Bilingual/Bicultural Studies

Program Description

The Master of Arts degree in Bilingual/Bicultural Studies is a part-time and/or full-time degree program (evenings) for educators and other professionals who work with the ever-growing Latino population of the Philadelphia area and the nation.

 

Mission

The program is designed to provide extensive bilingual and bicultural instruction for nurses and doctors, patient care hospital employees, social workers, court employees, law enforcement personnel, human resources professionals, business professionals, lawyers, paralegals, and teachers.

Program Goals

The Master of Arts in Bilingual/Bicultural Studies may be either a part-time degree program or a full-time program (nine credits per semester or more) for educators and other professionals who work with the ever-growing Latino population of the Philadelphia area and the nation.

The overall goals and objectives of the program are as follows:

  • To provide extensive bilingual and bicultural instruction for nurses, hospital employees, social workers, business professionals, court employees, police officers, human resources professionals, and others.
  • To develop, for advanced language students, the capabilities of using vocabulary that is pertinent to a particular Hispanic culture to allow circumstantial language usage.
  • To assure that students are exposed to a variety of Hispanic cultures on a first-hand basis through community service.
  • To develop an application and understanding of diverse cultural backgrounds and to relate/contrast these cultures, particularly, in terms of the dominant culture in the USA.
  • To acquire a solid historical perspective of various Hispanic groups in the USA with an emphasis on special relationships and conflicts among Hispanic groups themselves and in co-existence with the dominant Anglo culture.
  • To acquire an understanding of the roles played by race, ethnicity, language, culture, social stratification, family, class structure, and social mobility among Hispanic groups and in contrast to those played by Anglo society.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the students will be able to

  • Develop proficiency in Spanish so they can better serve the Hispanic community as nurses, hospital employees, social workers, business professionals, court employees, police officers, human resources professionals, and other professions.
  • Demonstrate the capability of using vocabulary that is pertinent to a particular Hispanic culture to allow circumstantial language usage.
  • Apply their knowledge of diverse cultural backgrounds and to relate/contrast these cultures, particularly, in terms of the dominant culture in the USA on a first-hand basis through an internship that serves the Hispanic community.  
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the diverse historical perspective of various Hispanic groups in the USA with an emphasis on special relationships and conflicts among Hispanic groups themselves and in co-existence with the dominant Anglo culture. 
  • Synthesize their acquired understanding of the roles played by race, ethnicity, language, culture, social stratification, family, class structure, and social mobility among Hispanic groups and in contrast to Anglo society.

Program Specific Information

The program is flexible and may be tailored to fit the needs and interests of individual students.

The language component is individualized, and students are encouraged to apply regardless of their current proficiency level in the Spanish language.

Academic Requirements

A minimum of thirty-three (33) credits is required for the degree. All courses are three (3) credits each.

Depending on the student’s linguistic skills in Spanish, candidates will be classified as “Advanced Language,” “Intermediate Language Proficient”or “Not Advanced Language.”  Classification of a student will depend on past academic background and other linguistic life experiences. The student’s classification will also be subject to the judgment of the Director of the program, and an assessment interview is required to determine initial linguistic skills. This assessment will be conducted by the Director of the program.

Course Sequence

The curriculum for each of these three (3) classifications will consist of the following courses:

Advanced Language Students:

Core Requirements

  • BLS 508 Workshops and Symposia
  • BLS 602 History of Spain and the Americas

    BLS 607 Art and Culture of Spanish America

  • BLS 520 Field Experience in the Latino Community
  • BLS 600 Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication
  • BLS 639 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Syntax
  • BLS 651 Master’s Project
  • Any Caribbean Literature Course

Elective Requirements

  • Any three courses, nine (9) credits offered by any of the programs within The Hispanic Institute, subject to each program’s prerequisites

Intermediate Language Proficient Students:

Core Requirements

  • BLS 502   Urban Spanish 2 or BLS 503 Urban Spanish 3 (depending on proficiency)
  • BLS 504   Urban Spanish 4
  • BLS 505   Urban Spanish 5
  • BLS 508   Workshops and Symposia
  • BLS 602 History of Spain and the Americas

  • BLS 520   Field Experience in the Latino Community
  • BLS 600   Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication
  • BLS 651   Master’s Project

Elective Requirements

  • For students beginning with BLS 502:any two courses offered within The Hispanic Institute, subject to each program’s prerequisites (6 credits)
  • For students beginning with BLS 503: any three courses offered within The Hispanic Institute, subject to each program’s prerequisites (9 credits)

Not Advanced Language Students:

Core Requirements

  • BLS 501   Urban Spanish 1
  • BLS 502   Urban Spanish 2
  • BLS 503   Urban Spanish 3
  • BLS 504   Urban Spanish 4
  • BLS 505   Urban Spanish 5
  • BLS 508   Workshops and Symposia
  • BLS 602 History of Spain and the Americas

  • BLS 520   Field Experience in the Latino Community
  • BLS 600   Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication
  • BLS 651   Master’s Project

Elective Requirements

  • Any one course offered within The Hispanic Institute (Note:  If a course is waived with permission of the Director, an elective course is added since candidates must complete 33 credits to earn the M.A. in Bilingual Bicultural Studies degree.)

Degree or Certificate Earned

M.A.

Number of Courses Required for Program Completion

11

Number of Credits Required for Program Completion

33

GPA Required for Program Completion

3.0

Program Contact Information

Hayman Hall, room 128

hispanicinstitute@lasalle.edu

(215) 991-3592

Staff Contact Information

J. Manuel Gomez, Ph.D.

Director

Hayman Hall, room 128

hispanicinstitute@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1209

 

Faculty

Director: Gomez

Full Professor: Ketz
Associate Professors: Biehl, Gomez, Ossa
Lecturers: Ezquerra-Hasbun, Hain-Poorman, Kopec, Natalini, Tellez, Toro, Zucker

Course Descriptions

BLS 501 to BLS 505 - Urban Spanish Series

These five (5) courses are intensive language courses taught by instructors familiar with the pronunciation, intonation, and idiomatic characteristics of Spanish. The courses use current language methodologies and are extensively individualized. Teachers, police officers, social workers, and nurses, for example, develop special vocabularies that increase their effectiveness in communicating with Spanish-speakers. Tests (in Spanish) evaluate oral and written competency of the candidate at each level. 

Length: Eight weeks (twice a week)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 508 - Workshops and Symposia

Offered only during the Summer I session (May-June), this course consists of a series of symposia and practical workshops presented by specialists chosen from bilingual schools, the fine arts, medical agencies, law enforcement facilities, and social agencies as well as from local universities, including La Salle. (In English)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 511 - Language and Culture of Puerto Rico I

This course is for advanced students of Spanish who need development in understanding the spoken and written language of Puerto Rico. Special attention is given to colloquial expressions of the Caribbean. Reading materials in this course not only represent special linguistic characteristics of Puerto Rico, but also reflect the cultural roots and values of the Puerto Rican community in urban mainland settings. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 512 - Language and Culture of Puerto Rico II (Summer I Session)

This is an intensive language course for advanced Spanish students and forms part of the Immersion Program. Emphasis is placed upon group work that provides students with practice in listening and speaking in Caribbean Spanish. Students discuss contemporary themes and cultural characteristics of Puerto Rican society. Readings are from Puerto Rican short stories, essays, poems, and periodicals.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 520 - Field Experience in the Latino Community

During the academic year, each student works in placements in a field experience directly related to his or her profession in the Greater Philadelphia/New Jersey Latino community. Teachers assist in bilingual schools; police in districts in bilingual neighborhoods; and social workers in social agencies dealing with Latinos, etc.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BLS 600 - Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Communication

The major objectives of this course are to develop an appreciation of diverse cultural backgrounds, especially among Latinos and Anglos, and to develop awareness of the complexity of cross-cultural communication. The following areas are considered as they relate to the dynamics of cross-cultural communication: the communication process; group properties and communication; linguistic approaches; the nonverbal element of communication systems, especially related to Anglos and Latinos; language and culture; language as social behavior; and channels of communication.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 601 - Techniques of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

The course analyzes various methodologies used in teaching English as a second language. Emphasis is placed upon methods in teaching, listening, and speaking. Microteaching of difficult points of pronunciation and grammar is also emphasized. Significant attention is given to effective techniques in second-language acquisition.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 602 - History of Spain and the Americas

This course treats the history and culture of the major Latino groups in the United States, especially those from the Caribbean. Emphasis is placed on such topics as Puerto Rico's special relationship with the United States, Latino populations (e.g., Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, and Central American) in the United States, and the historical relationship between Latino and Anglo communities.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 603 - Literature of Spanish America

This course is designed to familiarize the student with Spanish American culture and literature as seen through major literary works. Students read novels, short stories, essays, and poetry from the pre-Columbian period to the 21st  century. A cultural, sociological, and literary approach is emphasized in order to explore Spanish America’s diverse societies.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 604 - Cultural Pluralism and Minority Groups in the U.S.

Focusing on the ethnicity, language, and cultural and social stratification of minorities, with an emphasis on that of Latinos, this course analyzes contemporary American opportunity, family and class structures, social mobility, migration, the so-called "culture of poverty," urbanism, and related concepts and issues. Certain psychological dimensions, such as self-concept and the self-fulfilling prophecy, are also examined.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 605 - Curriculum and Development of Bilingual Programs

This course discusses the historical background of the bilingual movement, especially pertinent legislation, as well as the organization of a bilingual program. Topics of lecture and discussion include needs assessment of pupils, staff, and community; various types of curriculum models of bilingual and school organizations; selection of instructional materials for training bilingual students; and proper evaluative procedures.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 606 - Making Language Connections through Content in ESOL and Bilingual Classrooms

The major objective of this course is to provide mechanisms for second language content delivery utilizing the sheltered class model, SIOP, and "learning to learn" methods. The curriculum includes an analysis of academic language in content and texts and provides for a discussion of metacognitive processes and strategies that may be used in the classroom. Additionally, the role of learning styles and multiple intelligences is examined together with the rationale for and structure of thematic units for lesson planning purposes. The integration of language objectives and "what's difficult" for language learners is directed toward an authentic assessment of content and language.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Hybrid

BLS 607 - Art and Culture of Spanish America

This course traces the history of art in the Spanish Caribbean, emphasizing the major influences on its evolution and contemporary manifestations. Taino, Spanish, and African contributions to art in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic will be explored in detail and in all expressive forms: paintings, broadcasting, cinematography, theater, and popular culture. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 610 - Comparative Analysis English/Spanish

This course studies the comparative/contrastive grammar in the English-Spanish language pair. The course includes intensive practice in reading comprehension, *skim, scan, main idea, key words*, sequence of events, usage, error detection, synonyms, and most common translation problems in terms of grammar, vocabulary, idioms, and slang. Registers of speech are also explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 611 - Fundamentals of Interpretation

This course introduces the basic skills of interpretation: public speaking, memory work, and text analysis, as well as the theoretical foundations of interpretation. In addition, the students learn terminology research and professional skills: general business practices and ethics. Practicum emphasis is on public-speaking skills, as well as the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 612 - Consecutive Interpretation and Sight Translation

This course builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in BLS 611, Fundamentals of Interpretation. In consecutive interpreting, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. The course reinforces the ability to perceive essential meaning and introduces note-taking techniques. It emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Note taking and sight translation are introduced in the latter part of the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BLS 611

BLS 613 - Simultaneous Interpretation

In simultaneous interpreting, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode. The course begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students to develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the target language with correct grammar, diction, and style.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

This course further develops the skills in consecutive interpretation with note taking, sight translation, and simultaneous interpreting. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the introductory courses and produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting.

Students are introduced to the procedures in criminal and civil law, legal language, the courtroom, and the Interpreter's Code of Ethics. Practice in the classroom strives to recreate the most common scenarios in which legal interpreting takes place while developing the interpreting skills needed to work as a court interpreter. Students refine their note-taking skills, and special attention is given to develop stamina and maintain concentration while under stress in the courtroom. Assessment takes into account both accuracy and fluency in delivery.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 615 - Health-Care Interpretation

This course provides information on the health-care system in the United States, medical terminology, code of ethics for medical interpreters, and use of interpreters in health-care situations. In consecutive interpreting, students continue to enhance their memory and note-taking skills. They work on detecting and correcting problems from the listening stage to the delivery stage. In simultaneous interpreting, students work on polishing their delivery and language register. In sight translation, students become familiar with the different forms used in hospitals and health-care centers. Peer-assessment and self-assessment are encouraged in order to bring awareness of the importance of self-monitoring in interpreting. Furthermore, this course discusses current issues in health-care interpreting and provides information for further development in the profession.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 616 - Business Interpretation

This course introduces simultaneous interpreting with text, so that students learn to use visual or written materials appropriately to enhance their accuracy and completeness when interpreting. Conference interpreting is practiced in class, with students carrying on research and preparation for "conferences," including compilations of glossaries and topic research. A code of ethics for conference interpreters is discussed, as well as booth etiquette. In consecutive interpreting, students continue to develop their note taking skills and interpret longer utterances without interruption. Speech production aspects such as voice, fluency, and pacing are assessed as well.

Material for practice comes from diverse business areas such as banking, finance, world economic issues, and insurance, among others. Students are expected to read and research topics, make presentations, practice, grade peer exercises, and provide self-assessment. The purpose of these assignments is to develop confidence and assertiveness in students and resources for them so they are able to deal with nuances of meaning and accuracy in interpretation while delivering the interpretation smoothly and naturally in their target language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 617 - Technology: Applications in Translation and Interpretation

This course analyzes current tools to enhance and speed the translation process. These tools include word processors as well as CAT (computer-assisted translation), voice-recognition, and proofreading tools. The course explores and discusses their practical applications and features in terms of pricing, productivity, user-friendliness, quality output, and compatibility with other tools. The course examines simultaneous interpretation and video and telephonic interpreting in terms of both the software and hardware available to perform these types of interpreting and the job opportunities for interpreters in these growing areas. The course also introduces students to new fields in which translation and interpretation skills are being applied, such as subtitling, web and software localization, and voice-over, along with the tools needed to work in these fields. Students will become familiar with tools and resources to aid them in launching a translation and interpretation business and in keeping current with new advances in the industry.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 620 - Independent Study

Independent study in Caribbean history, language, or literature must be approved by the Director of the program.

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 635 - Myths and Legends in Caribbean and Latin American Literature

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 639 - Advanced Spanish Grammar and Syntax

This course is designed to provide a review of standard Spanish grammar and syntax for advanced students of the language. It includes intensive oral and written practice with a view toward improving native and non-native students' speaking and writing skills. The course also intends to make all speakers aware of standard Spanish cultivated in schools of the Spanish-speaking world. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 640 - Translation Studies: Theory and Practice

The first stage of this course is theoretical. Examining statements on the art of translation acquaint students with typical issues experienced by literary translators. Focusing on individual solutions to translation problems heightens awareness of the challenges of working interculturally and independently. Reading essays on the process of translation helps students understand what the field of translation studies has come to mean in abstract terms. Using explanations of the history of translation and of current theories helps students to develop a broad perspective on the field as a whole as they begin to incorporate standard terms in their own usage.

The second stage of this course is practical. Newspaper articles are examined as examples of language posing different challenges that, when identified, prompt the appropriate stylistic choices for a translator. Discussion and collaborative in-class translations of examples of each type complement the individual work done outside of class.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 641 - Professional Uses of Spanish: Medical

The topics and linguistic skills covered in this course include the following: vocabulary, oral practice (Spanish-English and English- Spanish), ethnical norms, health-care practices in the U.S., the Hispanic culture of the patient, role-playing, writing of a short medical script, observation at a local hospital with bilingual services, and supplemental readings on specific diseases or community health problems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 642 - Professional Uses of Spanish: Business

This course provides students the opportunity to translate a variety of texts, with emphasis on current world economic and financial issues, international trade, and business and economic forecasts. Students learn to apply basic concepts of economics and business to real-world texts, thereby improving their command of the technical terminology of these fields. Texts include printed and online promotional and informational material, as well as various types of business correspondence and transactions. The course both overs sectors of the business world in which consecutive interpretation is frequently used and emphasizes sequential logic in note taking and accurate terminology in delivery.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

A series of legal documents are analyzed for their technical features in order to grasp some of the systemic and cultural complexities that need to be understood in order to bridge the gap between lawyer and client when Spanish and English are both involved in a common legal proceeding.

Deeds, lease agreements, liens, living wills, and powers of attorney, all commonly used documents in the U.S. today, are translated. Students learn how to communicate efficiently with Spanish-speaking clients as well as to relay their verbal messages to a lawyer or a court. Through sight translation of written testimony (for example, letters or statements from clients), students practice basic skills of court translation. Attention is given to registers of speech (slang, police jargon, legal terms, or norms for courtroom testimony). Typical sessions of client counseling and contract negotiations are simulated in teams for classroom practice.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 651 - Master's Project/Thesis

A supervised, individual project that may be related to the student's fieldwork in the Latino community is the required capstone experience in the M.A. program. All project topics must relate to the mission and goals of the Bilingual/Bicultural Studies program.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

BLS 678 - Texto En Contexto: A Panorama of Present-Day Puerto Rico Through Selected Texts

A survey of contemporary Puerto Rican thought, this course explores issues critical to the Caribbean island nation's social, cultural, historical, and political identity. Texts hail from a multiplicity of academic disciplines, literary genres, and popular cultural forms. Among the social sciences covered are sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science. Literary genres covered include poetry, fiction, and the essay. Popular cultural forms include folkloric and popular music. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

BLS 703 - Internship and Portfolio

This course is required for the completion of the MA in Translation and Interpretation English/Spanish. The candidate will conduct a supervised internship of 60 hours and prepare a final on-line portfolio.  The project may focus on the application of particular techniques of translating as well as interpreting, and on the analysis of particular issues related to the translation/interpretation fields.

Number of Credits: 3

EDC 650 - Language Assessment and Special Education of ESL Learners

This course provides an overview of federal, state, and local mandates regarding the assessment of ESL learners. Placement testing, standardized assessment, performance assessment, rubrics, and portfolios are addressed specifically. Issues in authentic assessment and assessment in
the content areas are also addressed. This course also helps students to understand the legislation that promotes individual rights for children and adults with disabilities, the special education classification and labeling process, and current trends in the education of children with disabilities. Students analyze the impact that a handicapping condition has on the individual in learning and social environments.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: BLS 600 and BLS 601

ESL 650 - Language Assessment and Special Education of ESL Learners

This course provides an overview of federal, state, and local mandates regarding the assessment of ESL learners. Placement testing, standardized assessment, performance assessment, rubrics, and portfolios are addressed specifically. Issues in authentic assessment and assessment in the content areas are also addressed. This course also helps students to understand the legislation that promotes individual rights for children and adults with disabilities, the special education classification and labeling process, and current trends in the education of children with disabilities. Students analyze the impact that a handicapping condition has on the individual in learning and social environments.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: BLS 600 and BLS 601

TSOL 608 - Research Methods in TESOL

This course explores research design methods and writing conventions in the field of TESOL. It provides experience in using research materials and constructing logically coherent and professionally documented research in the discipline. The course connects sociolinguistics and language teaching by researching and reflecting on the social, historical, legal, and cultural issues influencing language learning in the context of cultural and linguistic diversity. The course also explores micro and macro levels of context in a variety of sites for learning a second and foreign language (U.S., international, university-based, community-based, public school-based) and with a variety of types of learners (varying age, ethno linguistic background, educational experiences, socioeconomic class, etc).

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 609 - Language Study for Educators

This course serves as a practical foundation in linguistics and its sub-branches for teachers who want to apply basic linguistic knowledge and research findings to their practice. The course begins with an overview of phonology and sounds and moves gradually through to morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics and gives special focus to first and second language acquisition research. Attention is given to developmental sequences of language acquisition and implications from research findings in first and second language acquisition literature as well as interlanguage research for designing lessons for the English Language Learner (ELL). During each unit, comparisons are made between languages from around the world with English, with special attention given to Spanish.

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 610 - Teaching Second Language Writing in TESOL

The purpose of this course is to provide teachers with a wide range of strategies for teaching ELLs (English language Learners) the art of writing for different audiences, while examining English grammar as it applies to curriculum and instruction. Methods used in current approaches to teaching grammar are examined and appraised.

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 611 - Multimedia Approaches to TESOL

The purpose of this course is to study the application of multimedia technology in the second language acquisition process. The course considers the effect of the use of technology-based centers to the development of listening, viewing, talking, reading, and writing skills in English within the context of Content-Based Instruction (CBI). Students taking this course explore the use of cassette/CD players, movies and shows, computers and the Internet, video cameras, cassette recorders, newspapers, and magazines to develop the second language acquisition continuum at a faster pace.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: BLS 609 - Language Studies for Educators

TSOL 612 - Sociolinguistics for Educators

This course delves deep into the social, cultural, historical, and very personal arenas within sociolinguistics. Students engage in readings and projects around such issues as language identity, language variation and education, bilingualism, multilingualism, the impact of language planning and policy on education, codes switching, dialects, standard and non-standard languages, language contact, diglossia, language maintenance, and language loss. The purpose of the course is to move beyond viewing language as an isolated subject so that one can take into account the many factors that make communication in multilingual societies so complex. Examples from multilingual environments from all over the world will be used as a basis for discussion of such topics, although special attention is given to the impact of these factors on language instruction and interaction in the classroom.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: BLS 609: Language Studies for Educators

TSOL 613 - Special Projects in English Education

This course focuses on current issues of second language acquisition and can be taken as an independent study.

Number of Credits: 3

TSOL 701 - Practicum/Field Experience

In this practicum, the students apply what they have learned during their studies in a new setting such as a school or nonprofit organization. Students select the organization with the Director's approval and provide the Director with a supervisor who oversees the practicum at the organization. It is expected that students take advantage of the practicum not only as a way of putting to use what they have learned but also as a means to further understand the cultural dimensions of communication and nuances of language teaching and learning in a specific setting (the Field Experience).

This practicum is required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for the ESL Specialist Certification Program.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all Core and Elective courses, M.A. in TESOL Program and ESL Specialist Certification Program.

TSOL 751 - M.A. TESOL Master's Project/Thesis

Students must complete a master's project/thesis as a capstone project that reflects their practicum, student teaching, and/or teaching practice as a culminating experience. It should provide the opportunity to apply, synthesize, and evaluate knowledge and skills acquired during their graduate studies. Students should consult their faculty adviser for a description of options and guidelines to meet the requirements of the M.A. in TESOL program.

Students should register for the capstone master's thesis in the semester in which they plan to complete the project. Students must successfully complete ALL required and elective courses (including the practicum) before they would be allowed to register for TSOL 751. Research that involves human subjects will be reviewed by the University's Institutional Review Board (IRB) and may not proceed until approval is granted by the IRB.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer