90 or more credits who have been inactive for four or more years are permitted to return to the University as a Non-Traditional/Evening student to complete requirements for their degree. A student will be able to complete his/her degree providing the major is an active evening major at the time the student is reactivated. If the student’s major from his/her prior experience at La Salle is not an active evening program the student will need to switch majors to an active evening major. If the student does not wish to switch majors, he/she must remain a day student to complete degree requirements.

The University reserves the right to require students to repeat coursework where content has become outdated due to the amount of elapsed time between taking the course and seeking credit for a degree.

Grade Renewal

La Salle University students who have not enrolled in credit cours­es at any college or university for a period of five years, who return to any of the University’s undergraduate degree programs, and who have successfully completed 12 consecutive credit hours with a grade of C or better in each course may request in writing from the Dean of their school a “transcript renewal.” Should the request be granted, the student will have the option of having all Fs renewed or all Fs and all Ds renewed. Any course granted renewal, for which a grade of F was earned, will receive a grade of “FR” and receive no credit for the course. Any course granted renewal, for which a grade of D was earned, will receive a grade of “DR” and receive no credit for the course. Renewal of D’s will result in loss of credits and loss of respective requirements. Grades of renewed courses will remain and be noted on the transcript, and cumulative grade point average will be adjusted. This request may be made only once by a given student.

Alternative Paths Toward College Credit

Dual Enrollment Credit

Transferring Dual Enrollment Credit (A 2 year Pilot Program Beginning in Fall 2017):

Students who took courses in high school through a dual enrollment program (classes taught on high school campus and taken with other high school students through a participating college), must submit the following in order for their credits to be reviewed:

  1. Official College transcripts
  2. Validation of Credit Transfer Request Form which is to be completed and mailed by the Registrar at their transferring institution.  This form can be found online, as well as in the official acceptance packet.
  3. Course syllabus for each course taken

La Salle University reserves the right to deny transfer credit for coursework that does not have an appropriate equivalent or satisfy La Salle’s curriculum. 

Transferring Dual Enrollment Credit

Courses may be transferred subject to department, school, or col­lege restrictions. Credit is transferred only for grades of “C” or bet­ter; however, the letter grade is not included in the computation of a students’ academic index at La Salle. A total of 70 credits is the maximum number which can be initially or ultimately transferred to La Salle from other institutions.

La Salle University considers two types of transfer credits for high school students who have participated in college programs:

  1. Transfer Credit:
    When courses to be transferred have been taught on the college campus or as an on-line course, are open to enrollment by and graded in direct competition with regularly matriculated students attending that college, and are part of the normal curriculum published in a college’s catalog.
  2. Dual Enrollment Credit (2 year Pilot Program began fall 2017):
    When courses to be transferred have been taught on high school campuses, and taken with other high school students, as part of the normal curriculum published in a college’s catalog. Students who wish to be considered for this 2 year Pilot Program, which began fall 2017, must submit the following in order for their credits to be reviewed:

    1. Official College transcripts
    2. Validation of Credit Transfer Request Form which is to be completed and mailed by the Registrar at their transferring institution. This form can be found online, as well as in the official acceptance packet.
    3. Course syllabus for each course taken

La Salle University reserves the right to deny transfer credit for coursework that does not have an appropriate equivalent or satisfy La Salle’s curriculum.

Credit for Courses Taken at Other Institutions

La Salle students may be approved to take courses at other institu­tions, subject to department or school restrictions.

Please note:

  • Prior to having 60 credits on their La Salle transcript, students are permitted to take courses at a two as well as a four-year school that bring their credit total to 60 credits.
  • After attaining 60 credits on their La Salle transcript, students are permitted to take a maximum 12 transfer credits but only at a four-year school.
  • Major courses may not be taken at other institutions.
  • Credit is transferred only for grades of “C” (2.0) or better; however, the letter grade is not included in the computation of a student’s academic index at La Salle.
  • Courses taken at La Salle for which a student received a grade may not be repeated elsewhere; however, a course from which a student withdrew and thus received a “W” grade may be repeated elsewhere.
  • Students must obtain written permission from the Dean’s Office of the student’s respective School, two weeks prior to the start of the semester.
  • Permission for credit for study abroad programs, other than those sponsored by La Salle University must be obtained in advance from the Dean’s Office of the student’s School.
  • It is the responsibility of the student to have an official transcript of credit for approved off-campus courses sent to the Dean’s office for inclusion in the student’s record.
  • The Transfer Credit requirement and Residency requirement are repeated here from other sections of this catalog because of their impact on courses taken at other institutions.

Transfer Credit Requirement

A total of 70 credits is the maximum number which can be initially or ultimately transferred to La Salle from other institutions.

Residency Requirement

Students are required to take their last 30 credits at La Salle.

American Council on Education (ACE) Approved Courses

Students who have successfully completed educational programs and seminars approved by the American Council on Education’s Program on Non-collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI) may be eligible to receive credit. This credit is not assigned a letter grade, nor is it computed in determining the student’s cumulative academic index. A written request with documentation of course completion should be forwarded to the Dean’s Office for evaluation. 

Courses at Chestnut Hill College

The cooperation of La Salle with Chestnut Hill College, a Catholic college situated about five miles from La Salle, results in a valuable coordination of programs. Students from either of the associated colleges can register for courses at the other college, with full credits and without payment of extra tuition. Students wishing to register for courses offered at Chestnut Hill should contact the Office of the University Registrar at 215.951.1020.

Examinations For Credit

Advanced Placement (AP) Exams

La Salle University participates in, and looks very favorably on, the Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. As such, the University will give college credit to students who perform satisfactorily on the AP examination. Ultimately, the decision to bestow credit for performance in AP courses/examinations lies with the academic dean and the department head of the test subject.

Students should submit their scores along with all required application materials to: La Salle University, Undergraduate Admission, 1900 W Olney Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19141.

Cambridge International Examination

Cambridge International Examinations, A Level, may be considered for college credit subject to the course(s) taken and scores earned. Examination transcripts may be submitted to: La Salle University, Undergraduate Admission, 1900 W Olney Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19141.

CLEP Examinations 

Undergraduate students may receive credit for approved courses taught in the La Salle University curriculum through participation in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board. Students who wish to attempt credit through examination must receive permission from the Assistant Dean of their major/program to determine which examinations are acceptable, the signature of approval must be executed on the CLEP Application form.

While the academic Assistant Dean determines the credits to be granted for CLEP, the individual department designates the subject examinations, which are applicable to specific courses at La Salle University. There are CLEP Examination restrictions and passing score requirements outlined on the CLEP website.

All CLEP exams must be taken by July 15 (summer semester), Nov. 15 (fall semester), or April 15 (spring semester) in order for those credits to be included in that particular semester. If these deadlines are not met, graduation will be postponed to the next conferral date.

All CLEP Examination instructions can be found on the Evening and Weekend Programs website at lasalle.edu/evening-and-weekend.

End-Of-Course Examination

Students who believe that their experience and study have trained them sufficiently to bypass a given La Salle University course may challenge that course through an end-of-course examination. End-of-course-examinations are offered at the discretion of individual departments in the School of Arts and Sciences. End-of-course examinations are not offered for courses in the School of Business. End-of-course examinations are restricted in the School of Nursing and Health Sciences; students should contact their adviser directly. A written request should be submitted to the Department Chair, who will then request the approval of the Dean. There is a $30 charge for each examination. Students who successfully complete the examination will receive credits for the course challenged, which will be posted on their La Salle transcripts upon receipt by the Office of Student and Accounts Receivable of a $25 per credit administrative fee. This credit is not assigned a letter grade, nor is it computed in determining the student’s cumulative academic index.

International Baccalaureate Examination

International Baccalaureate Examinations may be considered for college credit subject to the course(s) taken and scores earned. Examination transcripts may be submitted to: La Salle University, Undergraduate Admission, 1900 W Olney Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19141.

Graduate Courses

Undergraduate students with senior standing may take up to six graduate credits during their undergraduate career at La Salle University. Permission of both the undergraduate chairperson and the graduate director are required. Students should consult their school’s section in the Catalog for specific policies on undergraduate students taking graduate courses.

Online Learning

Each term, Fall, Spring, and Summer, students have the opportunity to take online courses. Course subjects vary and may be offered each semester during a 7, 8, or 15 week session, as well as the 4 week winter Intersession. Online courses offer a way for students to add flexibility to their in-class schedule or take a course from home over the summer. The full list of online courses being offered each semester may be found through the Registrar’s website.

When taking an online course, regardless of the length of the course, the learning outcomes remain constant and your time commitment to the courses will not vary.  A student taking a 15 week online course can expect about three hours of “instruction” and six hours of “out of class work” each week. Students who take an accelerated format (7 or 8 weeks), can anticipate to nearly double the amount of time you spend per week interacting with the course.  Students who are new to online learning may go through an online orientation.  The orientation gives students an introduction to the University, resources and strategies to be successful in online courses, and the digital tools used at La Salle.

Summer and Winter Sessions

A variety of core curriculum, free elective and major courses are offered in both day and evening sessions during the summer and winter sessions. These courses are offered in face-to-face and online formats, during both sessions. Students may use these courses to enrich their academic programs, to lighten their regular schedules, to make up failures, or, in some instances, to accelerate progress toward a degree.

For more information, students should consult with their academic advisor or Dean’s Office representative.