Translation and Interpretation

Program Description

The curriculum for this program is designed to address three (3) of the principal environments where translation and interpretation (English-Spanish and Spanish-English) are currently needed and will be more intensely needed in the future; that is, legal, health-care and business environments. In addition, governing translation/interpretation principles are also studied for application to language environments covered and not covered by the program.

The program consists of 12 courses (three credits each) to be taken in a predetermined fashion. Therefore, a total of 36 credits are required to complete the M.A. in Translation and Interpretation.

Mission

The Masters in Translation and Interpretation will establish a new standard for translators and interpreters in this geographic area and the nation by training individuals for multi-competency employment so as to aid/keep pace with the need for multilingual capabilities in the marketplace. The program seeks to educate the public on the importance of training and employing professional translators and interpreters.

Program Goals

  • Acquaint participants with the relatively new concept of translation and interpretation studies by reading informed criticism in the theoretical field, thereby contextualizing the disciplines in general terms.
  • Educate individuals for multi-competency employment.
  • Participants will develop awareness of current issues in translation and interpretation studies and practice, and of the importance of professionalizing these occupations.
  • Provide a foundation in the standards of ethics and practice in the profession of translation and interpretation.
  • Offer credits representing academic achievement in a field that is currently seeking professionalization.
  • Keep pace with the need for linguistic specialists in the Philadelphia region and the nation.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this program, the students will be able to:

  • Develop and demonstrate the same level of proficiency as educated native speakers of Spanish and English and transfer messages from one language to another accurately and fluently.
  • Recognize and apply the standards of court, health-care, or conference interpreters, as established by nationally recognized associations in those fields. This includes a foundation in the standards of ethics and practice in the respective areas.
  • Demonstrate expertise in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting and sight translation, in the legal, healthcare, and business fields.
  • Provide training in order to allow students to perform to the standards of court, healthcare, or conference interpreters as established by nationally recognized associations in those fields.
  • Apply what has been learned in the classroom to real-life working environments through guest speakers, on-site visits, in-class simulations, and the internship experience.
  • Identify ways to continue learning on their own by the use of self-assessment techniques and reflective practice skills.
  • Develop and enhance their linguistic competence and cultural awareness.

Program Specific Information

As part of the program requirements, the student will complete the following:

  • A 60-hour internship with the state courts, a health-care institution, or a translation or interpretation company
  • A final portfolio of work on the application of particular techniques to translating as well as interpreting, and the analysis of particular issues related to the translation/interpretation field

Academic Requirements

A minimum of thirty-six (36) credits is required for the degree. All courses are three (3) credits each.

 

Course Sequence

The recommended course sequence is as follows:

Year

Fall

Credits

Spring

Credits

Summer

Credits

1

BLS 610

3

BLS 612

3

BLS 614

3

 

BLS 617

3

BLS 641

3

BLS 642

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

BLS 615

3

BLS 616

3

BLS Elective

3

 

BLS 643

3

BLS 703

3

BLS Elective

3


BLS 612 Consecutive Interpretation and Sight TranslationBLS 610 Comparative Analysis of English / Spanish

BLS 614 Legal Interpretation

BLS 615 Health Interpretation

BLS 616 Business Interpretation

BLS 617: Technology in Translation and Interpretation

BLS 641 Professional Uses of Spanish: Health Care

BLS 642 Professional Uses of Spanish: Business

BLS 643 Professional uses of Spanish: Legal

BLS 703 Internship and Portfolio

Degree or Certificate Earned

M.A.

Number of Courses Required for Program Completion

12

Number of Credits Required for Program Completion

36

GPA Required for Program Completion

3.0

Program Contact Information

Hayman Hall, room 128

hispanicinstitute@lasalle.edu

(215) 991-3592

Staff Contact Information

J. Manuel Gomez, Ph.D.

Director

Hayman Hall, room 128

hispanicinstitute@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1209

Faculty

Director: Gomez

Full Professor: Ketz
Associate Professors: Biehl, Gomez,  Ossa
Lecturers: Ezquerra-Hasbun, Fischetti, Hain-Poorman, Natalini, Tellez

Course Descriptions

BLS 610 - Comparative Analysis English/Spanish

This course studies the comparative/contrastive grammar in the English-Spanish language pair. The course includes intensive practice in reading comprehension, *skim, scan, main idea, key words*, sequence of events, usage, error detection, synonyms, and most common translation problems in terms of grammar, vocabulary, idioms, and slang. Registers of speech are also explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 611 - Fundamentals of Interpretation

This course introduces the basic skills of interpretation: public speaking, memory work, and text analysis, as well as the theoretical foundations of interpretation. In addition, the students learn terminology research and professional skills: general business practices and ethics. Practicum emphasis is on public-speaking skills, as well as the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (SL) and convey it in the target language (TL) in a straightforward and clear manner.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 612 - Consecutive Interpretation and Sight Translation

This course builds on the practical and theoretical foundation laid in BLS 611, Fundamentals of Interpretation. In consecutive interpreting, students learn to identify the implicit structural organization of an extemporaneous speech by presenting and interpreting speeches of this type. The course reinforces the ability to perceive essential meaning and introduces note-taking techniques. It emphasizes clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction, and polished presentation. Note taking and sight translation are introduced in the latter part of the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BLS 611

BLS 613 - Simultaneous Interpretation

In simultaneous interpreting, students are introduced to basic strategies of interpreting in this mode. The course begins with a general introduction and follows up with a series of preparatory exercises helping students to develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time, mastering voice management, and acquiring smooth delivery techniques. Students learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent version in the target language with correct grammar, diction, and style.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

This course further develops the skills in consecutive interpretation with note taking, sight translation, and simultaneous interpreting. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired during the introductory courses and produce interpretations that would be of acceptable quality in a professional setting.

Students are introduced to the procedures in criminal and civil law, legal language, the courtroom, and the Interpreter's Code of Ethics. Practice in the classroom strives to recreate the most common scenarios in which legal interpreting takes place while developing the interpreting skills needed to work as a court interpreter. Students refine their note-taking skills, and special attention is given to develop stamina and maintain concentration while under stress in the courtroom. Assessment takes into account both accuracy and fluency in delivery.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 615 - Health-Care Interpretation

This course provides information on the health-care system in the United States, medical terminology, code of ethics for medical interpreters, and use of interpreters in health-care situations. In consecutive interpreting, students continue to enhance their memory and note-taking skills. They work on detecting and correcting problems from the listening stage to the delivery stage. In simultaneous interpreting, students work on polishing their delivery and language register. In sight translation, students become familiar with the different forms used in hospitals and health-care centers. Peer-assessment and self-assessment are encouraged in order to bring awareness of the importance of self-monitoring in interpreting. Furthermore, this course discusses current issues in health-care interpreting and provides information for further development in the profession.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 616 - Business Interpretation

This course introduces simultaneous interpreting with text, so that students learn to use visual or written materials appropriately to enhance their accuracy and completeness when interpreting. Conference interpreting is practiced in class, with students carrying on research and preparation for "conferences," including compilations of glossaries and topic research. A code of ethics for conference interpreters is discussed, as well as booth etiquette. In consecutive interpreting, students continue to develop their note taking skills and interpret longer utterances without interruption. Speech production aspects such as voice, fluency, and pacing are assessed as well.

Material for practice comes from diverse business areas such as banking, finance, world economic issues, and insurance, among others. Students are expected to read and research topics, make presentations, practice, grade peer exercises, and provide self-assessment. The purpose of these assignments is to develop confidence and assertiveness in students and resources for them so they are able to deal with nuances of meaning and accuracy in interpretation while delivering the interpretation smoothly and naturally in their target language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 617 - Technology: Applications in Translation and Interpretation

This course analyzes current tools to enhance and speed the translation process. These tools include word processors as well as CAT (computer-assisted translation), voice-recognition, and proofreading tools. The course explores and discusses their practical applications and features in terms of pricing, productivity, user-friendliness, quality output, and compatibility with other tools. The course examines simultaneous interpretation and video and telephonic interpreting in terms of both the software and hardware available to perform these types of interpreting and the job opportunities for interpreters in these growing areas. The course also introduces students to new fields in which translation and interpretation skills are being applied, such as subtitling, web and software localization, and voice-over, along with the tools needed to work in these fields. Students will become familiar with tools and resources to aid them in launching a translation and interpretation business and in keeping current with new advances in the industry.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 639 - Advanced Spanish Grammar and Syntax

This course is designed to provide a review of standard Spanish grammar and syntax for advanced students of the language. It includes intensive oral and written practice with a view toward improving native and non-native students' speaking and writing skills. The course also intends to make all speakers aware of standard Spanish cultivated in schools of the Spanish-speaking world. (In Spanish)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 640 - Translation Studies: Theory and Practice

The first stage of this course is theoretical. Examining statements on the art of translation acquaint students with typical issues experienced by literary translators. Focusing on individual solutions to translation problems heightens awareness of the challenges of working interculturally and independently. Reading essays on the process of translation helps students understand what the field of translation studies has come to mean in abstract terms. Using explanations of the history of translation and of current theories helps students to develop a broad perspective on the field as a whole as they begin to incorporate standard terms in their own usage.

The second stage of this course is practical. Newspaper articles are examined as examples of language posing different challenges that, when identified, prompt the appropriate stylistic choices for a translator. Discussion and collaborative in-class translations of examples of each type complement the individual work done outside of class.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 641 - Professional Uses of Spanish: Medical

The topics and linguistic skills covered in this course include the following: vocabulary, oral practice (Spanish-English and English- Spanish), ethnical norms, health-care practices in the U.S., the Hispanic culture of the patient, role-playing, writing of a short medical script, observation at a local hospital with bilingual services, and supplemental readings on specific diseases or community health problems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 642 - Professional Uses of Spanish: Business

This course provides students the opportunity to translate a variety of texts, with emphasis on current world economic and financial issues, international trade, and business and economic forecasts. Students learn to apply basic concepts of economics and business to real-world texts, thereby improving their command of the technical terminology of these fields. Texts include printed and online promotional and informational material, as well as various types of business correspondence and transactions. The course both overs sectors of the business world in which consecutive interpretation is frequently used and emphasizes sequential logic in note taking and accurate terminology in delivery.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

A series of legal documents are analyzed for their technical features in order to grasp some of the systemic and cultural complexities that need to be understood in order to bridge the gap between lawyer and client when Spanish and English are both involved in a common legal proceeding.

Deeds, lease agreements, liens, living wills, and powers of attorney, all commonly used documents in the U.S. today, are translated. Students learn how to communicate efficiently with Spanish-speaking clients as well as to relay their verbal messages to a lawyer or a court. Through sight translation of written testimony (for example, letters or statements from clients), students practice basic skills of court translation. Attention is given to registers of speech (slang, police jargon, legal terms, or norms for courtroom testimony). Typical sessions of client counseling and contract negotiations are simulated in teams for classroom practice.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BLS 703 - Internship and Portfolio

This course is required for the completion of the MA in Translation and Interpretation English/Spanish. The candidate will conduct a supervised internship of 60 hours and prepare a final on-line portfolio.  The project may focus on the application of particular techniques of translating as well as interpreting, and on the analysis of particular issues related to the translation/interpretation fields.

Number of Credits: 3