Print Compilation – Undergrad

General Info

Overview and Policies

Who are we?

Mission

La Salle University is a Catholic university in the tradition of the Brothers of the Christian Schools.  To a diverse community of learners, La Salle University offers a rigorous curriculum and co-curricular experiences designed to help students gain theoretical and practical knowledge, deepen their ethical sensibilities, and prepare for a lifetime of continuous learning, professional success, and dedicated service.

As a Catholic university rooted in the liberal arts tradition, La Salle challenges students to contemplate life’s ultimate questions as they develop their faith, engage in a free search for truth, and explore their full human potential.  As a Lasallian university, named for St. John Baptist de La Salle, patron saint of teachers, La Salle promotes excellence in teaching and scholarship, demonstrates respect for each person, nurtures mentoring relationships, and encourages authentic community. As an urban university, La Salle invites students to enhance their academic experience by immersing themselves in the rich resources of Philadelphia and the region.  All members of our community are called to maintain a heightened sensitivity to those marginalized within society as they practice civic engagement, provide leadership with a global perspective, and contribute to the common good.

Read more about our Mission and Core Values

The Lasallian Tradition

Following in the footsteps of founder Saint John Baptist de La Salle, the first De La Salle Christian Brothers first arrived in North America in the early 1800s and established the first permanent Lasallian school in Montreal, Canada, in 1837. In 1842, John McMullin became the first American De La Salle Brother.  He founded Calvert Hall College in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1845, which became the first permanent Lasallian school in the United States.  For more than a century-and-a-half, the Lasallian educational mission has spread throughout the United States and Canada with the establishment of schools, ministries, and services that have adapted to the changing needs of the times over the years as it continues to provide a human and Christian education to the young, especially the poor.

The college that was to become La Salle University was founded in Philadelphia in 1863.  The incorporators were a group of Christian Brothers, priests, and laymen, a cooperative group unusual among boards of American Catholic colleges.  Two of the group were the co-founders of the College, Bishop James Wood, fifth bishop of Philadelphia, and Brother Teliow, a German immigrant who had joined the Brothers in America.  Brother Teliow was at the time principal of the Brothers’ Academy in St. Michael’s parish (at 2nd and Jefferson Streets).  Four years after its foundation at St. Michael’s, the college moved to Filbert Street, opposite what was to become Philadelphia’s new City Hall. Here the small collegiate department developed for some twenty years in tandem with the high school department; the borders between the two, in fact, were at times indistinct.  Because crowding continued during the 1870’s, the trustees sought more commodious space “uptown” at 1240 North Broad Street.  The College was finally moved there in July, 1886, where it would remain until 1929.

After the end of World War I, the College looked forward to further expansion in the ’20’s.  For this purpose, the trustees purchased a part of the historic Belfield Farm, home from 1810 to 1821 of the American painter and Renaissance man, Charles Willson Peale.  No sooner was work on the new buildings completed, however, than the country plunged into its worst depression.  Only belt-tight economy and persistence by Presidents Alfred and Anselm and help from other Brothers’ schools got the College through its mortgage crisis and World War II, when enrollment dropped from 400 to 80 students.  But a new dawn came soon thereafter.

In 1946, La Salle College was faced with a wave of returning war veterans and began a period of expansion which has continued to the present.  New buildings mushroomed and an increasingly lay faculty kept pace with a student body that soon numbered thousands.  Since then the University (as of 1984) has expanded physically through acquisition of adjacent properties (basically reuniting Peale’s “Belfield”), constructing (and in some cases renovating) various campus buildings, and expanding the number of academic programs on both the Undergraduate and Graduate levels, including three doctoral degrees.

La Salle describes itself today as an urban comprehensive university, and it is clear that it has achieved important success over the last century and a half, combining the old and the new of American higher learning with the enduring values of Catholic tradition.

The Campus

Learning occurs both in and out of the classroom. As a La Salle student, you’ll find yourself in the fifth-largest city in the U.S., a city of neighborhoods rich with unique historical, educational, social, and cultural opportunities. Classes are regularly complemented by city-based activities and the University enjoys fruitful partnerships with a variety of organizations in and around the city that provide excellent experiential opportunities for students. North, south, east and west — this city has it all. 

View Campus Map and Directions

Main Campus: the heart of the University, numerous buildings are located here, containing various administrative offices, classrooms, and laboratories.  The Connelly Library is also located here, as well as nearby residence halls.

West Campus: is home to the School of Business (in Founders’ Hall) and the School of Nursing and Health Sciences (in Benilde Tower).  Offices for University Advancement are also located in Benilde.

South Campus: the Department of Communication is located here, as are several residence halls and the “Tree Tops” dining room, located adjacent to the St. Basil’ residence hall(s?).

Satellite Campuses: La Salle University maintains three separate locations away from the main campus:

Nationally Recognized

La Salle University has consistently been recognized for excellence and value. Recently, the University achieved the following citations:

Also, notably, in a study issued by The New York Times, La Salle graduates were in the top six percent for median income by age 34 ($58,700).  And, according to a new data study from U.S. News and World Report, the School of Business’s MBA program has the fourth highest employment rate in the nation; it was named to The Princeton Review’s Best 294 Business Schools 2017; and its Part-Time Hybrid MBA was included in U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 edition of “Best Graduate Schools.”

Read more information about La Salle’s ranking

Accreditations and Memberships – The Mark of Excellence

La Salle University was chartered in 1863 by the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and is empowered by that authority to grant academic degrees.

LaSalle is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE), 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 267.284.5000.  The Commission on Higher Education is recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education to conduct accreditation and pre-accreditation (Candidacy status) activities for institutions of higher education in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, including distance education and correspondence education programs offered at those institutions.  MSCHE is also recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) to accredit degree-granting institutions which offer one or more post-secondary educational programs of at least one academic year in length in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and other geographic areas in which the Commission conducts accrediting activities.

La Salle is also accredited by:

AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business)
777 South Harbor Island Blvd., Suite 750
Tampa, FL 33602-5730
813.769.6500

Pennsylvania Department of Education
333 Market St., 12th Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17126
717.787.5041

Regents of the University of the State of New York
Albany, NY 12234
518.474.5844
American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education

One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 610,
Washington, D.C. 20036
202.293.2450

American Chemical Society
1155 16th Street, NW,
Washington, D.C. 20036
202.872.4589

American Psychological Association
750 First Street, NE,
Washington, D.C. 20002-4242
800.374.2721

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)
One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530,
Washington, D.C. 20036
202.887.6791

Council on Social Work Education
1600 Duke St.,
Alexandria, VA 22314
703.683.8080

The Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology at La Salle University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

The Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of The American Dietetic Association, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312.899.0040 (La Salle University’s Didactic Program in Nutrition is currently granted approval and the Coordinated Program in Dietetics is currently granted developmental accreditation.)

The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs accredited the Frank J. Tornetta School of Anesthesia at Montgomery Hospital/LaSalle University Nurse Anesthesia Program.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Education’s Bureau of Teacher Preparation and Certification approved the School Nurse Certificate and the Certificate for Speech and Language Disabilities.

The Marriage and Family Therapy Master’s program at LaSalle University is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE) of the Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), 112 S. Alfred Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, (703) 838-9808.

By affirming that a program is meeting or exceeding established benchmarks of excellence and quality, accreditation is one of the most sought-after and highly-regarded achievement a program can earn. The BSN, MSN, DNP, and APRN Post-master’s Certificate programs at La Salle University are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, 202-887-6791.

Member of: Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences, American Council on Education, Association of American Colleges and Universities, National Collegiate Honors Council, College Entrance Examination Board, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Association of College Admissions Counselors, National Catholic Educational Association, College and University Council of Pennsylvania, Association of Liberal Arts Colleges of Pennsylvania for the Advancement of Teaching, Pennsylvania Catholic Education Association, American Library Association, Urban Studies Association, National Commission on Accrediting, American Catholic Historical Society, Educational Conference of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, National Association for Foreign Student Affairs, National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Association of College and University Housing Officers, and National Association of College and University Business Officers.

Policies, Rights, Responsibilities

Nondiscrimination Policy

La Salle University is a diverse community dedicated in the tradition of the Christian Brothers, and is concerned for both ultimate values and for the individual values of its faculty, employees, and students. Accordingly, in support of this values-driven mission, the University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment or any student or appli­cant for admission based upon race, color, religion, sex, age (40 years and older), disability, national origin or ancestry, citizenship, sexual preference or orientation, marital, parental, family, and pregnancy status, gender identity, military or veteran status, genetic informa­tion, or any prohibited basis, unless there is a bona fide occupation­al qualification which justifies a differentiation. This commitment applies to all aspects of the employment relationship, including hir­ing, promotion, compensation, discipline, discharge, and any term or condition of employment and extends to participation in all edu­cational programs and activities of La Salle University. Employment is based upon an applicant’s ability to meet the established require­ments for employment. All employment and admissions decisions will be made in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local antidiscrimination laws.

In addition, La Salle University will make reasonable accommoda­tion for qualified individuals with disabilities that are known to the University. The University will also make reasonable accommoda­tions to the religious beliefs and practices of which it is aware. The University, however, need not make any accommodation that would cause it an undue hardship.

Further, La Salle University firmly believes in providing a learning environment that is free from all forms of harassment and will not tolerate any form of impermissible harassment. Such harassment disregards individual values and impedes the Lasallian mission of providing an educational community that fosters both intellectual and spiritual development. Included in this prohibition are sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, and sexual violence, racial harass­ment, national origin harassment, and harassment based upon ancestry, color, religion, age, disability, citizenship, marital status, gender identity, military or veteran status, sexual preference or ori­entation, genetic information, or any basis prohibited under appli­cable non-discrimination laws.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): Rights And Privacy Act Provisions

Each year, La Salle University informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 . This act was intended to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to pro­vide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal or formal hearings.

To fulfill basic requirements for compliance with the act, each insti­tution must inform each student of his or her right to prevent dis­closure of personally identifiable information. Although La Salle does not publish a public directory, the Office of the Registrar, at its discretion, does disclose the following information: name, address, dates of attendance, class, major field of study, degree(s) conferred (including dates), and e-mail address.

Under the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Priva­cy Act, currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of such information. To prevent disclosure, written notification must be received by the Office of the Registrar by October 1 in the fall semester and February 15 in the spring semester. The University will honor each request to withhold any of the categories of infor­mation listed above but cannot assume responsibility to contact a student for subsequent permission to release them. Decisions about withholding any information should be made very carefully. Should a student decide to inform the institution not to release any infor­mation, any future requests for such information from non-institu­tional persons or organizations will be refused.

La Salle University assumes that failure to request the withholding of “directory information” indicates approval for disclosure.

Jeanne Clery Act and The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Act 73/College and University Security Information Act

To comply fully with the provisions of the Jeanne Clery Act and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Act 73, the College and University Security Information Act of 1988, La Salle University has available its Crime Statistics Report for the most recent three years, as well as a publication entitled “Safety and Security at La Salle University.” Copies of either document may be requested without charge in writ­ing from the Office of Safety and Security, La Salle University, Phil­adelphia, PA 19141 or can be accessed at on the Office of Safety and Security website.

Federal Consumer Information Regulations

To comply with Federal Consumer Information Regulations, La Salle University provides specific consumer information about the school to prospective and currently enrolled students and, in some cases, employees. Please visit the Student Consumer Information website for more information.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

A student’s matriculation at La Salle University is a voluntary decision that involves acceptance of the responsibility to perform academically and to behave socially in ways consistent with the goals and objectives of the University. When registering at La Salle, students accept University rules and regulations and the authority of the University to exercise disciplinary powers, including suspension and dismissal. The Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities is available on the University’s web site. All students are expected to follow the policies contained in the guide.

Administration

Board of Trustees

The membership of the Board changes annually.

Stephen T. Zarrilli, Chair
Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D., President
Reginald M. Browne
Frank G. Byrne, F.S.C.
Diego F. Calderin
Jack Curran, F.S.C.
Hannah C. Datz
Stephen K. Degnan
Peter M. DiBattiste, M.D.
James T. Durkin
Edward J. Fierko
Philip W. J. Fisher
Daniel K. Fitzpatrick
AmyLynn V. Flood, CPA
James F. Gaffney, F.S.C.
John S. Grady Jr.
John R. Greed
Elmer F. Hansen III
Brian Henderson, F.S.C.
John Kane, F.S.C.
Margaret A. Kane
Mark A. Lafond
Dennis Lee, F.S.C.
Thomas A. Leonard
Jerome S. Lezynski II
Robert W. Liptak
JoAnn Magnatta
Denise D’Antonio Malecki
Bernadette M. Mangan
William W. Matthews III, Esq.
Ralph J. Mauro, Esq.
James V. Morris
Anthony J. Nocella
Kevin F. O’Donnell
Frank C. Palopoli
Daniel S. Robins, Ph.D.
William R. Sasso, Esq.
John T. Shannon Jr.
Gregory J. Webster
Joseph A. Gallagher, Emeritus
G. Dennis O’Brien, Ph.D., Emeritus

Officers of The Corporation

Stephen T. Zarrilli, Chair
Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D., President
Edward J. Fierko, Vice Chair
William W. Matthews III, Esq., Vice Chair
Edward J. Sheehy, F.S.C., Ph.D., Vice President
Stephanie Pricken, Treasurer and Financial Adviser
Kevin E. Dolan, Esq., Secretary

President

Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D.

President’s Cabinet

Vice President and General Counsel
Kevin E. Dolan, Esq.

Chief of Staff and Executive Director of Government Affairs and Community Affairs
Joseph Meade

Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation
William Bradshaw

Vice President, Office of Mission
Ernest Miller, F.S.C.

Provost and Vice  President of Academic Affairs
Brian Goldstein, PhD

Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs
Dawn Soufleris, PhD

Vice President of Advancement
Kathleen Pasons-Nicolic

Vice President, Enrollment Services
TBD

University Offices and Services

View the complete listing of University Offices and Services online.

Academic Calendar

The Academic Calendar for the next year is usually published in the preceding Fall semester.  It is accompanied by a less-detailed schema for the next five years.

Student Resources

La Salle prides itself on putting students first and developing community among all of its members. Some of the most important experiences students have take place outside of the classroom during unplanned hours in a variety of locales. There are resources that directly support classroom learning and groups centered on common interests or lifestyles, academics, Greek life, and sports, as well as service, travel, and internships. If an activity or service you’re seeking doesn’t exist, let us know and help us create it. After all, part of exploration is invention.

Art Museum

The mission of the La Salle University Art Museum is to further the University’s Lasallian educational objectives by helping students, other members of the University community and the general public to experience significant, original works of art in an intimate setting and to place them in meaningful contexts. In addition to acquiring, preserving and exhibiting its collections, the Museum offers viewers an opportunity to sharpen their aesthetic perception and to investigate the interrelationships which emerge between art and other disciplines. A teaching museum first, the La Salle University Art Museum complements classroom instruction and provides experiential learning opportunities for students

Located in Olney Hall, the La Salle University Art Museum’s core collection focuses on Western art, with a comprehensive selection of European and American art from the Renaissance to the present, featuring examples of most major art movements with a range of subject matter. This core collection includes close to 350 paintings, 65 sculptures, 500 drawings, 3,000 graphic prints, 175 photographs and a few items of furniture and decorative art.  The Art Museum also owns a wide range of special collections of non-Western and ancient art. Selections from works which are not on permanent view often form the basis for temporary exhibitions, sometimes supplemented by loans from other museums. For more information visit the online collections database or contact artmuseum@lasalle.edu.

Center for Academic Achievement

The Center for Academic Achievement, located on the top floor of the Lawrence Building, offers a variety of resources to support the academic success of all students at La Salle. These include content-specific Subject Tutoring for many undergraduate courses, Supplemental Instruction in select math, science, and accounting courses, and Writing Tutoring for all student writing.

Additionally, one-on-one Academic Coaching appointments can help students strengthen important skills such as time management, study strategies, reading strategies, note-taking, test-taking, and organization. The Center offers a variety of workshops on these topics and more. 

Students may make an appointment via GradesFirst in the mylasalle portal, or contact Tutoring Support Services for more information: tutoringsupport@lasalle.edu, (215) 951-1326.

The Center also coordinates the First-Year Advising process and oversees the GradesFirst Early Alert system, which allows faculty to identify at-risk students in their courses and communicate concerns directly with students, advisor(s), and academic support staff. First-year students should contact their freshman advisers and meet early and often with them.

The Academic Achievement Center at Trumark serves as a satellite office and serves as a resource for student athletes.  The Academic Support for Student Athletes office is housed in the Academic Achievement Center at Trumark and is also a part of the Center for Academic Achievement.  The primary goal of this unit is to assist student athletes in their transition to the collegiate environment and to help them better understand the academic and athletic demands they will encounter. Through educational programming, advising, counseling, and other support services, La Salle student athletes are encouraged and supported in their pursuit of personal, academic, career and athletic goals.

View the Center for Academic Achievement website for more detailed information about all of the services and resources offered.

Center for Entrepreneurship

The La Salle Center for Entrepreneurship is leading the culture of innovation at La Salle. Because Entrepreneurship is the backbone of our economy and drives personal, national and global success, students in all majors are welcome to take advantage of an exciting array of programs including:

View the La Salle University Center for Entrepreneurship website for more information or contact Steve Melick at 215.951.1439 or LCE@lasalle.edu

The Connelly Library and Bucks County Resource Center

 The Connelly Library is the academic heart of La Salle University, offering traditional and innovative library services including Information Literacy Instruction, in-person and chat reference support, interlibrary loan and other services, plus warm and inviting individual and group study spaces that are open over 100 hours a week, with extended late night hours around midterms and finals. In addition to an extensive print and electronic book collection, the library collects feature films and documentaries that support the university’s academic and recreational needs. The library also provides access to almost 100 online research databases that support teaching and learning activities in every discipline.

The Special Collections area holds hundreds of rare and illustrated editions of the Holy Bible, archival material related to historic properties on La Salle’s grounds, the largest collection in the world of literary and creative works concerning the Vietnam War, and unique academic collections exploring popular culture, including a collection on Bob Dylan. The University Archives serves as the official repository for University records which possess permanent historical, administrative, legal, cultural, or fiscal value, and document the history of La Salle University.

In addition to the Connelly Library on the Main Campus, students at Bucks County Center can visit the Resource Center to work on assignments or meet with a librarian for research support. Connelly Library books and interlibrary loan materials can also be delivered to the Bucks County Center or the Montgomery County Center for pick up.

Visit the Connelly Library website to access library hours, search the library’s online and print resources, contact a librarian, access 24/7 chat reference or learn more about the Connelly Library.

Canvas

Canvas is a Learning Management System. It provides students with an online space to access course information.

Learn more about Canvas online.

Degree Works

Degree Works is an easy-to-use set of online academic planning tools that help students and advisers see what courses and requirements students need to graduate. The program provides an audit of your unique student record including program, major and catalog year and displays each course you have taken or transferred in and how it applies to your curriculum. It also displays credits earned, grades and GPA.

The program makes it easy to manage and track your degree progress by:

Degree Works should be used along with faculty advising. It is not an academic transcript and not an official notification of degree completion. Students should speak with their academic adviser, department chair, or the Dean’s Office regarding official degree progress.

Degree Works is available through the mylasalle portal under Tools.

For any questions, concerns, or issues regarding Degree Works, please email registrar@lasalle.edu.

Degree Works User Guides:

IT Helpdesk

The La Salle University IT Helpdesk can assist you with technology issues you may encounter. You can reach the Helpdesk by calling 215.951.1860, emailing helpdesk@lasalle.edu, or by clicking on Helpdesk from the Tools menu in the mylasalle portal.

Check out the Technology at La Salle webpage for more information about technology help and support.

Office of the University Registrar

As the central administrative office for student information, the Office of the University Registrar maintains La Salle’s integrity by ensuring the accuracy of official student records and upholding University policy. Student services provided by this office include, but are not limited to, assistance with new freshmen registration and current student registration, updating majors/minors/concentrations, address changes,  name changes, and employee partnership discounts.  Students may request documents, through the Office of the University Registrar, such as academic transcripts, enrollment verification, degree verification, and parental disclosure form.

The Office of the University Registrar is located in the Lawrence Administration Building, room 301. For more information about our services please contact regacct@lasalle.edu, 215- 951-1020 or visit our website.

Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, is the hub for all issues involving student life outside the classroom.  Departments that report within the Division of Student Affairs include:  Residence Life and Community Development, Student Conduct, Campus Life, University Ministry, Support and Services, the Career Center, the Multicultural Center, Student Wellness Services (Student Health Center, Student Counseling Center and the Substance Abuse and Violence Education—SAVE), and La Salle Public Safety.

View the Student Affairs website for more information or stop by Union 123 or call 215.951.1017.

Campus Life

Campus Activities at La Salle oversees more than 100 student organizations and clubs. These include academic clubs, honor societies, liturgical organizations, multicultural organizations, political organizations, performing arts, Greek Life, service organizations, student media organizations, and more! We are also responsible for Explorientation, our five-day orientation program occurring the week prior to F all classes. It consists of both educational sessions and fun social events; the week is designed to welcome new students to La Salle University by helping them prepare for college life both in and out of the classroom.

The Multicultural and International Center, supports students with resources that address their specific needs and raise cultural awareness on campus. The center provides a wide range of academic support and personal development services and events, such as special luncheons, reunions, and employment workshops, for students from diverse backgrounds. We offer advocacy and advisement for U.S. minority students, international students, and students interested in studying abroad.

View the Campus Activities and Explorientation website for more information or stop by Union 34, call 215.951.5044, or e-mail kazmierc@lasalle.edu

For more information about Union and Conference Services or the Information Desk, located in Union 123, call 215.951.1019, or e-mail spotok@lasalle.edu

View the Multicultural and International Center website for more information or stop by 1923 Olney Ave., call 215.951.1948, or e-mail rush@lasalle.edu

Career Center

La Salle’s Career Center offers an array of services, programs, and resources to help you prepare for and achieve your career goals, whether they be graduate school, full-time employment, or long-term volunteer opportunities. Regardless of your major or year, our staff is ready to help you plan for “life after La Salle”. Our program offers career planning, job search preparation, on-campus recruiting services, annual job fairs, resume reviews and assistance with planning for graduate studies.

View the Career Center website for more information or stop by Founders Hall, call 215.951.1682,  or e-mail baileyn@lasalle.edu

Residence Life and Community Development

The Office of Residence Life and Community Development wants you to feel welcome in your home away from home, whether you are living in one of our 15 residential areas on campus, or commuting from home. Browse our site for valuable information on housing, meal plans, policies, accommodations and more, but feel free to drop us a line anytime.

View the Residence Life and Community Development website for more information or stop by Union 301, call 215.951.1370, or e-mail housing@lasalle.edu or holmest@lasalle.edu

Office of Student Conduct

The Office of Student Conduct is responsible for coordinating and administering the student disciplinary process at La Salle. This includes receiving reports of alleged misconduct, ensuring that students receive due process and fair treatment throughout the hearing process, and maintaining students’ disciplinary records. Additionally, the Office of Student Conduct staff is committed to informing students of their rights as members of the university community and educating them regarding the responsibilities they have to themselves and the other members of the university community.

View the Student Guide website for more information about Student Conduct, call 215-951-1565, or e-mail zenilman@lasalle.edu

Public Safety Department

The La Salle University Public Safety Department is deeply committed to its mission of ensuring the safety of La Salle students, faculty, staff and guests. The department is opened and staffed year-round, 24 hours a day, providing safety and other services for the La Salle residence halls and apartment complexes, walking, vehicular access and egress routes, and public property immediately adjacent to the University in conjunction with the Philadelphia Police Department. In addition to providing security patrol services in and around campus, the department operates shuttle services during the Fall and Spring semesters and manages parking permit registration. Escort services are available year-round.

View the Public Safety website for more information or stop by Good Shepard Hall (West Campus in the Shoppes at La Salle complex) or call 215.951.1300.

FOR EMERGENCIES, CALL 215.991.2111  

Student Wellness Services

Student Wellness Services at La Salle University consists of three units: the Student Counseling Center, the Student Health Center, and the Substance Abuse and Violence Education Center. Together, these three offices work to support students in their lives outside of the classroom. Through health care, counseling, crisis management, and intervention services, students receive support and guidance around alcohol and drugs, sexual violence and overall health and wellness throughout their careers at La Salle.

View the Student Health Center website for more information stop by St.Benilde Hall, call 951.1357, or e-mail wessellj1@lasalle.edu

View the Student Counseling Center website for more information or stop by the Medical Office Building, Suite 112, call 215.951.1355, or e-mail brannan@lasalle.edu

View the Substance Abuse and Violence Education (SAVE) website for more information or stop by the Medical Office Building, Suite 112, call 215.951.1357, or e-mail shirleyk1@lasalle.edu

University Ministry, Service and Support (U-MSS)

University Ministry, Service and Support provides students with Catholic and interfaith initiatives that help promote spiritual engagement and worship, encourage reflection and dedicated service, and foster a supportive and inclusive community among students, faculty, staff, and Christian Brothers.  Campus Ministry mentors and guides students through events and activities such as celebrations of the Eucharist, retreats, student-driven liturgies, Evensong, and more. Civic Engagement provides opportunities for students at all levels to experience and lead service learning and volunteer opportunities in the Philadelphia area, within the U.S. and abroad.  Services within U-MSS include a food pantry, clothing resources, and other support for students in need.

View the Campus Ministry website for more information or stop by the lower level of College Hall, call 215.951.2026, or e-mail gauss01@lasalle.edu

View the Civic Engagement website for more information or stop by the St. Neumann Annex, call 215-951-2016, or e-mail hutchinson1@lasalle.edu

Financial Considerations

Financial Obligations

At the time of registration, the student contracts for the full amount of the tuition and related fees, regardless of the arrangement for payment. A student who is financially delinquent or who has a record of indebtedness cannot attend class, register for subsequent semesters, or receive grade reports, transcripts, or a diploma until such indebtedness is paid.

Tuition and Fees

Students may find the tuition and fee schedule on the Financial Aid website. 

Invoices and Payments

Fall semester electronic bills (eBills) will be available for view­ing and payment in July, spring semester eBills will be available in December, and summer semester eBills will be available in April. Payments are due as follows:

Fall semester:

August

Spring semester:

January

Summer semester:

May

Credit card (American Express, Discover, MasterCard and VISA) and eCheck (ACH) payments can be made at http://my.lasalle.edu. Credit card payments are subject to a 2.85 percent convenience fee; however, eCheck payments are not subject to a convenience fee. An ACH payment is an electronic debit of a checking or savings account. You must have your account number and routing number available to make an ACH payment. If you choose to pay via wire transfer, instructions are available on the secure portal. You must include your student ID number.

Write your student ID number on the face of the check/money order to ensure accurate and timely processing. A $45 fee will be assessed for all returned checks. If the University receives a total of three returned checks, all future payments must be made via cash, certi­fied check, or money order. DO NOT SEND CASH THROUGH THE MAIL.

When you access your eBill you will also be able to pay on-line. If full payment cannot be made, the La Salle Payment Plan is available. 

Third-Party Payments

If a recognized third party (employer, labor union, foundation, etc.) is paying all or a portion of your tuition, you must send the official notification to the Student Accounts Office to be applied to your account. To be eligible, the third party must be a recognized organi­zation, not an individual. The official notification must be on letter­head and contain the following, student name, La Salle Identification number, amount that will be paid, billing instructions and signature of authorized representative. Remember to remit payment for any amount due, not covered by a third party. Third party billing authorizations are accepted in lieu of payment and should be received by the payment due date. Please fax or email your billing authorization to 215.951.1799 or studentar@lasalle.edu.

Tuition Reduction for Catholic School Teachers

Students employed as full-time teachers in Catholic schools within the dioceses of Philadelphia, Allentown, Trenton, Camden, and Wilmington may receive a 30 percent tuition reduction for courses taken in all programs, except for Graduate Religion and Psy.D. to apply for this tuition reduction, the student is required to present a letter to the Office of Financial Aid from his or her principal, verifying full-time employment for each semester the tuition reduction is granted. Students must apply each semester.

Late Fees

A one percent monthly late payment fee will be assessed to all stu­dents who have not made payment in full or acceptable payment arrangements by the tuition due date for the semester. The fee will be monthly.

If you are unable to make payment in full, you are encouraged to sign up for the La Salle Payment Plan or refer to the Financial Aid section of the University Web site for directions on how to apply for financial aid.

Refund of Tuition

When registration has been finalized, a student shall be considered to be in continuous attendance until proper notice of withdrawal is received by the University. Students must file a withdrawal with the Dean of their school of study. Ceasing to attend and/or giving notice to your instructor(s) does not constitute the proper notice of withdrawal. The allowed percentage of a tuition refund will be based upon the date the notice of withdrawal is received.

*For the purpose of refund computation, a week shall be defined as the period of seven consecutive days; beginning with the official start date of the semester, not the first day of a class or first day of attendance.

** The first day of the semester is defined as the official start date of the semester, not the first day of a class or first day of attendance.

Full Fifteen Week Term

Up to and including the first week* of the semester 100% refund

Second week 60% refund

Third week 40% refund

Fourth week 20% refund

After fourth week no refund

Ten through Twelve Week Terms

Up to and including the first week* of the semester 100% refund

Second week 60% refund

Third week 20% refund

After the third week of the semester no refund

Five through Nine Week Terms

Up to and including the second day of the semester 100% refund

First week of the semester 60% refund

After the first week of the semester no refund

One through Four Week Terms (includes intersession)

Up to and including the first day** of the semester 100% refund

After the first day of the semester no refund

La Salle University uses federal regulations to determine the refund of fed­eral financial aid funds to the federal government. A copy of this federal refund calculation is available in the Office of Financial Aid.

Federal and State Financial Aid Programs

Applying for Financial Aid

To apply for financial aid, incoming day students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by Nov. 15. Return­ing day students must complete the FAFSA and the La Salle Institu­tional Data Form (IDF) by April 15. New and returning Pennsylvania residents in evening programs must complete the FAFSA by May 1 to be eligible for the PHEAA State Grant.

While all evening and graduate students must complete the FAFSA and IDF to be awarded financial aid, there is no La Salle deadline. However, remember that it takes at least six weeks to process finan­cial aid. If an evening or graduate student wishes to have a refund check for books and living expenses at the start of the term, and to pay all outstanding balances to avoid late fees, then the student should apply early for aid.

La Salle’s Title IV code is 003287. The FAFSA can be completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

For some students, the federal government requires us to collect additional documentation to complete an application. Notification will be sent that details the additional documentation that is need­ed. The documentation must be submitted within 30 days of receipt of the request letter. (See the section below on deadlines for more information). No aid information will be awarded until the request­ed documentation is returned.

All students must reapply each year for all forms of financial aid.

Financial aid and loans cannot be awarded once the student ceases to attend.

Deadline Dates

The purpose of the deadline dates is to ensure that there is enough time for the student’s financial aid to be processed and credited to the student’s account for the beginning of classes. Filing late or submitting requested documentation after the deadline may cause a reduction in the financial aid award or a delay in having aid cred­ited to the account. (However, generally, if a student files after the deadline date, there are still many types of aid available). If a stu­dent misses the application or the additional documentation dead­line, and if the financial aid is not in place for any reason, then the student must be prepared to use the payment plan offered by the Office of Student and Accounts Receivable. If the necessary payment arrangements are not made, late fees will be charged.

Please note, students also be prepared for a delay in receiving a refund check for living expenses or a transfer of funds to their Gold Card to buy books if a deadline is missed and the financial aid is not in place.

Types of Federal and State Financial Aid

Federal Pell Grants

The Pell program is a federally administered program based on exceptional need. Eligibility is determined by the federal government and notification is sent directly to students. Students who are Pell Grant eligible, may receive up to 12 semesters of funding as a full-time student; part-time students are eligible for a prorated number of semesters.

Federal Perkins Loans

The Federal Perkins Loan provides students, with exceptional need, with long-term, low-interest loans for educational expenses. The University deter­mines the amount of the loan to be offered within certain federal guidelines. Interest at the rate of 5 percent per year on the unpaid balance begins to accrue nine months after the student is enrolled in less than half-time study. The loan repayment period may be as long as 10 years, depending upon the total amount borrowed. Effective 10/1/2017, the Perkins Loan Program has expired. No new loans will be offered.

Pennsylvania State Grants (PHEAA) And Other State Grant Programs

Pennsylvania state grants are administered by the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA). Eligible students must demonstrate financial need, meet Pennsylvania residency requirements, and be enrolled at least half-time. Full-time students must complete a minimum of 24 credits per year, while half-time students must complete a minimum of 12 credits annually. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be filed by May 1 in order to be eligible.

PHEAA requires students to have at least 50 percent of their reg­istered credits on-campus. If more than 50 percent of a student’s registered credits during a given semester are for online classes, the student will be ineligible to receive a PHEAA State Grant for that semester.

Other states in addition to Pennsylvania have scholarship programs for their residents. Information and applications are available from the respective state boards of education.

Federal Work Study Program

The Federal Work Study Program provides students with exceptional need the opportunity to be eligible for part-time jobs on campus. The funds earned do not provide direct tuition relief, but they are intended to help meet incidental expenses encountered by students. Stu­dents are paid on a biweekly basis for the number of hours worked. The total amount that may be earned through the work program is determined by students’ needs and availability of funds at the Uni­versity. Students work an average of 12 hours a week throughout the academic year. Job listings are online.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)

The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) program is a federally funded, college-administered program avail­able to students with exceptional need who are also Federal Pell Grant recipients.

Federal Direct Subsidized Loan

The Direct Subsidized Loan is a fixed-rate loan awarded direct­ly by the federal government on the basis of financial need. This loan is interest-free during full-time and part-time enrollment in a degree-seeking program. Repayment and interest for this type of loan begins six months after leaving school or enrolling less than half-time, and allows for up to a maximum of 10 years to repay. Annually, a student may borrow up to $3,500 as a freshman, $4,500 as a sophomore, and $5,500 as a junior or senior.

The federal government has permanently limited eligibility for sub­sidized loans to 150 percent of the length of the student’s academic program for new borrowers beginning on or after July 1, 2013. The 150 percent change means students in a four-year program will be eligible for subsidized student loans for the equivalent of six years— three years for students in a two-year program. The student who reaches this limitation may continue to receive Unsubsidized Direct Loans if he or she is otherwise eligible (for example, student con­tinues to meet the school’s satisfactory academic progress require­ments).

Once a borrower has reached the 150 percent limitation, his or her eligibility for an interest subsidy also ends for all outstanding sub­sidized loans that were disbursed on or after July 1, 2013. At that point, interest on those previously borrowed loans would begin to accrue and would be payable in the same manner as interest on unsubsidized loans.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan

The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is an interest-accruing, fixed-rate loan available to dependent and independent students with no financial need requirement. The annual loan maximums are the same as those listed above for the Direct Subsidized Loan, except dependent students may borrow up to an additional $2,000 each year, while independent students may borrow up to $6,000 as a freshman and sophomore, and up to $7,000 as a junior and senior. If the parent of a dependent student is credit-denied for a Parent PLUS Loan, the student is eligible to borrow up to the same level as an independent student. Repayment for this type of loan begins six months after leaving school or enrolling less than half-time, and allows for up to a maximum of 10 years to repay.

Federal Direct Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students

The Federal PLUS Loan is a non-need-based loan for the parents of undergraduate students who are enrolled as at least half-time stu­dents. Borrowers have the option of beginning repayment on the PLUS Loan either 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed, or defer­ring until six months after the dependent student on whose behalf the parent borrowed, is no longer enrolled on at least a half-time basis. The interest rate is a fixed percentage with a set origination fee. For current interest and origination fee rates, please visit www.lasalle.edu/parentplus.

La Salle Scholarships and Grants

A variety of scholarships and grants are available for La Salle students, who must be enrolled for at least 12 credits in a day program to be eligible. Among those currently available to students in good standing are:

Full-Tuition Christian Brothers Scholarships

Full-tuition Christian Brothers Scholarships are offered annually to high school seniors who have demonstrated exceptional academic aptitude and achievement and offer evidence of potential for lead­ership in the La Salle community. This scholarship competition is open to high school seniors who have scored approximately 1360 on the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) Critical Read­ing and Mathematics sections and who have a class rank in the top 10 or top 10 percent of their high school graduating class. A sepa­rate application for a full-tuition scholarship is required and may be obtained by contacting the Director of the Honors Program or down­loaded from the Scholarship section of the Financial Aid Office Web site. The completed scholarship materials must be received by the Honors Program no later than January 15.

Founder’s Scholarships

Founder’s Scholarships are awarded in the memory of St. John Bap­tist de La Salle, the founder of the Christian Brothers, the religious order that sponsors the University. St. La Salle’s vision of teachers who would transform the lives of students and his desire to pro­vide access to education to those who would otherwise not receive it revolutionized education. For his achievement, he was named the Patron Saint of Teachers. His work is carried on at La Salle Universi­ty as well as at schools in 80 countries throughout the world.

Without neglecting the life of the mind, the traditional mission of the Lasallian School has been to help young people plan and prepare for a useful and humanly rewarding career.

The awarding of a Founder’s Scholarship is based on a variety of criteria, chief of which are grade point average, strength of course schedule, and SAT scores. The scholarship is renewable for four years provided the student maintains satisfactory academic prog­ress and full-time day status for the academic year. All students who have been accepted for admission by March 1 will be considered for the scholarship; no additional application is required.

La Salle Grants

As a reflection of its dedication to providing financial aid to stu­dents on the basis of financial need, the University has established the La Salle Grant program. Awards from this program are made to students based on their financial need as determined through completion of the FAFSA form. Awards are renewable provided the student maintains satisfactory academic progress and continues to show financial need and submits all requested documentation with­in deadline dates. Priority is given to full-time day students.

Athletic Grants

La Salle University offers grants to men and women excelling in ath­letics. Contact with the La Salle University Athletics Department is made by the student’s high school coach. These grants can be main­tained through the four years of study at La Salle University. No athletic grant is final until an official notification is sent from the Financial Aid Office. The awarding of an athletic grant may result in a reduction of the student’s financial aid. The student will be noti­fied in writing if such a reduction occurs.

Community Service Scholarships

Tuition scholarships are awarded to entering freshmen who have shown interest in and commitment to community service prior to their undergraduate careers, and who are willing to continue such involvement during their years at La Salle.

The grants are for $5,000 and may be combined with a Founder’s Scholarship. They are intended to free recipients from the need to seek employment during the academic year. The grants are renew­able each year if the recipient maintains a 2.5 GPA and full-time day status and continues his or her involvement with community ser­vice.

The application can be downloaded from the Scholarship section of the Financial Aid Office Web site.

All completed scholarship materials must be submitted by January 15 to the Office of University Ministry and Service.

Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation Scholarships

Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation Scholarships are offered to women who are at least 25 years of age, who are part-time or full-time students, and who will be enrolled at La Salle for a minimum of six credits during the term in which the scholarship will be used. The student must demonstrate financial need, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5, and have completed a minimum of 60 credits by the term during which the scholarship will be used. Additional application information can be obtained from the Student Financial Services section of the La Salle Web site at www.lasalle.edu. The pri­ority deadline is August 1.

Institutionally Administered Scholarships

Through the generous contributions of foundations, corporations, and individuals, La Salle students are eligible for a variety of private scholarships.

Students may apply each academic year by filling out a Common Scholarship Application, which is available via www.lasalle.edu/commonscholarship. Even if a student has been awarded a scholar­ship in the past, the student must reapply for that scholarship each academic year.

For more information and a complete listing of scholarships, please refer to the Financial Aid website.

Veteran’s Benefits

Students who qualify for Veteran’s benefits should contact the Financial Aid Office at 215.951.1070. Information for full-time and part-time veteran students is also available under the Active Duty Veterans link within the Tools and Resources section of the Financial Aid website.

Policies and Progress

Satisfactory Standards of Academic Progress/All Financial Aid

In order to continue receiving federal and financial aid, a student must be maintaining satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of the program of study. The student must be moving toward the goal of graduation.

Standards of Academic Progress

In order to continue to receive federal and institutional need-based aid, the student must successfully earn 67 percent of all attempted credits, and achieve the cumulative GPA as listed below:

Required Minimum Credits Earned Cumulative GPA

1-23: 1.50

24-53: 1.75

54 and above: 2.00

Graduate Students: 2.00

For the definition of “attempted” and “earned” credits, and for the formula of the calculation of the GPA, please contact the Registrar.

Some scholarships require a higher GPA for renewal.

Maximum Time Frame

The maximum time frame for completion of the undergraduate or graduate program cannot exceed 150 percent of the published pro­gram length for a full-time student. For example, the minimum credits for an undergraduate to complete a program is 120; there­fore, the student would have a maximum time frame of 180 attempt­ed credits to complete the program before loss of eligibility for fed­eral and institutional aid.

Measurement of Progress

Academic progress for each student will be measured in May, or at the end of the summer session, if applicable. If a student does not meet the standards of academic progress, then that student will not be considered for federal or institutional funds. In order for the stu­dent’s eligibility to be reinstated, the student’s grades must meet the required levels.

Appeals of Progress

Appeals may be based on either a serious personal illness or injury, the death of a relative, or other extenuating circumstances. The stu­dent must be able to demonstrate that the illness, injury, or exten­uating circumstance had a direct impact on the student’s academ­ic performance. If a student experience circumstances preventing completion of the program within the 150 percent time frame, then an appeal may be made on this basis.

All appeals for waivers of academic progress must be done in writ­ing and be accompanied by the Financial Aid Progress Appeal form, which can be found via www.lasalle.edu/finaidforms. Please follow the directions on this form, and submit it to the Financial Aid Office. If the Appeals Committee feels that there are mitigating circum­stances that had a direct bearing on the student’s academic perfor­mance, then the student can be funded during a probationary period for one semester. If a student fails to meet the standards of academ­ic progress at the end of the probationary period, then the student becomes ineligible for federal and institutional financial aid.

The University’s Academic Censure Policy and its Standards for Academic Progress for Financial Aid are two distinct policies. The University may allow a student to enroll for a semester but elect to withhold funding.

Repeat Coursework

Students are permitted to repeat a course that he/she has already passed one additional time and be eligible for financial aid. Any additional attempts of the same course will not be covered through financial aid.

If a student attempts a course for a third time, the student’s enroll­ment minus the repeated course must be equal to at least 6 credits as a part-time student or at least 12 credits as a full-time student in order to be aid-eligible.

For example: A student enrolled in 12 credits who is attempting a 3-credit course for a third time, will continue to be charged the tui­tion rate for 12 credits, but will be eligible for aid only as a part-time student (12 credits – 3 credits = 9 credits).

Standards of Academic Progress For PHEAA State Grant Program

The student must successfully complete at least 24 credits of new passing coursework for every two semesters of full-time PHEAA State Grant assistance received. For part-time PHEAA State Grant recipients, the above requirement will be prorated. (A student may appeal this policy directly to PHEAA.)

Financial Aid Policies

The University reserves the right to reduce financial aid due to a change in the student’s enrollment or housing status, or if a student receives additional funding from an outside source. Financial aid may also be reduced if there has been an error in the calculation of a student’s financial aid, as a result of verification, or if a student missed a deadline.

Students participating in a study abroad program are not permitted to use any institutionally-funded grants or scholarships, or athletic awards during the semester abroad. This includes, but is not limited to the Founder’s Scholarship, La Salle Grant, Academic Achievement Scholarship, and Excellence in Learning Grant, as well as any endowed scholarship that is awarded by the Financial Aid Office. Study abroad scholarships are available to qualified students.

Students interested in studying abroad must make an appointment with a representative in the Financial Aid Office as soon as possible to discuss the implications studying abroad will have on their finan­cial aid, scholarships and University billing.

If a student is doing a co-op/internship and will be enrolled in fewer than 12 credits during that semester, he/she must come to the Financial Aid Office to see how his/her financial aid may change due to differences in tuition charges and credits. If a student is enrolled ­ in at least 12 credits during the co-op/internship semester, his/her financial aid will not change.

La Salle University reserves the right to reduce University need-based or non-need-based funding in the event an “overaward” occurs due to a change in a student’s enrollment, housing, or finan­cial situation, or if additional outside funding is made available to a student. There are five types of overawards:

  1. When the total of a student’s grants and scholarships exceeds the student’s direct costs for tuition, room, board, and fees, La Salle University reserves the right to reduce institutional funding, either need-based or merit-based. All outside grants and scholarships will be applied first to University charges. University grants and scholarships will then be applied to subsequent University charges. The one exception to this policy is athletic aid, as the NCAA regulations take precedent.
  2. If a student receives more funding than the student’s federally calculated need allows, the University is required to resolve the overaward per federal and institutional policy, which prohibits a student from receiving aid in excess of need. If a student is awarded additional aid, which causes the total of all aid to exceed the federally calculated need, then there must be a reduction in the financial aid. To resolve this overaward, financial aid will be reduced in the following order: Perkins Loan, Federal Work Study, SEOG, La Salle grant, and Direct Loan.
  3. If a student has been awarded one or more La Salle University merit-based scholarships and then is subsequently awarded a half-tuition or greater scholarship, then the student becomes ineligible for those La Salle University merit-based scholarships.
  4. The total amount of all financial aid for a student cannot exceed that student’s financial aid cost of attendance. Financial aid includes Federal PLUS loans and alternative loans.
  5. If a student earns in excess of the Federal Work Study award, then La Salle University reserves the right to reduce other need-based aid.

Exception: If a student has already been awarded need-based aid and subsequently receives additional funding, such as a private scholarship, then no other aid will be reduced as long as the total of the financial aid does not exceed need.

It is the responsibility of all financial aid applicants to check their La Salle e-mail and mylasalle accounts for notices concerning finan­cial aid deadlines, policies, procedures, and eligibility. Important information may be sent through e-mail or posted on the Web site rather than through paper correspondence.

Fund Returns

Refund of Excess Aid

Students who are credited with aid in excess of tuition and other charges after all the appropriate forms have been completed will be sent a refund.

Withdrawals and Return Of Title IV Funds

If a student is a recipient of federal financial aid (Title IV funds) and withdraws from the University, then federal regulations require the University to follow a prescribed withdrawal process and stipulate the refund of funds to the federal financial aid programs.

Withdrawal Date

For a federal financial aid recipient, the withdrawal date is the date the student notifies the Dean of his or her school that he or she is withdrawing from the University. This can be done orally or in writ­ing. The student may rescind the official notification of withdrawal. This must be done in writing.

If the student does not notify the Dean of his or her withdrawal, the date of the withdrawal becomes the midpoint of the semester or the date of the student’s last attendance at a documented academically related activity.

If a student does not notify the Dean of his or her withdrawal due to circumstances beyond the student’s control, the withdrawal date becomes the date related to that circumstance. Finally, if a student does not return from an approved leave of absence, the withdrawal date becomes the date the student began the leave.

Return of Title IV Funds

If a student withdraws, the student’s federal financial aid will be prorated based on the number of days that the student completed in the term. This is the earned amount of federal financial aid. Once a student completes 60 percent of the term, then all federal financial aid has been earned and no refund to the programs is required. For the University policy on refund of tuition charges, see the section on Expenses. Please note that the Federal Return of Title IV Funds policy no longer stipulates how the University calculates its refund of tuition, fees, and other charges.

If a student has received disbursed aid in excess of the calculated earned aid, then funds must be returned to the federal financial aid programs in the following order: Unsubsidized Federal Direct loans, Subsidized Federal Direct loans, Perkins loans, Federal PLUS loans, Federal Pell Grant, and Federal SEOG.

A student will only be eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement of federal financial aid if the amount of the disbursed aid is less than the amount of the earned federal financial aid.

If a student has received a cash payment due to excess of financial aid over allowable tuition, fees, and other charges and if the student subsequently withdraws from the University, then the student may be required to repay monies to the federal financial aid programs. After a student is notified that he or she owes monies to the federal financial aid programs, the student has 45 days to either repay the funds or make satisfactory payment arrangements with the Depart­ment of Education. If the student fails to do either of the two previ­ous options, then the University must report “overpayment” to the National Student Loan System.

If a student receives final grades for a term that are all failures, then the student must present documentation that he/she attended for that particular term. If the student fails to produce such documen­tation, the Department of Education requires that the University assume that the student only attended through the midpoint of the term. We are then required to perform the Title IV Refund calcu­lation using the midpoint date as the estimated last date of atten­dance for that student. In these cases, we are required to return some or all of the student’s federal financial aid.

Students’ Rights and Responsibilities with Regard to Financial Aid

The following are the rights and responsibilities of students receiving federal funds.

You Have the Right to Ask a School:

It Is Your Responsibility to:

Undergraduate Specific Policies & Procedures

Academics: Requirements, Expectations, and Policies

Institutional Learning Outcomes

Anchored in the heritage of the Brothers of the Christian Schools and in the Catholic intellectual tradition, La Salle prepares ethical and engaged graduates committed to the global common good.

Four overarching commitments inform our approach to a La Salle University education:

Broader Identity, Expanded Literacies, Effective Expression, and Active Responsibility. Within these four commitments, we value students as whole persons engaged, in association with others, in a lifelong, dynamic process of growth and development. We recognize that such growth and development are part of a larger, interconnected, and interdependent environment in which we all live.

All La Salle students will develop some common knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes, and values as a result of their experiences at the University. La Salle identifies twelve such institutional learning outcomes (ILOs) that all graduates will have mastered. Each is tied to one of the four commitments.

University Core Curriculum

La Salle’s twelve institutional learning outcomes shape students’ experiences in all aspects of their lives at the University. Academically, the impact of these guiding principles is most evident in the University’s Core Curriculum. Through the Core, all students have the opportunity to acquire and demonstrate these common skills.

Because of the two-pronged nature of three of the ILOs, for the purposes of the Core, the twelve ILOs are viewed as having fifteen measurable elements. The Core is intended to be distributed throughout a student’s time at the University, with each ILO having lower-level (Level One) and higher-level (Level Two) objectives.

For Level One of the Core, students select twelve courses from among many options; these courses are open to all majors and do not have any prerequisites. Students also participate in two non-credit modules. The manageable size of this general education portion of the Core easily allows students in all programs, regardless of accreditation requirements, to complete the Core experience. In addition, it encourages the pursuit of double majors and minors by students with multiple areas of interest. One of the highlights of Level One is the First-Year Academic Seminar. In addition, of the remaining eleven courses, all students share a common religion and theology course as well as two common English courses.

Students address Level Two of the Core through their majors, experiencing all four commitments through a capstone course or co-curricular learning experience, a writing-intensive course, and two additional courses or co-curricular learning experiences.

While all La Salle graduates will have mastered the same fifteen measurable elements, they will also have achieved this mastery through unique routes due to the many options from which to choose and the wide variety of disciplines represented within each category.

First-Year Academic Seminar

The First-Year Academic Seminar is a foundational course for entering students. Although topics will vary, each seminar introduces students to a variety of perspectives on a particular issue, context, or problem through university-level reading, writing, and discussion. Students will be challenged to understand the central concept through multiple perspectives, with a particular focus on historical and contemporary points of view. These courses are taught by faculty from across the university. All sections are open to students across all schools; however, the course does not count toward any major or minor.

Majors

Students choose a major when applying to La Salle. It is the student’s responsibility to see that all major requirements are fulfilled.

Any change of major requires the student to complete the “Curriculum Change Form, found in the office of each major/Chair. Students are required to request permission and the signature of the Chair of their new major before submitting the form to The Office of the University Registrar.  This change may require tak­ing approved summer courses or attending La Salle for an addition­al semester(s). Any exceptions to the prescribed program that may be granted must be in writing from the Chair of the major.

La Salle offers majors in the following subjects:

Accounting1, American Studies, Art History, Biochemistry, Biology, Business Administration1 , Business Systems and Analytics, Chemistry, Communication, Computer Science, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Criminal Justice1 , Digit Art & Multi Media Design, Economics, Economics & International Studies, Education 4th thru 8th/Special Ed, Education Grades 4 thru 8, Education Pre-K thru 4th/Special Ed, Education Pre-K thru 4th, English, Environmental Science, Finance, History, Information Technology1, Integrated Science Business Technology, International Business, International Relations, Management & Leadership, Marketing, Mathematics, Nursing1, Nutrition, Organizational Leadership2, Philosophy, Political Science, Political Science/Philosophy/Economics, Psychology1, Public Health, Religion, Secondary Education, Social Work1 , Sociology, Spanish.

  1. These majors are available to students enrolled in the evening program.
  2. Organizational Leadership is only available to evening program students.

Multiple Majors/Degrees Earned

Undergraduates interested in pursuing multiple majors must complete the “Curriculum Change Form” and collect the appropriate approving signatures. This form may be found in the all major Department Offices. Students may declare more than one major after their first semester at La Salle. 

Specific policies regarding requirements for multiple majors may be found in the introduction section of the School under which the major falls. Detailed course requirements for majors are listed in the Undergraduate Majors section of this catalog, under each discipline.

Example: A student completes both a Communication major and an English major. Both majors earn a Bachelor of Arts. Students who double major in Communication and English will receive the single degree/diploma of Bachelor of Arts.

Example: A student completes both a Communication major and a Marketing major. Both majors earn different degrees. Students who double major in Communication and Marketing will receive both the degree/diploma for the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.                                               

La Salle will not award the same bachelor’s degree, to a student, more than once. Diplomas reflect the degree earned, not the major(s). The academic transcript will indicate the degree(s) awarded and the majors completed.

Minors

In addition to their major(s), students may complete up to three minors. To satisfy the requirements for a minor, students must complete six courses within a discipline. A minimum of three required courses, within each minor, must be completed at La Salle University.

Specific policies regarding requirements for minors may be found in the introduction section of the School under which the discipline falls. Detailed course requirements for minors are listed in the University Majors and Curricula section of this catalog, under each discipline.

Students wishing to declare a minor must consult and receive approval from the Chair of the department minor.

La Salle offers minors in the following subjects: Accounting1, American Studies, Art Histo­ry, Biology, Business Systems & Analytics, Business Administration1,2, Chemistry, Communication, Communication Management, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Digital Arts & Multimedia Design, Economics, English, Entrepreneurship, Environmental Science, Finance (for Accounting majors only), General Education, History, Health Science, Human Services, Information Technology[1], International Relations, Journalism, Latin American Studies, Leadership & Global Understanding, Life Science, Mass Media, Management & Leadership2 ,  Marketing2 , Mathematics, Nutrition, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology[1], Public Relations, Public Health, Religion[1], Risk Manage­ment & Insurance, Sociology, and Spanish.

  1. These minors are available to students enrolled in the evening program.
  2. These minors are not available to Business majors (ACC, BSA, BUS, FIN, MGTL, MKT) in the day or evening program.

Requirements for Associate In Arts Degree

The Associate in Arts degree is for the Non-Traditional/Evening student only. A candidate for an Associate in Arts degree, will complete the major of Liberal Arts, and must:

The courses which fulfill the requirements for the Associate degree may be applied to the Bachelor’s degree.

Requirements for A Bachelor’s Degree

A candidate for the baccalaureate degree must have completed a minimum of 120 semester credit hours that satisfy curricular requirements and that include at least 38 courses of three-credit hours or more.

Certain curricula may require a number of hours exceeding this minimum. In addition to completing the number of courses and hours needed, the student must also meet the following require­ require­ments:

  1. The student obtains a C average or cumulative index of 2.00 in the total program of studies.
  2. The student fulfills all course requirements controlled by the major department with a C average or a cumulative index of 2.00 in those courses (or higher in some majors).
  3. The student fulfills the core requirements.
  4. The student takes his or her last 30 credits at La Salle.

Requirements for A Second Bachelor’s Degree

La Salle University will award a second bachelor’s degree to a stu­dent who has already earned a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. The student must meet the following conditions:            

  1. If the student holds a bachelor’s degree from La Salle University:
    • The La Salle student must receive written permission from the appropriate Assistant Dean and Chairperson to enter a new bachelor’s degree program.
    • Core requirements may be fulfilled by the student’s first bachelor’s degree.
    • A minimum of 30 credit hours are required as determined at the time the student matriculates in the second degree program.

All transfer credit must be taken prior to the student taking his or her last 30 credits at La Salle University.*

  1. If the student holds a bachelor’s degree from another institution:

*Students in the RN-BSN program – all transfer credit must be taken prior to the student taking his or her last 27 credits at La Salle Uni­versity.

Graduation

Students who will complete requirements for a degree in a given semester must make a written application for graduation at the time specified by the Registrar. Commencement exercises are held annu­ally in the spring. Diplomas are issued three times a year – on August 31, January 15, and on the date of the Commencement exercises in May. Students who have three or fewer courses remaining to be fulfilled for their degree requirements will be eligible to participate in May Commencement exercises but will not be awarded a degree. Students receiving diplomas in August or January are invited to par­ticipate formally in the Commencement exercises held the following May.

Graduating with Honors

The bachelor’s degree with honors is conferred on a student who has completed his or her courses at the University with a cumulative GPA not lower than 3.4 and who has not incurred the penalty of loss of good standing for disciplinary reasons.

The candidate for the bachelor’s degree who has earned an average of 3.8 in all courses is graduated with the distinction maxima cum laude.

The candidate who has earned an average of 3.6 is graduated with the distinction magna cum laude.

The candidate who has earned an average of 3.4 is graduated with the distinction cum laude.

Registration

During announced registration periods published on the academic calendar, students should contact their Academic Adviser to create a roster of courses for the upcoming semester. The student may regis­ter for courses via the mylasalle portal or in person during the times specified by the Office of the University Registrar.

A course that is dropped during the registration period will no lon­ger appear on the student’s academic record. After the registration period is over, students may withdraw from a course on or before the withdrawal deadline. Refer to the section titled “Course Withdraw­al”.

Academic Integrity

A student’s matriculation at La Salle University is a voluntary decision that involves acceptance of the responsibility to perform academically and to behave socially in ways consistent with the goals and objectives of the University. Upon enrolling at La Salle, the student accepts University rules and regulations and the authority of the University to exercise academic disciplinary powers, including suspension and dismissal. All students are expected to follow the polices found in the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities .

Additional program-specific guidelines for monitoring students’ academic progress and grades are detailed in the section for each program or in the program’s student handbook. Students are expected to understand and adhere to the individual program standards and handbook policies, as they are amended, and should recognize that these individual program standards may be more specific or rigorous than the overarching university standards.

Students may be expected to undertake research projects as part of their curriculum. Research projects that use human subjects must be approved by the Institutional Research Board.

Attendance Policy

Students are expected to attend classes regularly. Absence beyond the control of the student, such as illness or serious personal or fam­ily situations, should be explained to the instructor. If an absence extends over a protracted period of time, the student should notify the Assistant Dean of the School under which the major falls. Attendance is taken from the first regular class day regardless of the time of reg­istration.

Grades and Grading

The coursework of undergraduate students is graded and recorded at the end of each semester. Mid-semester progress reports for new students are submitted to the Office of the University Registrar by each instructor. All grades may be viewed by the student through the mylasalle portal.

Grades

A Superior
B Very Good
C Average
D Passable
F Failure
I Incomplete
M Military Leave of Absence
S Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory
W Withdrawal
X Audit

The final course grade is determined through diverse evaluation examinations.

The following system of grades is used in measuring the quality of student achievement:

+/- Grading System

In assigning grades, faculty have the option of using A-, B+, B-, C+, C-, or D+. Those faculty who do not want to assign +/- grades are not obligated to do so.

Incomplete

The I grade is a provisional grade given by an instructor to a student who has otherwise maintained throughout the semester a passing grade in the course, but who has failed to take the semester exam­ination or complete the final project for reasons beyond his or her control. All I grades that have not been removed within three weeks of the last regular examination of the semester become Fs. When it is physically impossible for the student to remove this grade with­in the time limit, he or she must obtain a written extension of time from the Assistant Dean of his or her school.

Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory

Students may take up to two free electives under a pass/fail option. Students may request the pass/fail option in their Dean’s office within three weeks of the first day of the semester. The grade for a pass/fail course will be recorded as S or U. Such a grade will not affect the cumulative index, but semester hours graded S will be counted toward the total required for graduation. The purpose of this option is to encourage choice of challenging electives, including those outside the student’s major field.

Withdrawal

The W grade is assigned when a student officially withdraws from a course prior to its completion. The request for withdrawal from a course is filed by the student through his or her Dean’s office. The request must be filed on or before the “Last day to withdrawal from a class,” as published in the Academic Calendar. 

Audit

The X grade is assigned for courses audited. After obtaining permis­sion from the course instructor and the Assistant Dean, a student wishing to audit a course may sign up in the appropriate Dean’s Office before the first day of class.

Courses Repeat

If a student repeats a course, only the higher grade is counted toward graduation requirements and in the calculation of the GPA. A student who wishes to repeat a course should consult with his or her academic adviser prior to registering for the course.

Grade Change

Any change of final grade for a completed course must have the approval of the instructor’s Dean. No grade will be changed after the baccalaureate degree is awarded.

Appeal of Final Grades

If a student believes that his or her final grade was based on an arbi­trary or capricious action or some other inappropriate criteria not linked to academic performance the student must follow the proce­dures fully described in the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities.

The Grade Appeal Process is initiated by the student. This proce­dure applies only to assignment of the final course grade. There is a strong presumption that the faculty member’s course grade is based solely on academic performance and is authoritative. Thus, the bur­den of proof to support the alleged unjust grade remains at all times with the student initiating the process. Overturning a final course grade requires substantiating that the alleged unjust final grade was based on an arbitrary or capricious action or some other inappropri­ate criteria not linked to academic performance.

Scholarship Index

A scholarship index system is used at La Salle to determine a stu­dent’s average grade. In determining the index, each letter grade is ascribed a numerical value, called grade points.

A = 4 grade points
A- = 3.67 grade points
B+ = 3.33 grade points
B = 3.00 grade points
B- = 2.67 grade points
C+ = 2.33 grade points
C = 2.00 grade points
C- = 1.67 grade points
D+ = 1.33 grade points
D = 1.00 grade point
DR = 0.00 grade points
F = 0.00 grade points
FR = 0.00 grade points

A grade point score is calculated for each course by multiplying the numerical equivalent of the letter grade by the number of semes­ter hours. The index, or the average grade of all courses, is found by dividing the sum of the grade point scores for all courses by the total number of semester hours of course work attempted.

Examinations

The last week of each semester is set apart for final examinations. Examinations to measure student progress are usually given at mid-term. Students who, for satisfactory reasons, fail to take a semester examination as scheduled may take a delayed examination with per­mission.

Academic Progress

A full-time student is making adequate progress toward the degree if he or she has:

  1. completed within the academic year (fall, spring, and summer) 18 hours of new course work at satisfactory academic levels as indicated:
    1. completed freshman status 1.50 or above*
    2. completed sophomore status 1.75 or above*
    3. completed junior status 2.00 or above*
    4. within the senior year 2.00 or above*

*See “Class Level” for definition of status.

  1. completed graduation requirements within a maximum of seven years of full-time study. For justifiable reason, exceptions may be determined by the Dean.

Note that guidelines for academic progress for financial aid are defined in the section entitled “Satisfactory Standards of Academic Progress for All Financial Aid.”

Class Level

A full-time student carries a minimum of 12 semester credit hours; and a maximum of 18 credits. A student’s program may require more hours per week in some areas of instruction.

Class level is determined by the number of credit hours earned by the student. Students having completed zero to 23 credit hours are considered freshmen; those who have earned 24 to 53 credits are sophomores; those having earned 54 to 83 hours are juniors; and those with 84 credit hours or more earned are classified as seniors.

Part-time students carry a roster of less than 12 hours per week. Stu­dents in this category will require more than the typical four years to earn a degree.

Students who do not fulfill certain admission requirements may be admitted to follow particular courses and are considered as non-de­gree students. They do not register for a degree-granting program. Credits earned by a non-degree student may be counted toward a degree as soon as he or she has met all the requirements for admis­sion and candidacy for a degree provided that the credits thus earned are applicable to the program of study. A non-degree student cannot hold a scholarship or take part in extracurricular activities.

Deans’ Honor List

Traditional/Day Students

The Dean’s Honor List is published at the end of each fall and spring semester. Students who complete at least 12 cred­its of La Salle University courses with letter grades of A, B, C, or D and earn a semester grade point average of 3.5 and above are placed on the Dean’s Honor List.

Dean’s Honor List students are eligible for courses in the Universi­ty’s Honors Program.

Non-Traditional/Evening Students

The Dean’s Honor List is published at the end of each fall and spring semester. Students enrolled in degree programs who complete at least 3 credits of La Salle University course work and earn a semester grade point average of 3.5 and above are placed on the Dean’s Honor List. An academic convocation is held in the fall.

Academic Censure

Academic censure may assume one of two forms, probation or sus­pension, depending on the student’s academic standing. During the evaluation of student records at the end of each semester, a student will normally be subject to the form of academic censure indicated if the cumulative grade point average (GPA) falls below the levels out­lined below.

NOTE: For purposes of censure, the sum of the number of cred­its transferred from another institution and the number of cred­its attempted at La Salle are used to determine the student’s year. Students having 0 to 23 credits are considered to be in their freshman year; those having 24 to 53 credits are considered to be in their soph­omore year; those having 54 to 83 credits are considered to be in their junior year; those having more than 83 credits are considered to be in their senior year.

  1. Probation

    A student is placed on probation when he or she has attained a cumulative grade point average of (a) less than 1.75 after any term in the freshman year, (b) less that 1.9 after any term in the sophomore year, (c) less than 2.0 after any term in the junior or senior year.

    Note: Undergraduate non-traditional/evening students must also limit their course load to two courses (six credits) in a given semester.

  2. Suspension

    A student is placed on suspension when he or she has attained a cumulative GPA for two or more successive semesters of (a) less than 1.75 during the freshman year, (b) less than 1.9 during the sophomore year (c) less than 2.0 during the junior, or senior year.

    During the suspension period, the student (with exceptions noted) may elect one of the following options, assuming adherence to all other University policies:

  3. He or she does not participate in any academic coursework either at La Salle or any other institution for a one-year period.
  4. He or she takes coursework at La Salle as a non-matriculating student to demonstrate sufficient academic progress as deter­mined by the Dean’s Office. At most, two courses may be taken in one semester. This option is not available to international students since their visas require full-time status. This option may be elected only once in a student’s total academic career. On-campus housing is not guaranteed for “non-matriculating” students. Housing decisions are governed by the housing con­tract, which can be found on-line and in the University catalog. Students with questions should contact Administrative Ser­vices within the Division of Student Affairs.
  5. He or she takes courses at another institution. This option is not available to students who have ten or fewer courses remaining, due to the University’s Residency Requirement that states that students must take their last 30 credits at La Salle. This option may be elected only once in a student’s total aca­demic career and it can take the form of one of the following two time frames.

Time frame #1

For consideration of early return (less than one year), a student must take four courses and a minimum of 12 credits in one semester with the following caveats:

Time frame #2

During the year of suspension, a student can take a maximum of four courses at another institution. The courses must meet the following conditions:

Change in Division

Active Students

Students who have earned fewer than 90 credits and are in good aca­demic standing may change from Traditional/Day to Non-Traditional/Evening status, and vice versa. Students who have more than 90 credits are not permitted to transfer divisions.

The conditions for transfer differ, depending on the originating pro­gram:

Students wishing to change their division status should see the Assistant Dean of their respective school.

Returning Students

See below.

Leaves of Absence

Non-Academic Leave of Absence Policy

  1. Purpose/Policy Statement
    1. A Leave of Absence (LOA) is a process that allows a student to temporarily leave the University, with the intention of returning. Students approved for an LOA retain their matriculated status at La Salle, and upon return, can complete all curriculum and program requirements that were in place at the time of the LOA. Academic suspension or disciplinary suspensions override an LOA.
  2. Definitions
    1. Immediate Non-Academic Leave of Absence:
      An Immediate Non-Academic LOA is reserved for students who experience a personal, medical or other significant situation that requires an immediate, unplanned leave. Requests for an Immediate LOA can be made anytime between the first day of classes during the semester and the last day of classes. Upon approval of the LOA the Registrar’s Office will withdraw the student from any enrolled courses. If the LOA happens prior to the drop/add deadline for the semester, there will be no withdrawal indicated on the transcript.
    2. Involuntary Leave of Absence:
      In situations where a student is unable or unwilling to carry out substantial self-care obligations, where current medical knowledge and/or the best available objective evidence indicates that a student poses a significant risk to the health or safety of others, where a student poses an actual risk to their own safety not based on mere speculation, stereotypes, or generalizations about individuals with disabilities, or where the student cannot otherwise fulfill the eligibility requirements related to safety that are imposed on all students at La Salle, and the student does not want to pursue an Immediate LOA, the Vice President for Student Affairs has the authority to place the student on an Involuntary LOA. Before placing any student with a disability on an Involuntary LOA, La Salle will do an individualized assessment to determine if there are reasonable accommodations that would permit the student to continue to participate in La Salle’s campus community without taking a leave of absence. Such decision may be appealed in writing to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
  3. Policy Procedure/Substance
    1. Immediate Leave of Absence
      1. A student who is pursuing an Immediate Non-Academic LOA must meet with the Assistant Vice President for Wellness to complete the Request for Voluntary Non-Academic Leave of Absence During the meeting with the Assistant Vice President for Wellness, an LOA Success Plan will be created, with a focus on what the student will do during the time of the LOA and how best to reenter the university at the conclusion of the LOA.
      2. After completing the Request for Voluntary Non-Academic Leave of Absence form and LOA Success Plan, the information will be sent to the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee, who will, with input and collaboration from the university’s Students of Concern committee, determine whether to grant the Immediate Non-Academic LOA. Notice of the decision will then be provided to the student by the Vice President for Student Affairs.
    2. Involuntary Leave of Absence
      1. Before imposing an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA, the Vice President of Student Affairs or designee will ask the student to pursue an Immediate Non-Academic LOA. If the student refuses to pursue the Immediate LOA, or in the event that the student is incapable of responding on his or her own behalf, or if the student elects not to respond to inquiries or directives, the Vice President for Student Affairs has the right to place the student on an Involuntary LOA.
      2. In such a situation, the Vice President for Student Affairs, or designee, would:
        1. Review all documentation and incident reports regarding the student’s behavior, including any relevant medical documentation if available.
        2. Consult with the Students of Concern committee if appropriate.
        3. Seek the cooperation and involvement of parents or guardians of the student, if appropriate and feasible.
        4. Utilize the information gathered to make an individualized assessment regarding the student’s behavior and whether an Involuntary LOA is necessary to address the health and safety concerns or ensure the proper functioning of university programs and services.
      3. If the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee determines that an Involuntary Non- Academic LOA is appropriate, the student will be informed in writing of the decision. The Letter of Notification will include all relevant terms and conditions of the Involuntary LOA as well as terms and conditions for re-enrollment at the end of the Involuntary LOA.
      4. An Involuntary Non-Academic LOA will be noted on a student’s transcript in the same manner as an Immediate LOA.
      5. The student placed on an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA will be subject to the rules regarding financial aid and financial obligations (room, board, tuition, etc.) that apply based upon La Salle’s Refund Policy.
    3. For Immediate and Involuntary Non-Academic LOA’s
      1. During an LOA, a student cannot attend classes, must vacate university housing and are not involved in programmatic or other university activities. La Salle’s Refund Policy will be followed regarding tuition, fees, room and board or any other student financial aid.
      2. A student on an LOA cannot return to the university during the same semester that the LOA was approved and enacted.
      3. If approved for an LOA, the leave cannot exceed three consecutive semesters of non-enrollment. After the three consecutive semesters of non-enrollment, any student who has not returned to the university will be withdrawn.
    4. Returning from an Immediate Non-Academic LOA
      1. When a student is ready to pursue a return to the university, the student must complete a Return from Non-Academic Leave of Absence Form and submit it to the chairperson(s) for the Students of Concern committee for review and approval.
      2. The student must provide any documentation requested that was included as a component of the LOA Success Plan.
      3. If approved for a return to the university, the student will need to contact the appropriate Assistant Dean regarding possible course options to enroll into for the upcoming semester.
      4. If the student is not approved for a return to the university, the student will receive a letter indicating why the return was denied, and what is required for reconsideration. The student then may appeal the decision by submitting an appeal letter to the Vice President for Student Affairs within 10 business days of receiving notice of the decision. The following are the only grounds for appeal:
        1. The decision of the Students of Concern committee was arbitrary or capricious, or
        2. New or additional information is available that was not available at the time the request to return was considered and could reasonably be expected to have altered the decision. The student may also submit any information he or she believes to be relevant to the appeal.
      5. The Vice President of Student Affairs will make a final decision on the student’s request to return. The Vice President’s decision is not appealable.
    5. Returning from an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA
      1. When a student is ready to pursue a return to the university after an Involuntary Non-Academic LOA, the student must reach out to the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness and provide documentation that satisfies the requirements for return listed in the Involuntary LOA letter.
      2. The Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness will convene the Students of Concern committee to review the materials presented and determine whether the student has demonstrated that it is appropriate for the student to return to the University community.
      3. The decision will be communicated to the student in writing. As needed, the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness will notify the appropriate offices and administrators regarding the decision, and any relevant conditions necessary for the student’s successful return.
      4. The student, as they prepare to return to the university, will work with the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness on a success plan to assist the student returning to the university with the support necessary to resume campus life.
      5. If it is determined that the student is not ready to return to the university, the student may appeal the decision to the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee. The student then may appeal the decision by submitting an appeal letter to the Vice President for Student Affairs within 10 business days of receiving notice of the decision. The following are the only grounds for appeal:
        1. The decision of the Assistant Vice President for Student Wellness was arbitrary or capricious, or
        2. New or additional information is available that was not available at the time the request to return was considered and could reasonably be expected to have altered the decision. The student may also submit any information he or she believes to be relevant to the appeal.
      6. The Vice President for Student Affairs will review the student’s appeal and all necessary additional information and will then render a decision, which shall be final. The outcome of this appeal will be communicated to the student in writing.

Withdrawal from Course(S)

It is the student’s responsibility to notify the University in the event that he or she needs to withdraw from a course(s).

Students who choose to withdraw from a course(s) prior to its completion must:

  1. Complete a Course Withdrawal form in their Dean’s office on or before the “Last day for withdrawal from classes,” published in the Academic Calendar. After this date, grades will be assigned that reflect the result of the student’s course attendance and performance.
  2. Receive approval from their Assistant Dean.
  3. Contact the offices of Financial Aid and Student Accounts Receivable to determine whether an outstanding balance is due, to inquire about the financial implications of withdrawal, and to make arrangements to meet financial obligations.

Addi­tionally:

Please be advised that the date of filing the withdrawal notice is considered as the date of withdrawal from the class(es).

Ceasing to attend a class does not constitute a withdrawal; stu­dents must officially withdraw by completing the Course Withdrawal form in their Dean’s office. Ceasing to attend without officially with­drawing will result in the student receiving a grade for the course, possibly a failing grade. A “W” designation will only be assigned upon official withdrawal from a course.

Withdrawal from the University

It is the student’s responsibility to notify the University in the event that he or she needs to withdraw from the University.

Students who choose to withdraw from the University must:

  1. Complete the Withdrawal from the University form and Non-Returning Student Questionnaire in their Dean’s office. Students must withdraw on or before the “Last day for with­drawal from classes,” published in the Academic Calendar. After this date, grades will be assigned that reflect the result of entire semester’s attendance and performance in each course.
  2. Meet with an Assistant Dean in their Dean’s Office. Athletes must first meet with the Director of Academic Support for Ath­letes.
  3. Contact the offices of Financial Aid and Student Accounts Receivable to determine whether an outstanding balance is due, to inquire about the financial implications of withdrawal, and to make arrangements to meet financial obligations.
  4. Contact the Housing Services Coordinator and Food Services, if living on campus or having a meal plan.

Addi­tionally:

Please be advised that the date of filing the Withdrawal from the University form is considered as the date of withdrawal from the class (es) and the University.

Ceasing to attend classes does not constitute a withdrawal from the University; students must officially withdraw by filling out the Withdrawal from the University form in their Dean’s office. Ceasing to attend without officially withdrawing will result in the student receiving grades for all coursework, possibly failing grades. A “W” designation will only be assigned to coursework upon official withdrawal from the University.

Returning Students

Students who have previously attended La Salle and wish to return to continue their studies should contact the Dean’s Office of the major they last pursued.

Change in Division Returning Students

La Salle undergraduate day students with 90 or more credits who have been inactive for four or more years are permitted to return to the University as a Non-Traditional/Evening student to complete requirements for their degree. A student will be able to complete his/her degree providing the major is an active evening major at the time the student is reactivated. If the student’s major from his/her prior experience at La Salle is not an active evening program the student will need to switch majors to an active evening major. If the student does not wish to switch majors, he/she must remain a day student to complete degree requirements.

The University reserves the right to require students to repeat coursework where content has become outdated due to the amount of elapsed time between taking the course and seeking credit for a degree.

Grade Renewal

La Salle University students who have not enrolled in credit cours­es at any college or university for a period of five years, who return to any of the University’s undergraduate degree programs, and who have successfully completed 12 consecutive credit hours with a grade of C or better in each course may request in writing from the Dean of their school a “transcript renewal.” Should the request be granted, the student will have the option of having all Fs renewed or all Fs and all Ds renewed. Any course granted renewal, for which a grade of F was earned, will receive a grade of “FR” and receive no credit for the course. Any course granted renewal, for which a grade of D was earned, will receive a grade of “DR” and receive no credit for the course. Renewal of D’s will result in loss of credits and loss of respective requirements. Grades of renewed courses will remain and be noted on the transcript, and cumulative grade point average will be adjusted. This request may be made only once by a given student.

Alternative Paths Toward College Credit

Dual Enrollment Credit

Transferring Dual Enrollment Credit (A 2 year Pilot Program Beginning in Fall 2017):

Students who took courses in high school through a dual enrollment program (classes taught on high school campus and taken with other high school students through a participating college), must submit the following in order for their credits to be reviewed:

  1. Official College transcripts
  2. Validation of Credit Transfer Request Form which is to be completed and mailed by the Registrar at their transferring institution.  This form can be found online, as well as in the official acceptance packet.
  3. Course syllabus for each course taken

La Salle University reserves the right to deny transfer credit for coursework that does not have an appropriate equivalent or satisfy La Salle’s curriculum. 

Transferring Dual Enrollment Credit

Courses may be transferred subject to department, school, or col­lege restrictions. Credit is transferred only for grades of “C” or bet­ter; however, the letter grade is not included in the computation of a students’ academic index at La Salle. A total of 70 credits is the maximum number which can be initially or ultimately transferred to La Salle from other institutions.

La Salle University considers two types of transfer credits for high school students who have participated in college programs:

  1. Transfer Credit:
    When courses to be transferred have been taught on the college campus or as an on-line course, are open to enrollment by and graded in direct competition with regularly matriculated students attending that college, and are part of the normal curriculum published in a college’s catalog.
  2. Dual Enrollment Credit (2 year Pilot Program began fall 2017):
    When courses to be transferred have been taught on high school campuses, and taken with other high school students, as part of the normal curriculum published in a college’s catalog. Students who wish to be considered for this 2 year Pilot Program, which began fall 2017, must submit the following in order for their credits to be reviewed:

    1. Official College transcripts
    2. Validation of Credit Transfer Request Form which is to be completed and mailed by the Registrar at their transferring institution. This form can be found online, as well as in the official acceptance packet.
    3. Course syllabus for each course taken

La Salle University reserves the right to deny transfer credit for coursework that does not have an appropriate equivalent or satisfy La Salle’s curriculum.

Credit for Courses Taken at Other Institutions

La Salle students may be approved to take courses at other institu­tions, subject to department or school restrictions.

Please note:

Transfer Credit Requirement

A total of 70 credits is the maximum number which can be initially or ultimately transferred to La Salle from other institutions.

Residency Requirement

Students are required to take their last 30 credits at La Salle.

American Council on Education (ACE) Approved Courses

Students who have successfully completed educational programs and seminars approved by the American Council on Education’s Program on Non-collegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI) may be eligible to receive credit. This credit is not assigned a letter grade, nor is it computed in determining the student’s cumulative academic index. A written request with documentation of course completion should be forwarded to the Dean’s Office for evaluation. 

Courses at Chestnut Hill College

The cooperation of La Salle with Chestnut Hill College, a Catholic college situated about five miles from La Salle, results in a valuable coordination of programs. Students from either of the associated colleges can register for courses at the other college, with full credits and without payment of extra tuition. Students wishing to register for courses offered at Chestnut Hill should contact the Office of the University Registrar at 215.951.1020.

Examinations For Credit

Advanced Placement (AP) Exams

La Salle University participates in, and looks very favorably on, the Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. As such, the University will give college credit to students who perform satisfactorily on the AP examination. Ultimately, the decision to bestow credit for performance in AP courses/examinations lies with the academic dean and the department head of the test subject.

Students should submit their scores along with all required application materials to: La Salle University, Undergraduate Admission, 1900 W Olney Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19141.

Cambridge International Examination

Cambridge International Examinations, A Level, may be considered for college credit subject to the course(s) taken and scores earned. Examination transcripts may be submitted to: La Salle University, Undergraduate Admission, 1900 W Olney Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19141.

CLEP Examinations 

Undergraduate students may receive credit for approved courses taught in the La Salle University curriculum through participation in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board. Students who wish to attempt credit through examination must receive permission from the Assistant Dean of their major/program to determine which examinations are acceptable, the signature of approval must be executed on the CLEP Application form.

While the academic Assistant Dean determines the credits to be granted for CLEP, the individual department designates the subject examinations, which are applicable to specific courses at La Salle University. There are CLEP Examination restrictions and passing score requirements outlined on the CLEP website.

All CLEP exams must be taken by July 15 (summer semester), Nov. 15 (fall semester), or April 15 (spring semester) in order for those credits to be included in that particular semester. If these deadlines are not met, graduation will be postponed to the next conferral date.

All CLEP Examination instructions can be found on the Evening and Weekend Programs website at lasalle.edu/evening-and-weekend.

End-Of-Course Examination

Students who believe that their experience and study have trained them sufficiently to bypass a given La Salle University course may challenge that course through an end-of-course examination. End-of-course-examinations are offered at the discretion of individual departments in the School of Arts and Sciences. End-of-course examinations are not offered for courses in the School of Business. End-of-course examinations are restricted in the School of Nursing and Health Sciences; students should contact their adviser directly. A written request should be submitted to the Department Chair, who will then request the approval of the Dean. There is a $30 charge for each examination. Students who successfully complete the examination will receive credits for the course challenged, which will be posted on their La Salle transcripts upon receipt by the Office of Student and Accounts Receivable of a $25 per credit administrative fee. This credit is not assigned a letter grade, nor is it computed in determining the student’s cumulative academic index.

International Baccalaureate Examination

International Baccalaureate Examinations may be considered for college credit subject to the course(s) taken and scores earned. Examination transcripts may be submitted to: La Salle University, Undergraduate Admission, 1900 W Olney Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19141.

Graduate Courses

Undergraduate students with senior standing may take up to six graduate credits during their undergraduate career at La Salle University. Permission of both the undergraduate chairperson and the graduate director are required. Students should consult their school’s section in the Catalog for specific policies on undergraduate students taking graduate courses.

Online Learning

Each term, Fall, Spring, and Summer, students have the opportunity to take online courses. Course subjects vary and may be offered each semester during a 7, 8, or 15 week session, as well as the 4 week winter Intersession. Online courses offer a way for students to add flexibility to their in-class schedule or take a course from home over the summer. The full list of online courses being offered each semester may be found through the Registrar’s website.

When taking an online course, regardless of the length of the course, the learning outcomes remain constant and your time commitment to the courses will not vary.  A student taking a 15 week online course can expect about three hours of “instruction” and six hours of “out of class work” each week. Students who take an accelerated format (7 or 8 weeks), can anticipate to nearly double the amount of time you spend per week interacting with the course.  Students who are new to online learning may go through an online orientation.  The orientation gives students an introduction to the University, resources and strategies to be successful in online courses, and the digital tools used at La Salle.

Summer and Winter Sessions

A variety of core curriculum, free elective and major courses are offered in both day and evening sessions during the summer and winter sessions. These courses are offered in face-to-face and online formats, during both sessions. Students may use these courses to enrich their academic programs, to lighten their regular schedules, to make up failures, or, in some instances, to accelerate progress toward a degree.

For more information, students should consult with their academic advisor or Dean’s Office representative.

Special Programs and Experiential Learning

Academic Discovery Program (ADP)

The Academic Discovery Program (Pennsylvania ACT 101) is a specialized academic support program for students whose admissions applications indicate that they meet certain criteria for academic potential, financial need, and Philadelphia residence. Students are offered admission to the Academic Discovery Program after completing an extended application process including an in-person interview with program staff. Students accepted through ADP must complete an intensive academic summer bridge program involving courses in mathematics, writing, study skills, and critical thinking before the start of their first year. During the academic year, students take courses from the standard La Salle University curriculum, but they are assigned counselors, tutors, and an academic adviser to support their efforts ADP provides intensive support across each student’s academic career to help them develop and maintain effective study habits, establish and pursue clear career goals, and compete successfully in an accelerated academic setting. As much as possible, each student’s program is tailored to his or her individual needs.

View the Academic Discovery Program website for more information about the, including course descriptions and a breakdown of ADP requirements.

Additional questions or concerns may be addressed to:

Leonard Daniels
Director and Counselor
daniels@lasalle.edu
215.951.1548

Chappelle Washington-Freer
Enrollment and Retention Specialist
washingtonfreer@lasalle.edu
215.951.1123

Community-Engaged Learning, Service Learning, Explorer Connection

Service Learning, Community-Engaged Learning, and the Explorer Connection work together to provide enriched, robust learning experiences for students that take them beyond classroom walls. Community-Engaged Learning and Service Learning specialize in building relationships with the community both on- and off-campus.

Community-Engaged Learning

Such programs at La Salle exist to create and support meaningful educational experiences for students through direct engagement with the city, its resources, and its residents. Our programs invite students to experience the many cultural assets of our community, as well as to witness, critically reflect upon, and respond to its challenges. We aim to foster the kind of education that is at the heart of La Salle’s mission: one that empowers students to live fuller and more thoughtful lives, while working for the common good. Community-Based courses incorporate community engagement as a significant portion of the course’s work. One example: Inside Out courses, which are held in local prisons with a student population composed of half La Salle students and half incarcerated students.

Community-Engaged Learning also encourages students and faculty to make use of Philadelphia as a learning venue through both the City as Classroom program, in which faculty can apply for funding for course-related opportunities in Philadelphia and the Cultural Passport program, in which first-year students receive discounts to cultural institutions through Philadelphia. These community-based learning activities are tied to course goals, and can range from museum admission for an Art History course to theatre tickets for an English or Global Literature course to reimbursement for travel costs to take a Religion class to a local place of worship or a Public Health class to an underserved neighborhood or a Business class to a local factory.

View the Community Engaged Learning at La Salle website for more information or contact Heather McGee at 215.991.2877 or mcgeeh@lasalle.edu

 

Service Learning

Service Learning is a teaching and learning strategy that provides students with the opportunity to practice, perform, and observe the theories and practical applications of academic course content through service in the community.  The service learning experience is processed through structured and on-going reflection through a mix of writing, reading, speaking, and listening, individually and in groups.  Service learning is most effective when there is a sustained commitment throughout the semester and when the service experience addresses community-identified needs. Service Learning involves faculty and students in courses that blend sustained service and they provide for reciprocal relationships with community partners.

The Explorer Connection

The Explorer Connection offers co-curricular opportunities for students, faculty and staff to engage with current events, social trends and justice issues through panel discussions, guest lectures, workshops and teach-ins. The Explorer Connection’s weekly Explorer Café event provides regular occasions for the campus community to engage each other in conversation on timely topics from the impact of social media on student health, to the ethics of open source coding, to the role of higher education in preparing students for professions, and more.

View the Service Learning or the Explorer Connection website for more information or contact Tara Carr-Lemke at 215.951.5120 or carrlemke@lasalle.edu

English Language Institute (ELI) Program

The English Language Institute (ELI) program is committed to providing the highest quality intensive English language instruction to international students and all non-native speakers of English, who are interested in improving their English language proficiency. Our full-time curriculum focuses on all aspects of language learning – listening, speaking, reading and writing, to assist in meeting individualized goals.

The ELI is a part of, and located on the campus of La Salle University, where ELI students will attend classes and enjoy life alongside other university students. ELI students are a part of the La Salle community, and are always encouraged to participate in campus-wide activities, clubs, and social events, as well as special events organized by the English Language Institute, which are designed to increase cultural awareness and provide informal opportunities to practice English. 

La Salle University is located in the metropolitan and historic city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, otherwise referred to as the “City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection”.  Philadelphia is located just a short train or car ride from winter skiing, the beautiful beaches of southern New Jersey, NYC, and Washington D.C. 

Students who successfully complete the ELI program and are otherwise academically acceptable will have TOEFL/IELTS scores waived as an admission requirement to La Salle University.  Conditional Admission to both undergraduate and graduate programs at La Salle University is possible for students also submitting official and translated copies of academic transcripts.

ELI Courses

View the English language Institute website for more information or call or e-mail 215.991.2600, ELI@lasalle.edu

International Year One (IYO) Program

The International Year One (IYO) program provides academically qualified international students still needing additional academic English training, full admission to La Salle University. This freshman year program offers specially designed core and elective courses to support international students with their academic achievement and social adjustment.  Students receive free one-on-one English and subject tutoring each week, along with group study sessions, academic advising, and meetings with the Director of the program.  All undergraduate first year international students are encouraged to enroll in this program.

FYS 130 In Pursuit of the “American Dream”: Your Multilingual and Multicultural Experiences in the USA

This course will explore several topics related to your experience of multilingual and multicultural identities in the USA. We will explore this theme by first focusing on the college campus, where many of you have had your first American experiences. We will discuss diverse perspectives on the relationship between American students and international students. We then move onto language issues in the broader U.S. contexts, studying the historical and contemporary perspectives of bilingual education programs and the English-only movement. We will conclude the course with a focus on the hotly debated immigration policies and arguments surrounding them.

View the International Year One program website for more information.

Higher Education Initiative at La Salle University

High school students attending partner high schools may be eligible to take dual-credit, or, college-credit only, coursework at La Salle University.  Dual-credit programs include the Community Scholar Program, the Diocesan Scholar Program, and the Transformation Scholar Program.  College-credit only programs include the Summer Scholars Program and the Travel Study Partners Program.

High school students in the above programs are advised by the Registrar’s office, in consultation with the Coordinator of Academic Partnerships.  Summer Scholars and Travel Study Partner students must pay all attendant registration and/or travel fees before attending classes.

High school students enrolled in college-level courses are subject to all policies regarding matriculated La Salle University students.  Students should refer to the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities for policy details.

Grades earned by students in dual-credit courses become part of a student’s academic record at both La Salle University and the student’s high school, and, additionally, affect G.P.A. at both institutions.  Grades earned by high school students enrolled in college-credit only courses are not reported to high schools by La Salle University.  Both dual-credit and college-credit only develop college transcripts.  Transcripts do not indicate that students took courses as high school students.  La Salle University does not guarantee that courses will transfer to other institutions.  Official La Salle University transcripts can be requested through the Registrar’s office.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) gives students, parents and guardians certain rights and protections with respect to education records. FERPA-protects education records of minors in college credit or dual credit courses differently than High School courses.  La Salle University administrators may communicate with high school administrators regarding a student’s performance in a dual-credit course and the parents and guardians of minor students in a dual credit course may receive education records directly from the high school; however parents and guardians may not receive education records directly from La Salle unless the minor enrolled in the dual-credit or college-credit course gives express written permission.

View the Higher Education Initiative website for more information or call or e-mail 215-951-1160, langemak@lasalle.edu

Community Scholars Program

Junior and senior high school students with G.P.A.’s of at least 3.5 and no history of serious disciplinary violations are eligible for this program.  To apply, students must attend School District of Philadelphia high schools; students are selected through a District selection process.

Diocesan Scholar Program

Seniors attending Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and Catholic private schools are eligible for this program.  Applications and selections are managed by The Archdiocese.

Transformation Scholar Program

Junior and senior high school students with G.P.A.’s of at least 3.5 and no history of serious disciplinary violations are eligible for this program.  To apply, students from any area partner high school are eligible to apply to this program; students are selected through a La Salle University selection process.

Summer Scholars Program

Junior and senior high school students with G.P.A.’s of at least 3.5 and no history of serious disciplinary violations are eligible to take summer courses at reduced cost.  Students may attend any high school; eligible students may register for available courses on a first-come, first-served basis.

Travel Study Partners Program

Junior and senior high school students with G.P.A.’s of at least 3.5 and no history of serious disciplinary violations are eligible for this program.  Students attend courses and travel in cohorts from partner high schools.

Honors Program

Overview

La Salle University emphasizes the need for a strong basis in the humanities and the development of specific skills for all undergraduates. For this reason, all students are required to complete a core curriculum which fulfills the University’s institutional learning objectives, along with intensive study in a specific discipline. The curricular structure of the University Honors Program follows the general University model, but with modifications that recognize the needs and abilities of the highly motivated and intellectually gifted student.

Professors teaching in the first-year Honors Program “triple” coordinate their courses so that, at any particular time during the academic year, the students will be viewing the same period of civilization through the perspective of three different disciplines–literature, history and philosophy. Classroom instruction in the first-year “triple” is complemented by activities such as attendance at area performing arts organizations and visits to other cultural venues and sites of particular interest.

Admission

Each year approximately 70 to 80 students are admitted to the Honors Program.   Invitations are extended to students who have been accepted for admission by the University, who have combined SAT Critical Reading and Math scores of approximately 1260 or a composite ACT score of 26 and who have high school GPAs of 3.5 or higher.

Requirements

14 courses designed specifically for the Honors Program are required. Other requirements include:

Students who complete all of the requirements of the Honors Program are graduated from

LaSalle with the special distinction of General University Honors. This distinction is noted on the official transcript, on the diploma, and in a special listing in the Commencement program.

The Honors Affiliate Program

The Honors Affiliate Program aims to attract talented students who have opted not to join the full Honors Program to Honors courses. It’s an opportunity for students to take advantage of the true spirit of a liberal arts education, and broaden their perspectives beyond their majors and minors.

Prerequisites

In order to pursue the Honors Affiliate program, students must:

Course of Study

To successfully complete this program and graduate as an Honors Affiliate Scholar, students will be required to:

Completion of the Program

Upon completion of the Honors Affiliate Program, students will receive an Honors Affiliate Scholar Certificate and a special designation on the transcript. In addition, students will receive an invitation to apply for the Fulbright Scholarship program and personal mentoring by Honors Program staff members to prepare the Fulbright application.

Contact Information

The University Honors Program office is located in College Hall 304. The Director of the Program is Brother Michael McGinniss, F.S.C., and Ph.D. For additional information, call 215.951.1360 or email honors@lasalle.edu.

Internships, Externships, Co-ops, and More

Students have ample opportunity to find work related to their majors or career goals while simultaneously earning academic credit and gaining real world experience. In addition to internships, externships and cooperative education, there are a variety of clinical, practicum, and field experiences also available.

Typically available to juniors and seniors from any major, internships may be part-time or full-time, paid or unpaid, and can range in length from three to six months. Students must be in good academic standing, having completed appropriate academic requirements.

Co-op programs are available through the Schools of Arts and Sciences and Business. They typically involve full-time, paid work experiences lasting from three to six months.

Nursing, Communication Science Disorders, Education and Social Work are among the departments that require students to participate in hands-on experiences such as clinicals, practica, and field experiences. These may range from one to three semesters of work or service and are integrated into the curricula. (Check your academic department requirements for details.)

Externships usually include full-time, paid summer employment and are most common in the School of Nursing and Health Sciences

It is highly recommended that students investigate and prepare for internships, co-ops, etc., before completing the sophomore year. Early academic planning is critical in order to stay on track for graduation. The La Salle University Career Center can help you identify and apply for these opportunities and also will assist you with resume writing and interviewing skills.

View the La Salle University Career Center website for more information or contact 215.951.1075 or careers@lasalle.edu

ROTC

Army ROTC

Students at La Salle can participate in Army Reserve Officers’ Train­ing Corps (ROTC) through a partnership agreement with Drexel Uni­versity. The program is open to both male and female students who desire to earn a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army, Army Reserve, or Army National Guard upon gradua­tion.

Freshman and sophomore students take ROTC basic courses right on La Salle’s campus and incur no obligation (who are non-scholarship) to the U.S. Army by enrolling. Additionally, military science courses are applied toward graduation requirements.

Juniors and seniors enrolled in the Advanced Course take senior-lev­el military science courses at Drexel University.

The primary purpose of ROTC is to commission the future officer leadership of the United States Army and motivate young people to be better citizens. Students enrolled in the ROTC program receive instruction in the fundamentals of leadership with emphasis on self-discipline, integrity, confidence, and responsibility. ROTC is the only college elective that teaches leadership and management skills that enhance your future success in either a military or civilian career.

ROTC scholarships worth up to full tuition and fees per year are available on a competitive basis. Advancing freshman and sopho­more students may compete for two and three-year scholarships. All junior and senior students with a scholarship can receive a stipend for books and education fees and a non-taxable subsistence allowance per month while attending classes.

For more information on the program, scholarships, and career opportunities, contact ROTC at Drexel University.

Air Force ROTC

The AFROTC program offered through Detachment 750 at Saint Joseph’s University offers college students a three- or four-year cur­riculum leading to a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the Unit­ed States Air Force (USAF). In the four-year option, a student (cadet) takes General Military Course (GMC) classes during their freshmen and sophomore years, attends a 4-week summer training program between their sophomore and junior years, and then takes Profes­sional Officer Course (POC) classes during their junior and senior years. Cadets in the three-year option will be dual-enrolled in both GMC classes during their sophomore year, attend a summer train­ing program, and take POC classes during their junior and senior years. A cadet is under no contractual obligation with the USAF until entering the POC or accepting an AFROTC scholarship. The GMC curriculum focuses on the scope, structure, organization, and histo­ry of the USAF with an emphasis on the development of airpower and its relationship to current events. The POC curriculum concen­trates on the concepts and practices of leadership and management, and the role of national security forces in American society.

In addition to the academic portion of the curricula, each cadet par­ticipates in a two-hour Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) and two hours of Physical Training (PT) each week. Both LLAB and PT utilize the cadet organization designed for the practice of leadership and man­agement techniques.

For more information about the AFROTC program, contact ROTC at St. Joseph’s University located here.

Study Abroad

La Salle University offers semester and summer abroad experiences in Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Australia, England and Switzerland. In addition, La Salle is a member of the Lasallian International Programs Consortium, which includes programs in the following additional countries: Argentina, China, France, Germany, Spain, Japan and England. These programs are exclusively available to La Salle students and Lasallian consortium students. Students wishing to study abroad in the above countries are limited to only Lasallian programs; students may not study abroad through a non-La Salle program if La Salle already offers a program in the requested country.

La Salle University restricts study abroad experiences for its students to La Salle programs and programs through other U.S. universities on a pre-approved list. Students interested in a study abroad program should apply to the Director of Study Abroad Programs in the Multicultural and International Center, as well as directly to the sponsoring educational institution. Application deadlines are March 1st for the summer and fall semester(s) and early October for spring semester. Deadlines for pre-approved non-La Salle programs may be earlier than La Salle’s in-house deadline.

A student wishing to attend a university or study abroad program that is not currently affiliated with La  Salle, or is not currently on La  Salle’s list of approved programs, must petition to participate in a non-approved program. If permission is granted, the specific courses would then also need to be approved. A petition may only be used for students who have specific academic needs that cannot be met in any of the current La Salle affiliated/approved programs. The student must demonstrate how the program has an academic component that the already-approved programs do not.

For more information about Study Abroad, Travel Study, or Exchange Programs with Lasallian Schools, contact Melinda Massaro Ingersoll,  215.951.1948 or ingersoll@lasalle.edu or visit the Education Abroad website.

Travel/Study

La Salle offers semester-long courses with travel components included to enhance the educational experience. Past courses have included: The Lasallian World: View from United States and Guatemala; Comparative Business Practices—Germany or France and the United States; Education to Globalization in India; Conflict Resolution: Ireland; Narrative Versions of the Vietnam War; International Film in Prague; and Globalization and Tradition in 21st-Century China; between Globalization and Tradition in 21st-Century India; and The Political Economy of Latin America.

EXCHANGE PROGRAMS WITH LASALLIAN SCHOOLS La Salle is part of the “One La Salle” program. This allows students to study at selective Lasallian universities worldwide as part of a special exchange study abroad program. Each select program will require students to not only apply through La Salle’s study abroad application process but also the Lasallian institution abroad.

For more information about Study Abroad, Travel Study, or Exchange Programs with Lasallian Schools, contact Melinda Massaro Ingersoll,  215.951.1948 or ingersoll@lasalle.edu or visit the Education Abroad website.

Summit Program

The Summit Program serves first-year students with high potential for academic success, although their admissions files may show one or more academic risk factors. Students accepted through the Summit Program receive structured support within a challenging academic setting, including a sequence of foundational courses, intensive academic advising, and weekly academic support (including but not limited to tutoring).

The Summit Program’s foundational courses are intended to introduce students to a college-level workload in support of their coursework elsewhere in the University. INST 101 is an academic success workshop taken as a weeklong summer bridge program before the regular semester begins. INST 105 and INST 106 emphasize critical reading, thinking, and writing, using deliberately difficult texts from multiple disciplines. Students in these courses are expected to analyze, critique, and evaluate readings both in class discussion and in writing.

Visit the Summit Program website for more information about the program, including course descriptions and a breakdown of Summit requirements.

If you have additional questions or concerns, please contact:

Kristina Greenwood, M.Ed.
Director, Summit Program
greenwoodk1@lasalle.edu

Shaena Moody, M.Ed.
Assistant Director and Academic Advisor, Summit Program
moody@lasalle.edu

Undergraduate Student Research

Undergraduate Research is a program which provides opportunities for undergraduate students to conduct research in all fields with La Salle faculty members who are actively investigating and publishing and eager to mentor undergraduates in research projects.  Students can engage in personalized and professionally rewarding research in the arts and social sciences, in business, in nursing, and in the physical sciences. Such work, intellectually valuable in itself, can lead to conference papers and publications, which provide distinctive credentials for job-hunting and for further professional study.  The research normally occurs over one semester and the student receives three credits once the research is completed.  In addition, the student’s work is disseminated through a public poster session on campus and through Digital Commons, an online repository managed through the Connelly Library.

Visit the Undergraduate Student Research website for more information or contact Dr. Judith Musser at musser@lasalle.edu

School of Arts and Sciences

Overview

Print Compilation (includes all related program information in full)

The School of Arts and Sciences offers programs in the liberal arts and programs in science and mathematics. Within these two areas, the student may further specialize in a major field of study. In the liberal arts, the Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in American Studies, Art History, Communication, Criminal Justice, Economics, Economics and International Studies, Education, English, History, International Relations, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Sociology, and Spanish. Concentration in the science area may lead to a B.A. degree in Computer Science, Digital Arts and Multimedia Design (DArt), or Mathematics; or a B.S. degree in Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Science, Information Technology, Integrated Science, Business, and Technology (ISBT), or Mathematics. The Bachelor of Social Work degree is conferred upon Social Work graduates.

Preparation for The Health Professions

Students preparing for careers in the health professions (medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatric medicine, optometry) traditionally major in biochemistry, biology, or chemistry. However, students may elect to major in any program provided they complete the required science and mathematics courses to support their applications. The courses specified by the Association of American Medical Colleges for Medical School applicants are generally applicable as minimal requirements for most of the health professional schools. They are:

Most professional schools will accept these as minimal preparation, but may recommend additional courses. Students should be alert to the fact that professional schools are interested in demonstration of aptitude in science and mathematics, and the courses taken must be those normally rostered by majors in these areas, not courses offered for non-major election.

In the normal application process to health professional schools, the applicant’s full undergraduate record is scrutinized. The strong liberal arts component in the La Salle curriculum will provide evidence of broad interest and rounded academic development. Evidence of leadership and active interest in associated activities will lend strong additional support to applications. Volunteer work in the particular health profession is also necessary.

Normally, the competition for placement in these programs results in high acceptance standards. Grade point averages ranging from 3.4 to 4.0 are representative of levels expected in these programs. Students are encouraged to consult with their health professions advisor concerning admissions criteria at various schools.

Preparation for Law

Law schools do not prescribe particular curricula for admissions. La Salle University, therefore, approaches the preparation for law on an individualized basis, tailoring the program of each student to individual needs and desires. Thus, students may major in English, Philosophy, Political Science, History, Sociology, Business, etc., as preparation for law. In addition, La Salle offers a number of courses of particular interest to students interested in pursuing law careers, which may be taken as electives.

The Pre-Law Program offers the student a coordinated approach to course selection, preparation for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), and both academic and admissions counseling. In addition, it provides many programs and panel discussions through the St. Thomas More Pre-Law Society. The Coordinator of Pre-Law Programs gathers, collects, and disseminates to students appropriate information concerning legal education and the legal profession and informs students of special opportunities throughout the academic year. Pre-law advisors are available to guide students on an individualized basis with emphasis on particular needs.

Mission

Vision

The School of Arts and Sciences at La Salle University will develop a national reputation as a liberal arts school in the Catholic, Lasallian tradition with a vibrant intellectual environment, a strong sense of community, and an integral connection to global issues.

Mission

In keeping with the mission of La Salle University, the School of Arts and Sciences is dedicated to excellence in teaching and to developing the full intellectual, personal, and social potential of our students in an environment of mutual respect and cooperation. The faculty and staff of the School of Arts and Sciences provide a liberal education of both general and specialized studies for its own students and for those from the School of Business, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, and the Undergraduate Evening and Weekend Programs. The undergraduate and graduate programs of the School also aim to provide students with a solid foundation for lifelong learning, informed service, and progressive leadership in their communities, and for fulfilling the immediate and final goals of their lives. With the shared mission of the Christian Brothers, the School of Arts and Sciences is passionately engaged in the process of enriching the community of scholar-learners, teachers, and researchers, through the power of enhanced academic experience. Faculty and staff in the School of Arts and Sciences believe a liberal academic experience should provide the opportunity for the mutual advancement and sharing of the excitement of learning for its own sake.

Staff Listing

Pamela E. Barnett, Ph.D.
Dean, School of Arts and Sciences
barnett@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

LeeAnn Cardaciotto, Ph.D.
Associate Dean
cardaciotto@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

David Cichowicz, Ph.D.
Associate Dean
cichowic@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1264

Lisa Jarvinen, Ph.D.
Associate Dean
jarvinen@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

Evelyn Ramos, M.Ed.
Assistant Dean
ramose@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

Jim Rook, MBA
Assistant Dean
rook@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

Julie Valenti, M.A.
Assistant Dean
valenti@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

Michele Guy
Office Manager
guy@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

Karla Delgado
Administrative Assistant
delgadok1@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

School Specific Academic Policies

Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Courses

Undergraduate students with senior standing and an overall GPA of 3.0 or better may take up to six graduate credits during their undergraduate career at La Salle University. These six graduate credits will only apply toward the student’s undergraduate degree. Permission of both the undergraduate chairperson and the graduate director are required.

Requirements for Multiple Majors

Specific policies regarding requirements for multiple majors may be found in the introduction section of the School under which the major falls. Detailed course requirements for majors are listed in the University Majors and Curricula section of this catalog, under each discipline. The requirements for a Second major may be reduced slightly depending on the first Major.

Opportunities Outside the Classroom

As students progress through their programs of study, they learn about the process of conducting research in their major discipline. Capstone experiences in all fields as well as the Honors Program provide opportunities for independent scholarship projects.  Also, at the undergraduate level, the University offers a formal program that crosses all disciplines and helps match student and faculty interests. At the end of the year, multiple venues are offered for students to present their work.  For more information about the Undergraduate Research Program at La Salle, contact Dr. Judith Musser, Director of Undergraduate Research.  Last, many faculty invite outstanding students to participate in their own professional research programs. Faculty-undergraduate student teams can apply for financial support during the summer months through a competitive grant program sponsored by the School of Arts and Sciences.

Internships

Internships complement the theoretical foundation and the practical, hands-on learning experiences offered in students’ courses. Through internships, students have the opportunity to explore potential careers, acquire real-world, professional experience, make contacts and build relationships, and clarify their future goals and aspirations. With its prime location in the Delaware Valley, a hub for so many industries and organizations, La Salle is able to offer internship opportunities to students in every major. Internships can be taken for course credit or for no credit, and they can be paid or unpaid.  For additional information about the countless internship opportunities available to La Salle Arts and Sciences students, contact the undergraduate academic departments or the Office of Career Services.

Service-Learning

La Salle University’s culture is rooted in the Christian Brothers’ tradition of faith, service, and community. Service is such an integral part of life on campus that La Salle has been recognized several times on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. La Salle has also been selected for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Community Engagement Classification, an honor reserved for just a small fraction of colleges and universities that can demonstrate a true commitment to the local and global community.  Although many students join established outreach organizations on campus, there are also opportunities to perform community service through coursework. A list of approved courses can be found on the Service Learning Programs website.

Travel Study

Travel/study courses are semester-long classes with a 10- to 15-day travel component built into the syllabus. Through these courses, people, places, and concepts that student have learned about in the classroom are brought to life and given context. Students broaden their worldview, gain a heightened understanding of other cultures, and learn about the responsibilities of global leadership.  More information can be found on the Education Abroad Programs website.

Study Abroad

Students who study abroad have the opportunity to immerse themselves in a new culture, a new language, and a new environment for an entire semester. Through La Salle University’s own programs in Italy, Mexico, Ireland, and Australia, or through partnerships with other Lasallian schools around the country, students can choose among programs on six continents. With the right planning, students from nearly any major can study abroad and still stay on track to graduate in four years.  More information can be found on the Education Abroad Programs website.

Contact Information

Arts & Sciences Dean’s Office
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
ph: 215-951-1042
SASOffice@lasalle.edu

Departments

Majors

Minors

Department of Art

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Art, with its programs in Digital Arts & Multimedia Design (DArt) and in Art History, is to embrace and promote the idea that the visual arts are expression of cultures, both past and present. For those students in our program creating computer-generated imagery using the latest technologies, the goal is to engage with social and ethical implications of that activity. Both programs foster critical thinking in analyzing images to understand their power, a necessary skill in this image-saturated world.

Major(s) Offered

BA Art History

BA Digital Arts & Multimedia Design

Minor(s) Offered

Art History

Digital Arts & Multimedia Design

Concentrations

Digital Arts & Multimedia Design

Location/Contact Information

Susan M. Dixon, Chair

dixons@lasalle.edu

Olney Hall 126

215.951.1163

Full-Time Faculty

Art History

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Conaty, Dixon

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Holochwost, Moriuchi

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Haberstroh

Digital Arts & Multimedia Design

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Camomile

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: G. Beatty

AFFILIATED FACULTY: J. Beatty, Blum

Art History

Program Description

The Art History program prepares students to see images with precision, to describe how and what the images express, and to interpret them in terms of the culture that produced them. Our many courses provides the broad historical frameworks to understand art in all its forms: painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape architecture, minor arts and more. Students work with physical objects in museum and gallery collections, as well as in the urban spaces, and write persuasively about them.

Our program offers:

Why take this major?

You are a good candidate to major in Art History if you:

...and if you want to work in the following types of careers working in/as:

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ARTH 201 - History of Art I
ARTH 202 - History of Art II
ARTH 320 - Topics in Contemporary Art or ARTH 322 - Topics in American Art
ARTH 340 - Art & Culture or ARTH 370 - Special Topics in Art History
ARTH 380 - Research Seminar
ARTH 460 - Internship or ARTH 480 - Exhibition Seminar
5 ARTH 200- or 300-level courses
Choose 1: an ART course or another ARTH 200- or 300-level course

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

A dual major in Art History takes 10 courses:

Minor Requirements

The minor in Art History requires 6 courses:

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall

ARTH 201

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 320 or ARTH 322

ARTH 380

Spring

ARTH 202

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 340 or ARTH 370

ARTH 460 or 480

Course Descriptions

ART 102 - Basic Design

Students learn the fundamental design principles and techniques associated with creating and modifying digital images, and how to prepare these images for viewing on screen and in print. Both raster (paint) and vector (draw) type graphics will be studied, using appropriate software applications.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CSC 151 or equivalent

ART 202 - Visual Communication

An overview of issues related to the history and theory of images and their cultural function. Digital images and their effectiveness are assessed and analyzed. Students apply this knowledge to the creation of their own visual projects. Emphasis will be on the interactive potential of images in the digital media and on devising strategies to create dynamic interactive images.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102

ART 215 - Color Theory

This course is an introduction to color models, color interaction, and the human perception of color. Color in both subtractive (pigmented) and additive (electronic) environments are addressed. Theoretical knowledge will be reinforced by practical exercises in various media.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102

ART 260, 261 - Painting I, II

The course introduces the fundamentals of painting. Students learn the skills of manipulating paint to solve a sequence of problems exploring color theory, compositional structure, and figure/ground relationships. The course may be repeated for additional credit (ART 261) after the completion of ART 260.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall, Summer

ART 263, 264 - Drawing I, II

This course provides students with mastery of basic principles of observation and familiarity with the potential and limitation of various media. This course provides studies of proportion, volume, perspective, and anatomy. Representation of still lives, the human figure, and landscape using various media is also included. The course may be repeated for additional credit (ART 264) after the completion of ART 263.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ART 265, 266 - Sculpture I, II

This is an introduction to the fundamentals and concepts of organizing forms in three dimensions. Students use basic materials for a sequence of problems exploring such aspects as line, plane, volume, texture, and scale with modeled and constructed forms. The course may be repeated for additional credit (ART 266) after the completion of ART 265.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ART 268 - Intro to Digital Photography

This is a course that introduces basic concepts, techniques and terminology in digital photography such as how sharpness and exposure effect images and the way they are perceived by viewers. Getting images from camera to computer, to print and/or web, and using software such as Adobe Photoshop will be covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ART 270 - Special Topics in Studio Art

Material will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit if course is essentially different.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ARTH 150 - Introduction to Art History

This course will introduce students to basic elements of visual literacy through the exploration of art history in a variety of cultural traditions, geographic locations, and chronological periods. Students will learn about principles of design, form, and iconography while exploring the art of different societies and cultures.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 201, 202 - History of Art I, II

This course is a chronological survey of architecture, painting, sculpture, and minor arts from major cultures, especially in the West. Emphasis is on identification and comprehension of styles, monuments, and traditions. ARTH 201 covers pre-historic art to ca. 1400; ARTH 202 covers the Renaissance to the 21st century.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 203 - Ancient Art

This course is a study of the art and architecture of selected early civilizations from about the 13th Century BC to the 4th Century AD, emphasizing Greek, Roman, and other Aegean and Mediterranean cultures.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 205 - Medieval Art

This course examines the development of the visual arts from the late Roman period to the late Gothic of the 15th century. Special emphasis is on the establishment of Christian iconography.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 213 - Italian Renaissance Art

This course is a study of Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture of Italy from 1250 to 1570. Emphasis will be on the social, economic, religious, and political conditions in which the art of the age participates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 216 - Baroque Art

This course addresses major styles and trends in the visual arts of Western Europe during the 17th Century. Emphasis will be on the social, economic, religious and political conditions in which the art of the age participates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 217 - 19th-Century Art

This course focuses on painting's evolution, content, and style, from circa 1780 to the turn of the 20th century. Emphasis is on the major movements: Neoclassism, Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 219 - Modern Art (Formerly ARTH 319)

This course is a study of developments in late 19th- and early 20th-century art as they pertain to the rise of Modernism. Movements examined include Post-Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, and Surrealism. While the focus will be on painting and sculpture, related developments in architecture and the decorative arts may also be considered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 222 - American Art

This survey course introduces American art through the study of selected artists and works of art, many of them in local museums. It traces the evolution of American art from Native American beginnings, through the Colonial and Federal periods, and concluding in the World War II era.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 223 - American Architecture

This course is a study of the types and styles of American architecture from the Colonial to the Post-modern periods. Some emphasis is placed on urban and garden architecture, including that of Philadelphia. Field trips to significant architectural sites are included.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 224 - Latin American Art

An examination of the visual culture of Latin America beginning with the Spanish and Portuguese arrival and colonization of the New World to the present. It will encompass the study of painting, sculpture, graphics, architecture and other visual media from Mesoamerica, Central America, South America and the Caribbean, as well as Chicano art production in the United States.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 226 - Introduction to Museums

A study of the history and evolution of the museum and an examination of its main objectives. Topics include the mission and function of art museums—collection, care of objects, exhibition, and education—as well as the politics of interpretation and display. Site visits to local art museums and presentations by museum professionals from the area are required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

ARTH 270 - Special Topics in Art History

The topics in this course vary from semester to semester. It may be repeated for credit if the material is essentially different.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ARTH 312 - Art and Medicine

This course explores the common goals of art and medicine with representations of health, anatomy, and medical issues throughout the history of art. Students hone the skills shared by the disciplines of art history and the health sciences, a type of visual literacy that requires a keen sense of observation and an analysis of social context.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ARTH 316 - Women and Art

This course encourages students to think critically about the contributions of women artists, collectors, critics, models, and viewers to the fields of art and art history. This course requires that students look beyond the traditional models of art criticism to consider how gender has shaped women's artistic practices and responses.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ARTH 320 - Topics in Contemporary Art

This course evaluates art of the late 20th and 21st Centuries in terms of a particular idea or issue. Topics include: Art & Identity in a Global World, and Art & Social Justice in the Contemporary World.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 322 - Topics in American Art

This is an advanced course that takes an in-depth look at a particular topic in American Art. Possible subjects include The Hudson River School, and Picturing Ecology in America.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 340 - Art and Culture

This course takes an in-depth look at the art of one particular culture. It offers a thematic approach to understanding art in a cultural context. Past topics include Irish Art & Rebellion, and Art & Politics of World War II.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 370 - Special Topics in Art History

Topics in this course will vary from semester to semester. It may be repeated for credit if the material is essentially different.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 380 - Research Topics in Art History

This course focuses on an analysis and application of methods used in art criticism and research, with the emphasis on writing. Subjects will vary, depending on student interests.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Required of Art History majors. Art History minors may enroll with permission of chair.

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202

ARTH 460 - Internship

The internship is designed to give art history students the opportunity to gain real-world experience in the art field. Students will meet regularly with a faculty member during their internship.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: GPA of 3.0 overall and in the major OR approval of the chair. Students must apply for interships midway through the semester before the internship begins. For more guidelines, see Department's Internship coordinator.

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202

ARTH 480 - Exhibition Seminar

This course is for those with an interest in museum studies. It gives students practical training in anticipation of a museum or gallery career. The outcome of the course is an art exhibition, most often in the La Salle University Art Museum.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

Digital Arts and Multimedia Design (DArt)

Program Description

The Digital Arts & Multimedia Design (DArt) program challenges students to wed their creativity to a variety of technical and professional skills in order to make thoughtful and effective computer-generated imagery. It prepares students for exciting and dynamic careers in any business which has visual communication needs, no matter what the size or focus of the business. Students emerge from the DArt program able to produce graphic design, web design, 2-D and 3-D animation, and audio and interactive design. They gain the aptitude to deal confidently with emerging technologies, such as augmented and virtual reality design.

Our program offers:

Why take this major?

Studying DArt at La Salle means that you will be given ample opportunity to:

Our alumni take on the following roles in the workplace, singly or as part of a team:

They have found employment at: Comcast, Forbes, Vanguard, Independence Blue Cross, Kaiser Permanente, Trellist Marketing and Technology, American Basketball Association/Philly Spirit, Disney ABC Television Group, Anthropologie, Live Nation Entertainment, Think Brownstone, and Digitability.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Required for all 3 Tracks

ART 102 - Basic Design

CSC 240 - Database Management

DART 210 - Intro to Animation

DART 230 - Intro to Web Design & Development

DART 280/281/282 - Seminar (1 cr each)

DART 330 - Advanced Web Design & Development

DART 340 - Web Scripting

DART 480 - Senior Project Management (2 cr)

DART 481 - Senior Portfolio (1 cr)

Concentrations

Track 1: Creative & Multimedia Design

Required for Track 1 (4 courses or 12 credits):

Electives for Track 1 (3 courses or 9 credits):

Track 2: Electronic Publishing

Required for Track 2 (2 courses or 6 credits):

Electives for Track 2 (5 courses or 15 credits):

Track 3: Technical Development

Required for Track 3 (2 courses or 6 credits):

Electives for Track 3 (5 courses or 15 credits):

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

39 credits

Dual Majors in DArt take 6 fewer credits than is required for the major. These 6 credits will be determined in consultation with the Program Director or Adviser.

Minor Requirements

The minor in Digital Arts & Multimedia Design requires 18 credits or 6 courses:

Recommended Course Sequence

FALL SPRING
Track 1  
ART 102

ART 220

DART 280

ART 215

DART 210

DART 220

DART 310

DART 281

DART 230

CSC 240

ELECTIVE 1

DART 330

ELECTIVE 2

DART 282

DART 340

ELECTIVE 3

DART 480

DART 481

Track 2  
ART 102

ELECTIVE 1

DART 280

DART 210

ELECTIVE 2

CSC 240

ELECTIVE 3

DART 281

DART 230

ENG 310

ELECTIVE 4

DART 330

ENG 410

DART 340

ELECTIVE 5

DART 480

DART 481

Track 3  

ART 102

ELECTIVE 1

DART 280

DART 210

CSIT 220

ELECTIVE 2

 

CSC 230

ELECTIVE 3

DART 281

DART 230

CSC 240

DART 330

ELECTIVE 4

DART 340 DART 480

ELECTIVE 5 DART 481

Course Descriptions

DART 210 - Intro to Animation

An introduction to the basic principles and techniques of planning, designing, and creating multimedia content for computer-generated animations. Students learn various currently available animation software.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102

DART 220 - Intro to Digital Audio

An introduction to the concepts and tools used in digital audio production, including recording, composing, editing, processing, and mixing. Empasis is on the integral role of sound in multimedia production.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

DART 230 - Intro to Web Design and Development

Focus on preparation, design, development, and maintenance of Web documents. Creating, revising, editing and critiquing Web sites using 'hard code' and applications-based layout and editing, and the use of style sheets. Emphasis on site architecture and mastery of Web authoring tools, including Web document deployment and debugging.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 6.1 - Technological Competency

DART 280, 281, 282 - Digital Arts Seminar I, II, III

A forum for listening to professionals present current issues, research, and trends in digital arts & multimedia design, and for learning about and discussing one's place in the profession. Each semester is 1 credit.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

DART 300 - Digital Figure Drawing

Traditional drawing concepts and exercises are applied using an electronic drawing tablet and computer software. While basic elements of drawing will be reviewed, the course foces on drawing the figure. Classical through contemporary figure painting and drawing will be studied as a means of exploring concepts and personal style.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102 or permission of instructor

DART 301 - Typography

This course relates the basic skills of manipulating type to create meaningful communication. Emphasis on the formal, compositional, and communicative aspects of type. Students will develop typographic designs for static, motion, and internet graphics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102

DART 309 - Digital Storytelling

An introduction to the basic concepts of artistic video production including storyboarding, audio recording, and non-linear editing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102

DART 310 - Advanced Animation

Builds on topics related in DArt 210, advancing knowledge and application of animation techniques.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 210

DART 320 - Advanced Digital Audio

Builds on skills introduced in DART 220, advancing knowledge and application of digital audio technology.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: DART 220

DART 330 - Advanced Web Design and Development

Focus on methods to blend graphics, design, content, and multimedia components into a single digital medium; methods for merging these components; advanced and emerging technologies involving digital authoring, including advanced layout and multimedia designs, and current technology trends including server-side; the impact of emerging technologies on digital media designs.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 230

DART 340 - Web Scripting

This course is an introduction to basic programming concepts: variables, arrays, control structures (ifs and loops), and functions, as well as an introduction to basic interface concepts such as forms, elements, events, etc. Use of these concepts in the creation of dynamic and interactive documents for the Internet. The course is mainly client-side scripting, in particular JavaScript, but may also include some server-side scripting and XML.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 230

DART 461, 462 - Internship I, II

This experience is normally part-time, paid or non-paid employment in a cooperating site to provide practical experience in the discipline. Working under professional supervision for 10 to 15 hours per week, students learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of the world of work. Students will meet regularly with a faculty member and will be required to reflect on the relationship between their course work and their internship experience.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: GPA of 2.75 overall; junior or senior standing; approval of DArt Internship Coordinator

DART 480 - Senior Project Management Seminar

Seniors plan, manage, and complete a digital media project. They collaborate, develop, and manage a project budget, maintain a time line, and participate in group exercises.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 330

Corequisites: DART 481

DART 481 - Senior Portfolio

Each student will design and develop an individual portfolio showcasing the creative work he or she developed and the techniques used to achieve them. The portfolio will be presented to a faculty panel for evaluation.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 330

Corequisites: DART 480

Department of Biology

Mission Statement

The Biology Department of La Salle University is dedicated to the Lasallian tradition of excellence in teaching. We are committed to developing the full intellectual, personal, and social potential of our students in an environment of mutual respect and cooperation.

The faculty of La Salle’s Biology Department serves qualified students interested in pursuing further education and careers in the health professions, the physical sciences, the life sciences, and science education. In addition, we provide for non-science majors a variety of foundation level courses that explore biological issues of interest and concern to the general public.

La Salle has a long and proud tradition of training undergraduates for admission to health profession schools. We believe it important to provide these undergraduates with courses that emphasize the general principles of the life sciences and that address a diverse range of current scientific issues. We are equally committed to preparing students for graduate work in the life sciences, for careers in scientific/clinical technology, or for careers in science education by providing them with broadly based theoretical and laboratory training. We feel the development of critical thinking skills and the establishment of a firm understanding of the foundational principles of the life sciences are the best preparation for more specialized professional and graduate training.

We believe the academic experience should provide an opportunity for mutual advancement and sharing of excitement for science through supportive yet challenging dialogue among faculty and students.

Major(s) Offered

BS Biology

BS Environmental Science

BA/BS Secondary Education/Biology

Minor(s) Offered

Biology

Environmental Science

Location/Contact Information

David Zuzga, Chair

Holroyd Hall 235

zuzga@lasalle.edu

215.991.3773

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Ballough, Hoersch, Pierce

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Samulewicz, Seitchik, Zuzga

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Church, DeHaven, Hazell, Ling

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: McClory

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Belzer

Biology

Program Description

The Biology Department of La Salle University is dedicated to the Lasallian tradition of excellence in teaching. We are committed to developing the full intellectual, personal, and social potential of our students in an environment of mutual respect and cooperation.

The faculty of La Salle's Biology Department serves qualified students interested in pursuing further education and careers in the health professions, the physical sciences, the life sciences, and science education. In addition, we provide for non-science majors a variety of foundation level courses that explore biological issues of interest and concern to the general public.

La Salle has a long and proud tradition of training undergraduates for admission to health profession schools. We believe it important to provide these undergraduates with courses that emphasize the general principles of the life sciences and that address a diverse range of current scientific issues. We are equally committed to preparing students for graduate work in the life sciences, for careers in scientific/clinical technology, or for careers in science education by providing them with broadly-based theoretical and laboratory training. We feel the development of critical thinking skills and the establishment of a firm understanding of the foundational principles of the life sciences are the best preparation for more specialized professional and graduate training.

We believe the academic experience should provide an opportunity for mutual advancement and sharing of excitement for science through supportive yet challenging dialogue among faculty and students.

Why take this major?

The Biology program fosters a deep understanding of foundational knowledge in the life sciences and encourages students to apply this understanding in laboratory research projects that develop critical thinking skills and scientific reasoning. This training allows students to pursue a broad range of opportunities related to the life sciences including medical or graduate school and careers in the health professions, scientific/clinical technology, or science education.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHM 111 General Chemistry I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics
BIO 220 -  Structure and Function of Organisms
BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution, Ecology
BIO 412 - Biochemistry
BIO 413 - Molecular Biology

Additional 300/400-level biology courses to total a minimum of 11 courses

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry I
CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry II
PHY 105 -General Physics I
PHY 106 - General Physics II
MTH 120 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

REQUIRED FOR MINOR IN BIOLOGY:

BIO 210
BIO 220
BIO 230

Three additional courses from the 300/400 level

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 210   Biology 220  
Chemistry 111   Chemistry 112  
       

Sophomore Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 230   Biology Elective  
Chemistry 201   Chemistry 202  
Math 113 or Math 120   Math 120  
       

Junior Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 412   Biology 413  
Biology Elective   Biology Elective  
Physics 105   Physics 106  

Senior Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology Elective or Capstone   Biology Elective or Capstone  
Biology Elective      
       

* This is a "typical" schedule. Some students will take Biology 210 after the Fall semester of their freshman year.

Course Descriptions

BIO 157 - Life Science: An Environmental Approach

This foundation biology course for non-majors places emphasis on the unifying concepts of ecology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of environmental issues, and establish a relevance to students' lives. Topics will include human influence on patterns and products of change in living systems, energy matter and organization, and human interaction and interdependence with other living systems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BIO 158 - Life Science: A Human Approach

This foundation biology course for non-majors places emphasis on the unifying concepts of human biology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of life, and establish a relevance to students' lives. Topics will include: maintaining dynamic equilibrium in humans, human reproduction and inheritance, and human growth and differentiation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 161-162 - Anatomy and Physiology

This basic course in the structure and functioning of the human body places emphasis on the interrelationships of the major organ systems. It is intended for Allied Health students. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory; two terms.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: BIO 161 is a prerequisite for BIO 162.

BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology

Topics of this course include structure, growth, and identification of medically important microorganisms; role of specific pathogens in the etiology of human disease; immunology; chemotherapeutic and antibiotic control of infectious diseases. It is intended for Allied Health students. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics

This course provides an introduction to the principles of cellular and molecular biology and genetics. Topics include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular reproduction, and molecular and classical genetics. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students must be eligible for Math 113 or Math 120 and Chem 111

Prerequisites: High school or college chemistry.

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 220 - Structure and Function of Organisms

This course is an introduction to the principles of plant and animal form and function. Emphasis will be placed on the correlation of structure and function of the major organ systems of plants and animals. Laboratory sessions will focus on physiological phenomena. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or better in BIO 210

BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution, And Ecology

Topics in this course include an integrated study of evolutionary principles and mechanisms, the diversity of life, ecosystem structure and dynamics, human interaction with ecosystem components, and the biological basis of behavior. Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or better in BIO 220

BIO 301 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

This course examines the comparative systemic anatomy of the vertebrate classes, hypotheses of origin, and radiation of the phylum Chordata. Laboratory dissections of representative Chordates from amphioxus to mammal. Two hours lecture; four hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 303 - Microbiology

This course addresses the structure, growth, identification, and control of microorganisms of major medical, environmental, and industrial importance; molecular control and genetics of bacteria and viruses; immunology; microbial pathogenesis; and epidemiology of infectious diseases of humans. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 305 - General Physiology

This lecture-laboratory course examines the metabolic processes and associated physiochemical phenomena of vertebrates. Current hypotheses of neural, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, and digestive physiology will be studied. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 306 - Neurobiology

This course involves a lecture-laboratory study of the nervous system, including principles of membrane biophysics, cellular neurophysiology, systems neurophysiology, and neuroanatomy. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 310 - Genetics

This course is an introduction to genetics at the molecular, cytological, and organismal level. Included are the thorough coverage of Mendelian and other basic transmission genetics phenomena in the light of our knowledge of DNA and cell structure and function; mutation and mutagenesis; and an introduction to recombinant DNA. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 314 - Biometrics

This course addresses the analysis of experiments and research data in quantitative biology. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including probability distributions, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 317 - Invertebrate Zoology

Topics of this course involve life processes, phylogenetic advances, and basic classification of the major pre-chordate phyla with emphasis on their evolution and ecology. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 318 - Evolution

This course involves a presentation and analysis of the evidence for the evolution of life. Major topics include the origin of life and cellular organelles as well as the development of the diversity of life present today. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the ideas of Charles Darwin as expanded and modified by evidence from modern population genetics, cytogenetics, and molecular biology. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 319 - The Plant Kingdom

Topics of this course involve functional anatomy, phylogeny, and basic systematics of non-vascular and vascular plants. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 400 - Marine Biology

This course offers a contemporary view of the dynamics establishing community structure in pelagic, estuarine, mangrove tidepool, coral reef, hydrothermal vent, and intertidal ecosystems. Structural, functional, behavioral, and adaptive modifications of marine organisms will be examined. Three hours lecture; field trip(s) typically included.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 402 - Cell Biology

This course examines the physical properties, chemical structure, and metabolism of simple and specialized cells, as well as recent advances in the techniques of cell culture and investigation. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 403 - Principles of Ecology

This course addresses the basic concepts of ecology and a broad introduction to overall biosphere functioning. Major topics include energy flows; nutrient cycles; environmental conditions and their importance; plants and animals at the individual, population, and community level; and the overall functioning and development of the major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 404 - Field Ecology

This course involves field and laboratory projects/research at La Salle's Penllyn Biostation and other sites. Six hours laboratory and field work.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 403 or permission of instructor

BIO 405 - Histology

This course focuses on an examination of the minute and ultra structure of mammalian primary tissues together with their functional relationships in the formation of major organ systems; histological basis of function is stressed. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 406 - Developmental Biology

This course focuses on the molecular and genetic analysis of development and differentiation. Some descriptive morphogenesis is considered. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 412 - Biochemistry

The course demonstrates the principles of basic biochemistry while focusing on the interrelationships between those biochemical pathways that provide energy and those that provide the basic molecular species for synthesis. Topics include bioenergetics, low molecular weight biosynthesis, enzyme function and kinetics, and metabolic control. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses; CHM 201 and 202.

BIO 413 - Molecular Biology

This is a survey course that will examine the basic concepts of molecular biology. Topics include mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication, transcription, and translation, recombinant DNA technology, molecular aspects of gene interaction and recombination, cellular transformation, and the molecular biology of the nervous and immune systems. The laboratory focuses on utilizing the basic techniques currently employed in molecular biology (molecular cloning, ELISA, genetic recombination, gel electrophoresis, etc.) Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 412

BIO 420 - Genomics

The Genomics course will be a hybrid lecture and hands-on computer course. This course will focus on the topic of genome organization and the bioinformatic tools that are used to study genomes. We will investigate the genome structure of viral, microbial, and eukaryotic genomes and the different databases used to store and access this data. DNA sequence analysis using the BLAST algorithm and multiple sequence alignments will be studied. Identifying genes and genomic elements using different computational tools will be performed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 430 - The Biology of Cancer

The cellular and molecular mechanisms driving cancer's hallmark phenotypes will be explored. These include proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, reprogramming of energy metabolism and evading immune destruction. Within these conceptual frameworks, primary scientific literature will be examined and clinical implications of the research evaluated. Students will choose a specific area of interest, allowing them to develop an in-depth understanding of the current "state-of-the-art" in a field of research. Students will gain an informed understanding of the inherent challenges cancer presents and assess the prospects of treating and ultimately curing the disease.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 460 - Cooperative Education/Internship

This is normally a full-time, paid employment at a cooperating institution/company to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions may qualify). It involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. Position must be approved by Department Chair. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses; 3.0 G.P.A or higher.

BIO 470 - Special Topics in Biology

Periodically, a course will be offered that deals in detail with a topic of interest in current biological research. Students may be asked to write library research paper(s) and present a seminar.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 480-481 - Biological Research

This research is for election by qualified students contemplating advanced studies. It is intended to provide actual research experience under staff supervision. Students are required to present a seminar on their work and to prepare a poster. Hours to be arranged.

Number of Credits: 3 each

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A 2.0 or higher science GPA (average of grades from BIO 210, BIO 220, BIO 230, CHM 111 and CHM 112) is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses; permission of Chair required.

ENV 152 - Oceanography

This course provides a study of the physical processes that affect the oceans of the earth. Emphasis will be on tides, currents, waves, chemistry of the sea, and geology of ocean basins. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 153 - Introduction to Environmental Science

This course is an introduction to the field of environmental sciences, including the historical development of the subject, the current state of knowledge, and the development of humans and the impact they have had on our environment. Three lectures and three hours laboratory. Course includes mandatory field trips.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 155 - Earth Science

This course covers various topics pertaining to the earth and its place inthe universe. Major aspects of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy are studied. Emphasis is placed on the interactions of earth systems, and the evolution of our plane

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information. Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data. Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology. This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

GEO 202 - Mineralogy

Hand specimen identification of minerals is emphasized in this course. Study of the growth, internal structure, and physical properties of minerals is addressed. Six hours of lecture and laboratory are required.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

GEO 305 - Environmental Geochemistry

This course provides a practical background in basic geochemical principles that can be applied to environmental problems, such as global warming, acid rain, smog, acid mine drainage, nuclear waste disposal, and water pollution. Three-hour lecture/three-hour laboratory is required.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, CHM 112, ENV 153

Environmental Science

Program Description

The Environmental Science Program offers a specialized, integrated approach to global issues surronding sustainability, the use of natureal resources, how human activity impacts ecosystems, how such activity can cause degradation, and what can be done to mitigate this impact.

Why take this major?

Our program is designed to place graduates into positions in industry, energy and environmental, governmental and private, as well as in graduate programs (science or policy/management), and service institutions and agencies (Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, etc). Students (have been) and will be qualified to work in fields such as oil, gas and coal, alternative energy, environmental management, resource management, land-use planning, environmental policy, and environmental law (upon completion of law school). The Environmental Science program can also serve as a pre-teaching opportunity that prepares students for certification in education. We also understand the need to enhance critical thinking skills and have designed the environmental science curricula to meet this challenge by requiring an eclectic array of courses from many non-science related departments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Students must have a 2.00 G.P.A. in their major courses in order to graduate.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

ENV 153 - Introduction to Enviromental Science

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 152 - Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ENV 153 -Introduction to Environmental Science
MTH 120 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for Life Science
BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics
BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution and Ecology
BIO 320 - Biostatistics
ENV 202 -Earth Materials
ENV 305 -Environmental Chemistry
ENV xxx -Fundamentals of Soil Science
ENV xxx - Environmental Air Quality
ENV 310 -Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
POL 316 -Environmental Law and Policy
ENV 4xx - Capstone

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

ENV 153

Plus five courses chosen in consultation with Program Director

Recommended Course Sequence

Year

Fall

Spring

 

Freshman

ENV 153

BIO 210

CHM 111

CHM 112

   
   
   

 

Sophomore

ENV 202

BIO 230

MTH 120

BIO 320

CHM 262

 
   
   

 

Junior

ENV 305

ENV 310

POL 316

ENV xxx (soil)

 

ENV xxx (air quality)

   
   

 

Senior

ENV 4xx (capstone)

ENV elective

ENV elective

ENV elective

 

 

Course Descriptions

NOTE: - Requires courses from other disciplines.

A list of all courses may be found online at Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Mission Statement

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry embraces and supports the overall mission of La Salle University. We strive to create and maintain a nurturing, supportive environment for both students and faculty as we advance our understanding of chemistry and its application to the world around us. Our goal is to establish a community of curious and knowledgeable active learners. Implicit in the mission is a profound respect for the individual learner and an emphasis on the ethical responsibility of scientific inquiry towards the broader local, national and global communities.

Major(s) Offered

BS Chemistry

BS Biochemistry

Minor(s) Offered

Chemistry

Location/Contact Information

William Price, Chair

Holroyd Hall 345

price@lasalle.edu

215.951.1261

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Cichowicz, Price

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Prushan

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Femia, Kramer

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Lammers

INSTRUCTORS: Grande

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Straub

Biochemistry

Program Description

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry embraces and supports the overall mission of La Salle University. We strive to create and maintain a nurturing, supportive environment for both students and faculty as we advance our understanding of chemistry and its application to the world around us. Our goal is to establish a community of curious and knowledgeable active learners. Implicit in the mission is a profound respect for the individual learner and an emphasis on the ethical responsibility of scientific inquiry towards the broader local, national and global communities.

Why take this major?

Our graduates have attended some of the best graduate schools in the country including Princeton, Harvard, Berkeley, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, and Caltech. Many of our students have become physicians, laywers, or teachers, while other graduates have obtained lucrative employment in the chemical industry.

No matter what their chosen career path, our graduates excel because our department trains them in the critical thinking and problem solving. As a liberal arts university, La Salle has a curriculum that offers a solid background in the fundamentals of chemical and biochemical sciences coupled with a broad-based education. Students are made aware of the interconnections of chemistry with the other sciences and also with the social sciences, business, and the humanities. With such an education, our graduates leave La Salle as dynamic, adaptable, and prepared individuals ready for almost anything they will face in the future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

2.00 average in major courses required to graduate

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHM 111 General Chemistry I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 152 Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry I
CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry II
CHM 212 - Quantitative Analysis
CHM 311 - Instrumental Analysis
CHM 332 - Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy
CHM 331 - Thermodynamics & Kinetics
CHM 403 - Inorganic Chemistry
CHM 411 - Biochemistry I
CHM 412 - Biochemistry II
CHM 480 - Chemical Research
MTH 120 - Calculus I
MTH 121 - Calculus II
CSC 152 - Introduction to Computing; Mathematics/Science Applications
PHY 105 - General Physics I
PHY 106 - General Physics II

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Biochemistry majors wishing to double major in Chemistry need to take CHM 320 in addition to their Biochemistry major requirements.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year

CHM 111

CHM 112

MTH 120

MTH 221

Sophomore Year

CHM 201

CHM 202

PHY 105

PHY 106

CHM 212

Junior Year

CHM 311

CHM 331

CHM 332

Senior Year

CHM 403

CHM 412

CHM 411

Course Descriptions

Chemistry

Program Description

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry embraces and supports the overall mission of La Salle University. We strive to create and maintain a nurturing, supportive environment for both students and faculty as we advance our understanding of chemistry and its application to the world around us. Our goal is to establish a community of curious and knowledgeable active learners. Implicit in the mission is a profound respect for the individual learner and an emphasis on the ethical responsibility of scientific inquiry towards the broader local, national and global communities.

Why take this major?

Our graduates have attended some of the best graduate schools in the country including Princeton, Harvard, Berkeley, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, and Caltech. Many of our students have become physicians, laywers, or teachers, while other graduates have obtained lucrative employment in the chemical industry.

No matter what their chosen career path, our graduates excel because our department trains them in the critical thinking and problem solving. As a liberal arts university, La Salle has a curriculum that offers a solid background in the fundamentals of chemical science coupled with a broad-based education. Students are made aware of the interconnections of chemistry with the other sciences and also with the social sciences, business, and the humanities. With such an education, our graduates leave La Salle as dynamic, adaptable, and prepared individuals ready for almost anything they will face in the future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

2.0 cumlative

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHM 111 General Chemistry I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 152 Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

CHM 111 General Chemistry I
CHM 112 General Chemistry II
CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I
CHM 202 Organic Chemistry II
CHM 212 Quantitative Analysis
CHM 311 Instrumental Analysis
CHM 320 Advanced Organic Laboratory Methods
CHM 332 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
CHM 331 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
CHM 403 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
CHM 411 Biochemistry I
CHM 480 Chemical Research
MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MTH 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
CSC 152 Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications
PHY 105 Physics I
PHY 106 Physics II

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Chemistry majors wishing to double major in Biochemistry need to take CHM 412 in addition to their Chemistry major requirements.

Minor Requirements

CHM 111, 112, 201, 202, and any two of the following: 212, 311, 320 or 332

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Spring

Freshman Year:

CHM 111

CHM 112

MTH 120

MTH 221

Sophomore Year

CHM 201

CHM 202

PHY 105

PHY 106

CHM 212

Junior Year

CHM 311

CHM 331

CHM 332

CHM 320

Senior Year

CHM 403

CHM 411

 

Course Descriptions

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I

General Chemistry I provides a firm basis for understanding the fundamentals of chemistry. This course covers atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and the periodic table. The descriptive chemistry is principally concerned with the reactions of nonmetals and of ions in solution. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 101 (C+ or better) or equivalent

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

CHM 112 - General Chemistry II

General Chemistry II builds on the concepts of General Chemistry I and focuses on gasses, properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry. The laboratory experiments reinforce the concepts covered in lecture. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111 (C- or better)

CHM 150 - Consumer Chemistry

Consumer Chemistry is a non-mathematical examination of the development of fact and theory in chemistry and the utilization of chemistry by society. Topics may include energy, pharmaceuticals, environmental effects, food additives, or synthetic materials. No prior knowledge of chemistry required. The course consists of three hours of lecture/laboratory sessions.

Number of Credits: 3

CHM 152 - Criminalistics for Non-Physical Science Majors

This course is for non-science majors who are interested in learning more about how evidence from a crime scene is collected, analyzed, and evaluated. Of necessity, the course will be numerical in nature, but not math-intensive. As a multidisciplinary area of study, the course will use concepts from chemistry, biology, biochemistry, physics, toxicology, statistics, and other fields and will employ hands-on learning activities and laboratories, group work, and the traditional lecture format to convey the course material. The course consists of four hours of lecture/laboratory sessions.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

CHM 161 - Chemistry of The Life Sciences

Chemistry for the Life Sciences is a course for students typically majoring in nursing or nutrition. The course gives a general knowledge of chemistry (mostly inorganic) with an emphasis on health-related topics and problem-solving strategies. Descriptive and quantitative principles are discussed. This course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: High School Algebra

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry I

Organic Chemistry is the study of compounds containing carbon. This course is focused on the structure, bonding, and stereochemistry of these compounds together with an introduction to reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis. This course, as well as CHM 202, is intended for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry, and biology as well as those pursuing a career in the health professions. The laboratory introduces techniques used in organic synthesis, separation, purification, and structure elucidation. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112 (C- or better)

CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry II

The second semester of Organic Chemistry builds on the foundation established in CHM 201. The functional group and mechanistic approach to organic reactions allows for a more in-depth approach to organic synthesis. The use of basic spectral methods as a means of structure elucidation is also covered in this course. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 201 (C- or better)

CHM 212 - Quantitative Analysis

This course covers important areas of analytical chemistry, including statistics, error analysis, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and colorimetry. This course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112 (C- or better)

CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for The Life Sciences

CHM 262 is a one-semester course in organic chemistry designed to be particularly applicable to students majoring in nutrition and other health sciences. The subject matter includes organic chemistry principles: the naming of compounds, identification of functional groups, and chemical reactions. A particular emphasis is made in the coverage of reactions that are common to both organic and biochemistry. An effort will be made to make the examples and problems as health-related as possible. This course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 161 (C- or better)

CHM 263 - Biochemistry for the Life Sciences

CHM 263 is a one-semester course in biochemistry designed to be particularly applicable to students majoring in nutrition. The subject matter includes biochemical principles (identification and properties of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, metabolic pathways, etc.). An effort will be made to make the examples and problems as health-related as possible. This course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 262 (C- or better)

CHM 265 - Criminalistics for Physical Science Majors

Criminalistics for Physical Science Majors is a course for physical science majors who are interested in learning more about how evidence from a crime scene is collected, analyzed, and evaluated. The course employs hands-on learning activities, group work, and the traditional lecture format to convey the course material. Forensic science is a multidisciplinary field, and, as such, the course touches on areas of chemistry, biology, biochemistry, physics, toxicology, statistics, and other fields. The course consists of four hours of lecture/laboratory sessions.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 201 (C- or better)

CHM 311 - Instrumental Analysis

CHM 311 covers the theory and practice of physical measurments with modern chemical instrumentation. The course is divided into two parts: spectroscopic and separation methods. Topics include UV-visible, FT-IR, fluorescence, and magnetic resonance spectroscopies as well as mass spectrometry, gas and liquid chromatographies. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112 (C- or better) or permission from instructor

CHM 320 - Organic Laboratory Methods

This is a course in modern methods of organic synthesis and structure elucidation. This laboratory-intensive course emphasizes asymmetric synthesis, green chemistry, advanced spectral methods, and literature searching. The course consists of 75 minutes of lecture and six hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 202 (C- or better)

CHM 331 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

This course applies the principles of thermodynamics and kinetics to explain the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. Topics include the elucidation of chemical equilibria, phase transitions, reaction mechanisms, and statistical ensembles of energy states. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 202, MTH 221, PHY 106 (C- or better in all)

CHM 332 - Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy

This course uses the formalism of quantum mechanics to understand fundamental chemical systems. It explores atomic and molecular structures, molecular vibrations, and molecular rotations. It also explores the use of spectroscopy to probe these chemical processes. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112, MTH 221, PHY 106 (C- or better in all)

CHM 350, 450 - Cooperative Education

This course normally involves full-time, paid employment in a cooperating firm to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). The experience involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Department Chair. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information.

Number of Credits: 3

CHM 403 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This course covers theoretical and practical aspects of chemical bonding, descriptive periodic trends, and molecular structure and symmetry of molecules. A special emphasis is given to the chemistry of the transition metals, including coordination and organometallic chemistry. This course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 331, 332 (C- or better in both)

CHM 411 - Biochemistry I

Biochemistry I examines the biochemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, enzymes, and hormones from a chemist's perspective and emphasizes their role in metabolic processes. Laboratory work illustrates common techniques used to isolate, identify, and assay these molecules, such as chromatography, electrophoresis, and kinetic analysis. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 202, CHM 331 or permission from the instructor

CHM 412 - Biochemistry II

Biochemistry II focuses on the storage, replication, transmission, and expression of genetic information. It also examines recombinant DNA methodology and physiological processes at the molecular level. Laboratory work includes the isolation and analysis of plasmid DNA, creation of a new plasmid, and transformation into bacterial cells. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 411

CHM 470 - Special Topics

Occasionally, courses in "Bioinorganic Chemistry," "Advanced Organic and Organometallic Chemistry," or "Polymer Chemistry" may be offered as Special Topics. These courses are designed for juniors and seniors majoring in chemistry and/or biochemistry.

Number of Credits: 3

CHM 480-481 - Chemical Research

These courses provide students with the opportunity to engage in individual chemical or biochemical research. The research can be either laboratory-based or theoretical in nature. The work is done under the supervision of a staff member. The courses are restricted to chemistry and biochemistry majors unless otherwise approved by the chair of the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. The specific hours for the course are arranged with the supervising staff member with a minimum of six research hours per week.

Number of Credits: 4 credits each

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Department of Communication

Mission Statement

Guided by Lasallian values, the Communication Department integrates liberal arts education with theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the communication field, and challenges students to demonstrate communication competence.

The Department seeks to develop graduates who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings. Beyond assisting students with finding meaningful careers, we seek to provide students with the communication knowledge and skills needed for meaningful personal, professional and social relationships.

Major(s) Offered

BA Communication
BA/MA Communication 5-year

Minor(s) Offered

A minor in Communication is perfect for students from a wide variety of majors. From improving desirable workplace qualities to gaining skills in media and public relations, our minors offer students a variety of options.

The Department offers minors in the following areas:

Concentrations

Communication Management

Media and Journalism

Public Relations

Location/Contact Information

Communication Center, South Campus, 215.951.1844

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Dainton, Lannutti, Molyneaux

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Dunleavy, Smith, Texter, Zelley

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Celano, Daily, Lashley

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bradford, Muse

Communication

Program Description

The Communication major blends theory with practice, built on a liberal arts education and supplemented with experiential learning opportunities within and outside the classroom. This approach is captured in our program motto: Think. Do.

Communication majors start with a grounding in classes that provide a strong theoretical foundation for understanding a field that traces its roots to Aristotle but is as contemporary as today's Tweet. Students then can pursue tracks in Communication and Social Interaction, Media and Journalism, and Public Relations. These concentrations provide the communication knowledge and skills needed for meaningful personal, professional and social relationships.

Students may earn credit for Internships, including unique 1-credit internships that allow first and second year students to earn credit while taking advantage of the opportunities that studying in the nation's 5th largest media market provide.

The major seeks to develop graduates who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings. This goal reflects the Lasallian tradition of providing a practical education in the service of the greater good.

Why take this major?

Think. Do.

In our classes and on-campus experiences, we'll teach you how to think. You'll learn the theory that will help you make good decisions about how to best tell stories, position an organization, improve relationships. You'll be able to judge what works and what doesn't, and then prove it through research.

Our faculty work side by side with students to discuss tough issues, problem-solve, and develop communication strategies and tactics.

From your first few weeks on campus, you can get involved with our student organizations to gain valuable experience. Several of our classes use experiential and service-learning activities to help you gain real-life experience in a classroom setting.

This combination of thinking and doing prepares you to tackle internships in the nation's fifth largest media market (and beyond), which means incredible internship opportunities to apply what you learn. Our students intern with the Philadelphia Eagles, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and NBC10, and some internships have taken our thinkers and doers to the White House, the Super Bowl, The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, and ESPN. And that's just the short list.

We have 40 years worth of alumni ready to provide mentoring, internship opportunities, and a gateway to the careers you might seek.

Even if you're not interested in a career in communication, the major allows you to develop some of job skills most highly desired by employers--writing and speaking, teamwork, problem solving, interpersonal effectivness, and persuasion.

As a La Salle Communication graduate, you'll have the knowledge and the practical experience to launch your career.

Student Learning Outcomes

Aligned with learning outcomes from the National Communication Association (NCA), Communication majors, regardless of track or concentration, will be able to:

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

A student must have a 2.0 gpa in the major in order to graduate. If students want to earn credit for an internship, they should have a 2.75 GPA.

 

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Com 101 Intro Mass Media
Com 102 Interpersonal Com
Com 150 Presentation Skills (meets ILO1-8.1a/12.1)
Com 205 Com Theory & Research
Com 312 Persuasion

Concentrations

WE HAVE THREE CONCENTRATIONS

*Concentration: Communication & Social Interaction
Com 215 Group & Team Com (F)
Com 220 Com & Culture (S) (meets ILO1-11.1)
Com 315 Adv. Interpersonal (S)
Com 316 Com Research & Analysis
Com 317 Organizational Com
Choose (1)  from:  Com 203 Media Writing (S); or Com 206 News Writing; or Com 357 PR Writing
Choose (1) from: Com 267 Conflict; Com 325 Nonverbal Com; Com 345 Sex, Gender, & Communication; Com 365 Communication in Relationships
Com 415 Communication Management & Development (F)
Two COM electives outside of concentration

*Concentration: Public Relations
Com 206 News Writing & Reporting
Com 207 Principles of PR
Com 316 Com Research & Analysis
Com 317 Organizational Com
Com 357 PR Writing
Com 338 Social Media (F)
Com 387 PR Cases & Campaigns
Com 407 Public Relations Management
Two COM electives outside of concentration

*Concentration: Media & Journalism
Com 204 Media Criticism (F)
Com 208 Intro to Digital Video
Com 301 Media Industries
Com 358 Adv. Media Production
Com 308 Com Law & Ethics
Choose (1) from: Com 203 Media Writing (S); OR Com 206 News Writing
Choose (1) from: Com 306 Feature Writing (F); OR Com 368 Video Editing (S)
Com 408 Media & Journalism Practicum
Two COM electives outside of concentration

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Dual majors must complete the Communication Major core requirements plus the requirements for at least one concentration. Communication elective courses are usually waived for dual majors. The plan of study is developed in consultation with the department Chair.

Minor Requirements

Please see the Communication Department Chair to declare a Minor.

Interpersonal Skills Minor

COM 150 Presentation Skills
COM 102 Interpersonal Communication
COM 215 Group and Team Communication
COM 220 Intercultural Communication
COM 312 Persuasion, Power and Influence
COM 317 Organizational Communication

Media Studies Minor

COM 101: Mass Media and Society
COM 204: Media Criticism
COM 205: Com Theory & Research
COM 300: Communication Ethics
COM 301 Media Industries
COM 308 Communication Law and Ethics

Media Skills Minor

COM 101 Mass Media and Society
COM 150 Presentation Skills
COM 208 Introduction to Digital Video
COM 338 Social Media
COM 358 Advanced Media Production
Choice of either
COM 206 News Writing and Reporting or
COM 203 Media Writing

Public Relations

COM 101 Mass Media and Society
COM 150 Presentation Skills
COM 207 Principles of Public Relations
COM 312 Persuasion, Power and Influence
COM 357 Public Relations Writing
COM 387 PR Cases and Campaigns

General Communication Minor

COM 150 Presentation Skills
COM 101 Mass Media and Society
COM 102 Interpersonal Communication
One or two 200-level courses
Two or three 300-level courses

Students in the General Communication Minor may enroll in a 400-level course, assuming they have completed the pre-requisites, with permission of the Department Chair.

Recommended Course Sequence

The chart below illustrates the recommended sequence of courses for Communication majors. Transfer students should also follow this sequence. This will depend on whether the student has transferred in any Communication courses.

  Communication Core Communication &
Social Interaction
Media &
Journalism
Public Relations
First Year Students

COM 101
COM 102
COM 150

     
Sophomores COM 205
COM 312

COM 215 (F)
COM 220 (S)
COM 203(S)/206/357

COM 203(S)/206
COM 204(F)
COM 208

COM 206
COM 207
COM 317
Juniors   COM 315(S)
COM 316
COM 317
COM 301
COM 358
COM 306(F)/COM 356 (S)
COM 316
COM 357
COM 387
Seniors   COM 415 COM 408 COM 407
Anytime  

COM 267/325/3345/365
COM elective 1
COM elective 2

COM 308
COM elective 1
COM elective 2
COM 338(F)
COM elective 1
COM elective 2

F=Fall Semester, S=Spring Semester

 

Course Descriptions

COM 101 - Mass Media & Society

This course is an introduction to the mass media and their impact on society. Students will investigate the historical, technological, and social developments of a variety of media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, film, and emerging technologies. Students will be asked to consider evidence, assumptions, and assertions about the effects of media in order to draw conclusions about the responsibility of media professionals and the public when creating, sharing, and consuming content. The course will also examine legal and ethical issues of the media and how politics and economics affect the form, function, and content of media.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

COM 102 - Interpersonal Communication

This course examines the factors that influence interpersonal communication, effective and ineffective interpersonal communication practices, and the effects of interpersonal communication on our personal and professional lives. Specific topics include how culture influences communication, conflict management, the power of language, and the influence of communication on relationship development, maintenance, and deterioration.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 150 - Presentation Skills

The presentation skills course teaches students how to research, structure, and deliver effective oral presentations. It requires active student participation in order to build both skills and confidence. Among the topics covered in the course are: analyzing the audience; identifying, selecting, and critically evaluating content; organizing content in a logical manner; matching presentation content to presentation goals; using visual aids effectively; dealing with speaking anxiety; and effective, respectful collaboration in preparing presentations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 8.1.a - Oral Communication/ILO 12.1 - Collaborative Engagement

COM 203 - Media Writing

In this course, students will learn a variety of creative writing techniques for visual media projects. Students will work with various written formats including creative concepts, dual column and master scene scripts, treatments, and storyboards. Students will work within an interactive writers' room to craft effective advertisements/public service announcements, documentary concepts, original film and television scripts, and projects for emerging and interactive media forms. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 204 - Media Criticism

In this gateway course to the Media & Journalism track, students will learn the language of mediated storytelling by describing and analyzing the ways in which stories are creatively and artistically crafted for various formats and purposes, including television, film, online video, documentary, and news. Students will be exposed to various types of contemporary visual media, and discuss the ways in which production techniques play a role in creative expression and telling effective stories.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

COM 205 - Communication Theory and Research

This course introduces students to significant theories of communication, including interpersonal communication, mass media, and persuasion theories. Students will be introduced to the humanistic, social scientific, and critical traditions. A focus of the course is on practical application of theory to real world problems and situations. The course is geared toward sophomore or early junior-year students.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101 and COM 102

COM 206 - News Writing & Reporting

This course teaches students how to report and write news stories that are accurate, fair and complete. Students will learn the basic elements of reporting—how to observe events, how to interview people, and how to use other research tools. Students will also learn how to write and structure news stories for different media platforms including print, broadcast and online. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 207 - Principles of Public Relations

Public relations has been called "the unseen power" that influences culture, business, politics, and society. This class introduces students to the wide-ranging field of public relations, the role it plays in managing organizational relationships of all kinds, and the skills required to succeed in one of the fastest-growing communication professions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 208 - Introduction to Digital Video

This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices of audio and video production. Students will learn how the preproduction, production, and postproduction stages apply to media. Emphasis is on storytelling, the importance of audience research and planning, scheduling, and selecting and employing proper resources. Students will experience the process using fundamental production techniques of audio and video through hands-on projects.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 215 - Group and Team Communication

Successfully working within a group or team setting is important for our academic, professional, and personal lives. This course blends the theory and practice of successful group communication. Through experiential activities, students will learn about group roles, collaboration, and effective and ineffective decision-making and problem solving.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 220 - Intercultural Communication

Communication between members of different cultural groups is complex and challenging, and can lead to misunderstanding and a lack of trust. This course focuses on uncovering historical patterns that influence values, beliefs, and behaviors within cultural groups, and how these issues influence communication practices. A particular focus is on increasing knowledge and skills to improve communication between races and other ethnic and cultural groups.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

COM 267 - Communication and Conflict Management

Communication can be the source of conflict, can reflect conflict, or can be a tool to resolve conflict. This course focuses on productive and unproductive conflict management processes, with a particular focus on the techniques associated with negotiation and dispute resolution.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 300 - Communication Ethics

This course provides students with an overview of ethical standards relevant to social behavior and an in-depth study of contemporary ethical issues facing communicators. Students will apply ethical perspectives such as virtue, universalism, utilitarianism, egalitarianism, dialogic ethics, postmodernism, and the feminist ethic of care to contemporary ethical issues in interpersonal, organizational, public, and mass mediated communication contexts. Concepts of truth, confidentiality, conflict of interest, social justice, and other issues will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

COM 301 - Media Industries

This course explores how the media industries of television, radio, and the web have grown and changed through exploration of the economics, regulation, and effects of current entertainment and news media. Students will analyze how media companies make decisions based on research, discuss up to the minute news related to the business practices of media conglomerates, and learn the impact of media business decisions on society and culture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101

COM 306 - Feature Writing & Reporting

In this course, students will learn how to report and write feature stories making use of storytelling techniques such as scene-setting, descriptive language, the narrative arc, character development, use of dialogue, explication, and literary devices such as metaphors, flashbacks, foreshadowing and parallel construction. The techniques learned in this class will be applicable to print, broadcast and online presentation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 206

COM 308 - Communication Law & Ethics

The course is designed to review the history, development, and interpretation of the First Amendment in the U.S. by our court system and its impact upon journalists, professional communicators, and citizens, along with the ethical principles that underpin effective communication practices. Topics include privacy, defamation, press freedom, media regulations, and the law of emerging technologies. Students will learn to apply statutes, case law, and ethical theories to First Amendment issues and disputes. This course also meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding and reasoning within the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 310 - Communication Portfolio

The portfolio assists students with synthesizing and applying what they have learned in Communication courses to the task of bridging from undergraduate studies to post-graduation. Students will build a portfolio that can be used to demonstrate knowledge and skills.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

COM 312 - Persuasion, Power, And Influence

This course emphasizes theory-based analysis of persuasive messages across a variety of contexts and situations, ranging from interpersonal settings to mass mediated-campaigns. Students will also be taught techniques of presenting and selecting evidence with the goal of enhancing the student's abilities to strategically analyze and create persuasive messages. Students will be asked to consider assumptions and draw conclusions about the persuasive efficacy of messages by applying concepts from theory and research. This course also meets ILO 4.2 (critical analysis and reasoning in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 315 - Advanced Interpersonal Communication

Through reading and reflection, students will assess their own interpersonal communication skills. Students will also explore interpersonal programs of research, such as: forgiveness, jealousy, distance relationships, and bullying.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 316 - Communication Research and Analysis

This course introduces students to the strategic process of collecting and analyzing information in professional settings. The practical focus of course assignments will be on using research to solve problems. Students will be introduced to situation analysis, designing and implementing surveys, interviewing, focus groups, and content analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 317 - Organizational Communication

This course surveys classic concepts and theories associated with organizational communication such as leadership, organizational culture, and the role of organizations in society. Contemporary issues such as globalization, technology, and ethical decision making in organizations are also featured, as well as a focus on the practical skills necessary for successful organizational encounters and socialization. This course meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding & reasoning within the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 319 - Advanced Personal and Professional Presentations

This advanced course is designed to maximize professional success through an in-depth focus on achieving presentation goals. Students will learn how to effectively present themselves as skilled content experts in professional settings.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 150

COM 325 - Nonverbal Communication

Nonverbal communication refers to the many ways that we send messages without relying on words. This course focuses on specific nonverbal structures (e.g., touch, gesture, facial expression, appearance), the functions of nonverbal communication (e.g., impression formation, deception, etc.), and cultural variations in nonverbal communication rules and interpretations.

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 337 - Advertising Copywriting

This course provides experience with writing for advertising. Students will explore the theoretical and research basis for communication and will examine the role of both strategy and creativity in the development and implementation of communication campaigns. Students will write for print, broadcast, and other media.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 338 - Social Media

This course addresses the many positive and negative implications associated with society's reliance on social media platforms. Using a perspective rooted in digital literacy, the course examines how social media is used in both personal and professional contexts, and how me might use social media to communicate competently, ethically, and strategically.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 345 - Communication and Sex, Gender, And Sexuality

This course focuses on the influence of sex, gender, and sexuality on communication in a variety of contexts. The course will review the recent theories and research literature on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality. The course will present information on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality as it relates to individual identity development, personal relationships, and social relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 350/450 - Cooperative Education

This experience is normally a full-time, paid employment in a cooperating firm to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors. Position must be approved by Department Chair.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Restrictions: Junior or Senior status, 2.75 GPA, approval of Department Chair

COM 357 - Public Relations Writing

Writing is one of the top-rated skills for public relations professionals. This writing intensive course introduces students to the principles of planning and pre-writing as the basis for successful writing efforts. Students will learn how to produce a variety of pieces for print and electronic media, including press releases, backgrounders, brochures, newsletter articles, and public service announcements, as well as other tools designed to engage an organization's key stakeholders. This course meets ILO 8b.2 (effective writing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 358 - Advanced Media Production

In this course students learn to apply more advanced audio and video production techniques. Students will develop and strengthen their production skills through hands-on projects both in the field, and utilizing the tools of the television studio, for both news and creative productions that can be distributed across various media platforms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 208

COM 365 - Communication in Relationships

This course focuses on contemporary research and theories associated with communication in close relationships. We will address cultural norms regarding "good" communication and "good" relationships, as well as what research suggests are the realities associated with communication and relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 368 - Video Editing

Combining the study and critique of media examples with hands-on experience, this course examines the techniques, equipment, and theories involved in achieving structure in film and video through editing. Students will strengthen and expand their editing skills through class exercises and outside projects, while also studying past and present film and video productions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Com 208

COM 387 - Public Relations Cases and Campaigns

Public relations (PR) practitioners face a daunting range of choices when trying to manage key relationships. This course is designed to help students approach public relations strategically and to apply public relations techniques and theories to communication programs and campaigns. The course will also explore current trends in PR practice and how they influence planning.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 207

COM 407 - Public Relations Management

This capstone in Public Relations uses a combination of case studies and service-learning to provide students with an in-depth study of public relations theory and practice. In addition to exploring a particular practice area in greater depth, students work with community organizations on public relations projects to apply what they have learned. Students complete journal assignments throughout the semester that ask them to reflect on both their professional development and understanding of the needs addressed by the community partners with which they work. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior Standing

Prerequisites: COM 207, 357, 387, & Senior Standing

COM 408 - Media & Journalism Practicum

This capstone in Media and Journalism builds upon the skills students have developed throughout their coursework, including planning, writing, production, and editing. Students will synthesize various skills and work as a team to produce multimedia storytelling projects within the local community. Students will have the opportunity to create advanced-level work, cooperate as a team, and reflect on their role as media storytellers. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 306 or 358, & Senior Standing

COM 415 - Communication Management Capstone

With an emphasis on developing communication competence, this capstone in Communication and Social Interaction challenges students to apply theoretical and practical understanding of interpersonal communication to professional situations. Students will use problem-based learning to address communication needs. As part of the course, students will reflect on their own communication patterns and will actively develop competencies to increase professional success. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 102, 205 & senior standing

COM 461/462/463 - Internship

Students may intern in communication industries. Working approximately 15 hours a week under professional supervision, students learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of professional positions. The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors.

Number of Credits: 3 credits

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, 2.75 GPA, and recommendation of the Chair.

Communication (5-yr)

Program Description

The 5-year BA-MA program builds on our successful undergraduate major and our 20-plus years of graduate education to provide students with advanced training in professional and business communication, leading to the Master of Arts in Strategic Communication.

The Communication major blends theory with practice, built on a liberal arts education and supplemented with experiential learning opportunities within and outside the classroom. This approach is captured in our program motto: Think. Do.

The 5-year program allows students to dive deeper into communication issues, research, and contexts, and to apply that understanding to organizational contexts. An applied communication practicum is the capstone to the program, and students are also able to earn graduate credit for internships.

Regardless of which concentration students pursued at the Bachelor's level, they are able to count up to two undergraduate courses (6 credit hours) toward the Master's degree, thus enabling them to finish the MA with just one additional year of school.

Communication majors start with a grounding in classes that provide a strong theoretical foundation for understanding a field that traces its roots to Aristotle but is as contemporary as today's Tweet. Students then can pursue tracks in Communication and Social Interaction, Media and Journalism, and Public Relations. These concentrations provide the communication knowledge and skills needed for meaningful personal, professional and social relationships.

The major seeks to develop graduates who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings. This goal reflects the Lasallian tradition of providing a practical education in the service of the greater good.

Why take this major?

In addition to the various reasons for pursuing a Communication major, the 5-year BA/MA in Strategic Communication offers the following advantages:

In addition to those career benefits, there are some advantages for staying in school for a fifth year:

 

Student Learning Outcomes

The Communication Department at La Salle University has aligned our measures of student learning with the NationalCommunication Association's (2015) learning outcomes in communication.

Students graduating with a degree in Communication should be able to:

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

Students earn both a B.A. and, if they continue into the Strategic Communication graduate program, the M.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

A 3.0 minimum gpa is required for admission to the MA program.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

It is possible to complete a dual major while enrolled in the 5-year BA/MA program in Communicaiton. However, only Communication courses may double-count toward the MA prgoram.

Recommended Course Sequence

Students in the 5-year program would generally follow the recommended course sequence for the undergraduate Communication program. Most classes that would double count toward the MA degree would be taken during the senior year.

 

Course Descriptions

COM 101 - Mass Media & Society

This course is an introduction to the mass media and their impact on society. Students will investigate the historical, technological, and social developments of a variety of media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, film, and emerging technologies. Students will be asked to consider evidence, assumptions, and assertions about the effects of media in order to draw conclusions about the responsibility of media professionals and the public when creating, sharing, and consuming content. The course will also examine legal and ethical issues of the media and how politics and economics affect the form, function, and content of media.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

COM 102 - Interpersonal Communication

This course examines the factors that influence interpersonal communication, effective and ineffective interpersonal communication practices, and the effects of interpersonal communication on our personal and professional lives. Specific topics include how culture influences communication, conflict management, the power of language, and the influence of communication on relationship development, maintenance, and deterioration.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 150 - Presentation Skills

The presentation skills course teaches students how to research, structure, and deliver effective oral presentations. It requires active student participation in order to build both skills and confidence. Among the topics covered in the course are: analyzing the audience; identifying, selecting, and critically evaluating content; organizing content in a logical manner; matching presentation content to presentation goals; using visual aids effectively; dealing with speaking anxiety; and effective, respectful collaboration in preparing presentations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 8.1.a - Oral Communication/ILO 12.1 - Collaborative Engagement

COM 203 - Media Writing

In this course, students will learn a variety of creative writing techniques for visual media projects. Students will work with various written formats including creative concepts, dual column and master scene scripts, treatments, and storyboards. Students will work within an interactive writers' room to craft effective advertisements/public service announcements, documentary concepts, original film and television scripts, and projects for emerging and interactive media forms. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 204 - Media Criticism

In this gateway course to the Media & Journalism track, students will learn the language of mediated storytelling by describing and analyzing the ways in which stories are creatively and artistically crafted for various formats and purposes, including television, film, online video, documentary, and news. Students will be exposed to various types of contemporary visual media, and discuss the ways in which production techniques play a role in creative expression and telling effective stories.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

COM 205 - Communication Theory and Research

This course introduces students to significant theories of communication, including interpersonal communication, mass media, and persuasion theories. Students will be introduced to the humanistic, social scientific, and critical traditions. A focus of the course is on practical application of theory to real world problems and situations. The course is geared toward sophomore or early junior-year students.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101 and COM 102

COM 206 - News Writing & Reporting

This course teaches students how to report and write news stories that are accurate, fair and complete. Students will learn the basic elements of reporting—how to observe events, how to interview people, and how to use other research tools. Students will also learn how to write and structure news stories for different media platforms including print, broadcast and online. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 207 - Principles of Public Relations

Public relations has been called "the unseen power" that influences culture, business, politics, and society. This class introduces students to the wide-ranging field of public relations, the role it plays in managing organizational relationships of all kinds, and the skills required to succeed in one of the fastest-growing communication professions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 208 - Introduction to Digital Video

This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices of audio and video production. Students will learn how the preproduction, production, and postproduction stages apply to media. Emphasis is on storytelling, the importance of audience research and planning, scheduling, and selecting and employing proper resources. Students will experience the process using fundamental production techniques of audio and video through hands-on projects.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 215 - Group and Team Communication

Successfully working within a group or team setting is important for our academic, professional, and personal lives. This course blends the theory and practice of successful group communication. Through experiential activities, students will learn about group roles, collaboration, and effective and ineffective decision-making and problem solving.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 220 - Intercultural Communication

Communication between members of different cultural groups is complex and challenging, and can lead to misunderstanding and a lack of trust. This course focuses on uncovering historical patterns that influence values, beliefs, and behaviors within cultural groups, and how these issues influence communication practices. A particular focus is on increasing knowledge and skills to improve communication between races and other ethnic and cultural groups.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

COM 267 - Communication and Conflict Management

Communication can be the source of conflict, can reflect conflict, or can be a tool to resolve conflict. This course focuses on productive and unproductive conflict management processes, with a particular focus on the techniques associated with negotiation and dispute resolution.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 300 - Communication Ethics

This course provides students with an overview of ethical standards relevant to social behavior and an in-depth study of contemporary ethical issues facing communicators. Students will apply ethical perspectives such as virtue, universalism, utilitarianism, egalitarianism, dialogic ethics, postmodernism, and the feminist ethic of care to contemporary ethical issues in interpersonal, organizational, public, and mass mediated communication contexts. Concepts of truth, confidentiality, conflict of interest, social justice, and other issues will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

COM 301 - Media Industries

This course explores how the media industries of television, radio, and the web have grown and changed through exploration of the economics, regulation, and effects of current entertainment and news media. Students will analyze how media companies make decisions based on research, discuss up to the minute news related to the business practices of media conglomerates, and learn the impact of media business decisions on society and culture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101

COM 306 - Feature Writing & Reporting

In this course, students will learn how to report and write feature stories making use of storytelling techniques such as scene-setting, descriptive language, the narrative arc, character development, use of dialogue, explication, and literary devices such as metaphors, flashbacks, foreshadowing and parallel construction. The techniques learned in this class will be applicable to print, broadcast and online presentation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 206

COM 308 - Communication Law & Ethics

The course is designed to review the history, development, and interpretation of the First Amendment in the U.S. by our court system and its impact upon journalists, professional communicators, and citizens, along with the ethical principles that underpin effective communication practices. Topics include privacy, defamation, press freedom, media regulations, and the law of emerging technologies. Students will learn to apply statutes, case law, and ethical theories to First Amendment issues and disputes. This course also meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding and reasoning within the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 310 - Communication Portfolio

The portfolio assists students with synthesizing and applying what they have learned in Communication courses to the task of bridging from undergraduate studies to post-graduation. Students will build a portfolio that can be used to demonstrate knowledge and skills.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

COM 312 - Persuasion, Power, And Influence

This course emphasizes theory-based analysis of persuasive messages across a variety of contexts and situations, ranging from interpersonal settings to mass mediated-campaigns. Students will also be taught techniques of presenting and selecting evidence with the goal of enhancing the student's abilities to strategically analyze and create persuasive messages. Students will be asked to consider assumptions and draw conclusions about the persuasive efficacy of messages by applying concepts from theory and research. This course also meets ILO 4.2 (critical analysis and reasoning in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 315 - Advanced Interpersonal Communication

Through reading and reflection, students will assess their own interpersonal communication skills. Students will also explore interpersonal programs of research, such as: forgiveness, jealousy, distance relationships, and bullying.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 316 - Communication Research and Analysis

This course introduces students to the strategic process of collecting and analyzing information in professional settings. The practical focus of course assignments will be on using research to solve problems. Students will be introduced to situation analysis, designing and implementing surveys, interviewing, focus groups, and content analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 317 - Organizational Communication

This course surveys classic concepts and theories associated with organizational communication such as leadership, organizational culture, and the role of organizations in society. Contemporary issues such as globalization, technology, and ethical decision making in organizations are also featured, as well as a focus on the practical skills necessary for successful organizational encounters and socialization. This course meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding & reasoning within the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 319 - Advanced Personal and Professional Presentations

This advanced course is designed to maximize professional success through an in-depth focus on achieving presentation goals. Students will learn how to effectively present themselves as skilled content experts in professional settings.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 150

COM 325 - Nonverbal Communication

Nonverbal communication refers to the many ways that we send messages without relying on words. This course focuses on specific nonverbal structures (e.g., touch, gesture, facial expression, appearance), the functions of nonverbal communication (e.g., impression formation, deception, etc.), and cultural variations in nonverbal communication rules and interpretations.

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 337 - Advertising Copywriting

This course provides experience with writing for advertising. Students will explore the theoretical and research basis for communication and will examine the role of both strategy and creativity in the development and implementation of communication campaigns. Students will write for print, broadcast, and other media.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 338 - Social Media

This course addresses the many positive and negative implications associated with society's reliance on social media platforms. Using a perspective rooted in digital literacy, the course examines how social media is used in both personal and professional contexts, and how me might use social media to communicate competently, ethically, and strategically.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 345 - Communication and Sex, Gender, And Sexuality

This course focuses on the influence of sex, gender, and sexuality on communication in a variety of contexts. The course will review the recent theories and research literature on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality. The course will present information on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality as it relates to individual identity development, personal relationships, and social relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 350/450 - Cooperative Education

This experience is normally a full-time, paid employment in a cooperating firm to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors. Position must be approved by Department Chair.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Restrictions: Junior or Senior status, 2.75 GPA, approval of Department Chair

COM 357 - Public Relations Writing

Writing is one of the top-rated skills for public relations professionals. This writing intensive course introduces students to the principles of planning and pre-writing as the basis for successful writing efforts. Students will learn how to produce a variety of pieces for print and electronic media, including press releases, backgrounders, brochures, newsletter articles, and public service announcements, as well as other tools designed to engage an organization's key stakeholders. This course meets ILO 8b.2 (effective writing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 358 - Advanced Media Production

In this course students learn to apply more advanced audio and video production techniques. Students will develop and strengthen their production skills through hands-on projects both in the field, and utilizing the tools of the television studio, for both news and creative productions that can be distributed across various media platforms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 208

COM 365 - Communication in Relationships

This course focuses on contemporary research and theories associated with communication in close relationships. We will address cultural norms regarding "good" communication and "good" relationships, as well as what research suggests are the realities associated with communication and relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 368 - Video Editing

Combining the study and critique of media examples with hands-on experience, this course examines the techniques, equipment, and theories involved in achieving structure in film and video through editing. Students will strengthen and expand their editing skills through class exercises and outside projects, while also studying past and present film and video productions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Com 208

COM 387 - Public Relations Cases and Campaigns

Public relations (PR) practitioners face a daunting range of choices when trying to manage key relationships. This course is designed to help students approach public relations strategically and to apply public relations techniques and theories to communication programs and campaigns. The course will also explore current trends in PR practice and how they influence planning.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 207

COM 407 - Public Relations Management

This capstone in Public Relations uses a combination of case studies and service-learning to provide students with an in-depth study of public relations theory and practice. In addition to exploring a particular practice area in greater depth, students work with community organizations on public relations projects to apply what they have learned. Students complete journal assignments throughout the semester that ask them to reflect on both their professional development and understanding of the needs addressed by the community partners with which they work. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior Standing

Prerequisites: COM 207, 357, 387, & Senior Standing

COM 408 - Media & Journalism Practicum

This capstone in Media and Journalism builds upon the skills students have developed throughout their coursework, including planning, writing, production, and editing. Students will synthesize various skills and work as a team to produce multimedia storytelling projects within the local community. Students will have the opportunity to create advanced-level work, cooperate as a team, and reflect on their role as media storytellers. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 306 or 358, & Senior Standing

COM 415 - Communication Management Capstone

With an emphasis on developing communication competence, this capstone in Communication and Social Interaction challenges students to apply theoretical and practical understanding of interpersonal communication to professional situations. Students will use problem-based learning to address communication needs. As part of the course, students will reflect on their own communication patterns and will actively develop competencies to increase professional success. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 102, 205 & senior standing

COM 461/462/463 - Internship

Students may intern in communication industries. Working approximately 15 hours a week under professional supervision, students learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of professional positions. The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors.

Number of Credits: 3 credits

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, 2.75 GPA, and recommendation of the Chair.

Department of Economics

Mission Statement

The Economics Department is committed to providing students with a rigorous and relevant economic education necessary for informed citizenship. The Department is committed to teaching and research, believing that research informs what is taught and how it is taught. For its majors, the Department seeks to develop a deep understanding of how markets and economies work and do not work. Furthermore, the Department seeks to assure that majors and minors are capable of applying the tools of economic reasoning to consider questions of policy, efficiency, and equity.

Major(s) Offered

Economics

Economics & International Studies

Minor(s) Offered

Economics

Entrepreneurship

Location/Contact Information

H. David Robison, Ph.D.

Olney Hall 265

robison@lasalle.edu

215.951.1184

 

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Mshomba, Robison

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Paulin

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Pellillo, Mallon

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: George

Economics

Program Description

The Economics Department is committed to providing students with a rigorous and relevant economic education necessary for informed citizenship. The Department is committed to teaching and research, believing that research informs what is taught and how it is taught. For its majors, the Department seeks to develop a deep understanding of how markets and economies work and do not work. Further, the Department seeks to assure that majors and minors are capable of applying the tools of economic reasoning to consider questions of policy, efficiency, and equity.

Why take this major?

Economics is a major which provides students analytical tools to improve decision making and to address real-world problems. This major offers room for double-majoring or multiple minors, as well great flexibility for careers. Students learn to analyze and evaluate macroeconomic issues like the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on inflation and unemployment, and microeconomic issues like how firms decide how much to produce and the impact of taxes and regulations. Emphasis is also placed on considering what policies and actions are consistent with social justice. Some students go on to corporate and non-profit positions. Others go on to graduate programs in law, public policy, applied economics, and PhD programs in economics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

2.0 minimum GPA

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 or MTH 120

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I
ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I
ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science
ECN 214 - Econometrics
ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II
ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II
ECN 441 - History of Economic Thought
ECN 481 - Seminar in Economics
Five ECN electives
MTH 114 or MTH 120
One additional Social Science course

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

11 courses, 3 ECN electives are waived as is the extra Social Science course.

 

Minor Requirements

Any 6 ECN courses. BUS 202 counts as a substitute for ECN 213 and can be counted towards the minor.

Recommended Course Sequence

The suggestion below is merely a suggestion. Because many students double major or change majors and arrive in the ECN Department as sophomores or juniors, the suggested order and timing is not all that common among students.

Freshman Year:

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Global Economy I

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: The Business Firm and Market Analysis I

MTH 114 or MTH 120 A calculus-based math course

Sophomore Year

ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

ECN 214 - Econometrics

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: The Business Firm & Market Analysis II

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Globla Economy II

Junior Year

ECN 441

At least 3 other ECN electives

The additional Social Science elective

Senior Year

ECN 481 - Economics Seminar

Two additional ECN electives

 

Course Descriptions

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

After introducing students to the what and how of economic thinking, the course explores the causes of national economic prosperity and economic problems such as unemployment and inflation. It also discusses the role of fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international economic relations among the U.S. and other countries.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 156 - Principles of Economics in a US Historical Context

This course provides a one-semester survey of both macroeconomic and microeconomic phenomena. On the macroeconomic side, we will examine GDP, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, exchange rates, and the balance of payments. In microeconomics, we will examine markets, the impacts of government interference with markets, market structures, and market failures. To the extent possible, these concepts will be discussed in a US historical context.

Number of Credits: 3

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 214 - Econometrics

This course introduces the student to advanced statistical techniques used by economists, other social scientists, and people in business and law to test theories, predict future events, and provide empirical support for various types of hypotheses. The course emphasizes the applied nature of econometrics. As such, the student will construct, estimate, and evaluate well-specified regression models through computer application-based exercises using SAS statistical software.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 213 or BUS 202 or permission of Chair

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II

This course studies how business firms interact with consumers and one another in product and resource markets. Besides distilling profit-maximizing criteria for different firms in different markets, the course also evaluates how the operation of firms impacts the welfare of society in general.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 201; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II

This course analyzes the factors behind countries' long-term growth and also those responsible for short-term fluctuations in their levels of output and prices. It also demonstrates how economic booms and busts have prompted economists to search for explanations and possible policies for addressing these instabilities. Finally, the course compares and contrasts U.S. historical experience with that of other nations.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 270, 370, 470 - Special Topics in Economics

Topics include Labor Markets, Employment and Wages; Women in the Economy; European Union; Economics of Sports; Economics of Entertainment; and Law and Economics.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

ECN 287, 288 - Economics Internship

Working approximately 10 to 15 hours per week under professional supervision, students learn experientially the linkages between their formal studies and the demands of particular positions. Under faculty supervision, students complete informal and formal written assignments and an oral presentation that describe their duties and interpret their intern experience.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 201, at least sophomore standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 330 - Third World Poverty and Economic Development

This course describes and documents the poverty besetting the majority of humankind and analyzes its causes, utilizing economic concepts and theories in conjunction with social, political, cultural, religious, and philosophical factors. Prospects for the future and policies aiming to promote development are also examined.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 331 - International Economics

This course involves an introduction to the theory of international trade. Topics include specialization and the gains from trade, tariffs, and protectionist policies, trade imbalances, the role of international institutions, foreign exchange markets, and monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 332 - Political Economy of Africa

This course examines the political and economic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa and provides a historical perspective on these conditions. Issues examined include the political and economic consequences of colonialism, post-independence political forces and economic policies, and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 334 - The Political Economy of Latin America

This course begins by examining aspects of the indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans in what has come to be called "Latin America." Throughout, it considers issues such as colonialism, militarism, race, gender relations, and religion that have shaped the societies, polities, and economies of nations from Mexico and the Caribbean to those of the Southern Cone. The goal of the course is to afford class members the opportunity to better understand Latin America's history as a basis for comprehending its likely future. Cross-listed with HIS334 and POL 334.

Number of Credits: 3

ECN 335 - International Trade and Trade Wars

This course provides an overview of the U.S. in the global economy and the history of the World Trade Organization (WTO), an examination of the WTO's dispute settlement mechanism, and an examination of major trade disputes that involve the U.S. The course ultimately explores how international trade laws, politics, diplomacy, and multi-national corporations in pursuit of profits interact.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 340 - American Economic History

This course describes and analyzes long-term economic growth and development since colonization. It stresses changes in demographic, technological, and institutional factors as they interact with the market system. Basic economic concepts and theories of growth are applied to significant historical questions.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 351 - Environmental Economics

Provides an introduction to the trade-offs (costs versus benefits) associated with environmental issues. Evaluating trade-offs requires an examination of the magnitude or current environmental problems and some consideration of how to measure the costs and benefits of regulatory changes. Approximately half the course will be devoted to examining the current regulations, how the regulatory process works, and the economic implications of the regulations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 or permission of Chair

ECN 354 - Economics of the Entertainment Industry

The course surveys the economics of the entertainment industry with an emphasis on the importance of market structure (perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, monopoly) in determining behaviors and profitability. In this course, we will apply many microeconomic, and a few macroeconomic, concepts to evaluate structure, workings, and profitability of various segments in the entertainment industry, ranging from movies to music, TV, radio, publishing, casinos, and theme parks. Case studies will be used to highlight the issues facing particular firms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 385, 386 - Cooperative Education

This experience will be a full-time paid employment in a cooperating firm such as a bank, economics forecasting company, or public utility; a nonprofit company such as a Community Development Corporation; or a government agency such as a county planning department or a statistical analysis office. Under faculty supervision, students also complete job-related learning assignments that involve oral and written presentations.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 214; ECN 221; and junior standing or senior standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 441 - History of Economic Thought

The course details the development of economics as a coherent analytical discipline through a historical study of its main schools and contributors, including the Physiocrats; the Classical Economists (especially Jevons, Walras, and Clark), Marshall, and Keynes. Lesser figures are treated as time allows. Attention throughout is given to the changing philosophical and cultural background of economic thought.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 455 - Public Finance

This course involves an analysis of the revenue and expenditure activity of government with particular emphasis on the rationale of federal government activity. Also considered are the issues of distribution, efficiency, equity, and stability in the economy.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150; ECN 201

ECN 481 - Seminar in Economics

This course is intended to be a capstone course for economics majors, one that aids the student in integrating the material from diverse economics courses. It stresses techniques for the preparation of written research reports. Students will ordinarily deliver to the seminar an oral presentation of their research results.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

This capstone course for Economics and International Studies majors aims to assist students to research, integrate, and communicate information about the global economy. Specifically, students will learn to conduct research on economic problems and policies of countries and regions of the world not native to them. Students will compose a 250 to 300 word abstract of their seminar papers in two languages, English and a second language. Further, students will be expected to demonstrate at least one of the following competencies: a) to write, in a non-native language, summaries of research in sources written in non-native language; b) to write the seminar paper in a non-native language; or c) to present research results orally in a non-native language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN/POL 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

This course focuses on basic statistical methods used in the analysis of economic and political phenomena and decision-making. Emphasis is on the application of statistical techniques and the sound interpretation of statistical results. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, simple regression, and correlation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Economics and International Studies

Program Description

The Economics Department is committed to providing students with a rigorous and relevant economic education necessary for informed citizenship. The Department is committed to teaching and research, believing that research informs what is taught and how it is taught. For its majors, the Department seeks to develop a deep understanding of how markets and economies work and do not work. Further, the Department seeks to assure that majors and minors are capable of applying the tools of economic reasoning to consider questions of policy, efficiency, and equity.

The ECI major includes the core economics courses, a foreign language, and other internationally-focused courses.

Why take this major?

Like the Economics major, the Economics and International Studies major provides students analytical tools to improve decision making and address real-world problems. This major offers room for double-majoring or multiple minors, as well as great flexibility for careers. With a language requirement and courses with an international focus, students learn to analyze both domestic and global issues such as those pertaining to trade policies, economic integration, and capital mobility. Emphasis is also placed on considering what policies and actions are consistent with social justice. Some students go on to corporate and non-profit positions. Others go on to graduate programs in law, international relations, public policy, applied economics, and PhD programs in economics.

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

2.0 Minimum GPA

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 or MTH 120

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I
ECN 201 - Principles of Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I
ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science
ECN 214 - Econometrics
ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II
ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II
ECN 331 - International Economics
A second international ECN course
ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies
MTH 114 or MTH 120
A foreign language through the intermediate level
Two internationally-focused HIS courses
Two other internationally-focused courses in any discipline as approved by advisor

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

The guide below is merely a suggestion. Because many students double major or change majors and become ECI majors as sophomores, the suggested order and timing is not common among students.

Freshman Year:

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Global Economy I

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: The Business Firm and Market Analysis I

MTH 114 or MTH 120 A calculus-based math course

Language 101

Language 102

Sophomore Year

ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

ECN 214 - Econometrics

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: The Business Firm & Market Analysis II

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Globla Economy II

Language 201

Language 202

Junior Year

ECN 331

Second internationally-focused ECN course

Two internationally-focused History Courses

One other internationally-focused course

Senior Year

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

One other internationally-focused course

Course Descriptions

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

After introducing students to the what and how of economic thinking, the course explores the causes of national economic prosperity and economic problems such as unemployment and inflation. It also discusses the role of fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international economic relations among the U.S. and other countries.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 156 - Principles of Economics in a US Historical Context

This course provides a one-semester survey of both macroeconomic and microeconomic phenomena. On the macroeconomic side, we will examine GDP, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, exchange rates, and the balance of payments. In microeconomics, we will examine markets, the impacts of government interference with markets, market structures, and market failures. To the extent possible, these concepts will be discussed in a US historical context.

Number of Credits: 3

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 214 - Econometrics

This course introduces the student to advanced statistical techniques used by economists, other social scientists, and people in business and law to test theories, predict future events, and provide empirical support for various types of hypotheses. The course emphasizes the applied nature of econometrics. As such, the student will construct, estimate, and evaluate well-specified regression models through computer application-based exercises using SAS statistical software.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 213 or BUS 202 or permission of Chair

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II

This course studies how business firms interact with consumers and one another in product and resource markets. Besides distilling profit-maximizing criteria for different firms in different markets, the course also evaluates how the operation of firms impacts the welfare of society in general.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 201; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II

This course analyzes the factors behind countries' long-term growth and also those responsible for short-term fluctuations in their levels of output and prices. It also demonstrates how economic booms and busts have prompted economists to search for explanations and possible policies for addressing these instabilities. Finally, the course compares and contrasts U.S. historical experience with that of other nations.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 270, 370, 470 - Special Topics in Economics

Topics include Labor Markets, Employment and Wages; Women in the Economy; European Union; Economics of Sports; Economics of Entertainment; and Law and Economics.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

ECN 287, 288 - Economics Internship

Working approximately 10 to 15 hours per week under professional supervision, students learn experientially the linkages between their formal studies and the demands of particular positions. Under faculty supervision, students complete informal and formal written assignments and an oral presentation that describe their duties and interpret their intern experience.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 201, at least sophomore standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 330 - Third World Poverty and Economic Development

This course describes and documents the poverty besetting the majority of humankind and analyzes its causes, utilizing economic concepts and theories in conjunction with social, political, cultural, religious, and philosophical factors. Prospects for the future and policies aiming to promote development are also examined.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 331 - International Economics

This course involves an introduction to the theory of international trade. Topics include specialization and the gains from trade, tariffs, and protectionist policies, trade imbalances, the role of international institutions, foreign exchange markets, and monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 332 - Political Economy of Africa

This course examines the political and economic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa and provides a historical perspective on these conditions. Issues examined include the political and economic consequences of colonialism, post-independence political forces and economic policies, and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 334 - The Political Economy of Latin America

This course begins by examining aspects of the indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans in what has come to be called "Latin America." Throughout, it considers issues such as colonialism, militarism, race, gender relations, and religion that have shaped the societies, polities, and economies of nations from Mexico and the Caribbean to those of the Southern Cone. The goal of the course is to afford class members the opportunity to better understand Latin America's history as a basis for comprehending its likely future. Cross-listed with HIS334 and POL 334.

Number of Credits: 3

ECN 335 - International Trade and Trade Wars

This course provides an overview of the U.S. in the global economy and the history of the World Trade Organization (WTO), an examination of the WTO's dispute settlement mechanism, and an examination of major trade disputes that involve the U.S. The course ultimately explores how international trade laws, politics, diplomacy, and multi-national corporations in pursuit of profits interact.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 340 - American Economic History

This course describes and analyzes long-term economic growth and development since colonization. It stresses changes in demographic, technological, and institutional factors as they interact with the market system. Basic economic concepts and theories of growth are applied to significant historical questions.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 351 - Environmental Economics

Provides an introduction to the trade-offs (costs versus benefits) associated with environmental issues. Evaluating trade-offs requires an examination of the magnitude or current environmental problems and some consideration of how to measure the costs and benefits of regulatory changes. Approximately half the course will be devoted to examining the current regulations, how the regulatory process works, and the economic implications of the regulations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 or permission of Chair

ECN 354 - Economics of the Entertainment Industry

The course surveys the economics of the entertainment industry with an emphasis on the importance of market structure (perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, monopoly) in determining behaviors and profitability. In this course, we will apply many microeconomic, and a few macroeconomic, concepts to evaluate structure, workings, and profitability of various segments in the entertainment industry, ranging from movies to music, TV, radio, publishing, casinos, and theme parks. Case studies will be used to highlight the issues facing particular firms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 385, 386 - Cooperative Education

This experience will be a full-time paid employment in a cooperating firm such as a bank, economics forecasting company, or public utility; a nonprofit company such as a Community Development Corporation; or a government agency such as a county planning department or a statistical analysis office. Under faculty supervision, students also complete job-related learning assignments that involve oral and written presentations.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 214; ECN 221; and junior standing or senior standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 441 - History of Economic Thought

The course details the development of economics as a coherent analytical discipline through a historical study of its main schools and contributors, including the Physiocrats; the Classical Economists (especially Jevons, Walras, and Clark), Marshall, and Keynes. Lesser figures are treated as time allows. Attention throughout is given to the changing philosophical and cultural background of economic thought.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 455 - Public Finance

This course involves an analysis of the revenue and expenditure activity of government with particular emphasis on the rationale of federal government activity. Also considered are the issues of distribution, efficiency, equity, and stability in the economy.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150; ECN 201

ECN 481 - Seminar in Economics

This course is intended to be a capstone course for economics majors, one that aids the student in integrating the material from diverse economics courses. It stresses techniques for the preparation of written research reports. Students will ordinarily deliver to the seminar an oral presentation of their research results.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

This capstone course for Economics and International Studies majors aims to assist students to research, integrate, and communicate information about the global economy. Specifically, students will learn to conduct research on economic problems and policies of countries and regions of the world not native to them. Students will compose a 250 to 300 word abstract of their seminar papers in two languages, English and a second language. Further, students will be expected to demonstrate at least one of the following competencies: a) to write, in a non-native language, summaries of research in sources written in non-native language; b) to write the seminar paper in a non-native language; or c) to present research results orally in a non-native language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN/POL 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

This course focuses on basic statistical methods used in the analysis of economic and political phenomena and decision-making. Emphasis is on the application of statistical techniques and the sound interpretation of statistical results. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, simple regression, and correlation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Department of Education

Mission Statement

The vision of the Education Department incorporates the global de La Salle Christian Brothers tradition of teaching excellence and service. Our vision is to provide opportunities for educators to become forward thinking, research-minded, developmentally and social justice-oriented professionals who respond to the needs of all students.

La Salle educators are knowledgeable, intellectually curious, reflective, collaborative, confident, proactive, and committed to equity in education. Through collaborations with partnership schools, community organizations, and education-related agencies and organizations, educators are prepared to cultivate, value, and respond to the cultural and linguistic resources of all students, families, and communities in the communities they serve.

La Salle educators set the standard in their schools and communities by going beyond traditional expectations of the profession. The Education Department privileges project-based, problem-posing, service learning, and engaged pedagogies grounded in Lasallian values and dispositions.

Major(s) Offered

Teacher Preparation Programs

La Salle University offers teacher preparation programs in secondary education (grades 7-12), early elementary PreK–4/special education PreK–8 (ESEC), middle- level (grades 4-8) social studies, English, or mathematics with the option of adding PreK-4 special education (ESMD or ESML). These programs are approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) and lead to a B.A in Education. Upon successful completion, recommendation for Instructional I certification in the area(s) pursued by the certification candidate is made by the Education Department to the state. Students may declare a major in education in the freshman year, however, formal application for admission (candidacy) to the teacher education certification programs must be made after completion of 60 credits (which typically occurs at the end of the sophomore year). GPA and Basic Skills Testing requirements must be met in order to pass PDE candidacy requirements for all areas of certification. Students must also successfully complete all clearnance and field experiences required by major and area of certification. The policies and procedures for applying for admission to the programs and for advancement through the various stages of candidacy are contained in the Candidacy Requirements in the Education Department Student Handbook. All education majors are responsible for knowing and adhering to these policies and procedures for candidacy.

Note: Field Experience and Certification Requirements

Students are required to complete a minimum of two hours per week of fieldwork each semester. Early Elementary and Middle-Level juniors are required to complete one full day of field work in partnership schools. The Director of Placements and Partnerships makes placements for all education majors enrolled in education programs. In accordance with the provisions of Act 34 of 1985 of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, students engaging in mandatory field experiences each semester and applicants for an Instructional I certificate in the Commonwealth must also undergo background checks yearly. All students are required to obtain both a Criminal History and Child Abuse form. Education majors must have the Act 34 Request for Criminal Background check completed yearly. Prior to entering any field experience, including student teaching, students must submit proof of screening for tuberculosis. This test may be completed at the Student Health Center or by the student’s personal physician. This screening test is repeated yearly. Application forms relating to child abuse, criminal checks, and liability insurance will be distributed during orientation sessions for education majors each fall term. Forms are also available in the Education Department office (Olney 254). Students may be required to show school administrators the results of both the background checks and tuberculin tests and keep copies of the results on file in the Department of Education office. For more information about these requirements, see the Director of Placements and Partnerships. Further information about applying for certification is contained in the Education Department Student Handbook and the Handbooks for the Professional Year or Semester. All education majors are responsible for knowing and adhering to the policies and procedures that pertain to applying for certification.

Note: Student Teaching and Teacher Certification Students apply for Stage II candidacy in the education certification programs and, if approved, are recommended for the student teaching experience upon successful completion of all course requirements and pre-student teaching field experiences, with the indexes and grades specified in the Handbook. Department faculty consider the fitness of the individual for the professional position he or she has selected. Upon successful completion of student teaching and passing all relevant tests, a student may apply for Instructional I certification in PA. PDE certification regulations require that an applicant for a teaching certificate be known by the preparing institution as a person of good moral character and possessing sound personal qualities, professional knowledge, professional dispositions, and pedagogical competencies that warrant issuance of a teaching certificate. In addition, all applicants must meet certain physical and medical standards to obtain an Instructional I certificate to teach in the public schools of Pennsylvania. Any candidate applying for an Instructional I certificate is required by Pennsylvania State Board regulations to pass the appropriate sections of the Praxis Series Tests (Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers), which are administered by the Educational Testing Service and Pearson (ETS Core or PAPA, and PECT). Information about the Praxis Tests and Pennsylvania Tests is available in the Education Department office (Olney 254). Other states may also require prospective teachers to take these or other examinations.

Five-Year Options

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master of Arts degree. To apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs, students must complete the Curriculum Change Form, found in the Education Department, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Students should consult with the Chair of Education as to the specific undergraduate courses that will apply to their graduate degree.

Several Five-Year options are available for early childhood, middle level, or second­ary education majors. They are:

Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors

At the end of each semester, an audit is done of each student's file. Any student NOT meeting program requirements will be dismissed from the program. Please note: transfer and Summit students will be reviewed based on “year in the program”. Candidacy begins junior year (Year 3). The audit is based on the following:

Freshmen Audit:

Sophomores Audit:

Junior Audit:

 

Students not majoring in education are invited to register for education courses that carry no prerequisites. Please contact the Education Department with questions about registering for courses.

Minor(s) Offered

Education

Concentrations

Middle Level majors select an area of concentration in grades 7 and 8 in Social Studies, Math, or English.

Location/Contact Information

Laura Roy, Chair

roy@lasalle.edu

Olney Hall 254

215.951.1190

Full-Time Faculty

Professors: Bednar, Williams

Associate Professors: Lewinski, Liang, Mosca, Richardson, Roy

Assistant Professor: Byrne

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th

Program Description

Middle-Level certification students are preparing for Pennsylvania Instructional I certification in grades 4–8. Upon completion of the program and certification, they will be able to teach any subject in grades 4–6 and the concentration content area (English/ Language Arts; Mathematics; or Social Studies) in grades 7 and 8. Middle-Level Social Studies majors will also minor in American Studies. Students in this program may also choose to earn a Pennsylvania certification in special education (PreK-8).

Why take this major?

This dual major prepares students to teach in regular education or special education classrooms. Given that schools are in need of highly qualified educators who can work with students in regular education, inclusion, and special education classroom, this major makes graduates markatable to schools both locally and globally. Elementary teachers also have the opportunity to impact the lives of children early and set a positive tone for later educational experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 Explore in Sci & Math I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 Math:Myths & Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 Intro Csc:Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 300 US Republic To 1877

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 Human Learning/Cognition/Dev

EDC 104 Education Diversity in America

EDC 120 Foundations of Literacy

IMS 262 Explore in Sci & Math II

EDC 218 Physical & Cultural Geography

EDC 217 Learning & Teaching of Math

EDC 219 Integrated Social Science

EDC 220 Read/Wrt/Think Content Areas

EDC 307 Differentiated Instruction

EDC  309 DIATI Lab

EDC 224 Adolescent Development

EDC 431 Middle Level Education

EDC 474 Student Teaching: Elem Educ

EDC 475 Teach/Rsch Meth I

 

 

Concentrations

English

Mathematics

Comprehensive Social Studies

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Middle level, 4-8 majors must minor in American Studies.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

*IMS 162 (4 cr)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

*IMS 262 (4 cr) (F)

EDC 218 (F/S)

EDC 217 (F/S)

EDC 219 (F/S)

EDC 220 (F/S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 307 (3 cr) and EDC 309 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 320 (F)

**EDC 224

 

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

 

EDC 431 (2 cr) (S)

EDC 475 (3 cr) (S)

EDC 474 (12 cr) (S)

*Consult with advisor. Waived for some areas of concentration.

**Not required. Education elective option.

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th (5 yr)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th/Special Ed

Program Description

Middle-Level, Special Education certification students are preparing for Pennsylvania Instructional I certification in grades 4–8 and a PreK-4 Special education certification. Upon completion of the program and certification, they will be able to teach any subject in grades 4–6 and the concentration content area (English/ Language Arts; Mathematics; or Social Studies) in grades 7 and 8 and special education. Middle-Level Social Studies majors will also minor in American Studies.

Why take this major?

This dual major prepares students to teach in regular education or special education classrooms. Given that schools are in need of highly qualified educators who can work with students in regular education, inclusion, and special education classroom, this major makes graduates markatable to schools both locally and globally. Elementary teachers also have the opportunity to impact the lives of children early and set a positive tone for later educational experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 Explore in Sci & Math I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 Math:Myths & Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 Intro Csc:Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 300 US Republic To 1877

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 Human Learning/Cognition/Dev

EDC 104 Education Diversity in America

EDC 120 Foundations of Literacy

IMS 262 Explore in Sci & Math II

EDC 218 Physical & Cultural Geography

EDC 217 Learning & Teaching of Math

EDC 219 Integrated Social Science

EDC 220 Read/Wrt/Think Content Areas

EDC 307 Differentiated Instruction

EDC  309 DIATI Lab

EDC 320 Literacy in Inclusive Classes

EDC 308 Assess/Accommodat/Disabilities

EDC 310 AAASD Lab

EDC 325 Teaching ENG Language Learners

EDC 431 Middle Level Education

EDC 474 Student Teaching: Elem Educ

EDC 475 Teach/Rsch Meth I

 

Concentrations

English

Mathematics

Comprehensive Social Studies

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Middle level, 4-8 majors must minor in American Studies.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

*IMS 162 (4 cr)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

*IMS 262 (4 cr) (F)

EDC 218 (F/S)

EDC 217 (F/S)

EDC 219 (F/S)

EDC 220 (F/S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 307 (3 cr) and EDC 309 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 320 (F)

**EDC 224

EDC 308 (3 cr) and EDC 310 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 325 (S)

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

 

EDC 431 (2 cr) (S)

EDC 475 (3 cr) (S)

EDC 474 (12 cr) (S)

*Consult with advisor. Waived for some areas of concentration.

**Not required. Education elective option.

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th/Special Ed (5-yr)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education – Pre-K thru 4th

Program Description

Why take this major?

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 - Mathematics: Myths and Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 - Introduction to Computing Using Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 - Presentation Skills or PHL 155 - The Quest for Meaning: An Inside-Out Course

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 300 - US Republic to 1877 and AMST 100 - Introduction to American Studies

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose an American ARTH

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 250 - Literature and Culture

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition, and Development
EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America
EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy
EDC 217 - Teaching Mathematics
EDC 219 - Integrated Social Studies
EDC 220 - Teaching Literacy in the Content Areas
EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, and Technology Integration
EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, and Adaptations for Students with Disabilities
EDC 309 - Diati Lab
EDC 310 - AAASD Lab
EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom
EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners
EDC 326 - Early Childhood Foundations
EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child
EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching
EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods
EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education
EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum
IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I
IMS 262 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics II

Note: ESEC majors are also required to take 30 total AMST credits. Fifteen of those credits are included in the progress sheet. Fifteen additional credits are selected by the student. 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Pre-K thru 4th/Special Ed

Program Description

Early elementary and special education (ESEC) majors are also required to major in American Studies. La Salle University's ESEC combined program of study is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Successful completion leads to recommendations for Instructional I certification in early elementary education (PreK–4) and special education (PreK–8). A Department faculty member advises and meets individually with each student during pre-registration throughout the four-year program. This process ensures that all students are following the prescribed sequence of courses leading to a B.A. and a recommendation for certification. ESEC majors also major in American Studies. To meet state requirements, ESEC majors must choose Art for their Fine Arts requirement.

Why take this major?

This dual major prepares students to teach in regular education or special education classrooms. Given that schools are in need of highly qualified educators who can work with students in regular education, inclusion, and special education classroom, this major makes graduates highly desirable candidates for schools both locally and globally. Teachers in the early grades have the opportunity to impact the lives of children by setting a positive tone for later educational experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 - Mathematics: Myths and Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 - Introduction to Computing Using Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 - Presentation Skills or PHL 155 - The Quest for Meaning: An Inside-Out Course

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 300 - US Republic to 1877 and AMST 100 - Introduction to American Studies

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose an American ARTH meeting ILO 9.1

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 250 - Literature and Culture

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition, and Development
EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America
EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy
EDC 217 - Teaching Mathematics
EDC 219 - Integrated Social Studies
EDC 220 - Teaching Literacy in the Content Areas
EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, and Technology Integration
EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, and Adaptations for Students with Disabilities
EDC 309 - Diati Lab
EDC 310 - AAASD Lab
EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom
EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners
EDC 326 - Early Childhood Foundations
EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child
EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching
EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods
EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education
EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum
IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I
IMS 262 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics II

Note: ESEC majors are also required to take 30 total AMST credits. Fifteen of those credits are included in the progress sheet. Fifteen additional credits are selected by the student. 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

ESEC majors are required to dual major in American Studies.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

IMS 162 (4 cr)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

EDC 219 (F/S)

EDC 220 ((F/S)

IMS 262 (F)

EDC 326 (F/S)

EDC 217 (F/S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 307 (3 cr) and EDC 309 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 320

EDC 308 (3 cr) and EDC 310 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 325

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

EDC 477 (3 cr) (F/S)

EDC 410 (2 cr) (F/S)

EDC 478 (10 cr) (F/S)

473 (12 cr) (F/S)

475 (3 cr) (F/S)

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Pre-K thru 4th/Special Ed (5 yr)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education – Secondary Education

Program Description

The Secondary Education program is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to a recommendation for Instructional I certification in Social Studies (History major), English, Communication, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Spanish (PreK-12). Students may select religion as a dual major option, but it does not lead to teacher certification.

Why take this major?

Secondary Education majors have the benefit of choosing a dual (second) major and immersing themselves in this content. Upon graduation and certification, secondary education teachers can work in middle or high schools.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Secondary Education Majors are required to double major in: Social Studies (History major), English, Communication, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Spanish (PreK-12). Students may select religion as a dual major option, but it does not lead to teacher certification. 

Secondary Education majors will have designated course work for their associated discipline. See the Education Department Student Handbook and advisors for your second major for specific courses.

EDC 103 Human Learning/Cognition/Dev

EDC 104 Education Diversity in America

EDC 224 Adolescent Development

EDC 324 Differentiating Inst: Ed Tech

EDC 304 Develop Reading

EDC 306 Foundations of Education

EDC 401 Art & Science of Teaching

EDC 470 Prac & Prof of Teaching

EDC 472 Seminar

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Secondary Education majors will have designated course work for their associated discipline. See the Education Department Student Handbook and advisors for your second major for specific courses.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

EDC 224 (F)

EDC 218 (F)

EDC 336 (S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 324 (F)

EDC 304 (S)

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

EDC 401 (6 cr) (F)

EDC 470 (9 cr)

EDC 472 (3 cr)

 

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Secondary Education (5 yr)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education Studies

Program Description

Education Studies is designed for students who want to apply knowledge and strategies of teaching and learning in non-school settings that do not require teaching certification. It is the most flexible undergraduate major offered by the Department of Education at La Salle University. Each Education Studies major will enroll in one or more field experiences that serve as a culminating activity directed toward preparing Education Studies majors for entry into the field of education.

This degree is designed to introduce students to the meaning and purpose of education including the nature and purpose of liberal arts. The program is broadly conceived to acquaint students with a historical view of the academic discipline as well as practical understanding of teaching and learning in a variety of contexts both in and outside of traditional schools.Through careful advising, Education Studies students will select another major to satisfy the goals of the individual students.

Why take this major?

Students majoring in Education Studies gain knowledge enabling them to be informed citizens, teachers, and parents who understand how to interact constructively with educational organizations and schools. The Education Studies major amplifies the Lasallian mission of justice and community engagement. Grounded in the principles and practices of social justice and equity, this degree prepares students to center the notion of community by privileging the linguistic and cultural resources of their educational context, valuing engaged scholarship and advocacy practices, and seeking leadership opportunities to make transformative change.

Education Studies majors have an expanded career field outside of the traditional PK-12 classroom. Graduates can seek employment in the following areas:

Education Studies majors also have the potential to explore entrepreneurial endeavors in education by dual majoring in Business.

Student Learning Outcomes

Critical Habits of Mind:

Social Justice, Equity, and Community Engagement:

Engaged Scholarship:

Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Education:

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Education Studies majors must maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 Explorations in Math and Science

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

EDC 101 Education in an Urban Context

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SOC 262 Dynamics of Race and Ethnecity in Contemporary Societies

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 Human Learning, Cognition & Development

EDC 104 Educational Diversity in America

ENV 153 or ENV 155 or IMS 262

EDC 350 How People Learn

EDC 306 Foundations

EDC 460 Education Seminar

EDC 461 Education Internship

*Education Electives are also required - consult with your academic advisor.

*Dual majors consult with your academic advisor for additional required courses.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Education Studies majors may choose a dual major based on their career goals. See the second major requirements for a list of courses.

Minor Requirements

Minor in Education

Choosing a minor in education will provide students with a background in education and pedagogy that is useful in a number of careers, but does not lead to the attainment of a teaching certification. Students will learn how to motivate people, develop the ability to plan, organize, and present information, and understand how to evaluate outcomes. Students will also learn how to effectively work in diverse education and community contexts. These aspects of the Education Minor are all skills that are adaptable to many fields including, but not limited to, public health, social work, sociology, psychology, business, and communication.

Choosing 6 of the following courses will lead to a minor in Education:

 EDC 103: Human Learning, Cognition, and Development

 EDC 104: Educational Diversity in America

EDC 120: Foundations of Literacy OR EDC 220: Teaching Literacy in the Content Areas

If interested in Early Elementary Education, choose 1 course from these options:

If interested in Secondary Education, choose EDC 224: Adolescent Development

EDC 233: Autism: A Family Focus

If interested in the 5th Year Program, choose 1 course from these options (instead of EDC 233):

EDC 326: Early Childhood Foundations OR EDC 336: Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

NOTE: The Chair may choose other courses for the minor based upon a student's transcript review.

Recommended Course Sequence

Four Year Cycle of Courses

Education Studies Major with Minor or Dual Major

Freshman Fall (15 credits)

Freshman Spring (16 credits)

EDC 103: Human Learning, Cognition & Development 3 cr.

ENG 110: College Writing I, 3 cr. (ILO 8b)

REL 100: Religion Matters 3 cr. (ILO 100)

CSC: 151: Introduction to Computing 3 cr. (ILO 6)

FYS: 130: First Year Seminar 3cr. (ILO 1)

 

EDC 104 Educational Diversity in America 3 cr.

EDC 101 Education in an Urban Context 3 cr. (ILO 10)

IMS 162: Explorations in Math and Science 4 cr. (ILO 3b)

ENV 153 or ENV 155: 3cr. (ILO 3a) or IMS 262

ILO 10 3cr.

 

Sophomore Fall (15 credits)

Sophomore Spring (15credits)

EDC 220: Reading, Writing and Thinking in the Content Areas 3 cr.

ENG 210: College Writing II, 3 cr. (ILO 5)

ILO 8a & 12 3 cr.

Minor or major

Minor or major

SOC 262 Dynamics of race and ethnicity in contemporary societies 3 cr. (ILO 11)

ILO 4 3 cr.

ILO 9 3 cr.

Education Elective 1

Minor or Dual Major

Junior Fall (15 credits)

Junior Spring (15 credits)

EDC 350: How People Learn

Education Elective 1

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

Elective

EDC 306 Foundations

Education Elective 2

Minor or Dual Major

Elective (ILO 4)

Elective

Senior Fall (15 credits)

Senior Spring (15 credits)

Education Elective 3

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

EDC 460 (3 credit)

EDC 461 (6 credit)

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

 

Total Undergraduate Credits: 120 credits

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Department of English

Mission Statement

The English major at La Salle focuses on the study of literature but complements such study with additional attention to examining the various modes of writing (through courses in creative, professional, business, legal, and Web-based writing) and to considering the role language plays in everyday life and in the continuing history of literature (through courses in grammar, the history of language, and language and prejudice). In so doing, the major prepares students for a number of careers, including teaching at the secondary level, for graduate and professional education, and for a variety of roles in which they can prove themselves responsible, contributing members to society as a whole.

The English major at La Salle provides students with contexts, frameworks, and opportunities to read widely and deeply in a variety of literatures in English and translation; to write well in academic, creative, and professional modes; and to make connections between what they read and the communities in which they live. In doing so, the English major participates in La Salle’s broader mission “as a Catholic university rooted in the liberal arts tradition” that “challenges students to contemplate life’s ultimate questions as they develop their faith, engage in a free search for truth, and explore their full human potential.”

Major(s) Offered

BA English

Minor(s) Offered

English

Creative Writing

Location/Contact Information

Bryan Narendorf, Chair

narendorf@lasalle.edu

Olney Hall 141

215.951.1145

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Harty, Musser, Soven

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Allen, Beatty, Betz, Busse, Franson, Grauke, Jesson, Langemak, Narendorf

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Hibschman

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Butler

English

Program Description

The English major at La Salle focuses on the study of literature but complements such study with additional attention to examining the various modes of writing (through courses in creative, professional, business, legal, and Web-based writing) and to considering the role language plays in everyday life and in the continuing history of literature (through courses in grammar, the history of language, and language and prejudice). In so doing, the major prepares students for a number of careers, including teaching at the secondary level, for graduate and professional education, and for a variety of roles in which they can prove themselves responsible, contributing members to society as a whole.

The English major at La Salle provides students with contexts, frameworks, and opportunities to read widely and deeply in a variety of literatures in English and translation; to write well in academic, creative, and professional modes; and to make connections between what they read and the communities in which they live. In doing so, the English major participates in La Salle's broader mission "as a Catholic university rooted in the liberal arts tradition" that "challenges students to contemplate life's ultimate questions as they develop their faith, engage in a free search for truth, and explore their full human potential."

Why take this major?

English is the perfect major to prepare students for a number of careers and for post-graduate study in a number of areas. Our gradautes have gone on to careers in teaching, in creative writing, in journalism, in medicine and in the law, in public service, in business and management, in technology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

*For the Major in English (13 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 248 - Survey of Amer Lit to 1865
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
Two courses at the 400 level: ENG 402, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315, 316, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
1-4 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 315, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
*Double Major in English and Secondary Education (13 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 248 - Survey of Amer Lit to 1865
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
Two courses at the 400 level: ENG  417 and 438
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315 and 438
ENG 318 and 1 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
*For  the Double Major in English and another discipline other than Secondary Education(10 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
One course at the 400 level: ENG 402, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315, 316, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
1-2 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 315, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

*Double Major in English and Secondary Education (13 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 248 - Survey of Amer Lit to 1865
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
Two courses at the 400 level: ENG 417 and 438
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315 and 438
ENG 315 and 1 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447

NOTE: There is a maximum number of courses taken outside the department that students can count toward their 13 course major. No more than 5 courses taken outside the department can count toward the 13 course major. Such courses include AP credit, courses taken while studying abroad, courses taken at another institution, and Honors courses taught by faculty in English--Honors 111 + Honors 112 count as a single course: traditionally English 245. This rule also applies to the full double majors in Secondary Education and English where students take 13 courses in both Secondary Education and in English.

 

*For the Double Major in English and another discipline other than Secondary Education (10 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
One course at the 400 level: ENG 402, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315, 316, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
1-2 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 315, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447

NOTE: There is a maximum number of courses taken outside the department that students can count toward their 10 course double major. No more than 4 courses taken outside the department can count toward the 10 course double major. Such courses include AP credit, courses taken while studying abroad, courses taken at another institution, and Honors courses taught by faculty in English--Honors 111 + Honors 112 count as a single course: traditionally English 245.

Minor Requirements

*Minor in English

ENG 150 or ENG 180

ENG 245 or 246 or 248 or 249 or 250

Four electives, at least two of which must be at the 300 or 400 level.

*Minor in Creative Writing

ENG 204

ENG 353

Two 300-400 level creative writing courses

Additional literature course with ENG designation

Any additional literature or creative writing course with ENG designation.

NOTE: There is a maximum number of courses taken outside the department that students can count toward their 6 course minor in English or in Creative Writing. No more than 2 courses taken outside the department can count toward the 6 course minor. Such courses include AP credit, courses taken while studying abroad, courses taken at another institution, and Honors courses taught by faculty in English--Honors 111 + Honors 112 count as a single course: traditionally English 245.

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Freshmen
English 110
English 180
3 core courses

Spring Freshmen
English 245
English 248
3 core courses

Fall Sophomore
English 246
English 249
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Spring Sophomore
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Fall Junior
English 324
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Spring Junior
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Fall Senior
English 480
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Spring Senior
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Course Descriptions

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

This course introduces students to rhetorical analysis and argument, while helping students to improve their writing skills and to develop a writing process suited for college-level work. Students learn to read critically from a variety of texts, disciplines, and media. They learn to synthesize texts to develop original arguments aimed at an academic audience. The course establishes a community of learners whose writing engages in ethical inquiry and reasoned debate, and it prompts students to use writing to make meaningful connections between and among their academic, social, and political lives.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students must earn a grade of C or better to ENG 110 to enroll in ENG 210.

ILO Met: ILO 8.1.b - ENG 110

ENG 150 - Introduction to Literature

This introductory course, designed for students who are not majoring in English, takes an historical and generic approach to literature. Students will study works from multiple genres, including film. Syllabus will vary by section, but all sections are designed to teach students how to read, write, and think about primary texts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study

Required of all day English majors but open to all studnets in place of ENG 150, this course in literature introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices of literary studies, provides a general overview of literary periods, genres and theories, and offers directed practice in the use of library and database resources essential for the study of English.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ENG 204 - Introduction to Creative Writing

This course offers an introduction to writing in a variety of literary genres and to the workshop format of reading and discussing student writing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

This course builds upon the writing skills and rhetorical knowledge students gained in ENG 110, training them to conduct academic research and to compose innovative and original research papers that are appropriate for upper-division coursework in a variety of disciplines. Built around shared texts, concerns, or themes, this course is driven by individual research projects that students develop through consultation with the instructor and in conversation with the projects of their peers. Students learn to develop strong research questions, and they learn to find, critically evaluate, and synthesize a broad range of academic texts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENG 110.

ILO Met: ILO 5.1 - ENG 210

ENG 230 - Web Design and Development

Web Design and Development is an introduction to the practice of World Wide Web document design, grounded in an understanding of the Web's development and theories of graphics and communication. The course focuses on researching, creating, revising, and editing Web sites, using "hard code" and applications-based layout and editing. Cross-listed with DART 230.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 243 - Religion and Contemporary Literature

This course offers a study of religion and religious themes in literature. Attention will be paid both to literary critical concern and to religious analysis of poetry, fiction, and drama. Cross-listed as REL 243.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 245 - Survey of British Literature and Culture To 1798

This survey course considers important authors, works, and literary movements in British literature from its beginnings to 1798 within the context of shifts in history and culture. Students gain not only an overview of significant works within this time frame, including early Celtic literature, but also a broad understanding of the cultural and aesthetic underpinnings indicated by terms like Medieval literature, Renaissance or Early Modern literature, and Restoration and 18th-century literature.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 246 - Survey of British Literature and Culture Since 1798

This survey course considers important authors, works, and literary movements in British literature from 1798 to the present within the context of shifts in British history and culture. Students gain not only an overview of significant works within this time frame, including Irish literature, but also a broad understanding of the cultural and aesthetic underpinnings indicated by terms like Modernism and Post-Modernism.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 248 - Survey of American Literature and Culture To 1865

This survey course considers important authors, works, and literary movements of early American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War. Students gain not only an overview of significant works within this time frame, but also a broad understanding of the cultural and aesthetic underpinnings indicated by terms like the Age of Faith, the Age of Reason and Revolution, Transcendentalism, and the American Renaissance.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 249 - Survey of American Literature and Culture Since 1865

This survey course is the standard second half of the college survey of American literature written during the great transformations from 1865 to the present. Students will deepen their awareness of literary movements such as Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Students will also improve their familiarity with the works of important writers during this period.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 250 - Literature and Culture

In this intermediate literature course, students discuss a literary theme in its cultural contexts. Topics vary by section (Literature and the Family, Literature and Gender, Literature and Food, and so on) and will be discussed in terms of multiple genres, including film, and different historical and social contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 302 - Language and Prejudice

This course studies how language affects the way we view ourselves and others in our culture. Case studies of language in relation to sexism, racism, and politics will be supplemented by discussions of introductory concepts of language systems and stylistic analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

ENG 303 - Writing for Business

By providing instruction in planning and executing effective business writing, this course helps students learn to write the documents required of them as professionals: letters, resumes, memos, proposals, abstracts, and reports.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

ENG 305 - Fiction Writing I

This course offers an introduction to the writing of fiction using a workshop format.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 306 - Poetry Writing

This course offers an introduction to the writing of poetry using a workshop format.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 307 - Playwriting

This course will offer a study of the art of playwriting from the traditional and contemporary points of view, and provides guided writing of a one-act play.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 308 - Legal Writing

Legal Writing is a challenging yet practical course in the reading, planning, and writing of effective legal documents (legal letters and memoranda, briefs, contracts, and personal statements for applications to law schools). It is designed for students planning careers in areas such as law, business, communication, and media studies.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 309 - Topics in Creative and Professional Writing I

This course offers instruction in various types of specialized writing such as grant writing, creative nonfiction, and satire. Topics and emphases vary each time the course is offered, so students may take this course for credit more than once.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 310 - Editing and Publishing

This course takes a workshop approach to provide students with experience in judging manuscripts, proofreading, typographical design, and production of short documents: e.g., forms, resumes, flyers, brochures, and newsletters. ENG 310 offers an introduction to, and directed practice in, the use of desktop publishing software.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 315 - Young Adult Literature

In this course, attention will be paid to the reading and discussion of contemporary young adult fiction representing a variety of themes and genres. Other topics include adolescent psychology, the history and development of young adult literature, current trends in young adult literature, and the young adult in film and other mass media. In addition, this course prepares prospective and actual teachers, librarians, and parents to understand and to direct the reading of young adults.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 316 - Literary Theory and Criticism

Students in ENG 316 read and discuss major critical theories that have dominated literary and cultural studies in the last several decades.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 318 - Advanced Composition and the Writing Process

ENG 318 is an advanced course in writing and rewriting skills designed to show students how to write more effectively for different purposes and to different audiences in such genres as essays, articles, and reviews. Attention will be paid to a writer's method and audiences and to the several steps in the writing process.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ENG 110

ENG 324 - Shakespeare

This course considers selected poems and plays, including tragedies, comedies, history plays, and romances, exploring the literary, dramatic, and historical dimensions of Shakespeare's art.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 351 - Gender and Ethnicity

The course focuses on texts that represent various representations of gender or ethnicity in Western literature (primarily American ethnic literature and/or writers representing diaspora). The course may include literature from any time period, or be narrowed to specific groups, nationalities, or historic periods (i.e., Asian American women writers during World War II) or broadened to include cross-cultural, cross-gendered representations (i.e., British and French women writers).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 352 - Genre and Form

In this course, students examine literature through the lens of form and genre. Specifically, topics may include history of the elegy, history of the novel, literature of detection, science fiction, autobiography and memoir, environmental writing, or satire. Students will leave this course with a deeper understanding of how a specific genre is represented across time periods and from various cultural traditions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 353 - Contemporary Literature

This course examines fiction or drama or poetry from roughly 1950 to the present. It may include both Western and non-Western texts (including works in translation). The focus of the course in any given semester may be in one or more genres, with an emphasis on applying various critical methods for analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ENG 357 - Living American Writers

Students read from the works of four or five well-known American writers who visit the class to discuss their work. Although topics of discussion will vary according to the writers being studied, consideration will be given to such matters as canonicity, the role of the writer in the broader culture, literary form, theme as it evolves over the course of an author's career, and the business of publishing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 367 - Literature and Film

This course examines the uneasy relationship between literature and film, a relation long debated by writers and filmmakers alike. Specifically, students will study an eclectic selection of literary works and an equally eclectic collection of films based on those works. The literary texts will be drawn from different genres and national literary traditions, and the films will be drawn from different cinematic traditions and genres. Cross listed as FLMS 367

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 370-79 - Special Topics

Specially designed courses in literature built around a topic chosen by the instructor. Topics vary from semester to semester.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 402 - Topics in Creative and Professional Writing II

This course includes special topics in advanced writing, including memoir writing, magazine writing, advanced business writing, advanced poetry writing, and writing about the environment. Topics and emphases vary each time the course is offered, so students may take this course for credit more than once.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 405-06 - Advanced Fiction Workshop

ENG 405 and ENG 406 offer students further direction in the writing of fiction within a workshop. Students may repeat these courses for credit.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ENG 305

ENG 410 - Publication Design

Publication Design reviews and extends knowledge of copyediting and layout and design for both print and Web. The emphasis is on the use of Adobe InDesign to produce a range of documents, from logos, advertisements, and personal identity packages to magazine pages, magazine dummies, and Web layouts. Copy from La Salle journalism students will be used for some layout and photography exercises and posted to the Web. ENG 310 or experience with InDesign is helpful, but not required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 417 - History and Structure of the English Language

This course studies the ways in which the language we call English has developed over the centuries, the kinds of English that are spoken in the world today, and the underlying structure of these varieties of English and their different grammars. ENG 417 combines theory with text, using works by authors from the 7th century to the 21st as base texts in which to analyze how English has continued to develop as an important linguistic force throughout the world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 437 - World Literature, The Western Tradition

This course surveys the literature of Western Europe from the ancient Greeks to the modern period, emphasizing drama and narrative in their many forms. Literary works will be studied in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 438 - World Literature, The Non-Western Tradition

This course considers primarily 20th- and 21st-century readings in selected works from Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, and the Pacific Rim, emphasizing literature as a reflection of its cultural background.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 441 - Studies in British Literature and Culture To 1700

In this course, students intensively study aspects of Medieval British and Renaissance literature and culture up to the beginnings of the modern period. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors, examining them in light of their historical and cultural contexts, as well as their continental counterparts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 442 - Studies in British Literature and Culture 1700-1900

In this course, students intensively study British Restoration and 18th- and 19th-century literature, and the culture. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical, literary, and cultural contexts, as well as competitive or complementary continental traditions.

Number of Credits: 3

ENG 443 - Studies in British Literature and Culture Since 1900

In this course, students intensively study British literature and culture from 1900 to the present. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical and cultural contexts, as well as continental traditions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 446 - Studies in American Literature and Culture To 1900

In this course, students intensively study American literature from its beginnings to 1900. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical and cultural contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 447 - Studies in American Literature and Culture Since 1900

In this course, students intensively study American literature from 1900 to the present. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical and cultural contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 461-462 - Internship

Students may intern at a variety of sites including advertising and public relations firms, publishing and broadcasting companies, for-profit and nonprofit organizations, and social service or health care agencies. Student interns work under professional supervision to learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of the world of work. Students can earn 3 credits for internships requiring 12-15 hours per week of work, and 6 credits for internships requiring 24-30 hours per week of work. In addition, students can complete two 3-credit internships in different semesters.

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Interested students must have at least a junior or senior standing, a 2.75 grade point average both overall and in the major, and the recommendation of the internship coordinator.

ENG 480 - Capstone Seminar

The major and double major in English conclude with a capstone seminar in which students pursue an independent research, pedagogical, or writing project of significant depth and scope directed by a faculty facilitator and in consultation with faculty knowledgeable in each student's field of inquiry. The goal of the capstone seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to pursue a topic of interest in a sustained way and to support each student's project through the discussion and application of advanced research in the discipline and a workshop in which the student is able to present material in draft on the way to the production of the final project. The capstone provides a forum in which students can share ideas, provide feedback to one another, and solve problems related to scholarly research, pedagogy, and creative projects. ENG 480 may also be taken by students minoring in English.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Department of Global Languages, Literatures, and Perspectives

Mission Statement

The Department of Global Languages, Literatures, and Perspectives of La Salle University fully supports the University’s Mission as well as the Mission of the School of Arts and Sciences.

The Department of Global Languages, Literatures, and Perspectives offers foreign languages students the opportunity to break the barrier of a single language, facilitating communication with people in other cultures and the attainment of broader social and cultural understanding.

To this end, all of the programs strive to develop the student’s facility in comprehension, speaking, reading and writing in one of five world languages offered within the Department. The Global Languages, Literatures, and Perspectives Department aims to give the student knowledge of the historical development of a given language and its literature, together with an appreciation and understanding of its literary and cultural achievements.

The globalization of life, careers and professions, and the historical and traditional role of the United States as the preferred immigrant destination, have made the mission of the department more relevant and important than ever as a social tool, needed for effectively applying professional expertise and knowledge to social contact with other cultures. Further, for our society to effectively compete in the world, linguistic and cultural expertise is a requirement for our students to achieve competitive advantages and success.

Major(s) Offered

B.A. Spanish

B.S./B.A. Communication Sciences and Disorders and Spanish Double Major

B.A. Specialized Spanish and Elementary Education Double Major for Spanish Immersion Teaching

A.A. Liberal Studies

A.A. Liberal Studies - BUSCA (Bilingual Undergraduate Studies for Collegiate Advancement)

Minor(s) Offered

Leadership and Global Understanding (LGU)

Spanish

Latin American Studies

Available Electives

Location/Contact Information

Victoria Ketz, Chair

ketz@lasalle.edu

Olney Hall 241

215.951.1201

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Ketz, Kling

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Biehl, Cerocchi, Ossa

INSTRUCTORS: Da Costa Montesinos, Fischetti, Woods

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Marsh, Rudnytzky

BUSCA (Bilingual Undergraduate Studies for Collegiate Advancement)

Program Description

English

BUSCA offers the Spanish-speaking community the degree of Associate of Arts with a concentration in English for Academic Purposes. During their studies, students will take at least one course from each required Institutional Learning Outcomes. 

The BUSCA curriculum is designed to help the students become proficient in English in an educational environment that is comfortable and challenging.  The goal is for graduates to have the academic and linguistic skills they need to transfer into a bachelor's degree program at La Salle, if desired.

Bilingual support services are available to all BUSCA students.

Español

BUSCA ofrece a la comunidad hispanohablante el grado de Asociado en Artes Liberales con una concentración en “English for Academic Purposes.” Durante sus estudios, los estudiantes toman al mínimo un curso de cada categoría de los resultados institucionales. 

El currículum de BUSCA aborda las aspiraciones de los estudiantes en hacerse proficientes en el inglés mientras se les brinda un ambiente educativo donde el estudiante se siente como en casa, apreciado y retado académicamente.  La meta del programa es que los graduados tienen las habilidades académicas y lingüísticas necesarias para continuar sus estudios para recibir un bachillerato universitario de La Salle.

BUSCA ofrece apoyo bilingüe tanto académico como administrativo a todos los estudiantes.

Why take this major?

English

The Bilingual Undergraduate Studies for Collegiate Advancement (BUSCA) Program offers Hispanic students a unique opportunity to transform their lives and their futures by completing an Associate of Arts degree program at La Salle University,

BUSCA offers an inclusive, supportive learning community that focuses on the distinctive academic challenges of Spanish-dominant students.  The BUSCA faculty, staff, and administration respect each individual student and strive to build on each student’s educational foundation, maximizing on academic strengths and actively addressing weaknesses. 

As the BUSCA students strive to develop a stronger foundational base of knowledge, improved academic and English language skills, deeper intellectual curiosity, and increased self-confidence, they are challenged by a rigorous liberal arts-based curriculum and a demanding and nurturing faculty and staff.  Upon graduating with a valuable degree and sixty fully transferable credits into the bachelor’s degree program at La Salle University, BUSCA graduates are equipped to pursue further education and to become lifelong learners and bilingual leaders in our communities, society, and world.

Español

El programa BUSCA, conocido por sus siglas en inglés (Bilingual Undergraduate Studies for Collegiate Advancement), ofrece a los estudiantes hispanos una oportunidad única para transformar sus vidas y su futuro en un programa de la Universidad de La Salle del Grado de Asociado en Artes.

BUSCA ofrece una comunidad de aprendizaje y apoyo, tomando en cuenta los retos académicos de los estudiantes hispanohablantes. Tanto el profesorado como el personal y la administración de BUSCA respetan a cada estudiante como individuo, y se esfuerzan por construir una plataforma educativa sólida, aprovechando al máximo las capacidades académicas de los estudiantes y abordando activamente sus debilidades.

Al tiempo que se reta a los estudiantes de BUSCA para que desarrollen una base de conocimientos más amplios, adelanten sus habilidades, tanto académicas como del idioma inglés, escudriñen en el área  intelectual y mejoren la auto-confianza, también se encaran a un plan de estudios rigurosos en el área de las artes y un profesorado y personal que exige tanto como apoya. Después de graduarse con un título de sesenta créditos, que son transferibles en su totalidad para el programa de licenciatura en la Universidad de La Salle, los graduados de BUSCA están preparados para continuar sus estudios, continuar en un proceso de aprendizaje constante y ser líderes bilingües en la comunidad, la sociedad y el mundo.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

A.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

English

Students must earn a C or better in the following courses: INST 105, ENG 110, and ENG 210 as well as LIT 100, LIT 150, and LIT 250* to continue onto the next course and to enroll in BSCA 250. *With the approval of the BUSCA Director, students may take LIT 250 concurrently with BSCA 250.

Students must earn a C or better in BSCA 250 to earn an Associate Degree and to apply for a bachelor's degree program at La Salle.  Additionally, students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better to graduate and to apply for a bachelor's degree program at La Salle. 

Español

Los estudiantes deben aprobar los siguientes cursos: INST 105, ENG 110 y ENG 210 además de LIT 100, LIT 150 y LIT 250* con una nota mínima de "C" para continuar al próximo nivel y para inscribirse en el curso de BSCA 250. *Con la aprobación del Director, los estudiantes podrán tomar LIT 250 al mismo tiempo que toman BSCA 250.

Los estudiantes deben aprobar el curso de BSCA 250 con una nota mínima de “C” para recibir el Título de Asociado y continuar sus estudios en un programa de “Bachillerato universitario” en la Universidad de La Salle. Además, los estudiantes de BUSCA deben tener un promedio acumulativo de 2.0 o más para graduarse y para solicitar para un programa de “Bachillerato universitario” en la Universidad de La Salle.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 158 Life Science: A Human Approach

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 Mathematics: Myths and Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 Introduction to Computing Using Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

LIT 150 Modern European and Latin American Writers

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

LIT 250 Selected Topics in Western Literature

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

PHL 152 Ethics and the Good Life

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 203 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

INST 105- Academic Discourse I: Writing
LIT 100- Translingual and Transcultural Literature
SPN 204- Spanish for Heritage Speakers
BSCA 250- BUSCA Capstone Course
5 Courses to be offered in the BUSCA Program or approved by BUSCA Directors

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

English

Students must earn a C or better in all courses marked with an asterisk to move onto the next course in the sequence.

Semester 1

INST 105* Academic Discourse I: Writing

LIT 100* Translingual and Transcultural Literature

COM 150 Presentation Skills

SPN 203 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

CSC 151 Introduction to Computing Using Packages

Semester 2

ENG 110* College Writing 1: Persuasion (Prerequisite: INST 105)

LIT 150* Modern European and Latin American Writers (Prerequisite: LIT 100)

SPN 204 Spanish for Heritage Speakers (Prerequisite: SPN 203)

Approved elective #1 (Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better)

Approved elective #2 (Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better)

Semester 3

ENG 210* College Writing 2: Research (Prerequisite: ENG 110)

LIT 250* Selected Topics in Western Literature (Prerequisite: LIT 150)

MTH 150 Mathematics: Myths and Realities

REL 100 Religion Matters

Approved elective #3 (Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better)

Semester 4

BSCA 250** BUSCA Capstone Seminar (Prerequisite: ENG 210)

BIO 158 Life Science: A Human Approach

PHL 152 Ethics and the Good Life

Approved elective #4 (Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better)

Approved elective #5 (Prerequisite: Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better)

 ** Students must pass the capstone course, BSCA 250, with a minimum final grade of “C" to earn their Associate Degree.

A cumulative GPA of 2.0 is required to receive the associate degree.

BUSCA students may apply to a bachelor’s degree program at La Salle University only upon graduation from BUSCA with the associate degree and a minimum final grade of “C” in BSCA 250.

Español

Los estudiantes deben sacar una "C" o más alta en cada curso marcado en asterisco para poder tomar el curso siguiente de inglés.

Primer semestre

INST 105* La escritura académica

LIT 100* La literatura translingual y transcultural

COM 150 Las presentaciones académicas

SPN 203 El español para los hispanohablantes

CSC 151 Introducción a la computación con el uso de programas

Segundo semestre

ENG 110* El arte de escribir 1: Persuasión (pre-requisito: INST 105)

LIT 150* La literatura latinoamericana (pre-requisito: LIT 100)

SPN 204 El español para los hispanohablantes (pre-requisito: SPN 203)

Primer electivo aprobado (pre-requisito: un promedio acumulativo de 2.0 o más alto)

Segundo electivo aprobado (pre-requisito: un promedio acumulativo de 2.0 o más alto)

Tercer semestre

ENG 210* El arte de escribir 2: Investigación (pre-requisito: ENG 110)

LIT 250* Los temas en la literatura latinoamericana  (pre-requisito: LIT 150)

MTH 150 Matemáticas: Los mitos y las realidades

REL 100 La significancia de religión

Tercer electivo aprobado (pre-requisito: un promedio acumulativo de 2.0 o más alto)

Cuarto semestre

BSCA 250** El curso seminario de BUSCA (pre-requisito: ENG 210)

BIO 158 La biología humana

PHL 152 La ética y la vida

Cuarto electivo aprobado (pre-requisito: un promedio acumulativo de 2.0 o más alto)

Quinto electivo aprobado (pre-requisito: un promedio acumulativo de 2.0 o más alto)

** Para recibir el Título de Asociado, los estudiantes tienen que aprobar el curso de BSCA 250 con una nota mínima de “C” y mantener un promedio de 2.0.

Los estudiantes de BUSCA podrán solicitar admisión a un “Bachiller universitario” en la Universidad La Salle una vez que ellos aprueben el curso de BSCA 250 con una nota mínima de “C” y que se hayan graduado de BUSCA con el Título de Asociado.

Course Descriptions

BSCA 150 - Foundations Course

The primary objective of this English foundations course is to introduce the Spanish-speaking student to American English in the university context through spontaneous and directed oral, writing, and reading exercises. The course also guides the Spanish-speaking student through the acculturation process into typical American culture and academic life at the University. The course includes an emphasis on cross-cultural communication skills, beginning reading and writing exercises, grammar-based themes, public speaking, and other skills necessary to initiate a successful academic career.

BSCA 150 is the first course taken by a student entering the BUSCA program. It is a unique course for several reasons. First, it is a 12-credit course. Second, the classes for this one course are spread out over four weeknights. Third, there are four components to this course (Grammar, Composition, Conversation, and University Studies) and several instructors. Fourth, the student's final grade in all four components will be averaged together to form one final grade. Finally, BSCA 150 is unique because each student must earn a final grade of "C" or higher in order to continue in the BUSCA program. In other words, BSCA 150 is a prerequisite for all other courses in BUSCA.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Only Open to Students Registered in BUSCA

BSCA 150 - Curso De Fundamentos

El objetivo principal de este curso de fundamentos de inglés es introducir al estudiante hispanohablante al inglés americano en el contexto universitario, a través de la vía conversacional espontánea y dirigida, y a través de ejercicios de lectura y escritura. El curso también ayuda al estudiante hispanohablante a adaptarse a la asimilación de la cultura americana y la vida universitaria. El curso hace énfasis en las habilidades de comunicación intercultural, a través de ejercicios de lectura y de escritura, de temas basados en la gramática, la oratoria y otras habilidades necesarias para iniciar una carrera académica exitosa.

BSCA 150 es el primer curso tomado por el estudiante que entra en el programa BUSCA. Se trata de un curso único por varias razones; en primer lugar, se trata de un curso de doce créditos. En segundo lugar, las clases de este curso se imparten cuatro días de semana en la tanda nocturna. En tercer lugar, hay cuatro componentes de este curso (gramática, composición, conversación y estudios universitarios), cada uno con diferentes profesores. En cuarto lugar, la calificación final en los cuatro componentes se promedia, para formar una calificación final del alumno. Por último, el curso BSCA 150 es único, debido a que cada estudiante debe obtener una calificación final de "C" o mayor, con la finalidad de continuar en el programa BUSCA. En otras palabras, BSCA 150 es un requisito previo para todos los cursos en BUSCA.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Es un curso exclusivamente para estudiantes de BUSCA

Prerequisites: No

BSCA 250 - Capstone Seminar

This course serves as the ninth and final English for Academic Purposes course in the BUSCA program. It is intended to guide fifth-semester BUSCA students in their understanding of undergraduate university requirements and expectations and to refine the students' proficiency with the English language. Special emphasis is placed on continuing to develop the students' English language communication skills, persuasive writing, oral argumentation, critical reading, and facility with conducting academic research. The BSCA 250 students sharpen their skills through the analysis of provocative contemporary issues and through authentic language practice, such as debates, interviews, role plays, oral reports, presentations, essays, and a research paper.

Students must earn a "C" or higher in BSCA 250 to earn an Associate Degree and continue their studies in a bachelor's degree program at La Salle.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Only Open to Students Registered in BUSCA

Prerequisites: Must have C or higher in ENG 210 to register for the course

BSCA 250 - Seminario Final

Este curso es el noveno y último de inglés con propósitos académicos en el programa BUSCA. Su propósito es servir como guía para que el estudiante de quinto semestre conozca cuales son los requisitos de la universidad en cursos subgraduados y cuales son las expectativas, además le ayuda a perfeccionar las habilidades de comunicación en inglés. Este curso hace especial énfasis en continuar el desarrollo del estudiante en las habilidades de comunicación, la escritura persuasiva, la argumentación oral, la lectura crítica y facilita la realización de trabajos de investigación. Los estudiantes del curso BSCA 250 desarrollan sus habilidades a través del análisis de temas de actualidad y a través de la práctica auténtica; tales como debates, entrevistas, juegos de rol, informes orales, presentaciones, ensayos y trabajos de investigación.

Los estudiantes tienen que aprobar BSCA 250 con una nota mínima de "C" para recibir el Título de Asociado y continuar sus estudios en un programa de "Bachiller universitario" en la Universidad de La Salle.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Es un curso exclusivamente para estudiantes de BUSCA

Prerequisites: Los estudiantes necesitan tener una calificación de C o mejor en ENG 210 para tomar BSCA 250.

French Electives

Course Descriptions

FRN 101 - Elementary French

Elementary French is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French. Instruction is planned to help students develop basic, functional proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading and writing French. Daily written and oral exercises are assigned to complement work done in class.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

FRN 102 - Elementary French

Elementary French is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French. Instruction is planned to help students develop basic, functional proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading and writing French. Daily written and oral exercises are assigned to complement work done in class.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: FRN 101 or its equivalent.

FRN 201 - Intermediate French

Intermediate French is designed to build on the language skills acquired in Elementary French. Instruction is planned to expand the students' functional proficiency in French, especially by increasing active vocabulary and extending text type to the sentence level. Topical readings appropriate to the level are discussed in class.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Elementary French or its equivalent of 3 or 4 years of high school French.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

FRN 202 - Intermediate French

Intermediate French is designed to build on the language skills acquired in Elementary French. Instruction is planned to expand the students' functional proficiency in French, especially by increasing active vocabulary and extending text type to the sentence level. Topical readings appropriate to the level are discussed in class.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: FRN 201 or its equivalent.

German Electives

Course Descriptions

GER 101 - Beginning in German

These courses provide the basis for communication in German and for understanding the cultures of the German-speaking world. Through first elements of the language, students learn aspects of history, geography, and culture. Structures and patterns are introduced and practiced.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

GER 102 - Beginning in German

These courses provide the basis for communication in German and for understanding the cultures of the German-speaking world. Through first elements of the language, students learn aspects of history, geography, and culture. Structures and patterns are introduced and practiced.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: GER 101 or departmental placement test.

GER 201 - Continuing in German

Communication on personal topics is fostered through continuing study of the structural and lexical features of the language. Emphasis is on the encounters of daily life—employment, leisure activities, living situations, family and friends.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: German 101 and 102 or departmental placement.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

GER 202 - Continuing in German

Communication on personal topics is fostered through continuing study of the structural and lexical features of the language. Emphasis is on the encounters of daily life—employment, leisure activities, living situations, family and friends.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: German 201 or departmental placement.

Italian Electives

Course Descriptions

ITL 101 - Elementary Italian

These courses are designed for students with no prior knowledge of Italian or with basic knowledge of Italian. They emphasize the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. Basic grammar skills are also introduced. Students will make oral presentations, read short texts, and write brief compositions in Italian. The instructor will speak predominantly the target language. In addition, students will expand their knowledge of the culture, history, and daily lives of Italian people.

Instructional materials include listening to songs, visiting websites, watching video clips online, practice exercises in your textbooks (in-class and assigned as homework), group cooperative activities and practices and short class presentations. By the end of the semester students will be able to read, write, and speak Italian at a low intermediate level and be ready to take the following level course (201).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ITL 102 - Elementary Italian

These courses are designed for students with no prior knowledge of Italian or with basic knowledge of Italian. They emphasize the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. Basic grammar skills are also introduced. Students will make oral presentations, read short texts, and write brief compositions in Italian. The instructor will speak predominantly the target language. In addition, students will expand their knowledge of the culture, history, and daily lives of Italian people.

Instructional materials include listening to songs, visiting websites, watching video clips online, practice exercises in your textbooks (in-class and assigned as homework), group cooperative activities and practices and short class presentations. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ITL 201 - Intermediate Italian

These courses promote communication through the knowledge of the Italian language and culture. They involve further study of the structural and lexical features of the target language based upon topical subjects. They enhance the understanding of the in-depth culture of Italy through presentations on its traditions, art, music, literature, landmarks and daily life. Italian 201 is designed for students with intermediate proficiency. They emphasize the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. Communicative proficiency skills will be perfected through group activities, class discussion of assigned readings, short compositions and oral presentations; effective learning will be facilitated by listening to songs, visiting websites, watching video clips online, practice exercises in textbooks (in-class and assigned as homework), and a film screening after having analyzed its script. By the end of the semester students will be able to read, write, and speak Italian on an upper- intermediate level and be ready to take advanced level courses (300 level).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ITL 202 - Intermediate Italian

These courses promote communication through the knowledge of the Italian language and culture. They involve further study of the structural and lexical features of the target language based upon topical subjects. They enhance the understanding of the in-depth culture of Italy through presentations on its traditions, art, music, literature, landmarks and daily life. Italian 202 is designed for students with intermediate proficiency. They emphasize the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. Communicative proficiency skills will be perfected through group activities, class discussion of assigned readings, short compositions and oral presentations; effective learning will be facilitated by listening to songs, visiting websites, watching video clips online, practice exercises in textbooks (in-class and assigned as homework), and a film screening after having analyzed its script. By the end of the semester students will be able to read, write, and speak Italian on an upper- intermediate level and be ready to take advanced level courses (300 level).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Japanese Electives

Course Descriptions

JPN 101 - Elementary Japanese

This course introduces basic modern spoken and written Japanese to students who have had little or no previous knowledge of the language. The course will focus on developing students' communication skills in Japanese, including writing, reading, listening and speaking in order for students to function using Japanese in a Japanese social environment. Students will also learn aspects of Japanese culture associated with the use of the language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

JPN 102 - Elementary Japanese

A continuation of Elementary Japanese 101. The course will focus on developing students' communication skills in Japanese including writing, reading, listening and speaking with more advanced basic expressions and more Kanji in order for students to function using Japanese in actual settings. Students will also learn aspects of Japanese culture associated with the use of the language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: JPN 101

JPN 201 - Intermediate Japanese

An intermediate course in spoken and written Japanese. The course will focus on developing more advanced communication skills in Japanese: writing, reading, listening and speaking. Students will also continue to learn about aspects of Japanese culture reflected in its language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: JPN 102

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

JPN 202 - Intermediate Japanese

Intermediate Japanese 202 is a continuation of spoken and written Japanese for students who have had Japanese 201 or the equivalent. The course will focus on helping students continue to develop more advanced communication skills in Japanese: writing, reading, listening and speaking. Students will also continue to learn about aspects of Japanese culture associated with the use of the language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: JPN 201

Latin American Studies Minor

Program Description

The minor in Latin American Studies can complement any major with a series of six courses that emphasize the history, politics, economics, literature, language and art of the region. Latin America comprises more than twenty countries in the Western Hemisphere and is an area with deep and complex ties to the United States. A student can expect to develop a broad perspective on the Americas through comparative and interdisciplinary study that will also lend itself to professional preparation for many fields.

Why take this minor?

The LAS minor offers students the opportunity for students in any major to engage in the interdisciplinary study of a major world region with close ties to the United States. It encourages and prepares students to study abroad or participate in a travel study course or do an original research project, among other opportunities for engaged learning.

Student Learning Outcomes

On completing the program Latin American Studies Minors should:

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

6

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

18

Minor Requirements

Six three-credit courses distributed as follows. As course offerings change, please see Director for other approved courses on a semester-to-semester basis.

TWO Spanish language courses: 100 through 400-level

FOUR courses drawn from at least THREE of the following departments:

History (HIS 307, HIS 308, special topics)

Political Science / Economics (POL/ECN 334, special topics)

Art and Art History (ARTH 224, special topics)

Spanish (SPN 313, 322, 350, 351, 442, 443, 448, special topics)

Travel Study Course to a country in Latin America (multiple departments)

Courses are not sequenced but it is recommended that a student take two courses per year starting in the Sophomore year.

Leadership and Global Understanding Minor (LGU)

Program Description

This program is designed to make undergraduates more active learners and give them the tools to become truly engaged citizens in the various communities (local, national, global) they will enter after gradua- tion. Our primary objective is to create students who come to under- stand, value and accept their responsibility to become active citizens in their community, sensitive to cultural diversity, so that they may assume active leadership roles and help others do the same. In order to meet this objective, the minor in Leadership and Global Understanding (LGU) will integrate service learning, community leadership, intercultural/ international studies, travel study and student-centered pedagogy. But the key to such an objective is the integrative student centered pedago- gy where students assume primary responsibility for their own learning.

Why take this minor?

The LGU program is an interdisciplinary minor that aims to foster leadership qualities in undergraduate students by giving them intensive civic engagement experience on the local, national, and international levels. LGU students come from all academic units (Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Health Sciences, Business) and all majors within those schools. Over the course of their studies, LGU students interact directly with diverse individuals, which increases their intercultural competencies and inevitably changes the way they view their own academic and, ultimately, professional careers.

Students in the program engage in regular community service activities on campus and in the greater Philadelphia community, participate in travel study courses around the world that deal with overarching issues including education, social justice, and civil rights, and reflect critically on how they plan to contribute to the various communities they belong to.

Student Learning Outcomes

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

6

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

18

Admission Requirement

Admission into the LGU minor requires an interview with the director of the program.

Minor Requirements

SOPH Fall: LGU 200

SOPH Spring: Elective

JUNIOR Fall: Elective

JUNIOR Spring: Travel Study or Study Abroad Semester or SUMMER between JUNIOR and SENIOR YEAR: Study Abroad Program (variable)

SENIOR Spring: Travel Study (variable); LGU 400

Course Descriptions

LGU 200 - Introduction to Leadership and Global Understanding

This experiential course examines the various communities students are members of—the campus community, the city of Philadelphia, the greater Philadelphia area, the nation and the global community. In par- ticular, students will explore the Philadelphia community, its history and the various groups that make it up. The Introduction to Leadership and Global Understanding will introduce the student to the rich diver- sity of cultural groups in the Philadelphia area. Using Philadelphia as a model, students will learn to see the "community" as multi-layered and will begin to ask important questions about the rights and obligations of citizenship within such a community.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

LGU 400 - Studies in Leadership and Global Understanding- Capstone Experience

Studies in Leadership and Global Understanding is a multidisciplinary capstone course whose primary purpose is to integrate travel study courses, designated electives, home and abroad projects, curricular and extracurricular experiences including service learning opportunities of the student as he or she has progressed through the minor. Whereas the introductory course focused on the campus and Philadelphia commu- nities, the capstone course focuses on the bridges between these more immediate communities and the global community with which the stu- dent now has some direct experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: LGU minors only

Prerequisites: LGU 200 and progress in the LGU minor

Literature Electives

Course Descriptions

LIT 100 - Translingual And Transcultural Literature

An examination of identity through the lens of cultural heritage. It provides a study of representative texts that explore the composition of identity as well as the challenges of living in a translingual and transcultural world.

BUSCA students must earn a "C" or higher in LIT 100 to enroll in LIT 150.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students must get approval from Department Chair or Program Director to enroll in this course.

LIT 150 - Modern European And Latin American Writers

An examination of modern French, German, Hispanic, Italian, and Slavic literatures in English translation. It provides a study of attempts by representative men and women to comprehend their times and their cultures and to express their understandings of modern life in literature will be examined. Selected works of prose, poetry and drama will be addressed. Short critical papers are required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online, Hybrid

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

LIT 250 - Selected Topics in Western Literature

An examination of specific topics in modern French, German, Hispanic, Italian, and Slavic literatures in English translation. The topics may include motifs, such as the search for lost innocence, love and suffering, or the examination of specific literary movements such as Romanticism, Neo-Classicism, Modernism and Post-Modernism. Selected works of prose, poetry and drama will be addressed. Short critical papers are required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online, Hybrid

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

Russian Electives

Course Descriptions

RUS 101 - Elementary Russian

The courses are topically organized and designed to encourage communication and to offer insight into the culture of the speakers of Russian. Information is provided on the geo-political areas in which Russian is spoken and the cultural habits and orientation of its speakers.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Little or no previous study or experience in Russian.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

RUS 102 - Elementary Russian

The courses are topically organized and designed to encourage communication and to offer insight into the culture of the speakers of Russian. Information is provided on the geo-political areas in which Russian is spoken and the cultural habits and orientation of its speakers.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Little or no previous study or experience in Russian.

Prerequisites: RUS 101 or departmental placement.

RUS 201 - Intermediate Russian

These courses promote communication through a knowledge of Russian and Russian culture. They involve further study of the structural and lexical features of Russian, based upon topical subjects. They enhance understanding of the in-depth culture of Russia through presentations on its traditions of art, music, and literature.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: RUS 102 or departmental placement.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

RUS 202 - Intermediate Russian

These courses promote communication through a knowledge of Russian and Russian culture. They involve further study of the structural and lexical features of Russian, based upon topical subjects. They enhance understanding of the in-depth culture of Russia through presentations on its traditions of art, music, and literature.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: RUS 201 or departmental placement

RUS 241-242 - Russian Literature of the 19th Century

These courses focus on Romanticism and Realism in Russian literature. Readings from Pushkin, Griboedov, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Ostrovsky, Dostoevsky, L. Tolstoy, Saltykov-Shchedrin, Leskov, Chekhov, Kuprin, Bunin, and Andreev.

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: RUS 202 or permission of the instructor

RUS 245-246 - Soviet Literature

These courses examine socialist realism as a doctrine of art and literature in the Soviet Union. Readings from Gorky, Mayakovsky, Babel, Olesha, Leonov, Zamyatin, Zoshchenko, Sholokhov, Ilf and Petrov, Simonov, Pasternak, Yevtushenko, Solzhenitsyn, and others.

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: RUS 202 or permission of the instructor

Spanish

Program Description

The curriculum of the Spanish Program is designed to develop the cognitive and critical abilities of the students. It reflects the diverse corpus of knowledge required to master a target language with an acceptable degree of proficiency. The course offerings seek to reflect the breadth of skills required for such proficiency and focus on developing students' linguistic and cultural fluency. All of our elementary and intermediate level courses are offered on an annual rotation. The majority of our upper level courses are offered on a biennial schedule.

Why take this major?

Spanish is spoken by more than 400 million people worldwide. A major in Spanish will open the worlds of commerce and culture in many places throughout the globe including most of the Iberian Peninsula and a large swath of the Pacific Rim. Not only is Spanish one of the six working languages of the United Nations, but it is becoming a viable alternative to English in the United States.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

2.0 in the major

2.0 cumulative GPA

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

REQUIRED FOR MAJOR IN SPANISH: 14 COURSES

Ten courses in Spanish (Based on departmental placement)

Four courses in a second language (waived if double majoring)

Required for a Spanish Minor: 6 courses in Spanish (Based on departmental placement)

SPN 480 Special Topics

SPN 481 Capstone Experience

In order to major or minor in Spanish, the student will need to have his/her starting level of Spanish assessed by a faculty member.  Once the student's level of Spanish has been established, the appropriate sequence of courses for the student to satisfactorily complete his or her minor will be outlined by the Spanish area coordinator or a Spanish faculty advisor.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

COMMUNICATIONS SCIENCES AND DISORDERS (CSD) AND SPANISH DOUBLE MAJOR

The Communication Sciences and Disorders/Spanish double major aims to provide its students with the pre-clinical, linguistic and cultural foundations, which in addition to a master's degree in speech-language pathology, are necessary to treat and work with patients that are bilingual English/Spanish, as well as those that are Spanish speakers with limited English proficiency. Those wishing to become CSD/Spanish double majors must have their Spanish assessed by a Language faculty member in order to begin their studies at the appropriate level. After placement, students will follow the carefully designed course sequence prepared by the CSD and Languages departments.

REQUIREMENTS:

Fulfill the requirements of the CSD major as outlined by the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and 10 Spanish courses starting at the intermediate level or higher.

Minimum Requirements for Spanish:

* Students placing above the intermediate level will not take SPN 205 or 206. In lieu of these intermediate courses students will take additional 300/400 level Spanish courses to fulfill their requirements. Heritage speakers of Spanish will take SPN 203 and SPN 204 (Spanish for Heritage Speakers I and II) instead of SPN 301 and SPN 302.

 

SPECIALIZED SPANISH AND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION DOUBLE MAJOR FOR SPANISH IMMERSION TEACHING

Spanish immersion teachers, in addition to teaching language and culture, must also be able to instruct in content areas such as math, science and social studies in the target language. Therefore, these teachers must native or near native Spanish fluency, as well as have a good understanding of second language acquisition theories and pedagogy.

Candidates for this double major will take the Early Childhood (PK-4) sequence of courses offered by La Salle's Education department in order to meet certification requirements for Pennsylvania. There are reciprocal licensure agreements between Pennsylvania and several other states. This specialized double major gives students the opportunity to gain the necessary knowledge in second language acquisition theories and pedagogy as well as the skills in both Spanish and English to teach in related content areas, in order to qualify for positions as immersion teachers.

Those wishing to become Spanish immersion teachers will follow the carefully designed course sequence prepared by the Global Languages and Education departments and will receive advisement from both. Students must take a Spanish placement test before beginning the program. Below are the program's minimum requirements. However, the Spanish curriculum may be adjusted based on a student's initial placement level.

FOUR-YEAR ROSTER

DUAL MAJOR: EDUCATION (PRE K-4) AND SPANISH IMMERSION TEACHING

Freshman Year

Fall Spring

ENG 110 SPN 204 or 302

SPN 203 EDC 104

EDC 103 IMS 162 (4)

EDC 120 PHL 151 or 152

REL 150 or 153 ENG 150

Sophomore Year

Fall Spring

ENG 210 SPN 300/400

IMS 262 (4) EDC 219

SPN 300/400 EDC 220

EDC 217 HIS 300

HIS 151 CSC 151 or 152

Junior Year

Fall Spring

SPN 300/400 EDC 307/309 (7 credits)

SPN 300/400 SPN 300/400

PHL 200 or above SPN 300/400

EDC 325 PHL 200 or above

ENG 200 or above Elective

Senior Year

Fall Spring (Student Teaching Semester)

SPN 300 EDC 474 (12 credits)

Secondary Language Teaching Methods

SPN 331 EDC 475 (3 credits)

The Foreign Language Classroom

REL 200 or above

EDC 410 (2)

EDC 326

*Note: SPN 330 and 331 may be taken prior to the senior year depending on course cycling.

At least one 300/400 level Spanish course should be a literature or culture about Spain and at least one course should be a Latin American literature or culture, or SPN 307 (Commercial Spanish). SPN 307 is strongly recommended for students in this double major. Students may elect to do a study abroad semester either in the fall of their junior year or in the summer. If taken in the summer, they could do two sessions for a total of six credits.

Minor Requirements

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN SPANISH: 6 COURSES (18 credits) IN SPANISH (BASED ON DEPARTMENTAL PLACEMENT)

In order to major or minor in Spanish, the student will need to have his/her starting level of Spanish assessed by a faculty member. Once the student's level of Spanish has been established the appropriate sequence of courses for the student to satisfactorily complete his or her minor will be outlined by the Spanish area coordinator or a Spanish faculty advisor.

Recommended Course Sequence

Major: 10 courses

SPN 1: 101 102 201 202 301 302 4 at 300+

SPN 2: 201 202 301 302 6 at 300+

SPN 3: 301 302 8 at 300+

SPNHE (Heritage): 203 204 8 at 300+

SPNH (Healthcare): 103 104 205 206 301 302 4 at 300+

Minor: 6 courses

SPN 1: 101 102 201 202 301 302

SPN 2: 201 202 301 302 2 at 300+

SPN 3: 301 302 4 at 300+

SPNHE (Heritage): 203 204 4 at 300+

SPNH (Healthcare): 103 104 205 206 301 302

Course Descriptions

SPN 101 - Elementary Spanish

These courses are elementary level courses designed for students with little or no previous Spanish education or experience. In these courses, students will cultivate skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. In addition to cultivating language skills, students will gain insight into the diversity of Spanish-speaking peoples and cultures. Students will be immersed in language and cultures through classroom activities and homework assignments. Student output is emphasized in short simple reading, speaking, and writing activities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: Little or no previous Spanish.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 102 - Elementary Spanish

These courses are elementary level courses designed for students with little or no previous Spanish education or experience. In these courses, students will cultivate skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. In addition to cultivating language skills, students will gain insight into the diversity of Spanish-speaking peoples and cultures. Students will be immersed in language and cultures through classroom activities and homework assignments. Student output is emphasized in short simple reading, speaking, and writing activities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: SPN 101 or departmental placement.

SPN 103 - Spanish For Nursing and Health Sciences I

Spanish 103 is the first of a two-semester sequence. It is an introductory-level course designed for nursing and health sciences students with little or no previous Spanish education or experience. The course places special emphasis on the acquisition of health-related vocabulary and basic communication in situations faced by health professionals. The course focuses on developing the four language skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: Nursing and Health Sciences students with little or no previous Spanish

SPN 104 - Spanish For Nursing and Health Sciences II

Spanish 104 is the second of a two-semester sequence. It is an introductory-level course designed for nursing and health sciences students with little or no previous Spanish education or experience. The course places special emphasis on the acquisition of health-related vocabulary and basic communication in situations faced by health professionals. The course focuses on developing the four language skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: SPN 103

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 201 - Intermediate Spanish

These courses are intermediate level courses. Students placed at the intermediate level have generally taken approximately two to three years of high school Spanish or the equivalent. In these courses, students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. In addition to developing language skills, students will gain insight into the diversity of Spanish-speaking peoples and cultures. Students will be immersed in language and cultures through classroom activities and homework assignments. Student output is emphasized in increased longer reading, speaking, and writing activities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPN 102 or departmental placement.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 202 - Intermediate Spanish

These courses are intermediate level courses. Students placed at the intermediate level have generally taken approximately two to three years of high school Spanish or the equivalent. In these courses, students will further develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. In addition to developing language skills, students will gain insight into the diversity of Spanish-speaking peoples and cultures. Students will be immersed in language and cultures through classroom activities and homework assignments. Student output is emphasized in increased longer reading, speaking, and writing activities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPN 201 or departmental placement.

SPN 203 - Spanish For Heritage Speakers

This is a two semester course taught in Spanish. The second half is SPN 204. It is specifically designed for Heritage Speakers who have learned Spanish in the home and wish to learn more about their culture and heritage. Students will develop further their competencies in grammar and spelling as well as acquire new vocabulary through readings in different genres. They will continue to develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will be immersed in the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures through classroom activities and outside assignments.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are for heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: Departmental placement.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 204 - Spanish For Heritage Speakers

This is a two semester course taught in Spanish. The second half is SPN 203. It is specifically designed for Heritage Speakers who have learned Spanish in the home and wish to learn more about their culture and heritage. Students will develop further their competencies in grammar and spelling as well as acquire new vocabulary through readings in different genres. They will continue to develop skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will be immersed in the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures through classroom activities and outside assignments.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are for heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: SPN 203

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 205 - Intermediate Spanish For Nursing and Health Sciences I

This is an intermediate level I Spanish course designed for nursing and health sciences students. This course is a continuation of Elementary Spanish for Nursing and Health Sciences II and will reinforce and build upon the grammar and vocabulary acquired in that course. Special emphasis will be placed on communicating in Spanish in health related contexts. The course will focus on developing the four language skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: This course is not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: SPN 104 or departmental placement

SPN 206 - Intermediate Spanish For Nursing and Health Sciences II

This is an intermediate level II Spanish course designed for nursing and health sciences students. This course is a continuation of Intermediate Spanish for Nursing and Health Sciences I and will reinforce and build upon the grammar and vocabulary acquired in that course. Special emphasis will be placed on communicating in Spanish in health related contexts. The course will focus on developing the four language skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: This course is not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: SPN 205 or departmental placement

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 301 - Conversation and Composition

These courses focus on developing students' conversational and writing skills in Spanish as well as on educating students about the people and cultures of the Spanish speaking world. These courses also serve to prepare students for upper division Spanish courses. Grammar is reviewed regularly in these courses in order to enable students to improve their command of grammar and apply grammar appropriately when speaking and writing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: SPN 202 or departmental placement.

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 302 - Conversation and Composition

These courses focus on developing students' conversational and writing skills in Spanish as well as on educating students about the people and cultures of the Spanish speaking world. These courses also serve to prepare students for upper division Spanish courses. Grammar is reviewed regularly in these courses in order to enable students to improve their command of grammar and apply grammar appropriately when speaking and writing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: These courses are not intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish

Prerequisites: SPN 301

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 307 - Commercial Spanish

The purpose of this course is to better enable students to utilize Spanish in business and other professional contexts. The course aims to increase students' workplace vocabulary (ex. vocabulary related to the office, computers, travel, etc. will be covered). Written exercises will include exercises such as business letters and other professional correspondence, as well as short translation exercises. Formality vs. informality, use of proper titles to address people in professional situations, and other issues related to cultural etiquette will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 311-312 - Survey of Spanish Literature

This course is an introduction to the study of peninsular Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present. Readings and discussions in Spanish are offered.

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 313 - Survey of Spanish American Literature

This course involves reading and discussion of works from the colonial period to the 20th century, with special emphasis upon contemporary Latin American literature.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 314 - Latin American Short Stories

This is a survey course in which a wide selection of short stories from the late 19th century through the 21st century will be studied. The goal is to familiarize students with works written by a variety of Latin American authors. Themes such as love, gender roles and discrimination, among others, will be examined.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 321 - Survey of Spanish Civilization

This course provides a cultural and historic study of Spain's past, examining the effects of Rome and Islam, the period of Spanish domination and later decline, and the status of present-day Spain.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 322 - Survey of Spanish American Civilization

This course provides a cultural and historic presentation of the diversity of Latin America from the Aztecs and Incas to the Conquest, the viceroyalties, and the establishment of independent nations; course concludes with a thorough study of today's Latin America.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 330 - Second Language Teaching Methods

Second Language Teaching Methods is a general course in second language acquisition theories and teaching methodologies for students interested in a career in second language teaching - both ESL and foreign language. Students will review an familiarize themselves with the dominant theories of the field by linguists such as Stephen Krashen, Michael Long, Susan Gass, Bill VanPatten, Jim Lantolf, and others. This course provides students the opportunity to weigh the merits of the two competing camps within second language acquisition and apply these theories to their own teaching by creating appropriate lesson plans and testing materials to maximize student learning and outcomes in all of the four language skills—reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 331 - The Foreign Language Classroom

The Foreign Language Classroom is a course designed for students interested in a career as an immersion teacher of Spanish. The course will prepare students for teaching Pre-K to 4th grade children in the areas of Math, Science, and Social Studies. Through the review of various second language acquisition theories and teaching methods, students will design and present lessons and activities in Spanish targeting specific content areas.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SPN 350-351 - Introduction to Bilingual-Bicultural Studies

These courses use linguistic and cultural problems in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Emphasis on materials, techniques, and attitudes of teachers and students. Special emphasis on the vocabulary and idiom of the Caribbean. Cultural survey of present-day problems in Puerto Rico and other Caribbean countries will be presented.

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SPN 352 - Introduction to Translation and Interpretation

This introductory translation and interpretation course provides students with an overview of translation theory while providing practice with a variety of texts. Students practice translating from Spanish language to English and vice versa in different topics. Basic concepts and problems in the area of translation studies are identified and discussed. Students also discuss different types and modes of translation as well as translation strategies and techniques. In addition, students are familiarized with the role and functions of translator and/or interpreter in the process of intercultural communication.

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 401 - History of The Spanish Language

This course is a study of the formation of the language, its evolution and phonetic changes from Latin to the present modern pronunciations. Reading and discussion of the early Spanish texts and the development of the language in the early period will be provided.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 402 - Introduction to Spanish Sociolinguinistics

This course introduces students to the study of Spanish language variation within its social context. Social factors such as geography, race, gender, age, social class, economics, education, as well as specific linguistic features belonging to certain Spanish speaking communities, will be discussed. Students will familiarize with sociolinguistic research methodology and theory including, but not limited to, sampling of speech community, data collection, types of linguistic variation, and the sociolinguistic variable. In addition to learning about the concepts, questions, and methods associated with sociolinguistic research as they are applied to language, students will discuss and review studies of language variation in different speaking communities. Finally students will examine language contact situations such as Spanish in the United States.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 405 - Literature of The Middle Ages

This course places emphasis on such works as Cantar de Mio Cid, Poema de Fernán González, and Amadis de Gaula; authors include Berceo, Alfonso X, Juan Manuel, Juan Ruiz, Marqués de Santillana, and los Manrique.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 411 - Renaissance Literature

This course looks at the works of Boscan, Garcilaso, Encina, Nebrija, Torres Naharro, and Lope de Rueda, and such works as Tirant lo Blanc, Celestina, and Lazarillo de Tormes form the basis of this period of literary activity.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 415 - Drama of The Golden Age

This course entails readings, reports, and discussions of the principal dramatists of the Golden Age: Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderon, Alarcon, and others.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 419 - Cervantes

This course offers readings and discussions of Don Quixote. Other important works by Cervantes will also be discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 420 - Spanish For Speech-Language Pathologists

This course introduces the double majors in speech-language and hearing science/Spanish to the Spanish vocabulary used during evaluations and treatments of communication and swallowing disorders. It also includes issues related to cross-linguistic and cross-cultural differences which affect clinical practice. Students will learn about language differences vs language disorders as they critic translated tests and compare them with those normed on Spanish speaking individuals. While using primarily Spanish in this course students will be exposed to a variety of clinical situations. Students will have a better understanding of the difference between interpreter and translators via practical projects.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Must be a CSD/SPN dual major or CSD major and SPN minor with permission from the instructor

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 421 - Bilingualism in Spanish-English Speakers: Development and Disorder

This course is designed for double majors/minors in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Spanish. The course reviews bilingual language acquisition and development, and how the process may vary depending on whether the user is learning the second language simultaneously or sequentially. The topic of bilingualism is discussed from the phonological, lexical, semantic, and syntactical developmental process. The course also includes issues related to cross-linguistic and cross-cultural differences which affect evaluation and treatment of bilingual individuals. Additional topics include the consequences of bilingualism for language, cognition, and the brain.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Must be a CSD/SPN dual major or CSD major and SPN minor with permission from the instructor

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 422 - Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Phonology is a basic course about the production, articulation, and perception of the different sounds of the Spanish language as well as the rules that govern the pronunciation of such sounds. Basic readings and activities will focus on identifying, explaining and transcribing the vowels and consonants of the Spanish language. Students will also review the rules of accentuation in Spanish and how to divide words into syllables.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 423 - Introduction to Spanish Dialectology

Introduction to Spanish Dialectology is a basic course in dialectology. The course reviews the processes of linguistic variations that differentiate geographic dialects of the Spanish language. Some topics include: language variations in Peninsular Spanish, Caribbean Spanish, and Latin American Spanish. The course will also discuss the varieties of Spanish in the United States as well as the influences from other languages on Spanish.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 442 - Romanticism

A study of the early 19th century that analyzes works of such authors and poets as Larra, Duque de Rivas, Zorilla, Espronceda, García Gutiérrez, Hartzenbusch, and Becquer.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 443 - Poetry of the 19th And 20th Centuries

This course focuses on the works by Gabriel y Galán, de Castro, Dario, los Machado, Jiménez, Lorca, Guillén, Otero, and Salinas are considered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 448 - The Spanish American Novel

This course introduces students to the development of the contemporary Latin American novel through an analysis of the sociological and literary aspects of the work of various leading authors. Special attention is denoted to works by and about women. Class discussions and examinations will be given in Spanish.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 457 - The Spanish Novel of the 19th And 20th Centuries

This course provides reading and discussion of Spanish authors, their ideology and philosophies: Fernán Caballero, Galdós, Valera, Pío Baroja, Ala, Cela, Delibes, and Goytisolo.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

SPN 480 - Seminar

Topics of investigation will vary from semester to semester.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SPN 204 or SPN 302

Department of History

Mission Statement

In accordance with our belief that History is, as G.R. Elton once put it, “the only living laboratory we have of the human experience,” the History Department of La Salle University seeks to immerse its students as broadly as possible in that experience. In the best tradition of the Christian Brothers, we aspire to teach our students, “where we find them,” regardless of means or status. Toward that end we take to heart the words of the University’s mission statement, seeking "to educate the whole person by fostering a rigorous free search for truth." We believe that showing students the full reach of the human past "prepares students for the lifelong pursuit and exploration of wisdom, knowledge, and faith that lead to engaged and fulfilling lives marked by a commitment to the common good."

Major(s) Offered

BA American Studies

BA History

BA/MA History 5-year

Minor(s) Offered

American Studies

History

Concentrations

Americas

Afro-Eurasian

Location/Contact Information

Stuart Leibiger, Ph.D.

leibiger@lasalle.edu

Olney Hall 341

215.951.1093

 

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Desnoyers, Leibiger, Stow

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Allen, Jarvinen, Sheehy, Stebbins

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Jallow

VISITING ASSISANT PROFESSORS: Hurwitz, Poznan

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Rossi

American Studies

Program Description

American Studies (AMST) is an interdisciplinary program that examines American society and culture, both past and present. Through a study of American history, literature, philosophy, religion, media, social science, and fine arts, students critically analyze the richness of the American experience.

American Studies majors also learn to deconstruct various American narratives that are embedded in formal and popular culture and that reveal a deeper understanding of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and of America's place in the world. In this sense, students become "cultural critics" who, in seeing connections across academic disciplines, are able to apply an interdisciplinary perspective in assessing the dominant assumptions about power and identity in everyday life.

American Studies majors also have an opportunity to do an internship, a field-based experience that helps them link theory to practice through the application of AMST courses and researchstrategies to real-life problems. Typical internships sites include the Betsy Ross House, Franklin Institute, Cliveden Historical House, Germantown Historical Society, National Park Service, and the Philadelphia criminal justice system.

American Studies Program Link:http://www.lasalle.edu/american-studies/

 

Why take this major?

The Bachelor of Arts in American Studies prepares students for numerous careers that require broad-based understanding of American culture, critical thinking and writing, and interdisciplinary perspectives and applications. Such careers include law, journalism, business, public service, social work, education, museum studies, and graduate school.

Student Learning Outcomes

 

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

AMST 100

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

AMST 100
AMST 200
AMST 360
AMST 400
One American History course
One American Literature course
One American Art course
One American Social Science course
One American Philosophy course
One American Media or Film course

One free elective dealing with the American experience

Three course concentration

Concentrations

Three course concentration

Three course concentration in one academic discipline dealing with the American experience (e.g. American literature, American history, or American philosophy) or three courses based in one American theme or topic (e.g. Gender in America).

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in American Studies as a Dual Major: 10 courses

Three Integrating Courses:

Three courses in American topics core American Studies areas:

Three controlled electives:

Free elective:

Minor Requirements

Requirements for the Minor in American Studies: 6 courses

Recommended Course Sequence

AMST Majors and Double Majors should take the integrating American Studies courses in the following sequence:

Students may take AMST 360: Internship after having at least completed AMST 100 and AMST 200.

Course Descriptions

AMST 100 - American Dreams: Amer Themes

This course introduces students to interdisciplinary modes of analyzing American culture. Core readings across disciplines will be supplemented by instruction and practice in various research strategies, including oral history, use of AMST-related data bases, and critical deconstruction of primary sources, that focus on the intersection of race, ethnicity, class, and gender. Readings, films, field trips, and activities will also emphasize the use of myths, symbols, and images in analyzing the American experience. Open to non-majors; no prerequisites.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online, Hybrid

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

AMST 200 - Themes in American Culture

This course focuses on one American theme or topic (e.g., "The Family in American Culture," "The City in American Life") and examines it from the perspectives of multiple academic disciplines. The course builds on and refines the analytic skills presented in AMST 100, and it provides opportunities for students to draw on, integrate, and synthesize content from AMST core discipline courses, as well as from AMST controlled electives. (May be repeated for credit as topic varies.)

Number of Credits: 3

AMST 360 - Internship

Workng under a professioinal supervisor, students expand their understanding of American culture and society through hans-on participation at a professional site. The internship requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection journals, a majot paper, and an evaluation by the site supervisor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Hybrid

Restrictions: AMST Majors, AMST Double Majors, and AMST Minors

Prerequisites: AMST 100: Introduction to American Studies; AMST 200 Themes and Topics in American Studies

AMST 400 - Capstone Seminar in American Studies

This seminar, limited to 18 students, requires core readings on a selected theme as well as refinement of research skills relevant to the completion if a major research paper. Sample topics have included: The American City, Food and Drink in America, Medicine in America, Bob Dylan and the Sixties, The Fifties in American Culture, and The American Family.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: AMST Majors, AMST Double Majors, and AMST Minors

Prerequisites: AMST 100: Introduction to American Studies; AMST 200 Themes and Topics in American Studies

History

Program Description

In accordance with our belief that History is, as G.R. Elton once put it, "the only living laboratory we have of the human experience," the History Department of La Salle University seeks to immerse its students as broadly as possible in that experience. In the best tradition of the Christian Brothers, we aspire to teach our students, "where we find them," regardless of means or status. Toward that end we take to heart the words of the University's mission statement, seeking "to educate the whole person by fostering a rigorous free search for truth." We believe that showing students the full reach of the human past "prepares students for the lifelong pursuit and exploration of wisdom, knowledge, and faith that lead to engaged and fulfilling lives marked by a commitment to the common good."

Why take this major?

History is a great major to keep your career options open, because majors acquire invaluable critical reading, writing, and thinking skills essential for jobs in all fields. History majors have ended up in just about every career imaginable, but it is an especially good major for careers in museums/archives, government (at the federal, state, or local levels), law, and teaching.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO**

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO**

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO**

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO**

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

**Note: All History majors must take HIS 200, HIS 202, or HIS 205 AND they must take HIS 206, HIS 251, or 255. Because of the distinct discipline requirement, a student may only apply one of these six courses toward the core. Majors may therefore choose one of the following two options:

Option A:

Option B:

Americas Concentration: 5 Americas 300-349 electives and 3 Afro-Eurasian 350-399 electives

fro-Eurasian Concentration: 5 Afro-Eurasian 350-399 electives and 3 more Americas 300–349 electives

All History majors are required to take: HIS 480 Seminar I and HIS 481 Seminar I

Concentrations

Americas Concentration

Afro-Eurasian Concentration

Please see above.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Double Majors: Students whose second major is History are not required to take His 480 and His 481.

Minor Requirements

REQUIRED FOR HISTORY MINORS: 6 COURSES

Minors must take the two core History courses listed above, plus any four upper-level (300 and above) electives.

Advanced Placement credit in history is granted to students who score 4 or above.

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Year 1: Core Americas (ILO 4.1)

Spring Year 1: Core Afro-Eurasian (ILO 11.1)

Fall Year 2: Two Upper-Level Electives

Spring Year 2: Two Upper-Level Electives

Fall Year 3: Two Upper-Level Electives

Spring Year 3: Two Upper-Level Electives

Fall Year 4: His 480

Spring Year 4: His 481

Course Descriptions

HIS 200 - U.S. Republic to 1877

This course examines the creation of the United States, the modern world’s first truly successful experiment in republican government (representative democracy). After tracing the 17th-century founding and 18th-century maturation of the British North American colonies, it covers the causes and results of the American Revolution, the political, social, and economic history of the early republic, how the Market Revolution transformed the lives of Americans, and how the Civil War resolved the ambiguous legacies of the American Revolution. (Formerly His 300.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 202 - Themes in American History: A Biographical Approach

This introductory survey course covers United States history through the lives of representative Americans. Course readings consist of a series of paired biographies of major figures who confronted the pivotal issues and challenges of their times. Course themes include the establishment of the colonies, the emergence of American national identity, the founding and preservation of the republic, the struggle against slavery and racism, the spread of capitalism and industrialization, the rise of foreign affairs, the influence of immigration, the growth of the federal welfare state, and the creation of an inclusive society. Overall, the course addresses the experiences of different races, classes, genders, and ethnicities. (Formerly HIS 155.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 205 - US Since 1877

The second half of the survey begun by the Core concentration course, HIS 300, is presented in this study. It addresses the Progressive Movement, American involvement in World War I, the Roaring Twenties, America between the wars, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam Era, and the United States at the dawn of the 21st century. (Formerly His 305.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 250 - Global History To 1500

This course examines the development of the first civilizations in Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean, and the Americas, with the aim of exploring their distinctive approaches to human needs and social organization. Students are also introduced to historical methodology, historiography, and different perspectives on how we view the past. (Formerly His 151.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

HIS 251 - Global History From 1500 To the Present

This course offers a study of the evolution and interactions of the cultures of Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Oceania from 1500 to the present, designed to give students a greater understanding of the relationships among modern nations so necessary in today's shrinking globe. Students also have the opportunity to further hone their skills in the areas of the historian's craft introduced in HIS 151.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

HIS 255 - 20th Century Global History

This course is a survey of global history during the 20th century. Key topics include the rise of modern ideologies, imperialism and neocolonialism, global conflicts (World Wars I and II and the Cold War), decolonization, economic integration and globalization. These topics will be examined through the lens of how the peoples of different countries and world regions shaped and were in turn shaped by the century's major developments.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

HIS 302 - American Revolution

Revolutions have shaped the modern world. Perhaps the most important of these revolutions gave birth to the United States, an experiment in republican government. Covering 1740-1790, this course analyzes the colonies' separation from Great Britain, an upheaval whose promise Americans have sought to fulfill for more than 200 years. Topics include the causes, results, stages, and historiography of the Revolution. This course examines how revolutionary the American Revolution really was, politically, militarily, socially, and ideologically. (Formerly His 402.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 307 - Latin America: The Colonial Period

This course surveys Latin American history from the pre-contact era (with an emphasis on Aztec, Mayan, and Inca cultures) through the Spanish and Portuguese empires. It employs social, cultural, and political history perspectives.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 308 - Latin America In Revolution

This course is an introduction to the history of post-independence Latin America. It studies the political, social, and economic history of the former American colonies of Spain and Portugal from their revolutions for independence through the present day. It is structured by three major themes: revolutions and reactions, nation building, and international relations. It pays close attention to the ways in which different social groups—men and women; people of Indian, African, European, and Asian descent; the upper, middle, and lower classes; city dwellers and country dwellers—participated in significant events.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 313 - Jeffersonian-Jacksonian Democracy

This course is a detailed analysis of the development of the American political system in an increasingly democratic society. (Formerly HIS 413.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 315 - Fiery Trial: Civil War

The Civil War has been called the defining moment in our nation's history. Not only did the conflict emancipate four million slaves, but it also settled a longstanding debate over American federalism and proved once and for all the success of the Founders' experiment in republican government. Covering 1850-1877, this course analyzes the causes, course, and aftermath of the most momentous war in American history. It explores political, constitutional, military, economic, and social issues. (Formerly HIS 415.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 324 - History of Philadelphia

Philadelphia was America's "First City" both in size and influence. Although its importance later declined, the city has continued to be an American icon. This course covers the development of Philadelphia from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on social, political, and economic history. It considers how the peoples of the city have shaped it, the role Philadelphia has played in national history, and the nature of historical memory about the city. Lectures and discussion are complemented by field trips and student research.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 327 - Modern America

This course examines the growth of government involvement at home and abroad since 1939 with readings and analysis of original documents. (Formerly HIS 425.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 329 - History of US Women

An in-depth analysis of the experience of women in American culture is examined in this course. Special attention is given to the women's rights movement, women in the Industrial Revolution, and women in World War I and World War II.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 330 - The Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1913

This course focuses on the nationalization of American life, including the building of the railroad network, the rise of industry, the labor movement, immigration, and urbanization. (Formerly HIS 429.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 331 - America's Military Past

The impact of the American military establishment upon American society and the formation of defense strategy and foreign policy are the topics of emphasis in this course.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 332 - Introduction to Public History

Public History is the field within historical studies that communicates historical information to the general public within a variety of media. This semester, we will look at some of the ways which professional public historians participate in and lead those activities. Public historians follow a variety of career tracks: curators and collections care specialists; archivists; historic site managers and interpreters; historic preservationists and historic district advocates; historic archeologists and architects, and a variety of other fields are all part of the world of public history. This upper-level elective class is intended to be an overview, a glimpse at a variety of issues that face public historians in these various area. We will examine how Americans have used the past, issues that face us as we interpret history and heritage, and the numerous career potentials available to professionals who wish to devote their careers to public history. (Formerly HIS 430.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 333 - The American Immigrant

This course focuses on the history of immigration to America and the ethnic impact upon American institutions.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 334 - The Political Economy of Latin America

This course begins by examining aspects of the indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans in what has come to be called "Latin America." Throughout, it considers issues such as colonialism, militarism, race, gender relations, and religion that have shaped the societies, polities, and economies of nations from Mexico and the Caribbean to those of the Southern Cone. The goal of the course is to afford class members the opportunity to better understand Latin America's history as a basis for comprehending its likely future. Cross-listed with ECN 334 and POL 334.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 337 - African-American History

This course covers African-American history from colonization to the modern Civil Rights Movement.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 340 - Topics in U.S. History

This course is an examination of selected topics illustrating the political, social, and cultural history of the modern world.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 341 - Russia And America Since 1741

Topics emphasized in this course include Russian colonization of Alaska, Russian diplomatic relations with the United States, Russian emigration to America, the Cold War, trade, and cultural exchanges between the Soviet Union and the United States.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 342 - History of the Westward Movement in America

This course is a study of the American frontier, emphasizing pioneer life, federal Indian policy, and the settlement of the Great Plains and Far West.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 345 - Twentieth Century Europe

Beginning with World War I and ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union, this course surveys major events of twentieth-century European history.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 347 - Presidential Elections

This course provides an historical analysis of presidential campaigns from 1900 to 1980, stressing the evolution of political techniques, issues, political parties, and presidential personalities.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 349 - The United States in the Pacific Basin

This course explores the interrelationship of the United States and the East Asian world in the modern period. (Formerly HIS 447.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 355 - Topics in Modern European History

This course is an examination of selected topics illustrating the political, social, and cultural history of modern Europe.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 357 - Twentieth-Century Third World

This class traces the recent history of the world outside the "core," using case studies to try to understand the big picture of global history and see how historical changes affected the daily lives of individuals in the Third World. The topics covered will include the impact of the world wars and the Cold War; the circumstances of empire, the processes of decolonization, and the experiences of independence; and the history of local economies in the face of globalization. (Formerly HIS 303.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 358 - Women and History

Selected topics on the history of women in Europe from the Classical Period to the 21st century will be explored in this course. (Formerly HIS 328.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 359 - Europe To 1400

This course traces the unfolding of Western civilization from pre-history to the Renaissance. The legacies of Greece and Rome; the heritage of both early Christian Europe and the Byzantine and Islamic civilizations; and the contribution of later medieval society to the governmental, economic, and intellectual growth of Europe. (Formerly HIS 310.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 360 - Europe from 1400 To the Present

This course surveys the decline of feudal institutions, emergence of modern European states, expansion into the Western hemisphere, the impact of the Renaissance, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, rise of nationalism, development of modern totalitarianism, and the impact of two world wars on Western society. (Formerly HIS 311.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 361 - Imperialism in the Modern World

This course examines the causes and consequences of imperialism in the modern world. It considers and compares imperial institutions, ideologies, economies, and cultures. It also studies the variety of ways in which subject peoples shaped these encounters and evaluates the significance of these experiences for the post-colonial global order. (Formerly His 325.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 365 - Greek Civilization

This course is a survey that stresses the development of Greek civilization until the death of Alexander the Great. (Formerly HIS 335.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 366 - The Roman Empire

This is a survey course that places a special emphasis upon the Roman Republic and the Empire until 476 A.D. (Formerly HIS 336.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 367 - The Early Middle Ages

This course is a study of the period from 284 A.D. until circa 1000 A.D., emphasizing the synthesis of Roman, Christian, and barbarian cultures. (Formerly HIS 338.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 368 - The Later Middle Ages

This course is a study of the period from circa 1000 A.D. until the Renaissance, focusing on the social, economic, intellectual, and political revival of Europe. (Formerly HIS 339.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

His 369 - The Holocaust

The Holocaust was the most significant human rights tragedy in twentieth-century history. This course examines the history and memory of the Nazi campaign from 1933 to 1945 to stigmatize, isolate, and destroy European Jews. Roots of the Holocaust are addressed by examining European antisemitism. The Holocaust is placed into the context of Nazi consolidation of power and World War II. The course focuses on key events in the Holocaust, including Nazi policies to isolate Jews from 1933 on, the removal of German citizenship from Jews, the Night of the Broken Glass (Kristallnacht), deportations of Jews to concentration camps, the mass shootings of Jews on the Eastern Front during World War II, and the gassing of Jews to death in camps and mobile vans. Topics such as Allied response to the Holocaust, liberation of prisoners from the camps, treatment of displaced persons, and the Nuremburg trials are addressed. Students are introduced to intentionalist and functionalist arguments concerning the origins of the Holocaust. Much consideration is given to the role of perpetrators in carrying out the Holocaust and of bystanders who failed to intervene. Memory of the Holocaust is analyzed through documentary films, oral histories, memorials, and the phenomenon of Holocaust denial.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 381 - Muscovy and the Russian Empire, 1462-1917

This course is an examination of the history of the Muscovite state and of the Russian empire from 1462 to 1917. Central themes will include autocratic rule, statebuilding, imperial expansion, church-state relations, Westernization, serfdom, popular rebellion, modernization, and revolution. (Formerly HIS 348.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 382 - 20th-Century Russia and the USSR

Major themes of this course include revolution, collapse of the empire and creation of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, industrialization, Stalinist repression, World War II, reform, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. (Formerly HIS 452.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 383 - Modern Europe: 1789 To 1914

A survey of Europe in the "long nineteenth century," this course begins with the French Revolution and ends with the outbreak of World War I. It focuses on the political and social history of France, Germany, and Russia. (Formerly HIS 343.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 384 - Topics in African History

History 384 is an introductory survey of African history from the origins of humanity to the events of the recent past, with special attention paid to the early modern and modern eras. The course focuses on the global role of Africans in the history of the world, the importation of commodities and culture, the ways outsiders have portrayed Africa and Africans, the daily lives and experiences of the continent's inhabitants, and the challenges of using the available sources for "doing" African history. (Formerly HIS 344.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 385 - Modern Ireland

This course is an examination of the major political, social, and economic developments in Ireland since the Famine of 1845. (Formerly HIS 440.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 386 - East Asia in the Modern World

Changes in Modern Asia as a result of the rise of industrialism, urbanism, nationalism, and Western influence will be examined in this course. (Formerly HIS 346.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 388 - Recent Britain: Empire to Welfare State

This course analyzes the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of modern Britain. It explores the development of parliamentary government, democracy, the modern state, empire, capitalism, and urban-industrial society as well as the cultural changes accompanying and informing these transformations. British modernity was indeed precocious, and this course evaluates the context, causes, and consequences of that experience. (Formerly HIS 458.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 389 - Political Economy of Africa

This course examines the political and economic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa and provides a historical perspective on these conditions. Issues examined include the political and economic consequences of colonialism, post-independence political forces and economic policies, and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa. Course is offered only every other Spring (i.e. of odd numbered years).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

HIS 390 - Traditional China To 1840

This course will trace the social, political, cultural, and economic origins of the Chinese dynastic system, the elaboration and triumph of Confucianism, and the expansion of the empire south of the Yangtze and west to Central Asia. The course will conclude with an overview of the initial Western intrusion into this wealthiest and most populous of traditional civilizations. (Formerly HIS 350.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 391 - Modern China, 1840 To the Present

Beginning with the traumas of the Opium Wars and Taiping Rebellion, this course will provide an overview of China's initial attempts at using foreign technology to safeguard the Confucian polity, the rending of the social fabric during the Republican and Civil War eras, and the eventual triumph of Chinese Communism. The economic reforms of Deng Xiaoping and the events leading to Tiananmen Square will receive particular attention. (Formerly HIS 351.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 392 - Traditional Japan To 1840

For nearly two millennia, the people of Japan have shown a remarkable ability to marry religious, political, and cultural innovations from abroad with vigorous indigenous institutions. The result has been one of the world's most remarkable cultural syntheses. This course will trace the origins and development of the imperial system, the influence of Shinto and Buddhism, the development and elaboration of the early Shogunates, and conclude with an examination of Tokugawa society on the eve of Japan's "opening" to the west. (Formerly HIS 352.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 393 - Modern Japan, 1840 To the Present

This course will assess the astounding transformation of Japan from Tokugawa seclusion to the dynamic superpower of today. Along the way, such topics as the impact of the Meiji Restoration, Japan's "special relationship" with China and the Asian mainland, the grand catastrophe of World War II, and the resurgence of a demilitarized economic colossus in the Pacific Rim will be examined. (Formerly HIS 353.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 394 - The Modern Middle East

This course investigates the history of the modern Middle East since the 18th century. It examines the political, economic, social, and cultural transformations of this period in the Ottoman Empire, its successor states, Egypt, and Iran. Topics include the encounter with Western imperialism, modernization, ideological change, revolution, and war. (Formerly HIS 354.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 396 - Topics in Modern Non-Western History

This course provides an examination of selected topics illustrating the political, social, and cultural history of the non-Western world. (Formerly HIS 356.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 460 - Directed Readings

This course involves readings of certain basic books relating to a specific historical topic, theme, or era; assignments discussed in seminar-tutorial fashion.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 470 - Special Topics in Third World Areas

Central America, the Middle East, China, India, etc.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 475 - Internship

Working under a public historian, a student will expand his/her understanding of American History through hands-on participation at a historical site, museum, or archive. The internship requires meetings with a faculty supervisor, an on-site project, a major paper, and an evaluation by the site historian.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 480 - Seminar

Methodology and historiography; bibliographical essay required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 481 - Seminar

Writing a research paper.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 482-485 - Seminars

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

How Offered: Face-to-Face

History (5-Yr)

Program Description

Students may earn both a B.A. and M.A. in history by participating in the University's Five-Year Program. To be eligible for this option, undergraduate students must complete 90 credit hours, be a history major, and have a minimum GPA of 3.0. Students satisfy the undergraduate history major requirements during their first four years at the University, earning a minimum of 120 credits, of which a maximum of six may be graduate credits, while maintaining a GPA of 3.0 or better. Upon completion of a B.A., students may then enter the M.A. in History program by completing the remainder of the full degree requirements.

Why take this major?

The unique features of this program provide distinct opportunities to advance the careers of both practicing social studies teachers and aspiring graduate students in history. The appeal for all teachers with teaching certificates is that this program will broaden and deepen their knowledge of history in maintaining active certification status (in conformity with Act 48) and reaching the "highly qualified teacher" category by mastery of content knowledge.

Those students in pursuit of a traditional M.A. in History will also find La Salle's program attractive:

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the student should be able to do the following:

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A., M.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

3.0 to earn MA degree.

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

HIS 155, 300, 305

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

HIS 206, 251, 255

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

His 480 Seminar I

His 331 America's Military Past

His 333 American Immigrant

His 402 American Revolution

His 415 Civil War & Reconstruction

His 425 America as a World Power

His 481 Seminar II

His 335 Greek Civilization

His 336 Roman Empire

His 338 Early Middle Ages

His 339 Later Middle Ages

His 350 Traditional China to 1840

His 369 The Holocaust

His 452 20th Century Russia & the USSR

Americas Concentration: 4 more Americas upper-level electives and 2 more Afro-Eurasian upper-level electives
Afro-Eurasian Concentration: 4 more Afro-Eurasian upper-level electives and 2 more Americas upper-level electives

HIS 510 Historiography

HIS 610 Readings in American History

Concentrations

Undergraduate:
Americas or Afro-Eurasian

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Freshmen

Core Americas (ILO 4.1)

Spring Freshmen

Core Afro-Eurasian (ILO 11.1)

Fall Sophomore

Two Upper-Level Electives

Spring Sophomore

Two Upper-Level Electives

Fall Junior

His 480 and One Upper-Level Elective

Spring Junior

His 481 and One Upper-Level Elective

Fall Senior

HIS 480 Senior Seminar I

Mix of core courses, controlled electives in major, free electives

HIS 510 Historiography

Spring Senior

HIS 481 Senior Seminar II

Mix of core courses, controlled electives in major, free electives

HIS 610 Readings in American History

Course Descriptions

All course descriptions may be found in the main menu under Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z

Department of Integrated Science, Business, and Technology

Mission Statement

Consistent with La Salle University’s mission and the Christian Brothers’ heritage, the ISBT program supplements La Salle students’ liberal and value-based education with further breadth in multidisciplinary science, technology, and business areas. Within the ISBT program the ISBT faculty are committed to providing students with a liberal education which promotes their discovery of values used to temper the connections made among the ethical, moral, scientific, and business aspects of real-world problems, especially those addressing the needs of the greater Philadelphia area. The ISBT program challenges the student to manage complex projects and communicate effectively in a collaborative team environment.

Major(s) Offered

BS Integrated Science, Business and Technology

Minor(s) Offered

Integrated Science, Business and Technology

Concentrations

Biotechnology

Information and Knowledge Management

Energy and Natural Resources

Location/Contact Information

Nancy Jones, Chair

jones@lasalle.edu

Holroyd Hall 249

215.951.1265

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Borkowski, Jones

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Weaver

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Diaz

Integrated Science, Business, and Technology (ISBT)

Program Description

The Integrated Science, Business, and Technology (ISBT) major leads to a bachelor's of science degree and provides a curriculum in which the study of science, technology, mathematics, business, and the liberal arts are integrated to develop a graduate who is uniquely qualified to take an active leadership role in arriving at scientifically and economically informed solutions to real-world problems. Because effective solutions to complex real-world problems require multidisciplinary teams, the ISBT major aims to provide the students with a facility in the tools and processes underpinning effective team-building and project management. This major will build on La Salle's strengths by making connections between the ethical and moral dimensions as well as the scientific and business aspects of these real-world problems. An important attribute of ISBT graduates will be their ability to quickly acquire the necessary information and knowledge relevant to a specific problem.

Three areas of concentration for in-depth exploration have been chosen in consultation with the ISBT Advisory Board. They are Biotechnology (BIO), Information and Knowledge Management (IKM), and Energy and Natural Resources (ENR).

The ISBT BIO concentration will prepare students for employment in diagnostic, pharmaceutical, medical, food, agricultural, and other types of biotechnology-based companies. Courses in this concentration will provide students with experience in protein chemistry, tissue culture, microbiology, and molecular biology. The students will also gain a fundamental understanding of the regulations and procedures used by agencies that regulate the biotechnology industry. Specific regulations to be covered will include GMP, environmental issues (waste disposal, pollution, etc.), patent considerations, and biosafety.

Graduates of the ISBT IKM concentration are "Knowledge Liaisons" who facilitate the flow of information throughout the entire corporate organization. Building on a technical foundation that includes an understanding of data collection methods, database structure, system architecture, and data-mining applications, the Knowledge Liaison shepherds information among corporate divisions, departments, individuals, and the corporate knowledge repository.

The ISBT ENR concentration provides a broad understanding of energy and natural resource supply and use. Topics to be emphasized include sustainable energy development, efficiency, natural resource management, environmental concerns, related government policy, risk assessment, and the effect of deregulation on the energy industry. This area of study will address supply chain management in terms of the use and disposal of natural resources. Energy production will be analyzed to include the consideration of the raw materials necessary for production as well as the consideration of the waste and by-products resulting from energy production. The technical and economic aspects and the human benefits resulting from this area will be studied.

Why take this major?

Within the Integrated Science, Business, and Technology (ISBT) Program, our faculty and staff are committed to providing students with a liberal arts education that promotes their discovery of the ethical, moral, scientific, and business aspects of real-world problems. The ISBT program challenges the student to manage complex projects and communicate effectively in a collaobrative team environment that offers:

State-of-the-Art Equipment and Laboratory Spaces

You will be able to learn in spaces that are created just for you, including modern lab spaces and our Innovation Factory where you have access to 3D printers and maker tools.

A Well-Rounded Education

The ISBT program supplements La Salle's liberal and value-based education with interdisciplinary science, technology, and business areas, ensuring your education is never in-the-box.

An Early Immersion into Key Content

ISBT majors share a common experience the first two years with a focus on the foundational concepts of physics, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, and the life sciences, as well as the organizational concepts of collaboration, project management, business analysis, and system dynamics.

An Opportunity to Perform Research

ISBT majors take part in a two-semester sequence of the SEA-PHAGES program, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute sponsored research experience where students isolate and characterize bacterial viruses in soil samples. Student research is frequently included in large, peer-reviewed scientific journals and can form the basis of future Capstone projects.

One-on-One Attention

With an average class size of 22 students, you receive individualized attention that enables you to explore your interests and customize your career interest.

Pursuit of Interships and Co-Operative Experiences

Students majoring in ISBT have established a strong record of having successful co-operative and internship positions. Many complete internships while taking courses part-time or during the summer semester break, while others complete paid six-month co-ops. Students can take internships and co-ops for academic credit; and while not required, ISBT faculty encourage students to seek and participate in them.

The following are some of the organizations where ISBT majors have found these opportunities:

Career Preparation

ISBT Graduates enjoy successful careers covering a variety of fields with some of the biggest names in the country, including:

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major:

Total:

GPA Required for Graduation

Major:

Cumulative:

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

ISBT 103 - Scientific Discovery: Phage Hunting I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

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Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

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ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

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ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

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ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

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Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete courses in total in order to graduate.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ISBT 104 - Scientific Discovery: Phage Hunting I
ISBT 111 - Technology and Systems Analysis
ISBT 112 - Technology Foundations I: Processes
ISBT 201 - Living Systems II
ISBT 202 - Technology and Business Analysis
ISBT 211 - Instrumentation and Measurement
ISBT 212 - Technology and Foundations II: Processes
ISBT 311 - Bioinformatics
ISBT 312 - Collaborative Software Development
ISBT 331 - Science, Business and Technology Writing
ISBT 422 -Sustainable Energy Development 
ISBT 481 - Capstone Experience I
ISBT 482 - Capstone Experience II
BUS 100 - Business Perspectives
4 Concentration courses

Concentrations

Students must take 4 ISBT elective courses within one of three concentrations: Biotechnology, Energy and Natural Resources, or Information and Knowledge Management.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Six courses are required for the ISBT minor chosen in consultation with the Chair. Normally these will include two courses at the 100-level, two at the 200-level, and two at the 300-400-level, 22-24 credits.

Two from ISBT 103, 104, 111, 112

Two from ISBT 201, 202, 211, 212

Two from ISBT 301, 302, 401, 47x, 311, 312, 411, 412, 321, 322, 421, 422

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Freshmen

ISBT 103

ISBT 112

Electives

Spring Freshmen

ISBT 104

ISBT 111

BUS 100

Electives

Fall Sophomore

ISBT 201

ISBT 211

Electives

Spring Sophomore

ISBT 202

ISBT 212

Electives

Fall Junior

ISBT 312

ISBT 331

1 ISBT Elective* course

Electives

Spring Junior

ISBT 311

ISBT 422

1 ISBT Elective* courses

Electives

Fall Senior

ISBT 481

1-2 ISBT Elective* courses

Electives

Spring Senior

ISBT 482

1-2 ISBT Elective* courses

Electives

*A total of 6 ISBT concentration courses are required.

Course Descriptions

ISBT 103 - Scientific Discovery: Phage Hunting I

This course is designed to teach students how to do scientific research. It is the first semester of a year-long research-based project lab course in which students will participate in a nation-wide program in collaboration with undergraduates at other colleges. Students will isolate and characterize novel bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) from the environment using modern molecular biology techniques.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ISBT 104 - Scientific Discovery: Phage Hunting II

This is the second semester ("Phage 2") of a year-long research-based project lab course in which students will participate in a nationwide program in collaboration with undergraduates at other colleges. Students will describe the basic genome structure. This will involve mastering the strategies and computer programs required to predict where genes are located in the genome and annotating the function of those genes. These results will be presented for peer-review and will likely result in a scientific publication for the student.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ISBT 111 - Technology and Systems Analysis

This course will introduce students to the field of systems analysis and to the broad spectrum of technologies that are integrated into the design, construction, and operation of a high-tech electronic commercial product. The product will be disassembled into its simplest parts followed by an analysis of the form, function, and fundamental physical-sciencebasis of each component. Using laboratory computers, equipment, and software tools, students will assemble the components into a working prototype of the commercial product.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ISBT 112 - Technology Foundations I: Processes

This course will examine the fundamental physical processes utilized by a wide range of technologies. Topics include kinematics, force, work, energy, momentum, and thermodynamics. The mathematical concepts used to describe these topics will be introduced along with their applications. The course will be laboratory-intensive with handson group learning experiences. Upon completion of this course, students will be comfortable in a physical science laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.b - Quantitative Reasoning

ISBT 201 - Living Systems II

This course will examine specific concepts and practices underlying biology, chemistry, and environmental science, with forensics providing an over-arching theme. Students will spend most of their time in the laboratory learning the skills and procedures that are essential in the technological practice of these sciences. Students will work in teams and practice hands-on problem solving.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ISBT 103

ISBT 202 - Technology and Business Analysis

This course will continue the student's exploration of existing technologies and the process of commercialization. Students, working in teams, will create companies and analyze three different technologies as if their companies were creating and developing those technologies. Specifically, the students will need to demonstrate the science of the technology in the laboratory, define the need, analyze the sales and marketing plan, understand the moral and ethical implication, and calculate costs and profitability. The students will assess the business-state of the technology and recommend directions in which the technology should expand. Each team will be required to prepare both written and oral presentations.

Teams will be required to select a technology from each of the ISBT areas of concentration, i.e., (biotechnology, energy and natural resources, and information and knowledge management.) Analysis of a technology from each of the areas will prepare students to choose their area of concentration.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ISBT 111 and BUS 100

ISBT 211 - Instrumentation and Measurement

This course will examine the acquisition of data through an analysis of measurement transducers, instrument design, and computer data-acquisition and interfacing. The descriptive statistics and data-visualization techniques required to transform raw data into useful information will be investigated in a laboratory setting. The incorporation of multiple measurements into process-level monitoring and control systems will be studied with respect to the various commercially available intelligent instruments, industrial network architectures, and information control systems.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ISBT 111 and ISBT 112

ISBT 212 - Technology Foundations II: Materials

This course will examine the materials utilized in machines, devices, and consumer products. The study of metals, polymers, ceramics, adhesives, coatings, fuels, and lubricants is combined with the exploration of mechanical and nondestructive materials testing in a hands-on laboratory environment. In addition the sources of raw materials, production methods, markets, costs, and waste products of each type of material are evaluated.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ISBT 301 - Methods in Biotechnology

This course will provide a hands-on introduction to biotechnology. Throughout the semester the student will learn many of the techniques routinely used in molecular biology and biotechnology. The majority of the time will be spent in the laboratory. Upon completion of the course, the student should have sufficient fundamental knowledge of molecular biology and biotechnology to be able to function in a biotechnology laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ISBT 201

ISBT 302 - Tissue Culture

This course will provide the student with a hands-on introduction to cell culture. Throughout the semester, the student will learn techniques for handling, storing, growing, and manipulating cells in culture. The majority of the time will be spent in the laboratory practicing these techniques. Upon completion of the course, the student should have sufficient fundamental knowledge of cell culture to be able to function in a cell culture laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ISBT 201

ISBT 311 - Bioinformatics

This course examines current biological problems and explore and develop bioinformatic solutions to these issues. Each topic includes a definition of the problem, a review of the basic biological concepts involved, an introduction to the computational techniques used to address the problem along with a utilization of existing web-based tools and software solutions often employed by professionals in the field of bioinformatics. Biological topics include those such as antibiotic resistance, genetic disease, and genome sequencing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ISBT 312 - Collaborative Software Development

This course will introduce students to the tenets of collaborative software development. As commercial and professional applications are developed by a group of software engineers rather than individuals, this course will examine various methods of project management and specifically utilize Agile project management. Working ap