History

Program Description

La Salle’s M.A. in History program is different from all others in the Mid- Atlantic region in several distinct ways:  for example, its two-track program and its unique Concentration in Public History.

A Two-Track Program

  • M.A. in History (30 credits)
  • M.A. in History for Educators (30 credits)

Unique features of the M.A. in History for Educators and the M.A. in History:

  • A common core of seven courses:
    • HIS 510 - Historiography
    • HIS 610 - Readings in American History
    • HIS 620 - Readings in European History
    • HIS 630 - Readings in World History
    • HIS 640 - Visualizing History
    • HIS 650 - Oral History
    • HIS 663 - Readings in Special Topics in American, European, and Global
  • The option of either a comprehensive exam or writing a thesis.

These unique features of this program provide distinct opportunities to advance the careers of both practicing social studies teachers and aspiring graduate students in history. The appeal for all teachers with teaching certificates is that this program will broaden and deepen their knowledge of history in maintaining active certification status (in conformity with Act 48) and reaching the “highly qualified teacher” category by mastery of content knowledge.

Those students in pursuit of a traditional M.A. in History will also find La Salle’s program attractive:

  • The M.A. in History curriculum is professional in nature and is designed as preparation for the doctorate and numerous professional careers.
  • The common core of seven courses, along with upper-level electives and seminars provides excellent preparation for archival analysis, visual history, material culture, oral history, and interdisciplinary research that, collectively, has become the hallmark of doctoral-level courses in history, as well as most doctoral dissertations.

Unique features of the M.A. in History with a Concentration in Public History:

La Salle’s M.A. in History with a concentration in Public History provides graduates with both historical content knowledge and professional skills needed for successful careers in Public History by offering the following:

  • A general introduction to Public History
  • The acquisition of both content knowledge and pedagogical skills in visual representations associated with American social and cultural history
  • An introduction to the analysis of material culture and archival analysis
  • Familiarization with the workings of history museums and the development of exhibits
  • Familiarization with various digital media skills for the development of Web sites and documentaries
  • An internship with a public history venue in order to develop skills required for a successful career in public history

 

Mission

In accordance with our belief that History is, as G.R. Elton once put it, “the only living laboratory we have of the human experience,” the History Department of La Salle University seeks to immerse its students as broadly as possible in that experience. In the best tradition of the Christian Brothers, we aspire to teach our students, “where we find them,” regardless of means or status. Toward that end we take to heart the words of the University’s mission statement, seeking to “assist students in liberating themselves from narrow interests, prejudices, and perspectives,” and to show them the full reach of the human past. We believe that such training develops our students as both active citizens and, more important, as fully-realized human beings.

Program Goals

Instructional Goals

  • The application of varying historiography
  • The demonstration of a firm understanding of historical content knowledge combined with pedagogy
  • The production of original historical scholarship
  • The ability to form convincing historical arguments
  • The incorporation of substantive primary source material to prove a preconceived thesis

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the student will be able to do the following:

  • Understand historiographical approaches
  • Comprehend and retain pedagogical content knowledge
  • Apply critical thinking and analytical skills relative to the contextual historical scholarship
  • Use substantive prose style in order to present meaningful explanations of historical events
  • Appreciate the importance of factual evidence and chronology

Program Specific Information

Admission Requirements

M.A. in History and M.A. in History with a Concentration in Public History

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  • Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University.  The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  • Provide evidence of completing a bachelor’s degree with 18 hours of undergraduate course work in history or a related discipline with a GPA of at least 3.0
  • Provide official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work
  • Obtain and submit an acceptable score on the Graduate Record Exam General Test   (Native speakers of a language other than English must submit TOEFL scores.)
  • Provide a Professional Résumé.
  • Request two letters of recommendation from colleagues or supervisors who can address    
    the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrollment.
  • Provide a writing sample (preferably from an undergraduate research paper)
  •  Provide a brief personal statement (250 to 500 words)

Admission is based solely upon the applicant’s qualifications.  Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog 
* The stated admission requirements are construed as guidelines; the graduate admissions committee fully recognizes that some candidates may present either credentials or prior experiences that lie beyond the parameters described above.

All documents should be sent to the following:

 Office of Graduate Enrollment
 La Salle University- Box 826
 1900 W. Olney Avenue
 Philadelphia, PA 19141
 215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462

 grad@lasalle.edu

M.A. in History for Educators

To be accepted for admission to the program, a candidate must:

  • Complete the Application for Admission which may be obtained at http://www.lasalle.edu/grad/ accompanied by the stipulated application fee payable to La Salle University.  The application fee is waived for applications submitted online.
  • In most cases, candidates for admission to the M.A. program in History for Educators should have taken 18 hours of undergraduate course work in history or a related discipline, with a GPA of at least 3.0.
  • Request that official transcripts from the institutions of higher education showing all undergraduate and previous graduate study (if applicable).
  • Present evidence of one of the following:
    • A currently valid teaching certificate, OR
    • An acceptable score on the Professional Knowledge section of the Praxis Test (Native speakers of a language other than English must submit TOEFL scores.) OR
    • An acceptable score on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)
  • Provide a Professional Résumé.
  • Request two letters of recommendation from colleagues or supervisors who can address the candidate’s ability and motivation for enrollment.
  • Provide a personal statement of your interest in the program, if requested (optional).

Please refer to the University’s Nondiscrimination Policy in the General Reference section of this catalog. Admission is based solely upon applicant’s qualifications. 

Office of Graduate Enrollment
 La Salle University- Box 826
 1900 W. Olney Avenue
 Philadelphia, PA 19141
 215.951.1100/ Fax 215.951.1462
 grad@lasalle.edu

 

 

Academic Requirements

M.A. in History

(30 Credits)

  • HIS 510 - Historiography
  • HIS 610 - Readings in American History
  • HIS 620 - Readings in European History
  • HIS 630 - Readings in World History
  • HIS 640 - Visualizing History
  • HIS 650 - Oral History
  • HIS 663 - Readings in Special Topics
  • HIS 700* - History Elective
  • HIS 770 - Thesis Direction I
  • HIS 771 - Thesis Direction II

Comprehensive Exam Option

  • HIS 710 - History Elective
  • HIS 760 - Seminar: Integration and Application of Research Strategies Presented in Core Courses

*As Additional His 700 can serve as a substitute for one of the following courses: HIS 640 or 650

M.A. in History for Educators

(30 Credits)

  • HIS 510 - Historiography
  • HIS 610 - Readings in American History
  • HIS 620 - Readings in European History
  • HIS 630 - Readings in World History
  • HIS 640 - Visualizing History
  • HIS 650 - Oral History
  • HIS 663 - Readings in Special Topics
  • History/Education/English Elective
  • HIS 775 - Thesis Direction for Educators I
  • HIS 776 - Thesis Direction for Educators II

Comprehensive Exam Option

  • *HIS 700 - History Elective
  • HIS 761 - Seminar in the History of Education

*As Additional His 700 can serve as a substitute for one of the following courses: HIS 640 or 650

M.A. History with a Concentration in Public History

(30 Credits)

  • HIS 505 - Introduction to Public History
  • HIS 510 - Historiography
  • HIS 610 - Readings in American History
  • HIS 615 - History of Philadelphia
  • HIS 640 - Visualizing History
  • HIS 650 - Oral History
  • HIS 665 - Museum Studies
  • HIS 668 - Issues and Practices Management
  • HIS 680 - Techniques in Public History
  • HIS 705 - Internship in Public History

 

Course Sequence

The sequence of courses may vary, with the exception of the capstone requirements that should be taken as the final courses towards the degree. 

Degree or Certificate Earned

M.A.

Number of Courses Required for Program Completion

10

Number of Credits Required for Program Completion

30

GPA Required for Program Completion

3.0

Program Contact Information

Department of History

Hayman Hall, room 342

gradhis@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1090

Staff Contact Information

George Stow, Ph.D.

Professor and Graduate Director

stow@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1097

Hayman Hall, room 342

Faculty

Director: George B. Stow, Ph.D.
Professors: Desnoyers, Leibiger, Stow
Associate Professors: Allen, Jarvinen, Stebbins

Assistant Professor: Jallow
Lecturer: Frassetto, R. Ryan
Professor Emeritus: Rossi, Ryan

Course Descriptions

HIS 505 - Introduction to Public History

An introduction to the theoretical and methodological practices of public history. It serves as a foundation for considering the implications of shared practices of history in which professionals consider and collaborate on the meaning of the past for the present.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 510 - Historiography: Introduction to Research and Historiography

This course serves as an introduction to the craft of history. In addition to research methodologies, the course explores different "schools" and approaches to the study of the past.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 610 - Readings in American History

This seminar, which covers central themes and developments from 1607 to the present, focuses on the growth of national identity, the founding and preservation of the American republic, the crucible of slavery and its aftermath, the rise of the United States as a military and industrial power, and the struggle to create an inclusive society.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 615 - History of Philadelphia

A survey of the history of Philadelphia from its founding to the present through an examination of the peoples who imagined it, built it, and struggled for and over it.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 620 - Readings in European History

This seminar follows the contours of an advanced course in the development of Western Civilization. The seminar is divided into two segments: from antiquity to the Renaissance and from the Renaissance to the modern era. Readings focus on principal themes and developments in the following areas or disciplines: political and social; economic; religious; scientific; diplomatic and military; intellectual and cultural.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 630 - Readings in World History

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 640 - Visualizing History

Analysis of historical themes and topics (e.g., American immigration; 20th century American social and intellectual history; the Greco-Roman World; World Wars I and II) through readings, photography, painting, and film documentaries.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 650 - Oral History: Theory and Practice

Theme-based readings and practice in oral history (e.g., family history, labor and class history; gender history; African-American history; military history).

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 663 - Readings in Special Topics in American, European, and Global History

This course examines aspects of a selected topic in American, European, or Global History. Sample titles might include the following: Readings in the History of Education; Readings in the History of Ideas, Readings in Roman History; Readings in English History; Readings in Asian History.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 665 - Museum Studies

An introduction to basic object theory and practice as central to every history museum and historical society. Students gain practical hands-on knowledge through various assignments such as developing exhibitions and creating clear and proper documentation for researchers and future generations.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 667 - Historic Site Management

This graduate level course will introduce the basic principles in the administration of historic houses and historic sites. The course poses two larger questions: What challenges are facing history museums today? What kinds of skills are needed to deal with these challenges? We will discuss ethical and legal issues, strategic planning, museum organization, personnel management, collections management, marketing and public relations and governance. The course will focus specifically on developing student knowledge of current issues in the field and building skills needed to work in various areas of museum management.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 668 - Issues and Practices in Archival Management

This course is designed to meet two objectives to provide an overview of the field of archival management, and introduce the students to the work of archivists, while at the same time preparing them to fulfill the duties of archivists as a component in a career in public history. The course will also include guest speakers and at least one site visit.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 680 - Techniques in Public History

An introduction to the basic concepts of various digital media processes (e.g., the design and publishing of public history projects by using Web sites, audio, and video content). Students also review and evaluate public history Web sites and other media based on criteria used by professional public history organizations.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 700 - History Elective

Samples include "The Ordeal of Total War: World War II"; "England in the Late Middle Ages"; "China and Japan"; "American Intellectual History"; "U.S Constitution in Crises"; "Colonial Latin America"; "The American Revolution"; "The Modern Middle East"; "Progressive Era to New Deal"; "Lincoln and the Civil War"; "America and World War I"; Explorers and Travelers of the 19th Century"; and "Soviet Russia: Lenin to Stalin."

*Can serve as a substitute for HIS 640, HIS 650, or HIS 663

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 705 - Internship in Public History

An internship experience that allows students to combine theory and course content knowledge with practice through hands-on experience in one of several public history venues in the Philadelphia area. Working approximately 15 hours a week under professional supervision, students learn how to apply their education. The student will meet with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Be an M.A. student in History; have at least a 3.0 GPA; have completed all required courses; have permission of the graduate director. Students may not take internship credit with an organization for whom the student works full-time.

HIS 760 - Seminar: Integration and Application of Research Strategies Presented in Core Courses

This seminar is designed to allow students to pursue an advanced research project in either American, European, or global history. It also serves to prepare students for a comprehensive exam in their chosen area of concentration.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 761 - Seminar in the History of Education

This seminar is designed to allow students to pursue an advanced research project in the history of education, either American, European, or global history. Students may choose to investigate issues within the areas of curriculum and instruction that relate to middle school, secondary school, or higher education and/or that focus on a variety of topics within education including gender, race, class, ethnicity, politics, or religion. Alternatively, students may choose to investigate other institutions whose form and function are essentially educational, e.g., museums, settlement houses, and historical sites.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 770 - Thesis Direction I

Supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to compose a detailed outline, to write a draft version of the thesis. Research and completion of thesis continues in HIS 771.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 771 - Thesis Direction II

Continued supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to compose a detailed outline, to write a draft version of the thesis, followed by the submission of a final version.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: HIS 770

HIS 775 - Thesis Direction for History Educators I

Supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to develop a suitable thesis topic, to prepare a working bibliography and to begin research. Research continues and is completed in HIS 776.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 776 - Thesis Direction for History Educators II

Supervised research for students writing the M.A. thesis in order to compose a detailed outline, to write a draft version of the thesis, followed by the submission of a final version.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: HIS 775