Marriage and Family Therapy

Program Description

Students earning a Master of Arts degree in in Marriage and Family Therapy will meet the education requirements for licensure as Marriage and Family Therapists. The MFT Master's Program is COAMFTE Accredited.

Diversity Statement

Diversity includes many areas, and addressing it involves understanding the importance of an appreciation for differing world views. Non-discrimination policy is stated in the opening section of this catalog.

The MFT program at La Salle University are committed to introducing faculty and students to diverse people, thoughts, and ideas. This is accomplished through courses and coursework, internship and clinical experiences, professional activities, and developmental opportunities.

Issues of diversity are addressed and integrated throughout the MFT curricula.

Statement on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination

The Marriage and Family Therapy Program harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination policy is in accord with the La Salle university policy on harassment, sexual misconduct, and discrimination, aligned with the La Salle mission and the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities to establish an environment where students, faculty and staff can function, work and learn, safely and with respect.

The MFT Program publishes a Diversity statement in its Student Handbook and a diversity statement is listed on all MFT Course syllabi. La Salle’s MFT Program is committed to understanding and appreciating diversity among all individuals, and to the principle that there shall be no discrimination in the treatment of any person.

Student’s Guide to Resources Rights and Responsibilities contains the university’s policy on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination.
This can be found online:
https://www.lasalle.edu/students/dean/divpub/manuals/studentguide/

Mission

In keeping with this Lasallian tradition, the Marriage and Family Therapy Program strives to prepare professionals with the abilities and competencies requisite for the practice of marriage and family therapy. The curriculum emphasizes a conceptualization of the role of an individual in primary relationships, such as couple, marriage and the family. Students are provided with course work and clinical experiences, which encourages them to examine the complex interplay of all forces (scientific, interpersonal, emotional, mental, and spiritual) that coexist within and exert influence on an individual and on a family system. The goal is to prepare marriage and family therapists who will competently develop and implement comprehensive interventions, acquire a holistic perspective to health care, understand the complexity of addressing the overall, long-term well-being of individuals, their families and their relationships; evaluate and treat mental and emotional disorders, and address a wide array of relationship issues that will best meet the needs of clients within the context of a relationships and the family system.

 

Program Goals

MFT Program Goals

  1. Graduates will be prepared to pass the MFT national exam by demonstrating foundational knowledge in the field of couples and family therapy, including in ethics, cultural competency, systems theory, and research.
  2. Graduates will demonstrate clinical competency in systems skills and delivering MFT interventions and services.
  3. Graduates will be prepared for employment as a MFT professional by demonstrating a commitment to their own professional development.

Faculty Goals of the Program

Faculty will:

  1. Demonstrate sensitivity for diversity within the coursework;
  2. Incorporate clinical experience, marriage and family therapy literature and research in their teaching;
  3. Incorporate COAMFTE Core Competencies and ethical practice in their teaching;
  4. Participate in professional development in the Marriage and Family Therapy field or field related to mental health;
  5. Participate in scholarly activities within the MFT program, department, university and community.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the Program, the student will be able to do the following:

  • Use an ethical approach with developmental and cultural sensitivity.
  • Use MFT/systems theories to guide case conceptualization, treatment planning, & clinical practice.
  • Utilize appropriate systemic techniques and interventions to maintain collaborative relationships with clients.
  • Demonstrate the ability to assess and diagnose in their clinical practice.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply research relevant to their clinical practice.
  • Develop professional identities as marriage and family therapists.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of oneself and professional maturity in their approach to responsibilities.

Program Specific Information

Supervised Practical Training: (Field Placement)
Includes Internship and Professional Seminar

All students are required to engage in supervised field training. The program has contracts with many mental health agencies and service providers; however it is up to the student to be accepted as an intern. The program prepares the student well to begin Internship, and the student is responsible to demonstrate their preparedness when applying to sites in order to complete their Field Placement requirement. It is also up to the student to acquire an Internship that is conducive to their academic and personal schedules.

Marriage and Family Therapy students preparing for licensing complete four semesters of Internship (PCMF 680/681/682/683) of at least 700 clock hours, 500 of which need to be direct client hours—the usual clinical internship placement involves 12 to 15 hours per week of on-site service. While engaged in the internship, students also attend Professional Seminar (PCMF 690/691/692/693).

Requirements

In addition to the curricular and field placement requirements, students are required to pass the Written Comprehensive Examination and Oral Comprehensive Examination for graduation.

Students must pass the Written Comprehensive Examination prior to applying for Internship.

Both the Written Comprehensive Examination and the Oral Comprehensive Examination are specific to the student’s degree.

Preparation for Licensure

The Marriage and Family Therapy degree (60 credit hours) prepares students to become licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFTs).

Counseling and Family Therapy Master's Programs in Montgomery County

Students are able to complete the Marriage and Family Therapy degree degree at the La Salle University Main Campus in Philadelphia and at the Montgomery County Center, Victory Office Park, in Plymouth Meeting, PA.

Academic Requirements

Master's Degree Program (60 Credit Hours)

Required Courses

  • PCMF 500 - Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)
  • PCMF 502 - Counseling Lab I (3)
  • PCMF 503 - Psychopathology (3)
  • PCMF 504 - Human Behavior: A Developmental Perspective (3)
  • PCMF 505 - Systems, Systemic Thinking and Ethics (F/TR) (3)
  • PCMF 506 - Basic Principles of Research and Design (3)
  • PCMF 602 - Advanced Counseling Lab (F/TP) (3)
  • PCMF 603 - Human Sexuality (3)
  • PCMF 608 - Therapeutic Approaches for Children and Adolescents (F/TP) (3)
  • PCMF 614 - Working with Families (F/TP) (3)
  • PCMF 616 - Contextual Family Therapy (F/TP) (3)
  • PCMF 619 - Multicultural Counseling and Therapy (3)
  • PCMF 624 - Marital and Couples’ Therapy (F/TP) (3)
  • PCMF 628 - Understanding Relationships (F/TR) (3)
  • PCMF 634 - Addictions & the Family (F/TR) (3)
  • PCMF 680/81/82/83 - Internship (8)
  • PCMF 690/91/92/93 - Professional Seminar (4)

Total 57

F/TR = Family Theory
F/TP = Family Therapy

Additional 3 credit hours required to meet 60 credits

Choose one of the following:

  • PCMF 601 - Grief, Loss and Trauma Counseling (3)
  • PCC 612 - Group Processes (3)
  • PCMF 646 - Sex Therapy (3)
  • PCMF 607 - Graduate Research (3) As approved by the Director

Total 3 credits

Course Sequence

Progression through the Program

The Marriage and Family Therapy requires 60 credits, as specified in the curriculum section.

  • 15-21 credits—Theories and processes in Marriage and Family Therapy
  • 15-27 credits—Advanced training in specific approaches in the degree program
  • 12 credits—Supervised practical training through practicum, internships, case seminar, and professional seminar for Marriage and Family Therapy 

Degree or Certificate Earned

M.A.

Number of Courses Required for Program Completion

20

Number of Credits Required for Program Completion

60

GPA Required for Program Completion

3.0

Program Contact Information

Dr. Michael Sude, Director

Marriage and Family Therapy Master's Programs

208 Wister Hall 

cftma@lasalle.edu

215-951-1767

 

Staff Contact Information

Milissa Kernahan, Administrative Assistant

Counseling and Family Therapy Master's Programs

208 Wister Hall 

cftma@lasalle.edu

215-951-1767

Faculty

Director of Marriage and Family Therapy Master's Program: Michael Sude, Ph.D.

Interim Director Professional Clinical Counseling Master's Program, LeeAnn Cardaciotto, Ph.D.

Associate Professors: Cardaciotto, Moon, Roth, Sude
Assistant Professors: Mendez, Parker
Associate Clinical Faculty: Hannigan
Lecturers: Albert, Boyll, Cos, DiNardo,  Evans-Weaver, Maida, Rodriguez, Saraga

Course Descriptions

PCC 501 - Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice of Counseling

This course instructs the student on the history and philosophy of the counseling profession; in it the student will gain an understanding of the role, function, and interactions counselors engage in with other human service providers. Additionally, the counselors' role and responsibility with regard to emergency, crisis, and trauma-causing events is examined. Self-care of the counselor, supervision practices and models, overview of professional organizations, advocating for the profession, and advocating for the success of clients is also covered. Personal safety concerns for the counselor is discussed and covered. Throughout the course there is a focus on the ethical standards of the professional organizations, credentialing bodies, and licensing as well as legal issues as related to the professional counselor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 507 - Advanced Statistics

This course provides students with statistical background that is useful in organizational research settings such as survey analysis and program evaluation. The topics include both parametric and non-parametric statistical methods, such as descriptive statistics, point and interval estimates, means comparisons, correlation, linear regression and multiple regression.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 508 - Cognition and Learning

This course details the empirical and theoretical foundations of the present understanding of cognitive psychology and learning psychology and their integration in contemporary social learning theory. Special attention is paid to the application of the theories and research in counseling and psychotherapy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

PCC 509 - Psychological Assessment I: Assessment in Clinical and Career Counseling

This course addresses the basic concepts in the construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment procedures commonly used in psychology. It uses major reference works for selecting and evaluating assessment procedures and includes supervised experience in selecting, administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment procedures and experience with computer-assisted testing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 506 (PCC students) PCC 507 (IOP students)

PCC 510 - Advanced Research Methods

This course provides students with background on higher level research methods topics and statistical techniques that are useful to students in their roles as consumers and producers of research. Specific topics include the use of statistical methods to establish relationships between variables, psychometric issues, formulation of research-based conclusions, factor analysis, meta-analysis and structural equation modeling.

 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507

PCC 511 - Practice and Concepts of Clinical Mental Health Counseling

In this course, students learn the history, philosophy, trends, and practices within community mental health agencies. This course will review the roles and function of clinicians and help students in developing the knowledge and skills needed to work as professional counselors. This will include reviews of the profession, professional identity, management of programs, and ethics; as well as teaching students how to advocate for clients; develop and review programs; understand, assess, and manage emergencies and crises.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Summer every other even year at Bucks Center; Offered Summer every other odd year at Montgomery Center

PCC 512 - Addictions Counseling

This course focuses mainly on chemical substance abuse but considers the etiology and manifestations of other addictions as well. Attention is given to the occurrence of addiction in the family with particular reference to the physical, behavioral, and attitudinal manifestations of addictive behavior and identification and diagnosis of addiction, as well as the selection of appropriate processes of intervention.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offred Summer every other odd year at Bucks Center

PCC 513 - Advanced Social Psychology

This course provides students with background on topics related to social bases of human behavior which have direct implications to human behavior in organizational settings. The topics include attitude, social perception and cognition, persuasion, helping, attraction, self-concept, stereotype and prejudice, aggression and group processes.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 533 - Advanced I/O Psychology

This course provides a review of psychological principles applied to issues of organizations, including organizational assessment, selection, training, performance, organizational development, motivation, and work-life balance.

 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCC 610 - Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches in Counseling & Psychotherapy

This is a clinical skills course that focuses on the initial problems addressed in the process of therapeutic intervention, namely the self-regulation of thoughts, feelings, and actions. Training is in a broadly conceived cognitive behavior therapy that includes a variety of specific intervention strategies designed to address problems of self-regulation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Spring every other odd year at Bucks Center; Offered Spring every other even year at Montgomery Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC/PCMF 502

PCC 611 - Insight-Oriented Approaches in Counseling and Psychotherapy

A clinical skills course that focuses on the issues addressed in those counseling and psychotherapy approaches that see the gaining of insight as a significant goal in the change process. Key concepts identified with these specific approaches will be presented along with general process issues for working with individuals. Techniques specific to a number of insight-oriented approaches will be explored and students will be encouraged to gain both an understanding of these skills and the ability to utilize them.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Fall every other odd year at Bucks Center; Offered Summer every other even year at Montgomery Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 500

PCC 612 - Group Processes in Counseling and Psychotherapy

This course combines experiential and didactic approaches. The student learns the major theoretical approaches to group counseling and psychotherapy and also participates in group counseling sessions on issues presented by the classroom group. This experience will show the dynamics of groups and lead to the acquisition of skills needed to assist in the resolution of behavioral problems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC/PCMF 502

PCC 635 - Measurement of Individual Differences

This course provides students with background on various measurement issues in organizations, such as employee selection, performance appraisal, employee attitude surveys, and training evaluation. The topics include classical measurement theory, generalizability theory, item response theory, various psychological tests in I/O settings and professional guidelines in organizational measurements.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507 and PCC 533

PCC 636 - Work Motivation/Attitude

This course provides students with the basis for understanding research and theory in relevant domains of I/O psychology that represent general applications of one or more motivational perspectives. The topics include worker attitudes, opinions, beliefs, and general strategies for work motivation such as goal setting, job design, incentive systems, and participation in decision making.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507 and PCC 533

PCC 644 - Career Counseling

This course offers an opportunity to help adapt a student's clinical skills to the critical area of career development. It also relates career success and satisfaction to mental health and life fulfillment, considers theories of career development and the process of career counseling, and utilizes career assessment, career resource information, and job placement requirements. Additionally, it includes career counseling with special populations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCMF 506

PCC 653 - Organizational Interventions

This course is designed to assist individuals interested in a career in industrial/organizational psychology in learning about the issues involved in implementing organizational change and development programs. These issues include engaging employees in the change process, diagnosing organizational problems, effective methods for implementing change programs, and the techniques needed to evaluate the entire process.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: The IOHR program is being taught out, and this course is only offered as an Independent Study for those IOHR students that may need it to graduate.

PCC 659 - Selection/Performance Managment

This course presents the theories and techniques involved in the employee selection and performance appraisal/management processes. The topics include job analysis, classical and decision-theory models of selection, alternative selection devices including interview and assessment centers, rating scale construction, rater training, criteria development, designing a performance management system, and legal and societal considerations that affect selection and performance management processes.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCC 507, PCC 533 and PCC 635

PCC 660 - Practicum

This is a practicum at an approved field placement site for a minimum of 100 clocked hours observing and/or practicing clinical skills with individuals, couples, families, and/or groups under the direction of an approved supervisor. The practicum must be taken in conjunction with the on-campus seminar in professional ethics (PCC 661).

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Successful completion of written comprehensive examination and completion of 24 credit hours, including PCC/PCMF 502 and one additional skills course.

Corequisites: PCC 661

PCC 661 - Professional/Case Practicum Seminar

This course examines professional and ethical issues, with particular reference to the everyday issues of practice, in a peer consultative format. The student is encouraged to develop a "critically examined" personal style and stance with which to address these issues. The class focus will be on the development of an understanding and a working knowledge of the Codes of Ethical Conduct of the American Counseling Association, the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy, the American Psychological Association, and relevant Cpmmonwealth of Pennsylvania laws and statutes.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Successful completion of written comprehensive examination, completion of 24 credit hours including necessary skills courses.

Corequisites: PCC 660

PCC 680-681-682 PCMF 680-681-682-683 - Internship

An internship takes place in a supervised experience at an approved field placement site for approximately 200 hours per term. By the conclusion of the internship, PCC students are required to accrue a minimum of 600 clock hours, half of which are direct client contact. MFT students are required to accrue a minimum of 700 clock hours, 500 of which are direct client contact. Prior to beginning Internship, students must have completed PCC/PCMF 502, 602 and one additional skills course; PCC students must also have completed PCC 660; and practice in clinical skills with individuals, couples, families, and/or groups. Includes on-campus case seminar. (Continued with PCC 681, 682 or PCMF 681, 682, 683. Each semester is two credits.)

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including successful completion of written comprehensive examination.; PCC Students: PCC 660

Corequisites: PCC/PCMF 680 taken with PCC/PCMF 690, PCC/PCMF 681 taken with PCC/PCMF 691, PCC/PCMF 682 taken with PCC/PCMF 692 and PCMF 683 taken with PCMF 693.

PCC 685-86 - IOP Program Internship

The supervised internship experience is in an approved business/organization for a minimum of 200 hours per term. (Continued with PCC 686.) Each semester is two credits.

Number of Credits: 2

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including necessary IOP and MGT courses and successful completion of written comprehensive examination

Corequisites: PCC 685 taken with PCC 695; PCC 686 taken with PCC 696

PCC 688/PCC 689 - I/O Thesis

Thesis is a culmination of knowledge and skills learned in the program. Students will conduct their own research project under the supervision of a faculty advisor and prepare a research report of high quality that is suitable for publication or presentation at a national and/or professional conference. The Thesis is a total of six credits: PCC 688 (3 credits) and PCC 689 (3 credits).

Number of Credits: 6

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours, including necessary IOP and MGT courses and successful completion of written comprehensive examination

PCC 695-696 - IOP Professional Seminar

The personal, practical, and ethical issues involved in the field of industrial/organizational psychology and human resource management. Examination of professional development, professional associations, continuing education, credentialing, legal responsibilities and liabilities, confidentiality, agency practice, independent practice, consulting, and inter-professional cooperation.

Number of Credits: 1

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: For PCC 685 - completion of 24 credit hours, including necessary IOP and MGT courses and successful completion of written comprehensive examination

Corequisites: PCC 695 taken with PCC 685; PCC 696 taken with PCC 686

PCC/PCMF 570 - Statistics and Research Methods

This is a foundation course that satisfies the undergraduate prerequisites but does not count toward the 48 or 60 credit hours needed for the master's degree.

Number of Credits: 3

PCC/PCMF 574 - Introduction to Graduate Research and Writing

This is a foundation course that satisfies the undergraduate prerequisites but does not count toward the 48 or 60 credit hours needed for the master's degree. The course introduces students to the latest research technology and databases for advanced work in their degree. Emphasis is placed on research and communication skills, including oral presentations and written reports.

Number of Credits: 3

PCC/PCMF 607 - Graduate Research

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to engage in research. Students will be required to complete a literature review and design and complete a research project.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered as an Independent Study with approval of Director and sponsored by a faculty member

Prerequisites: PCMF 506

PCC/PCMF 690-91-92-93 - Professional/Case Seminar

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: For PCC/PCMF 690 - Completion of 24 credit hours, including successful completion of written comprehensive examination

Corequisites: PCC/PCMF 690 taken with PCC/PCMF 680, PCC/PCMF 691 taken with PCC/PCMF 681, PCC/PCMF 692 taken with PCC/PCMF 682 and PCMF 693 taken with PCMF 683.

PCMF 500 - Introduction to Counseling and Psychotherapy: Theories and Interventions

This course examines major theories of counseling and psychotherapy and the interventions based on those theories. It includes an emphasis on knowledge, skills, and ethical standards needed to provide direct counseling and psychotherapeutic interventions for individuals, families, and groups.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 502 - Counseling Laboratory I

This laboratory course is designed to develop the basic counseling and therapy skills that enables students to understand the client/s, develop a trusting relationship with the client/s, and to facilitate the client/s' self-exploration. Case conceptualization, treatment planning, and progress notes will be covered. Personal safety concerns for the counselor/therapist is discussed and covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 503 - Psychopathology

This course discusses the major categories of psychological disorders, as well as theory and research regarding etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Introduction to the use of the DSM.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 504 - Human Behavior: A Developmental Perspective

This course addresses principles of human development and family processes that form the context for the study of human behavior. Special emphasis will be given to grand theories that have made important contributions, both historically and currently, to the study of human development, as well as recent discoveries in developmental science. Issues of separation, individuation, and integration in life patterns will be studied within the context of these major theories.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 505 - Systems, Systemic Thinking, and Ethics


This course provides the student with an overview and consideration of family functioning. It includes family structure, family development, family health, family dysfunction, and family treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on acquiring a systems perspective and applying that perspective to an understanding of family functioning. Ethics, boundaries, technology, licensure laws, and diversity are considered and included in the overall systemic view, thinking, AAMFT Code of Ethics, and identifying as a MFT. Personal safety concerns for the marriage and family therapist is discussed and covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 506 - Basic Principles of Research Design, Statistics, Program Development, and Evaluation

This consumer-oriented course focuses on broad concerns common to all forms of social research. Criteria for evaluation and interpretation of various statistical techniques and research designs are covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 601 - Grief, Loss and Trauma Counseling

This course will provide students with an advanced understanding of grief, loss, trauma, and related counseling interventions for children, adults, and families. The basics of grief and bereavement will be explicated, as will specific disorders related to trauma. This course is designed to help students identify needs, resources and assets available to clients coping with grief and/or trauma related disorders, and research supported methods in improving client functioning.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCMF 502.

PCMF 602 - Advanced Counseling Laboratory

This course builds on the basic skills practiced and developed in the first counseling laboratory—PCMF 502. It provides the student with an intermediate experience and opportunity (prior to field placement) to develop a range of additional counseling skills and strategies, with particular attention given to distinguishing between the content and the process of therapy. While it emphasizes those skills and techniques common to many, if not most, approaches, it also highlights those emphasized and represented in the respective concentrations of the program. Students are assigned to sections of this course according to their concentration. Case conceptualization, treatment planning, and progress notes will be covered. Personal safety concerns for the counselor/therapist is discussed and covered.

Prerequisite: PCMF 502

Prerequisite for MFT Students: PCMF 505

Prerequisite for PCC Students: PCC 501

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 502; MFT Students: PCMF 505; PCC Students: PCC 501

PCMF 603 - Human Sexuality

This course examines the variety of ways that human sexuality is expressed in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in the context of the interplay between social, physiological, and psychological factors. Methods of studying sexual behavior, concepts of variation and difference, psychosexual development in life stages, and sexual dysfunctions and treatment are addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 608 - Therapeutic Approaches for Children and Adolescents

This course is designed to provide an understanding of working with children, adolescents, and their families. It will focus on treating a variety of presenting issues, as well as provide several theoretical perspectives for working with families with children and/or adolescents. We will explore many clinical interventions for working with youth of varying ages, and the course will include play therapy. Students will have many experiential opportunities to learn about play therapy techniques and interventions. Careful attention will be paid to ethical issues, laws regarding mandated reporting, duty-to-warn, when treating children and adolescents, as well as cultural and diversity issues will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Offered Summer every other even year at Bucks Center; Offered Summer every other odd year at Montgomery Center

Prerequisites: PCMF 500 and PCC/PCMF 502

PCMF 614 - Working with Families

This course covers the basic principles, techniques, applications, uses, and contra indicators of the major family therapy systems models. Specifically, the intersystems interface among intrapsychic, interpersonal, and family systems dynamics is addressed. Assessment techniques and intervention rationales are covered along with the role of the therapist and the therapist as person. The concepts of family-of-origin, family functioning, structure, strength, and narratives will be studied through an experiential and didactic approach. Application of theory and research to practice is discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 616 - Contextual Family Therapy

This course provides an exploration of the convictions, concepts, strategies, and techniques of contextual therapy, a resource-oriented, trust-based modality of healing interventions for individuals, couples, and families.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 619 - Multicultural Counseling and Therapy

This course explores multicultural counseling theory as well as culture-specific counseling strategies for culturally diverse clients. It is designed to help students develop their multicultural counseling competence and increase their ability to work effectively and ethically in a complex and diverse social world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PCMF 624 - Marital and Couples Therapy

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the issues typically addressed in couples' therapy and the ethical considerations when working with couples. Role playing is used to illustrate couples' treatment dynamics and intervention strategies from initial contacts through the treatment process. Special issues in couples therapy, such as the relationship history, communication patterns, sexual intimacy, and the "couple" relationship vs. the "parenting" relationship, are addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 628 - Understanding Relationships

This course examines human relationships with particular reference to their various forms, functions, and patterns of development. The processes of attachment, separation, individuation, and differentiation are highlighted and are used in a contextual (systemic) framework to examine each relationship. Special emphasis is placed on the clinical applications of this knowledge to couples and families. The student is required to complete a study of one of his/her primary dyadic relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 634 - Addictions and the Family

This course focuses on an understanding of how addictive processes interact with social and family contexts. This allows more effective treatment interventions to be designed. The current research on family dynamics and treatment of codependence, adolescent substance abuse, and children of addicts will also be reviewed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 505

PCMF 646 - Sex Therapy

This course examines the variety of ways that human sexuality is expressed in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in the context of the interplay between social, physiological, and psychological factors. Methods of studying sexual behavior, concepts of variation and difference, psychosexual development in life stages, and sexual dysfunctions and treatment will be addressed. Models of sexual response, general theories of sex therapy, and modes of sex therapy will also be explored. Students will learn to take detailed sexual histories, sexual assessments, and applications of sexuality within a clinical framework with consideration of multicultural diversity.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PCMF 502, PCMF 602, and PCMF 603

PCMF 648 - Professional/Skill Development

This course is individually designed by a faculty member for a student who has been recommended for enhanced professional or skill development. The intent of the course is to assist the student in improving their academic ability, clinical skills, and professionalism in order to be successful in the overall program. The student must agree to the professional or skill development plan once it has been established, and continue in the course until it has been determined by the faculty member that the student has passed with a B grade or higher. Students may have to take this course for more than one semester.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: This course is only available to students by recommendation from committee and approval of the Director.