School of Arts and Sciences – Print Compilation

Overview

Print Compilation 
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The School of Arts and Sciences provides the curriculum that is at the heart of La Salle University’s liberal arts education, offering coursework through the colleges of: Humanities, Education & Behavioral Sciences, Natural & Applied Sciences and Leadership & Global Understanding. It is the University’s largest school, with more than half of La Salle’s undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in one of the School of Arts and Sciences’ majors or programs.  The School of Arts and Sciences offers coursework in a variety of departments to meet La Salle’s institutional learning outcomes, which include:  Critical Analysis and Reasoning, Oral and Written Communication, Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning, Ethical Understanding and Reasoning, Understanding Diverse Perspectives and Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity.

As a liberal arts school in a Catholic, Lasallian tradition, we aim to develop the whole person by fostering a rigorous search for truth, and preparing students to live purposefully and well in association with others.   The arts and sciences are essential for making a good living and a good life.

To meet these aims, the School of Arts and Sciences: 1) provides an innovative and transformative academic experience that promotes students’ academic, professional and personal growth.  2) offers a diverse and inclusive learning environment, distinguished by productive inter-group engagement about power, privilege and social justice. 3) nurtures partnerships with our neighboring communities, the Greater Philadelphia area, and beyond, to increase our academic, social, and economic impact and 4) fosters a sense of community that contributes to the overall well-being of our faculty, staff and students. 

 

Mission

Vision

The School of Arts and Sciences at La Salle University will develop a national reputation as a liberal arts school in the Catholic, Lasallian tradition with a vibrant intellectual environment, a strong sense of community, and an integral connection to global issues.

Mission

In keeping with the mission of La Salle University, the School of Arts and Sciences is dedicated to excellence in teaching and to developing the full intellectual, personal, and social potential of our students in an environment of mutual respect and cooperation. The faculty and staff of the School of Arts and Sciences provide a liberal education of both general and specialized studies for its own students and for those from the School of Business, the School of Nursing and Health Sciences, and the Undergraduate Evening and Weekend Programs. The undergraduate and graduate programs of the School also aim to provide students with a solid foundation for lifelong learning, informed service, and progressive leadership in their communities, and for fulfilling the immediate and final goals of their lives. With the shared mission of the Christian Brothers, the School of Arts and Sciences is passionately engaged in the process of enriching the community of scholar-learners, teachers, and researchers, through the power of enhanced academic experience. Faculty and staff in the School of Arts and Sciences believe a liberal academic experience should provide the opportunity for the mutual advancement and sharing of the excitement of learning for its own sake.

Location/Contact Information

School of Arts and Sciences, Dean’s Office
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
SASOffice@lasalle.edu
(215)-951-1042

Staff Contact Information

Pamela Barnett, Ph.D.
Dean, School of Arts and Sciences
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
barnett@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

LeeAnn Cardaciotto, Ph.D.
Associate Dean
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
cardaciotto@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

David Cichowicz, Ph.D.
Associate Dean
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
cichowic@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

Lisa Jarvinen, Ph.D.
Associate Dean
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
jarvinen@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

Evelyn Ramos, M.Ed.
Assistant Dean
ramose@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

Jim Rook, M.B.A.
Assistant Dean
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
rook@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

Julie Valenti, M.A.
Assistant Dean
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
valenti@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

Michele Guy
Office Manager
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
guy@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1043

Karla Delgado
Administrative Assistant
Holroyd Hall, Suite 104
delgadok1@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1042

School Specific Academic Policies

Undergraduate Students Taking Graduate Courses

Undergraduate students with senior standing and an overall GPA of 3.0 or better may take up to six graduate credits during their undergraduate career at La Salle University. These six graduate credits will only apply toward the student’s undergraduate degree. Permission of both the undergraduate chairperson and the graduate director are required.

Requirements for Multiple Majors

Specific policies regarding requirements for multiple majors may be found in the introduction section of the School under which the major falls. Detailed course requirements for majors are listed in the University Majors and Curricula section of this catalog, under each discipline. The requirements for a Second major may be reduced slightly depending on the first Major.

Opportunities Outside the Classroom

As students progress through their programs of study, they learn about the process of conducting research in their major discipline. Capstone experiences in all fields as well as the Honors Program provide opportunities for independent scholarship projects.  Also, at the undergraduate level, the University offers a formal program that crosses all disciplines and helps match student and faculty interests. At the end of the year, multiple venues are offered for students to present their work.  For more information about the Undergraduate Research Program at La Salle, contact Dr. Judith Musser, Director of Undergraduate Research.  Last, many faculty invite outstanding students to participate in their own professional research programs. Faculty-undergraduate student teams can apply for financial support during the summer months through a competitive grant program sponsored by the School of Arts and Sciences.

Internships

Internships complement the theoretical foundation and the practical, hands-on learning experiences offered in students’ courses. Through internships, students have the opportunity to explore potential careers, acquire real-world, professional experience, make contacts and build relationships, and clarify their future goals and aspirations. With its prime location in the Delaware Valley, a hub for so many industries and organizations, La Salle is able to offer internship opportunities to students in every major. Internships can be taken for course credit or for no credit, and they can be paid or unpaid.  For additional information about the countless internship opportunities available to La Salle Arts and Sciences students, contact the undergraduate academic departments or the Office of Career Services.

Service-Learning

La Salle University’s culture is rooted in the Christian Brothers’ tradition of faith, service, and community. Service is such an integral part of life on campus that La Salle has been recognized several times on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. La Salle has also been selected for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Community Engagement Classification, an honor reserved for just a small fraction of colleges and universities that can demonstrate a true commitment to the local and global community.  Although many students join established outreach organizations on campus, there are also opportunities to perform community service through coursework. A list of approved courses can be found on the Service Learning Programs website.

Travel Study

Travel/study courses are semester-long classes with a 10- to 15-day travel component built into the syllabus. Through these courses, people, places, and concepts that student have learned about in the classroom are brought to life and given context. Students broaden their worldview, gain a heightened understanding of other cultures, and learn about the responsibilities of global leadership.  More information can be found on the Education Abroad Programs website.

Study Abroad

Students who study abroad have the opportunity to immerse themselves in a new culture, a new language, and a new environment for an entire semester. Through La Salle University’s own programs in Italy, Mexico, Ireland, and Australia, or through partnerships with other Lasallian schools around the country, students can choose among programs on six continents. With the right planning, students from nearly any major can study abroad and still stay on track to graduate in four years.  More information can be found on the Education Abroad Programs website.

Departments

Majors

Minors

 

Preparation for The Health Professions

Students preparing for careers in the health professions (medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, podiatric medicine, optometry) traditionally major in biochemistry, biology, or chemistry. However, students may elect to major in any program provided they complete the required science and mathematics courses to support their applications. The courses specified by the Association of American Medical Colleges for Medical School applicants are generally applicable as minimal requirements for most of the health professional schools. They are:

Most professional schools will accept these as minimal preparation, but may recommend additional courses. Students should be alert to the fact that professional schools are interested in demonstration of aptitude in science and mathematics, and the courses taken must be those normally rostered by majors in these areas, not courses offered for non-major election.

In the normal application process to health professional schools, the applicant’s full undergraduate record is scrutinized. The strong liberal arts component in the La Salle curriculum will provide evidence of broad interest and rounded academic development. Evidence of leadership and active interest in associated activities will lend strong additional support to applications. Volunteer work in the particular health profession is also necessary.

Normally, the competition for placement in these programs results in high acceptance standards. Grade point averages ranging from 3.4 to 4.0 are representative of levels expected in these programs. Students are encouraged to consult with their health professions advisor concerning admissions criteria at various schools.

Preparation for Law

Law schools do not prescribe particular curricula for admissions. La Salle University, therefore, approaches the preparation for law on an individualized basis, tailoring the program of each student to individual needs and desires. Thus, students may major in English, Philosophy, Political Science, History, Sociology, Business, etc., as preparation for law. In addition, La Salle offers a number of courses of particular interest to students interested in pursuing law careers, which may be taken as electives.

The Pre-Law Program offers the student a coordinated approach to course selection, preparation for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), and both academic and admissions counseling. In addition, it provides many programs and panel discussions through the St. Thomas More Pre-Law Society. The Coordinator of Pre-Law Programs gathers, collects, and disseminates to students appropriate information concerning legal education and the legal profession and informs students of special opportunities throughout the academic year. Pre-law advisors are available to guide students on an individualized basis with emphasis on particular needs.

Department of Art

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Art, with its programs in Digital Arts & Multimedia Design (DArt) and in Art History, is to embrace and promote the idea that the visual arts are expression of cultures, both past and present. For those students in our program creating computer-generated imagery using the latest technologies, the goal is to engage with social and ethical implications of that activity. Both programs foster critical thinking in analyzing images to understand their power, a necessary skill in this image-saturated world.

Major(s) Offered

Art History

Digital Arts

Minor(s) Offered

Art History

Digital Arts

Concentrations

Digital Arts

Location/Contact Information

Susan M. Dixon, Chair

Hayman Hall 126

dixons@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1163

Full-Time Faculty

Art History

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Conaty, Dixon

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Holochwost, Moriuchi

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Haberstroh

Digital Arts & Multimedia Design

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Camomile

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: G. Beatty

AFFILIATED FACULTY: J. Beatty, Blum

Art History

Program Description

The Art History program prepares students to see images with precision, to describe how and what the images express, and to interpret them in terms of the culture that produced them. Our many courses provides the broad historical frameworks to understand art in all its forms: painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape architecture, minor arts and more. Students work with physical objects in museum and gallery collections, as well as in the urban spaces, and write persuasively about them.

Our program offers:

Why take this major?

You are a good candidate to major in Art History if you:

...and if you want to work in the following types of careers working in/as:

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Susan Dixon

Chair, Art Department

Hayman Hall, room 126

(215) 951-1163

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 12

Total: 38-40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 36

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 courses in total in order to graduate. 12 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ARTH 201 - History of Art I
ARTH 202 - History of Art II
ARTH 320 - Topics in Contemporary Art or ARTH 322 - Topics in American Art
ARTH 340 - Art & Culture or ARTH 370 - Special Topics in Art History
ARTH 380 - Research Seminar
ARTH 460 - Internship or ARTH 480 - Exhibition Seminar
5 ARTH 200- or 300-level courses
Choose 1: an ART course or another ARTH 200- or 300-level course

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

A dual major in Art History takes 10 courses:

Minor Requirements

The minor in Art History requires 6 courses:

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall

ARTH 201

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 320 or ARTH 322

ARTH 380

Spring

ARTH 202

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 200- or 300-level

ARTH 340 or ARTH 370

ARTH 460 or 480

Course Descriptions

ART 102 - Basic Design (Cross Listed with DART 102)

Students learn the fundamental design principles and techniques associated with creating and modifying digital images, and how to prepare these images for viewing on screen and in print. Both raster (paint) and vector (draw) type graphics will be studied, using appropriate software applications.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ART 202 - Visual Communication (Cross Listed with DART 202)

An overview of issues related to the history and theory of images and their cultural function. Digital images and their effectiveness are assessed and analyzed. Students apply this knowledge to the creation of their own visual projects. Emphasis will be on the interactive potential of images in the digital media and on devising strategies to create dynamic interactive images.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102

ART 215 - Color Theory (Cross Listed with DART 215)

This course is an introduction to color models, color interaction, and the human perception of color. Color in both subtractive (pigmented) and additive (electronic) environments are addressed. Theoretical knowledge will be reinforced by practical exercises in various media.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ART 102

ART 260, 261 - Painting I, II

The course introduces the fundamentals of painting. Students learn the skills of manipulating paint to solve a sequence of problems exploring color theory, compositional structure, and figure/ground relationships. The course may be repeated for additional credit (ART 261) after the completion of ART 260.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall, Summer

ART 263, 264 - Drawing I, II

This course provides students with mastery of basic principles of observation and familiarity with the potential and limitation of various media. This course provides studies of proportion, volume, perspective, and anatomy. Representation of still lives, the human figure, and landscape using various media is also included. The course may be repeated for additional credit (ART 264) after the completion of ART 263.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ART 265, 266 - Sculpture I, II

This is an introduction to the fundamentals and concepts of organizing forms in three dimensions. Students use basic materials for a sequence of problems exploring such aspects as line, plane, volume, texture, and scale with modeled and constructed forms. The course may be repeated for additional credit (ART 266) after the completion of ART 265.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ART 268 - Intro to Digital Photography

This is a course that introduces basic concepts, techniques and terminology in digital photography such as how sharpness and exposure effect images and the way they are perceived by viewers. Getting images from camera to computer, to print and/or web, and using software such as Adobe Photoshop will be covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ART 270 - Special Topics in Studio Art

Material will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit if course is essentially different.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ART 283 - Drawing in the Digital Studio (Cross Listed with DART 283)

An introductory drawing course which merges traditional drawing techniques and digital media applications and processes.  While students acquire experience in art and technology, observational skills will be cultivated, promoting new ways of seeing and thinking.  Rendering drawings from still life, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of drawing using line, form, value, and space in developing original compositions.  Students will learn how to critique drawings and receive criticism and advice from fellow students and the instructor. 

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ARTH 150 - Introduction to Art History

This course will introduce students to basic elements of visual literacy through the exploration of art history in a variety of cultural traditions, geographic locations, and chronological periods. Students will learn about principles of design, form, and iconography while exploring the art of different societies and cultures.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 201, 202 - History of Art I, II

This course is a chronological survey of architecture, painting, sculpture, and minor arts from major cultures, especially in the West. Emphasis is on identification and comprehension of styles, monuments, and traditions. ARTH 201 covers pre-historic art to ca. 1400; ARTH 202 covers the Renaissance to the 21st century.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 203 - Ancient Art

This course is a study of the art and architecture of selected early civilizations from about the 13th Century BC to the 4th Century AD, emphasizing Greek, Roman, and other Aegean and Mediterranean cultures.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 205 - Medieval Art

This course examines the development of the visual arts from the late Roman period to the late Gothic of the 15th century. Special emphasis is on the establishment of Christian iconography.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 213 - Italian Renaissance Art

This course is a study of Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture of Italy from 1250 to 1570. Emphasis will be on the social, economic, religious, and political conditions in which the art of the age participates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 216 - Baroque Art

This course addresses major styles and trends in the visual arts of Western Europe during the 17th Century. Emphasis will be on the social, economic, religious and political conditions in which the art of the age participates.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 217 - 19th-Century Art

This course focuses on painting's evolution, content, and style, from circa 1780 to the turn of the 20th century. Emphasis is on the major movements: Neoclassism, Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 219 - Modern Art (Formerly ARTH 319)

This course is a study of developments in late 19th- and early 20th-century art as they pertain to the rise of Modernism. Movements examined include Post-Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, and Surrealism. While the focus will be on painting and sculpture, related developments in architecture and the decorative arts may also be considered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 222 - American Art

This survey course introduces American art through the study of selected artists and works of art, many of them in local museums. It traces the evolution of American art from Native American beginnings, through the Colonial and Federal periods, and concluding in the World War II era.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 223 - American Architecture

This course is a study of the types and styles of American architecture from the Colonial to the Post-modern periods. Some emphasis is placed on urban and garden architecture, including that of Philadelphia. Field trips to significant architectural sites are included.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ARTH 224 - Latin American Art

An examination of the visual culture of Latin America beginning with the Spanish and Portuguese arrival and colonization of the New World to the present. It will encompass the study of painting, sculpture, graphics, architecture and other visual media from Mesoamerica, Central America, South America and the Caribbean, as well as Chicano art production in the United States.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ARTH 226 - Introduction to Museums

A study of the history and evolution of the museum and an examination of its main objectives. Topics include the mission and function of art museums—collection, care of objects, exhibition, and education—as well as the politics of interpretation and display. Site visits to local art museums and presentations by museum professionals from the area are required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

ARTH 270 - Special Topics in Art History

The topics in this course vary from semester to semester. It may be repeated for credit if the material is essentially different.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ARTH 310 - History of Photography

A survey of the history of photography from its invention to the present. It addresses photography as an artistic medium, a social text, a technological adventure and a cultural practice. Important contributors to photography’s history, as well as iconic images, will be examined. Ethical issues prompted by the creation and consumption of photographs will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ARTH 312 - Art and Medicine

This course explores the common goals of art and medicine with representations of health, anatomy, and medical issues throughout the history of art. Students hone the skills shared by the disciplines of art history and the health sciences, a type of visual literacy that requires a keen sense of observation and an analysis of social context.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ARTH 316 - Women and Art

This course encourages students to think critically about the contributions of women artists, collectors, critics, models, and viewers to the fields of art and art history. This course requires that students look beyond the traditional models of art criticism to consider how gender has shaped women's artistic practices and responses.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ARTH 320 - Topics in Contemporary Art

This course evaluates art of the late 20th and 21st Centuries in terms of a particular idea or issue. Topics include: Art & Identity in a Global World, and Art & Social Justice in the Contemporary World.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 322 - Topics in American Art

This is an advanced course that takes an in-depth look at a particular topic in American Art. Possible subjects include The Hudson River School, and Picturing Ecology in America.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 340 - Art and Culture

This course takes an in-depth look at the art of one particular culture. It offers a thematic approach to understanding art in a cultural context. Past topics include Irish Art & Rebellion, and Art & Politics of World War II.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 370 - Special Topics in Art History

Topics in this course will vary from semester to semester. It may be repeated for credit if the material is essentially different.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

ARTH 380 - Research Topics in Art History

This course focuses on an analysis and application of methods used in art criticism and research, with the emphasis on writing. Subjects will vary, depending on student interests.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Required of Art History majors. Art History minors may enroll with permission of chair.

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202

ARTH 460 - Internship

The internship is designed to give art history students the opportunity to gain real-world experience in the art field. Students will meet regularly with a faculty member during their internship.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: GPA of 3.0 overall and in the major OR approval of the chair. Students must apply for interships midway through the semester before the internship begins. For more guidelines, see Department's Internship coordinator.

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202

ARTH 480 - Exhibition Seminar

This course is for those with an interest in museum studies. It gives students practical training in anticipation of a museum or gallery career. The outcome of the course is an art exhibition, most often in the La Salle University Art Museum.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ARTH 201 and 202 or permission of instructor

Digital Arts and Multimedia Design (DArt)

Program Description

The Digital Arts (DArt) program challenges students to wed their creativity to a variety of technical and professional skills in order to make thoughtful and effective computer-generated imagery. It prepares students for exciting and dynamic careers in any business which has visual communication needs, no matter what the size or focus of the business. Students emerge from the DArt program able to produce graphic design, web design, 2-D and 3-D animation, and audio and interactive design. They gain the aptitude to deal confidently with emerging technologies, such as augmented and virtual reality design.

Our program offers:

Why take this major?

Studying DArt at La Salle means that you will be given ample opportunity to:

Our alumni take on the following roles in the workplace, singly or as part of a team:

They have found employment at: Comcast, Forbes, Vanguard, Independence Blue Cross, Kaiser Permanente, Trellist Marketing and Technology, American Basketball Association/Philly Spirit, Disney ABC Television Group, Anthropologie, Live Nation Entertainment, Think Brownstone, and Digitability.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Susan Dixon

Chair, Art Department

Hayman Hall, room 126

(215) 951-1163

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 18

Total: 38-40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 45

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 courses in total in order to graduate. 18 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Required for all 3 Tracks

DART/ART 102 - Basic Design

CSC 240 - Database Management

DART 210 - Intro to Animation

DART 230 - Intro to Web Design & Development

DART 280/281/282 - Seminar (1 cr each)

DART 330 - Advanced Web Design & Development

DART 340 - Web Scripting

DART 480 - Senior Project Management (2 cr)

DART 481 - Senior Portfolio (1 cr)

Concentrations

Track 1: Creative & Multimedia Design

Required for Track 1 (4 courses or 12 credits):

Electives for Track 1 (3 courses or 9 credits):

Track 2: Electronic Publishing

Required for Track 2 (2 courses or 6 credits):

Electives for Track 2 (5 courses or 15 credits):

Track 3: Technical Development

Required for Track 3 (2 courses or 6 credits):

Electives for Track 3 (5 courses or 15 credits):

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

39 credits

Dual Majors in DArt take 6 fewer credits than is required for the major. These 6 credits will be determined in consultation with the Program Director or Adviser.

Minor Requirements

The minor in Digital Arts & Multimedia Design requires 18 credits or 6 courses:

Recommended Course Sequence

FALL SPRING
Track 1  

DART 102

DART 220

DART 280

DART 215

DART 210

DART 220

DART 310

DART 281

DART 230

CSC 240

ELECTIVE 1

DART 330

ELECTIVE 2

DART 282

DART 340

ELECTIVE 3

DART 480

DART 481

Track 2  

DART 102

ELECTIVE 1

DART 280

DART 210

ELECTIVE 2

CSC 240

ELECTIVE 3

DART 281

DART 230

ENG 310

ELECTIVE 4

DART 330

ENG 410

DART 340

ELECTIVE 5

DART 480

DART 481

Track 3  

DART 102

ELECTIVE 1

DART 280

DART 210

CSIT 220

ELECTIVE 2

 

CSC 230

ELECTIVE 3

DART 281

DART 230

CSC 240

DART 330

ELECTIVE 4

DART 340

ELECTIVE 5

DART 480

DART 481

 

Course Descriptions

DART 102 - Basic Design (Cross Listed with ART 102)

Students learn the fundamental design principles and techniques associated with creating and modifying digital images, and how to prepare these images for viewing on screen and in print. Both raster (paint) and vector (draw) type graphics will be studied, using appropriate software applications.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

DART 202 - Visual Communication (Cross Listed with ART 202)

An overview of issues related to the history and theory of images and their cultural function. Digital images and their effectiveness are assessed and analyzed. Students apply this knowledge to the creation of their own visual projects. Emphasis will be on the interactive potential of images in the digital media and on devising strategies to create dynamic interactive images.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 102/ART 102

DART 210 - Intro to Animation

An introduction to the basic principles and techniques of planning, designing, and creating multimedia content for computer-generated animations. Students learn various currently available animation software.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 102/ART 102

DART 215 - Color Theory (Cross Listed with ART 215)

This course is an introduction to color models, color interaction, and the human perception of color. Color in both subtractive (pigmented) and additive (electronic) environments are addressed. Theoretical knowledge will be reinforced by practical exercises in various media.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 102/ART 102

DART 220 - Intro to Digital Audio

An introduction to the concepts and tools used in digital audio production, including recording, composing, editing, processing, and mixing. Empasis is on the integral role of sound in multimedia production.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

DART 230 - Intro to Web Design and Development

Focus on preparation, design, development, and maintenance of Web documents. Creating, revising, editing and critiquing Web sites using 'hard code' and applications-based layout and editing, and the use of style sheets. Emphasis on site architecture and mastery of Web authoring tools, including Web document deployment and debugging.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 6.1 - Technological Competency

DART 268 - Introduction to Digital Photography (Cross Listed with ART 268)

This is a course that introduces basic concepts, techniques and terminology in digital photography such as how sharpness and exposure effect images and the way they are perceived by viewers. Getting images from camera to computer, to print and/or web, and using software such as Adobe Photoshop will be covered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

DART 280, 281, 282 - Digital Arts Seminar I, II, III

A forum for listening to professionals present current issues, research, and trends in digital arts & multimedia design, and for learning about and discussing one's place in the profession. Each semester is 1 credit.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

DART 283 - Drawing in the Digital Studio (Cross Listed with ART 283)

An introductory drawing course which merges traditional drawing techniques and digital media applications and processes.  While students acquire experience in art and technology, observational skills will be cultivated, promoting new ways of seeing and thinking.  Rendering drawings from still life, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of drawing using line, form, value, and space in developing original compositions.  Students will learn how to critique drawings and receive criticism and advice from fellow students and the instructor. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

DART 300 - Digital Figure Drawing

Traditional drawing concepts and exercises are applied using an electronic drawing tablet and computer software. While basic elements of drawing will be reviewed, the course foces on drawing the figure. Classical through contemporary figure painting and drawing will be studied as a means of exploring concepts and personal style.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 102/ART 102 or permission of instructor

DART 301 - Typography

This course relates the basic skills of manipulating type to create meaningful communication. Emphasis on the formal, compositional, and communicative aspects of type. Students will develop typographic designs for static, motion, and internet graphics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 102/ART 102

DART 305 - Narrative Illustration

This course explores the theories and methods of how to illustrate narrative. Students study the cultural interpretations and history of narrative illustration. They create computer generated images (CGI) on tablet monitors, using a pressure sensitive stylus and digital software. Lectures and demonstrations lay the groundwork for each course project, concluded by class critiques.  Critiques are an instrumental part of the course, aiding in the development of the visual language and furthering the understanding of constructive evaluation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 215/ART 215

DART 309 - Digital Storytelling

An introduction to the basic concepts of artistic video production including storyboarding, audio recording, and non-linear editing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 102/ART 102

DART 310 - Advanced Animation

Builds on topics related in DArt 210, advancing knowledge and application of animation techniques.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 210

DART 320 - Advanced Digital Audio

Builds on skills introduced in DART 220, advancing knowledge and application of digital audio technology.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: DART 220

DART 330 - Advanced Web Design and Development

Focus on methods to blend graphics, design, content, and multimedia components into a single digital medium; methods for merging these components; advanced and emerging technologies involving digital authoring, including advanced layout and multimedia designs, and current technology trends including server-side; the impact of emerging technologies on digital media designs.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 230

DART 340 - Web Scripting

This course is an introduction to basic programming concepts: variables, arrays, control structures (ifs and loops), and functions, as well as an introduction to basic interface concepts such as forms, elements, events, etc. Use of these concepts in the creation of dynamic and interactive documents for the Internet. The course is mainly client-side scripting, in particular JavaScript, but may also include some server-side scripting and XML.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 230

DART 461, 462 - Internship I, II

This experience is normally part-time, paid or non-paid employment in a cooperating site to provide practical experience in the discipline. Working under professional supervision for 10 to 15 hours per week, students learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of the world of work. Students will meet regularly with a faculty member and will be required to reflect on the relationship between their course work and their internship experience.

Number of Credits: 3 each

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: GPA of 2.75 overall; junior or senior standing; approval of DArt Internship Coordinator

DART 480 - Senior Project Management Seminar

Seniors plan, manage, and complete a digital media project. They collaborate, develop, and manage a project budget, maintain a time line, and participate in group exercises.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 330

Corequisites: DART 481

DART 481 - Senior Portfolio

Each student will design and develop an individual portfolio showcasing the creative work he or she developed and the techniques used to achieve them. The portfolio will be presented to a faculty panel for evaluation.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: DART 330

Corequisites: DART 480

Department of Biology

Mission Statement

The Biology Department of La Salle University is dedicated to the Lasallian tradition of excellence in teaching. We are committed to developing the full intellectual, personal, and social potential of our students in an environment of mutual respect and cooperation.

The faculty of La Salle’s Biology Department serves qualified students interested in pursuing further education and careers in the health professions, the physical sciences, the life sciences, and science education. In addition, we provide for non-science majors a variety of foundation level courses that explore biological issues of interest and concern to the general public.

La Salle has a long and proud tradition of training undergraduates for admission to health profession schools. We believe it important to provide these undergraduates with courses that emphasize the general principles of the life sciences and that address a diverse range of current scientific issues. We are equally committed to preparing students for graduate work in the life sciences, for careers in scientific/clinical technology, or for careers in science education by providing them with broadly based theoretical and laboratory training. We feel the development of critical thinking skills and the establishment of a firm understanding of the foundational principles of the life sciences are the best preparation for more specialized professional and graduate training.

We believe the academic experience should provide an opportunity for mutual advancement and sharing of excitement for science through supportive yet challenging dialogue among faculty and students.

Department Goals

Major(s) Offered

Biology

Environmental Science

Secondary Education (B.A.)/Biology (B.S.)

Minor(s) Offered

Biology

Environmental Science

Location/Contact Information

David Zuzga, Chair

Holroyd Hall 235

zuzga@lasalle.edu

(215) 991-3773

Staff Contact Information

Carol E. Miller, Administrative Assistant

Holroyd Hall 237

cmiller@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1245

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Ballough, Pierce

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Samulewicz, Seitchik, Zuzga

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Church, DeHaven, Hazell, Ling

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: McClory

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Bart, Belzer, Hoersch

Biology

Program Description

The Biology Department of La Salle University is dedicated to the Lasallian tradition of excellence in teaching. We are committed to developing the full intellectual, personal, and social potential of our students in an environment of mutual respect and cooperation.

The faculty of La Salle's Biology Department serves qualified students interested in pursuing further education and careers in the health professions, the physical sciences, the life sciences, and science education. In addition, we provide for non-science majors a variety of foundation level courses that explore biological issues of interest and concern to the general public.

La Salle has a long and proud tradition of training undergraduates for admission to health profession schools. We believe it important to provide these undergraduates with courses that emphasize the general principles of the life sciences and that address a diverse range of current scientific issues. We are equally committed to preparing students for graduate work in the life sciences, for careers in scientific/clinical technology, or for careers in science education by providing them with broadly-based theoretical and laboratory training. We feel the development of critical thinking skills and the establishment of a firm understanding of the foundational principles of the life sciences are the best preparation for more specialized professional and graduate training.

We believe the academic experience should provide an opportunity for mutual advancement and sharing of excitement for science through supportive yet challenging dialogue among faculty and students.

Why take this major?

The Biology program fosters a deep understanding of foundational knowledge in the life sciences and encourages students to apply this understanding in laboratory research projects that develop critical thinking skills and scientific reasoning. This training allows students to pursue a broad range of opportunities related to the life sciences including medical or graduate school and careers in the health professions, scientific/clinical technology, or science education.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

David Zuzga

Chair

Holroyd Hall 235

zuzga@lasalle.edu

(215) 991-3773

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 18

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: Minimum of 66

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 210 Cellular Biology and Genetics

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 18 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics
BIO 220 -  Structure and Function of Organisms
BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution, Ecology
BIO 412 - Biochemistry
BIO 413 - Molecular Biology

Additional 300/400-level biology courses to total a minimum of 11 courses

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry I
CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry II
PHY 105 -General Physics I
PHY 106 - General Physics II
MTH 120 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

REQUIRED FOR MINOR IN BIOLOGY:

BIO 210
BIO 220
BIO 230

Three additional courses from the 300/400 level

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 210   Biology 220  
Chemistry 111   Chemistry 112  
       

Sophomore Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 230   Biology Elective  
Chemistry 201   Chemistry 202  
Math 113 or Math 120   Math 120  
       

Junior Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 412   Biology 413  
Biology Elective   Biology Elective  
Physics 105   Physics 106  

Senior Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology Elective or Capstone   Biology Elective or Capstone  
Biology Elective      
       

* This is a "typical" schedule. Some students will take Biology 210 after the Fall semester of their freshman year.

Course Descriptions

BIO 157 - Life Science: An Environmental Approach

This foundation biology course for non-majors places emphasis on the unifying concepts of ecology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of environmental issues, and establish a relevance to students' lives. Topics will include human influence on patterns and products of change in living systems, energy matter and organization, and human interaction and interdependence with other living systems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 158 - Life Science: A Human Approach

This foundation biology course for non-majors places emphasis on the unifying concepts of human biology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of life, and establish a relevance to students' lives. Topics will include: maintaining dynamic equilibrium in humans, human reproduction and inheritance, and human growth and differentiation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 161-162 - Anatomy and Physiology

This basic course in the structure and functioning of the human body places emphasis on the interrelationships of the major organ systems. It is intended for Allied Health students. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory; two terms.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: BIO 161 is a prerequisite for BIO 162.

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology

Topics of this course include structure, growth, and identification of medically important microorganisms; role of specific pathogens in the etiology of human disease; immunology; chemotherapeutic and antibiotic control of infectious diseases. It is intended for Allied Health students. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics

This course provides an introduction to the principles of cellular and molecular biology and genetics. Topics include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular reproduction, and molecular and classical genetics. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students must be eligible for Math 113 or Math 120 and Chem 111

Prerequisites: High school or college chemistry.

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 220 - Structure and Function of Organisms

This course is an introduction to the principles of plant and animal form and function. Emphasis will be placed on the correlation of structure and function of the major organ systems of plants and animals. Laboratory sessions will focus on physiological phenomena. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 210

BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution, And Ecology

Topics in this course include an integrated study of evolutionary principles and mechanisms, the diversity of life, ecosystem structure and dynamics, human interaction with ecosystem components, and the biological basis of behavior. Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 220

BIO 301 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

This course examines the comparative systemic anatomy of the vertebrate classes, hypotheses of origin, and radiation of the phylum Chordata. Laboratory dissections of representative Chordates from amphioxus to mammal. Two hours lecture; four hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 303 - Microbiology

This course addresses the structure, growth, identification, and control of microorganisms of major medical, environmental, and industrial importance; molecular control and genetics of bacteria and viruses; immunology; microbial pathogenesis; and epidemiology of infectious diseases of humans. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: C- or higher grade in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 305 - Mammalian Physiology

This lecture-laboratory course examines the metabolic processes and associated physiochemical phenomena of mammals. Current physiological hypotheses of the nervous, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, and digestive systems, as well as special senses, will be studied. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 306 - Neurobiology

This course involves a lecture-laboratory study of the nervous system, including principles of membrane biophysics, cellular neurophysiology, systems neurophysiology, and neuroanatomy. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 310 - Genetics

This course is an introduction to genetics at the molecular, cytological, and organismal level. Included are the thorough coverage of Mendelian and other basic transmission genetics phenomena in the light of our knowledge of DNA and cell structure and function; mutation and mutagenesis; and an introduction to recombinant DNA. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 314 - Biometrics

This course addresses the analysis of experiments and research data in quantitative biology. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including probability distributions, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 317 - Invertebrate Zoology

Topics of this course involve life processes, phylogenetic advances, and basic classification of the major pre-chordate phyla with emphasis on their evolution and ecology. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 318 - Evolution

This course involves a presentation and analysis of the evidence for the evolution of life. Major topics include the origin of life and cellular organelles as well as the development of the diversity of life present today. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the ideas of Charles Darwin as expanded and modified by evidence from modern population genetics, cytogenetics, and molecular biology. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 319 - The Plant Kingdom

Topics of this course involve functional anatomy, phylogeny, and basic systematics of non-vascular and vascular plants. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 400 - Marine Biology

This course offers a contemporary view of the dynamics establishing community structure in pelagic, estuarine, mangrove tidepool, coral reef, hydrothermal vent, and intertidal ecosystems. Structural, functional, behavioral, and adaptive modifications of marine organisms will be examined. Three hours lecture; field trip(s) typically included.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 402 - Cell Biology

This course examines the physical properties, chemical structure, and metabolism of simple and specialized cells, as well as recent advances in the techniques of cell culture and investigation. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 403 - Principles of Ecology

This course addresses the basic concepts of ecology and a broad introduction to overall biosphere functioning. Major topics include energy flows; nutrient cycles; environmental conditions and their importance; plants and animals at the individual, population, and community level; and the overall functioning and development of the major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 404 - Field Ecology

This course involves field and laboratory projects/research at La Salle's Penllyn Biostation and other sites. Six hours laboratory and field work.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 403 or permission of instructor

BIO 405 - Histology

This course focuses on an examination of the minute and ultra structure of mammalian primary tissues together with their functional relationships in the formation of major organ systems; histological basis of function is stressed. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 406 - Developmental Biology

This course focuses on the molecular and genetic analysis of development and differentiation. Some descriptive morphogenesis is considered. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 412 - Biochemistry

The course demonstrates the principles of basic biochemistry while focusing on the interrelationships between those biochemical pathways that provide energy and those that provide the basic molecular species for synthesis. Topics include bioenergetics, low molecular weight biosynthesis, enzyme function and kinetics, and metabolic control. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 413 - Molecular Biology

This is a survey course that will examine the basic concepts of molecular biology. Topics include mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication, transcription, and translation, recombinant DNA technology, molecular aspects of gene interaction and recombination, cellular transformation, and the molecular biology of the nervous and immune systems. The laboratory focuses on utilizing the basic techniques currently employed in molecular biology (molecular cloning, ELISA, genetic recombination, gel electrophoresis, etc.) Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 412

BIO 420 - Genomics

The Genomics course will be a hybrid lecture and hands-on computer course. This course will focus on the topic of genome organization and the bioinformatic tools that are used to study genomes. We will investigate the genome structure of viral, microbial, and eukaryotic genomes and the different databases used to store and access this data. DNA sequence analysis using the BLAST algorithm and multiple sequence alignments will be studied. Identifying genes and genomic elements using different computational tools will be performed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 430 - The Biology of Cancer

The cellular and molecular mechanisms driving cancer's hallmark phenotypes will be explored. These include proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, reprogramming of energy metabolism and evading immune destruction. Within these conceptual frameworks, primary scientific literature will be examined and clinical implications of the research evaluated. Students will choose a specific area of interest, allowing them to develop an in-depth understanding of the current "state-of-the-art" in a field of research. Students will gain an informed understanding of the inherent challenges cancer presents and assess the prospects of treating and ultimately curing the disease.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 460 - Cooperative Education/Internship

This is normally a full-time, paid employment at a cooperating institution/company to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions may qualify). It involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. Position must be approved by Department Chair. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 470 - Special Topics in Biology

Periodically, a course will be offered that deals in detail with a topic of interest in current biological research. Students may be asked to write library research paper(s) and present a seminar.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 480-481 - Biological Research

This research is for election by qualified students contemplating advanced studies. It is intended to provide actual research experience under staff supervision. Students are required to present a seminar on their work and to prepare a poster. Hours to be arranged.

Number of Credits: 3 each

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

ENV 152 - Oceanography

This course provides a study of the physical processes that affect the oceans of the earth. Emphasis will be on tides, currents, waves, chemistry of the sea, and geology of ocean basins. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 153 - Introduction to Environmental Science

This course is an introduction to the field of environmental science, including the historical development of the subject, the current state of knowledge, and the development of humans and the impact they have had on our environment. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory a week. The course includes mandatory field trips.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 155 - Earth Science

This course covers various topics pertaining to the earth and its place inthe universe. Major aspects of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy are studied. Emphasis is placed on the interactions of earth systems, and the evolution of our plane

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information. Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data. Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology. This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

GEO 202 - Mineralogy

Hand specimen identification of minerals is emphasized in this course. Study of the growth, internal structure, and physical properties of minerals is addressed. Six hours of lecture and laboratory are required.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

GEO 305 - Environmental Geochemistry

This course provides a practical background in basic geochemical principles that can be applied to environmental problems, such as global warming, acid rain, smog, acid mine drainage, nuclear waste disposal, and water pollution. Three-hour lecture/three-hour laboratory is required.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, CHM 112, ENV 153

Environmental Science

Program Description

The Environmental Science Program offers a specialized, integrated approach to global issues surronding sustainability, the use of natureal resources, how human activity impacts ecosystems, how such activity can cause degradation, and what can be done to mitigate this impact.

Why take this major?

Our program is designed to place graduates into positions in industry, energy and environmental, governmental and private, as well as in graduate programs (science or policy/management), and service institutions and agencies (Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, etc). Students (have been) and will be qualified to work in fields such as oil, gas and coal, alternative energy, environmental management, resource management, land-use planning, environmental policy, and environmental law (upon completion of law school). The Environmental Science program can also serve as a pre-teaching opportunity that prepares students for certification in education. We also understand the need to enhance critical thinking skills and have designed the environmental science curricula to meet this challenge by requiring an eclectic array of courses from many non-science related departments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Florence Ling

Assistant Professor

Holroyd Hall 043

ling@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1848

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 18

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 62

Total: 120 minimum

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

ENV 153 - Introduction to Enviromental Science

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 152 - Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 18 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics
BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution and Ecology
BIO 320 - Biostatistics

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for Life Science

ENV 202 -Earth Materials
ENV 305 -Environmental Chemistry

ENV 310 -Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
ENV 401 -Fundamentals of Soil Science
ENV 402 - Environmental Air Quality

ENV 450 - Capstone
POL 316 - Environmental Law and Policy

Required Electives

Choose three courses from the following:

BIO 303 -Microbiology

BIO 319 - Plant Kingdom

BIO 400 -Marine Biology

BIO 403 - Principles of Ecology

BIO 404 - Field Ecology

ENV 306 - Hydrology

ENV 460 - Cooperative Education/Internship

ENV 480 - Research

CHM 311 - Instrumental Analysis

PHY 105 - Physics I

PHY 106 - Physics II

ECN 351 - Environmental Economics

ISBT 321 - Fundamentals of Energy and Natural Resources

ISBT 322 - Role of Energy and Natural Resources in Modern Society

ISBT 421 - Nature Resource Management

ISBT 422 - Sustainable Energy Development

ISBT 431 - Regulatory Affairs

PHL 306 - Environmental Philosophy

PHLT 314 - Unhealthy Urban Environments:  Healthy Solutions

 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

To be determined by Program Director and Chair of other major department.

Minor Requirements

ENV 153

Plus five courses chosen in consultation with Program Director

Recommended Course Sequence

Year

Fall

Spring

 

Freshman

ENV 153

ENV 202

CHM 111

CHM 112

   
   
   

 

Sophomore

BIO 210

BIO 230

MTH 120

BIO 320

CHM 262

 
   
   

 

Junior

ENV 305

ENV 310

POL 316

ENV 401

 

ENV 401

   
   

 

Senior

ENV 450

ENV elective

ENV elective

ENV elective

 

 

Course Descriptions

ENV 153 - Introduction to Environmental Science

This course is an introduction to the field of environmental science, including the historical development of the subject, the current state of knowledge, and the development of humans and the impact they have had on our environment. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory a week. The course includes mandatory field trips.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 202 - Earth Materials

This course is an introduction to the materials that make up the earth and their composition, structure, classification and formation. Students will study earth resources and the environmental impact of resource usage. Topics include mineralogy, petrology (the study of rocks), energy, metals, fertilizers, construction/building materials, water and soil. Three hours lecture and three hours lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 305 - Environmental Chemisty

This course focuses on geochemical processes that occur at or near the surface of the earth which are of particular importance to environmental quality and therefore to humans and ecological systems.  Students will explore the foundational concepts required to understand water and soil chemistry,  Other topics include the study and use of analytical tools used to determine contamination in sediments, soils and water and the remediation techniques available to cleanup such pollution. Three hours of lecture and three lab hours. 

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, CHM 112, ENV 153

ENV 306 - Hydrology

Hydrology deals with the physical principles governing the flow of groundwater and surface water.  Emphasis will be on well hydraulics and flow system analysis.  Topics include water budgets, floods and flood frequency analysis, groundwater supply, steady state and non-steady state flow, hydro-geologic regimes, and introductory groundwater chemistry.  Three hours of lecture per week.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information. Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data. Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology. This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology.  As part of the toolkit for many fields, ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information to a broader audience.  Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data.  Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology.  This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.  Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 6.1 - Technological Competency

ENV 401 - Fundamentals of Soil Science

An overview of soil science, covering the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils.  Students will gain an understanding of soil formation, the classification of soils, and the chemical/biological reactions that occur in soils.  In the laboratory, students will learn methods of soil analysis, including chemical and mineralogical analyses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, ENV 153, MTH 113 or MTH 120

ENV 402 - Environmental Air Quality

This course introduces the causes and effects of air pollutants on humans.  The source of pollutants, their physical and chemical behavior in the atmosphere, and strategies to mitigate air pollution will be discussed.  Students will also be introduced to systems modeling to understand the flow of sources and sinks of atmospheric pollutants. Three hours of lecture per week.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, ENV 153, MTH 113 or MTH 120 or permission of instructor

ENV 450 - Capstone

To be determined.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior Level Status

ENV 460 - Cooperative Education/Internship

This is normally a full-time, paid employment at a cooperating institution/company to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions may qualify).  It involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision.  Position must be approved by the Program Director.  Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in the La Salle University Career Center before registering for the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 480 - Research

This research is for election by qualified students contemplating advanced studies. It is intended to provide actual research experience under staff supervision.  Students are required to present a seminar on their work and to prepare a poster.  Permission of the Program Director is required.  Hours to be arranged.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Junior or Senior Level Status

NOTE: - Requires courses from other disciplines.

A list of all courses may be found online at Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Mission Statement

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry embraces and supports the overall mission of La Salle University. We strive to create and maintain a nurturing, supportive environment for both students and faculty as we advance our understanding of chemistry and its application to the world around us. Our goal is to establish a community of curious and knowledgeable active learners. Implicit in the mission is a profound respect for the individual learner and an emphasis on the ethical responsibility of scientific inquiry towards the broader local, national and global communities.

Major(s) Offered

Chemistry

Biochemistry

Minor(s) Offered

Chemistry

Location/Contact Information

William Price, Chair

Holroyd Hall 345

price@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1261

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Cichowicz, Price

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Prushan

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Femia, Kramer

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Lammers

INSTRUCTORS: Grande

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Straub

Biochemistry

Program Description

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry embraces and supports the overall mission of La Salle University. We strive to create and maintain a nurturing, supportive environment for both students and faculty as we advance our understanding of biochemistry and its application to the world around us. Our goal is to establish a community of curious and knowledgeable active learners. Implicit in the mission is a profound respect for the individual learner and an emphasis on the ethical responsibility of scientific inquiry towards the broader local, national and global communities.

Why take this major?

Our graduates have attended some of the best graduate schools in the country including Princeton, Harvard, Berkeley, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, and Caltech. Many of our students have become physicians, laywers, or teachers, while other graduates have obtained lucrative employment in the biochemical industry.

No matter what their chosen career path, our graduates excel because our department trains them in the critical thinking and problem solving. As a liberal arts university, La Salle has a curriculum that offers a solid background in the fundamentals of chemical and biochemical sciences coupled with a broad-based education. Students are made aware of the interconnections of biochemistry with the other sciences and also with the social sciences, business, and the humanities. With such an education, our graduates leave La Salle as dynamic, adaptable, and prepared individuals ready for almost anything they will face in the future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

William Price

Chair

Holroyd Hall 345

price@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1261

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 19 Courses: 9-11 Chemistry, 3-5 Biology, 2 Math, 2 Physics, 1 Computer Science

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 73

Total: minimum of 130

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHM 111 General Chemistry I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 152 Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 19 Courses: 9-11 Chemistry, 3-5 Biology, 2 Math, 2 Physics, 1 Computer Science courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics
BIO 402 - Cell Biology
BIO 413 - Molecular Biology
CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry I
CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry II
CHM 212 - Quantitative Analysis
CHM 331 - Thermodynamics & Kinetics
CHM 411 - Biochemistry I
CHM 412 - Biochemistry II
CHM 499 - Capstone
CSC 152 - Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications
MTH 120 - Calculus I
MTH 121 - Calculus II
PHY 105 - General Physics I
PHY 106 - General Physics II

 

Two Elective courses from the list below:
   For students double majoring in Biology and Biochemistry, the two electives must be Chemistry courses.
   For students double majoring in Chemistry and Biochemistry, the two electives must be Biology courses.

 

BIO 306 - Neurobiology
BIO 310 - Genetics
BIO 430 - Biology of Cancer
CHM 311 - Instrumental Chemistry
CHM 320 - Organic Laboratory Methods
CHM 332 - Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
CHM 403 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

CSC 152 - Introduction to Computing; Mathematics/Science Applications

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Biology majors wishing to double major with Biochemistry need to take two Chemistry courses as their electives.

Chemistry majors wishing to double major with Biochemistry need to take two Biology courses as their electives.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year:

   Fall:  CHM 111, MTH 120

   Spring:   CHM 112, MTH 221, CSC 152

Sophomore Year:

  Fall:   CHM 201, PHY 105

  Spring:   CHM 202, PHY 106, BIO 210

Junior Year:

  Fall:   BIO 402, Elective

  Spring:   CHM 212, CHM 331, BIO 413

Senior Year:

  Fall:   CHM 411, Elective

  Spring:   CHM 412, CHM 499

Course Descriptions

All course descriptions may be found in the main menu under Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z

Chemistry

Program Description

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry embraces and supports the overall mission of La Salle University. We strive to create and maintain a nurturing, supportive environment for both students and faculty as we advance our understanding of chemistry and its application to the world around us. Our goal is to establish a community of curious and knowledgeable active learners. Implicit in the mission is a profound respect for the individual learner and an emphasis on the ethical responsibility of scientific inquiry towards the broader local, national and global communities.

Why take this major?

Our graduates have attended some of the best graduate schools in the country including Princeton, Harvard, Berkeley, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, and Caltech. Many of our students have become physicians, laywers, or teachers, while other graduates have obtained lucrative employment in the chemical industry.

No matter what their chosen career path, our graduates excel because our department trains them in the critical thinking and problem solving. As a liberal arts university, La Salle has a curriculum that offers a solid background in the fundamentals of chemical science coupled with a broad-based education. Students are made aware of the interconnections of chemistry with the other sciences and also with the social sciences, business, and the humanities. With such an education, our graduates leave La Salle as dynamic, adaptable, and prepared individuals ready for almost anything they will face in the future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

William Price

Chair

Holroyd Hall 345

price@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1261

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 17 Courses: 12 Chemistry, 2 Math, 2 Physics, 1 Computer Science

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 67

Total: minimum 130

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHM 111 General Chemistry I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 152 Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 17 Courses: 12 Chemistry, 2 Math, 2 Physics, 1 Computer Science courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

CHM 111 General Chemistry I
CHM 112 General Chemistry II
CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I
CHM 202 Organic Chemistry II
CHM 212 Quantitative Analysis
CHM 311 Instrumental Analysis
CHM 320 Advanced Organic Laboratory Methods
CHM 332 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
CHM 331 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
CHM 403 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
CHM 411 Biochemistry I
CHM 480 Chemical Research
MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
MTH 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
CSC 152 Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications
PHY 105 Physics I
PHY 106 Physics II

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Chemistry majors wishing to double major in Biochemistry need to take CHM 412 in addition to their Chemistry major requirements.

Minor Requirements

CHM 111, 112, 201, 202, and any two of the following: 212, 311, 320 or 332

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Spring

Freshman Year:

CHM 111

CHM 112

MTH 120

MTH 221

Sophomore Year

CHM 201

CHM 202

PHY 105

PHY 106

CHM 212

Junior Year

CHM 311

CHM 331

CHM 332

CHM 320

Senior Year

CHM 403

CHM 411

 

Course Descriptions

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I

General Chemistry I provides a firm basis for understanding the fundamentals of chemistry. This course covers atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and the periodic table. The descriptive chemistry is principally concerned with the reactions of nonmetals and of ions in solution. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 101 (C+ or better) or equivalent

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

CHM 112 - General Chemistry II

General Chemistry II builds on the concepts of General Chemistry I and focuses on gasses, properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry. The laboratory experiments reinforce the concepts covered in lecture. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111 (C- or better)

CHM 150 - Consumer Chemistry

Consumer Chemistry is a non-mathematical examination of the development of fact and theory in chemistry and the utilization of chemistry by society. Topics may include energy, pharmaceuticals, environmental effects, food additives, or synthetic materials. No prior knowledge of chemistry required. The course consists of three hours of lecture/laboratory sessions.

Number of Credits: 3

CHM 152 - Criminalistics for Non-Physical Science Majors

This course is for non-science majors who are interested in learning more about how evidence from a crime scene is collected, analyzed, and evaluated. Of necessity, the course will be numerical in nature, but not math-intensive. As a multidisciplinary area of study, the course will use concepts from chemistry, biology, biochemistry, physics, toxicology, statistics, and other fields and will employ hands-on learning activities and laboratories, group work, and the traditional lecture format to convey the course material. The course consists of four hours of lecture/laboratory sessions.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

CHM 161 - Chemistry of The Life Sciences

Chemistry for the Life Sciences is a course for students typically majoring in nursing or nutrition. The course gives a general knowledge of chemistry (mostly inorganic) with an emphasis on health-related topics and problem-solving strategies. Descriptive and quantitative principles are discussed. This course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: High School Algebra

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry I

Organic Chemistry is the study of compounds containing carbon. This course is focused on the structure, bonding, and stereochemistry of these compounds together with an introduction to reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis. This course, as well as CHM 202, is intended for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry, and biology as well as those pursuing a career in the health professions. The laboratory introduces techniques used in organic synthesis, separation, purification, and structure elucidation. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112 (C- or better)

CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry II

The second semester of Organic Chemistry builds on the foundation established in CHM 201. The functional group and mechanistic approach to organic reactions allows for a more in-depth approach to organic synthesis. The use of basic spectral methods as a means of structure elucidation is also covered in this course. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 201 (C- or better)

CHM 212 - Quantitative Analysis

This course covers important areas of analytical chemistry, including statistics, error analysis, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and colorimetry. This course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112 (C- or better)

CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for The Life Sciences

CHM 262 is a one-semester course in organic chemistry designed to be particularly applicable to students majoring in nutrition and other health sciences. The subject matter includes organic chemistry principles: the naming of compounds, identification of functional groups, and chemical reactions. A particular emphasis is made in the coverage of reactions that are common to both organic and biochemistry. An effort will be made to make the examples and problems as health-related as possible. This course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 161 (C- or better)

CHM 263 - Biochemistry for the Life Sciences

CHM 263 is a one-semester course in biochemistry designed to be particularly applicable to students majoring in nutrition. The subject matter includes biochemical principles (identification and properties of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, metabolic pathways, etc.). An effort will be made to make the examples and problems as health-related as possible. This course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 262 (C- or better)

CHM 265 - Criminalistics for Physical Science Majors

Criminalistics for Physical Science Majors is a course for physical science majors who are interested in learning more about how evidence from a crime scene is collected, analyzed, and evaluated. The course employs hands-on learning activities, group work, and the traditional lecture format to convey the course material. Forensic science is a multidisciplinary field, and, as such, the course touches on areas of chemistry, biology, biochemistry, physics, toxicology, statistics, and other fields. The course consists of four hours of lecture/laboratory sessions.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 201 (C- or better)

CHM 311 - Instrumental Analysis

CHM 311 covers the theory and practice of physical measurments with modern chemical instrumentation. The course is divided into two parts: spectroscopic and separation methods. Topics include UV-visible, FT-IR, fluorescence, and magnetic resonance spectroscopies as well as mass spectrometry, gas and liquid chromatographies. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112 (C- or better) or permission from instructor

CHM 320 - Organic Laboratory Methods

This is a course in modern methods of organic synthesis and structure elucidation. This laboratory-intensive course emphasizes asymmetric synthesis, green chemistry, advanced spectral methods, and literature searching. The course consists of 75 minutes of lecture and six hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 202 (C- or better)

CHM 331 - Thermodynamics and Kinetics

This course applies the principles of thermodynamics and kinetics to explain the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. Topics include the elucidation of chemical equilibria, phase transitions, reaction mechanisms, and statistical ensembles of energy states. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 202, MTH 221, PHY 106 (C- or better in all)

CHM 332 - Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy

This course uses the formalism of quantum mechanics to understand fundamental chemical systems. It explores atomic and molecular structures, molecular vibrations, and molecular rotations. It also explores the use of spectroscopy to probe these chemical processes. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 112, MTH 221, PHY 106 (C- or better in all)

CHM 350, 450 - Cooperative Education

This course normally involves full-time, paid employment in a cooperating firm to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). The experience involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Department Chair. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information.

Number of Credits: 3

CHM 403 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This course covers theoretical and practical aspects of chemical bonding, descriptive periodic trends, and molecular structure and symmetry of molecules. A special emphasis is given to the chemistry of the transition metals, including coordination and organometallic chemistry. This course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 331, 332 (C- or better in both)

CHM 411 - Biochemistry I

Biochemistry I examines the biochemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, enzymes, and hormones from a chemist's perspective and emphasizes their role in metabolic processes. Laboratory work illustrates common techniques used to isolate, identify, and assay these molecules, such as chromatography, electrophoresis, and kinetic analysis. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 202, CHM 331 or permission from the instructor

CHM 412 - Biochemistry II

Biochemistry II focuses on the storage, replication, transmission, and expression of genetic information. It also examines recombinant DNA methodology and physiological processes at the molecular level. Laboratory work includes the isolation and analysis of plasmid DNA, creation of a new plasmid, and transformation into bacterial cells. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 411

CHM 470 - Special Topics

Occasionally, courses in "Bioinorganic Chemistry," "Advanced Organic and Organometallic Chemistry," or "Polymer Chemistry" may be offered as Special Topics. These courses are designed for juniors and seniors majoring in chemistry and/or biochemistry.

Number of Credits: 3

CHM 480-481 - Chemical Research

These courses provide students with the opportunity to engage in individual chemical or biochemical research. The research can be either laboratory-based or theoretical in nature. The work is done under the supervision of a staff member. The courses are restricted to chemistry and biochemistry majors unless otherwise approved by the chair of the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. The specific hours for the course are arranged with the supervising staff member with a minimum of six research hours per week.

Number of Credits: 4 credits each

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Department of Communication

Mission Statement

Guided by Lasallian values, the Communication Department integrates liberal arts education with theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the communication field, and challenges students to demonstrate communication competence.

The Department seeks to develop graduates who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings. Beyond assisting students with finding meaningful careers, we seek to provide students with the communication knowledge and skills needed for meaningful personal, professional and social relationships.

Department Goals

Major(s) Offered

Communication
Communication 5-year (B.A./M.A.)

Minor(s) Offered

A minor in Communication is perfect for students from a wide variety of majors. From improving desirable workplace qualities to gaining skills in media and public relations, our minors offer students a variety of options.

The Department offers minors in the following areas:

Concentrations

Interpersonal Communication

Media and Journalism

Public Relations

Location/Contact Information

Communication Center, South Campus

(215) 951-1844

Staff Contact Information

Michael Smith, Chair

msmith@lasalle.edu 

Elaine Zelley, Assistant Chair 

zelley@lasalle.edu 

Jamila Wilson, Administrative Assistant 

wilsonjo@lasalle.edu 

 

Main Office number: (215) 951-1844

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Dainton, Lannutti, Molyneaux

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Dunleavy, Smith, Texter, Zelley

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Celano, Daily, Lashley

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bradford, Muse

Communication

Program Description

The Communication major blends theory with practice, built on a liberal arts education and supplemented with experiential learning opportunities within and outside the classroom. This approach is captured in our program motto: Think. Do.

Communication majors start with a grounding in classes that provide a strong theoretical foundation for understanding a field that traces its roots to Aristotle but is as contemporary as today's Tweet. Students then can pursue tracks in three concentrations:

These concentrations provide the communication knowledge and skills needed for meaningful personal, professional and social relationships.

Students may earn credit for Internships, including unique 1-credit internships that allow first and second year students to earn credit while taking advantage of the opportunities that studying in the nation's 5th largest media market provide.

The major seeks to develop graduates who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings. This goal reflects the Lasallian tradition of providing a practical education in the service of the greater good.

Why take this major?

Think. Do.

In our classes and on-campus experiences, we'll teach you how to think. You'll learn the theory that will help you make good decisions about how to best tell stories, position an organization, improve relationships. You'll be able to judge what works and what doesn't, and then prove it through research.

Our faculty work side by side with students to discuss tough issues, problem-solve, and develop communication strategies and tactics.

From your first few weeks on campus, you can get involved with our student organizations to gain valuable experience. Several of our classes use experiential and service-learning activities to help you gain real-life experience in a classroom setting.

This combination of thinking and doing prepares you to tackle internships in the nation's fifth largest media market (and beyond), which means incredible opportunities to apply what you learn. Our students have interned with the Philadelphia Eagles, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and NBC10, while some internships have taken our thinkers and doers to the White House, the Super Bowl, The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, and ESPN. And that's just the short list.

We have 40 years worth of alumni ready to provide mentoring, internship opportunities, and a gateway to the careers you might seek.

Even if you're not interested in a career in communication, the major and minors allow you to develop some of job skills most highly desired by employers--writing and speaking, teamwork, problem solving, interpersonal effectivness, and persuasion. The CEO of LinkedIn recently said that interpersonal communication skills represent the biggest "skills gap" in American business today.  

As a La Salle Communication graduate, you'll have the knowledge and the practical experience to launch your career.

Student Learning Outcomes

Aligned with learning outcomes from the National Communication Association (NCA), Communication majors, regardless of track or concentration, will be able to:

Program Contact Information

Michael Smith
Chair and Associate Professor 
Communication Center, Room 219
msmith@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1844

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 15

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 45

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 15 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Com 101 Intro Mass Media
Com 102 Interpersonal Com
Com 150 Presentation Skills (meets ILO1-8.1a/12.1)
Com 205 Com Theory & Research
Com 312 Persuasion

Concentrations

WE HAVE THREE CONCENTRATIONS

*Concentration: Interpersonal Communication
Com 215 - Group and Team Com (F)
Com 220 - Com and Culture (S) (meets ILO1-11.1)
Com 315 - Adv. Interpersonal (S)
Com 316 - Com Research and Analysis
Com 317 - Organizational Com
Choose (1)  from:  Com 203 - Media Writing (S); or Com 206 - News Writing; or Com 357 - PR Writing
Choose (1) from: Com 267 - Conflict; Com 325 - Nonverbal Com; Com 345 - Sex, Gender, and Communication; Com - 365 Communication in Relationships
Com 415 - Capstone in Applied Interpersonal Communication (F)
Two COM electives outside of concentration

*Concentration: Public Relations
Com 206- News Writing & Reporting
Com 207 - Principles of PR
Com 316 - Com Research and Analysis
Com 317 - Organizational Com
Com 357 - PR Writing
Com 338 - Social Media (F)
Com 387 - PR Cases and Campaigns
Com 407 - Public Relations Management
Two COM electives outside of concentration

*Concentration: Media and Journalism
Com 204 - Media Criticism (F)
Com 208 - Intro to Digital Video
Com 301 - Media Industries
Com 358 - Adv. Media Production
Com 308 - Com Law and Ethics
Choose (1) from: Com 203 - Media Writing (S); OR Com 206 - News Writing
Choose (1) from: Com 306 - Feature Writing (F); OR Com 368 - Video Editing (S)
Com 408 - Media andJournalism Practicum
Two COM electives outside of concentration

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Dual majors must complete the Communication Major core requirements plus the requirements for at least one concentration and two Communication elective courses. Depending on the second major, adjustments to the required number of electives may be permitted.   The plan of study is developed in consultation with the department Chair.

Minor Requirements

Please see the Communication Department Chair to declare a Minor.

Interpersonal Skills Minor

COM 150 - Presentation Skills
COM 102 - Interpersonal Communication
COM 215 - Group and Team Communication
COM 220 - Intercultural Communication
COM 312 - Persuasion, Power and Influence
COM 317 - Organizational Communication

Media Studies Minor

COM 101 - Mass Media and Society
COM 204 - Media Criticism
COM 205 - Com Theory and Research
COM 300 - Communication Ethics
COM 301 - Media Industries
COM 308 - Communication Law and Ethics

Media Skills Minor

COM 101 - Mass Media and Society
COM 150 - Presentation Skills
COM 208 - Introduction to Digital Video
COM 338 - Social Media
COM 358 - Advanced Media Production
Choose (1) from: COM 206 - News Writing and Reporting or COM 203 - Media Writing

Public Relations

COM 101 - Mass Media and Society
COM 150 - Presentation Skills
COM 207 - Principles of Public Relations
COM 312 - Persuasion, Power and Influence
COM 357 - Public Relations Writing
COM 387 - PR Cases and Campaigns

General Communication Minor

COM 150 - Presentation Skills
Choose (1) from:  COM 101 - Mass Media and Society or COM 102 - Interpersonal Communication
One or two 200-level courses
Two or three 300-level courses

Students in the General Communication Minor may enroll in a 400-level course, assuming they have completed the pre-requisites, with permission of the Department Chair.

Recommended Course Sequence

The chart below illustrates the recommended sequence of courses for Communication majors. Transfer students should also follow this sequence, although their sequence depend on whether the student has transferred in any Communication courses.

  Communication Core Interpersonal Communication Media and 
Journalism
Public Relations
First Year Students

COM 101
COM 102
COM 150

     
Sophomores COM 205
COM 312

COM 215 (F)
COM 220 (S)
COM 203(S)/206/357

COM 203(S)/206
COM 204(F)
COM 208

COM 206
COM 207
COM 317
Juniors   COM 315(S)
COM 316
COM 317
COM 301
COM 358
COM 306(F)/COM 356 (S)
COM 316
COM 357
COM 387
Seniors   COM 415 COM 408 COM 407
Anytime  

COM 267/325/3345/365
COM elective 1
COM elective 2

COM 308
COM elective 1
COM elective 2
COM 338(F)
COM elective 1
COM elective 2

F=Fall Semester, S=Spring Semester

 

Course Descriptions

COM 101 - Mass Media and Society

This course is an introduction to the mass media and their impact on society. Students will investigate the historical, technological, and social developments of a variety of media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, film, and emerging technologies. Students will be asked to consider evidence, assumptions, and assertions about the effects of media in order to draw conclusions about the responsibility of media professionals and the public when creating, sharing, and consuming content. The course will also examine legal and ethical issues of the media and how politics and economics affect the form, function, and content of media.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

COM 102 - Interpersonal Communication

This course examines the factors that influence interpersonal communication, effective and ineffective interpersonal communication practices, and the effects of interpersonal communication on our personal and professional lives. Specific topics include how culture influences communication, conflict management, the power of language, and the influence of communication on relationship development, maintenance, and deterioration.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 150 - Presentation Skills

The presentation skills course teaches students how to research, structure, and deliver effective oral presentations. It requires active student participation in order to build both skills and confidence. Among the topics covered in the course are: analyzing the audience; identifying, selecting, and critically evaluating content; organizing content in a logical manner; matching presentation content to presentation goals; using visual aids effectively; dealing with speaking anxiety; and effective, respectful collaboration in preparing presentations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 8.1.a - Oral Communication/ILO 12.1 - Collaborative Engagement

COM 203 - Media Writing

In this course, students will learn a variety of creative writing techniques for visual media projects. Students will work with various written formats including creative concepts, dual column and master scene scripts, treatments, and storyboards. Students will work within an interactive writers' room to craft effective advertisements/public service announcements, documentary concepts, original film and television scripts, and projects for emerging and interactive media forms. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 204 - Media Criticism

In this gateway course to the Media & Journalism track, students will learn the language of mediated storytelling by describing and analyzing the ways in which stories are creatively and artistically crafted for various formats and purposes, including television, film, online video, documentary, and news. Students will be exposed to various types of contemporary visual media, and discuss the ways in which production techniques play a role in creative expression and telling effective stories.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

COM 205 - Communication Theory and Research

This course introduces students to significant theories of communication, including interpersonal communication, mass media, and persuasion theories. Students will be introduced to the humanistic, social scientific, and critical traditions. A focus of the course is on practical application of theory to real world problems and situations. The course is geared toward sophomore or early junior-year students.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101 and COM 102

COM 206 - News Writing and Reporting

This course teaches students how to report and write news stories that are accurate, fair and complete. Students will learn the basic elements of reporting—how to observe events, how to interview people, and how to use other research tools. Students will also learn how to write and structure news stories for different media platforms including print, broadcast and online. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 207 - Principles of Public Relations

Public relations has been called "the unseen power" that influences culture, business, politics, and society. This class introduces students to the wide-ranging field of public relations, the role it plays in managing organizational relationships of all kinds, and the skills required to succeed in one of the fastest-growing communication professions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 208 - Introduction to Digital Video

This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices of audio and video production. Students will learn how the preproduction, production, and postproduction stages apply to media. Emphasis is on storytelling, the importance of audience research and planning, scheduling, and selecting and employing proper resources. Students will experience the process using fundamental production techniques of audio and video through hands-on projects.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 215 - Group and Team Communication

Successfully working within a group or team setting is important for our academic, professional, and personal lives. This course blends the theory and practice of successful group communication. Through experiential activities, students will learn about group roles, collaboration, and effective and ineffective decision-making and problem solving.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 220 - Intercultural Communication

Communication between members of different cultural groups is complex and challenging, and can lead to misunderstanding and a lack of trust. This course focuses on uncovering historical patterns that influence values, beliefs, and behaviors within cultural groups, and how these issues influence communication practices. A particular focus is on increasing knowledge and skills to improve communication between races and other ethnic and cultural groups.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

COM 267 - Communication and Conflict Management

Communication can be the source of conflict, can reflect conflict, or can be a tool to resolve conflict. This course focuses on productive and unproductive conflict management processes, with a particular focus on the techniques associated with negotiation and dispute resolution.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 300 - Communication Ethics

This course provides students with an overview of ethical standards relevant to social behavior and an in-depth study of contemporary ethical issues facing communicators. Students will apply ethical perspectives such as virtue, universalism, utilitarianism, egalitarianism, dialogic ethics, postmodernism, and the feminist ethic of care to contemporary ethical issues in interpersonal, organizational, public, and mass mediated communication contexts. Concepts of truth, confidentiality, conflict of interest, social justice, and other issues will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

COM 301 - Media Industries

This course explores how the media industries of television, radio, and the web have grown and changed through exploration of the economics, regulation, and effects of current entertainment and news media. Students will analyze how media companies make decisions based on research, discuss up to the minute news related to the business practices of media conglomerates, and learn the impact of media business decisions on society and culture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101

COM 306 - News Writing and Reporting

In this course, students will learn how to report and write feature stories making use of storytelling techniques such as scene-setting, descriptive language, the narrative arc, character development, use of dialogue, explication, and literary devices such as metaphors, flashbacks, foreshadowing and parallel construction. The techniques learned in this class will be applicable to print, broadcast and online presentation.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 206

COM 308 - Communication Law and Ethics

The course is designed to review the history, development, and interpretation of the First Amendment in the U.S. by our court system and its impact upon journalists, professional communicators, and citizens, along with the ethical principles that underpin effective communication practices. Topics include privacy, defamation, press freedom, media regulations, and the law of emerging technologies. Students will learn to apply statutes, case law, and ethical theories to First Amendment issues and disputes. This course also meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding and reasoning within the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 310 - Communication Portfolio

The portfolio assists students with synthesizing and applying what they have learned in Communication courses to the task of bridging from undergraduate studies to post-graduation. Students will build a portfolio that can be used to demonstrate knowledge and skills.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

COM 312 - Persuasion, Power, and Influence

This course emphasizes theory-based analysis of persuasive messages across a variety of contexts and situations, ranging from interpersonal settings to mass mediated-campaigns. Students will also be taught techniques of presenting and selecting evidence with the goal of enhancing the student's abilities to strategically analyze and create persuasive messages. Students will be asked to consider assumptions and draw conclusions about the persuasive efficacy of messages by applying concepts from theory and research. This course also meets ILO 4.2 (critical analysis and reasoning in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 315 - Advanced Interpersonal Communication

Through reading and reflection, students will assess their own interpersonal communication skills. Students will also explore interpersonal programs of research, such as: forgiveness, jealousy, distance relationships, and bullying.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 316 - Communication Research and Analysis

This course introduces students to the strategic process of collecting and analyzing information in professional settings. The practical focus of course assignments will be on using research to solve problems. Students will be introduced to situation analysis, designing and implementing surveys, interviewing, focus groups, and content analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 317 - Organizational Communication

This course surveys classic concepts and theories associated with organizational communication such as leadership, organizational culture, and the role of organizations in society. Contemporary issues such as globalization, technology, and ethical decision making in organizations are also featured, as well as a focus on the practical skills necessary for successful organizational encounters and socialization. This course meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding & reasoning within the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 319 - Advanced Personal and Professional Presentations

This advanced course is designed to maximize professional success through an in-depth focus on achieving presentation goals. Students will learn how to effectively present themselves as skilled content experts in professional settings.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 150

COM 325 - Nonverbal Communication

Nonverbal communication refers to the many ways that we send messages without relying on words. This course focuses on specific nonverbal structures (e.g., touch, gesture, facial expression, appearance), the functions of nonverbal communication (e.g., impression formation, deception, etc.), and cultural variations in nonverbal communication rules and interpretations.

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 337 - Advertising Copywriting

This course provides experience with writing for advertising. Students will explore the theoretical and research basis for communication and will examine the role of both strategy and creativity in the development and implementation of communication campaigns. Students will write for print, broadcast, and other media.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 338 - Social Media

This course addresses the many positive and negative implications associated with society's reliance on social media platforms. Using a perspective rooted in digital literacy, the course examines how social media is used in both personal and professional contexts, and how me might use social media to communicate competently, ethically, and strategically.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 345 - Communication and Sex, Gender, And Sexuality

This course focuses on the influence of sex, gender, and sexuality on communication in a variety of contexts. The course will review the recent theories and research literature on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality. The course will present information on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality as it relates to individual identity development, personal relationships, and social relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 350/450 - Cooperative Education

This experience is normally a full-time, paid employment in a cooperating firm to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors. Position must be approved by Department Chair.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Restrictions: Junior or Senior status, 2.75 GPA, approval of Department Chair

COM 357 - Public Relations Writing

Writing is one of the top-rated skills for public relations professionals. This writing intensive course introduces students to the principles of planning and pre-writing as the basis for successful writing efforts. Students will learn how to produce a variety of pieces for print and electronic media, including press releases, backgrounders, brochures, newsletter articles, and public service announcements, as well as other tools designed to engage an organization's key stakeholders. This course meets ILO 8b.2 (effective writing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 358 - Advanced Media Production

In this course students learn to apply more advanced audio and video production techniques. Students will develop and strengthen their production skills through hands-on projects both in the field, and utilizing the tools of the television studio, for both news and creative productions that can be distributed across various media platforms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 208

COM 365 - Communication in Relationships

This course focuses on contemporary research and theories associated with communication in close relationships. We will address cultural norms regarding "good" communication and "good" relationships, as well as what research suggests are the realities associated with communication and relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 368 - Video Editing

Combining the study and critique of media examples with hands-on experience, this course examines the techniques, equipment, and theories involved in achieving structure in film and video through editing. Students will strengthen and expand their editing skills through class exercises and outside projects, while also studying past and present film and video productions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Com 208

COM 387 - Public Relations Cases and Campaigns

Public relations (PR) practitioners face a daunting range of choices when trying to manage key relationships. This course is designed to help students approach public relations strategically and to apply public relations techniques and theories to communication programs and campaigns. The course will also explore current trends in PR practice and how they influence planning.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 207

COM 407 - Public Relations Management

This capstone in Public Relations uses a combination of case studies and service-learning to provide students with an in-depth study of public relations theory and practice. In addition to exploring a particular practice area in greater depth, students work with community organizations on public relations projects to apply what they have learned. Students complete journal assignments throughout the semester that ask them to reflect on both their professional development and understanding of the needs addressed by the community partners with which they work. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior Standing

Prerequisites: COM 207, 357, 387

COM 408 - Media and Journalism Practicum

This capstone in Media and Journalism builds upon the skills students have developed throughout their coursework, including planning, writing, production, and editing. Students will synthesize various skills and work as a team to produce multimedia storytelling projects within the local community. Students will have the opportunity to create advanced-level work, cooperate as a team, and reflect on their role as media storytellers. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

 

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 306 or 358

COM 415 - Communication Management and Development

With an emphasis on developing communication competence, this capstone in Communication and Social Interaction challenges students to apply theoretical and practical understanding of interpersonal communication to professional situations. Students will use problem-based learning to address communication needs. As part of the course, students will reflect on their own communication patterns and will actively develop competencies to increase professional success. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 102, 205, 315

COM 461/462/463 - Internship

Students may intern in communication industries. Working approximately 15 hours a week under professional supervision, students learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of professional positions. The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors.

Number of Credits: 3 credits

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, 2.75 GPA, and recommendation of the Chair.

Communication B.A./M.A. (5-Year)

Program Description

The 5-year BA-MA program builds on our successful undergraduate major and our 20-plus years of graduate education to provide students with advanced training in professional and business communication, leading to the Master of Arts in Strategic Communication.

The Communication major blends theory with practice, built on a liberal arts education and supplemented with experiential learning opportunities within and outside the classroom. This approach is captured in our program motto: Think. Do.

The 5-year program allows students to dive deeper into communication issues, research, and contexts, and to apply that understanding to organizational contexts. An applied communication practicum is the capstone to the program, and students are also able to earn graduate credit for internships.

Regardless of which concentration students pursued at the Bachelor's level, they are able to count up to two undergraduate courses (6 credit hours) toward the Master's degree, thus enabling them to finish the MA with just one additional year of school.

Communication majors start with a grounding in classes that provide a strong theoretical foundation for understanding a field that traces its roots to Aristotle but is as contemporary as today's Tweet. Students then can pursue tracks in Communication and Social Interaction, Media and Journalism, and Public Relations. These concentrations provide the communication knowledge and skills needed for meaningful personal, professional and social relationships.

The major seeks to develop graduates who engage in informed civic participation and progressive leadership in professional and community settings. This goal reflects the Lasallian tradition of providing a practical education in the service of the greater good.

UG/Grad Dual Counted Courses

The following undergraduate classes may be double-counted toward the 5-year BA/MA program.

Undergraduate Course Graduate Equivalent
COM 300: Communication Ethics COM 601: Professional 
Communication Ethics
COM 308: Communication Law and Ethics COM 670: Communication Graduate 
Elective Course
COM 387: Public Relations Cases
and Campaigns
COM 619: Public Relations Campaigns
COM 407: Public Relations Management
Capstone
COM 613: Approaches to Public Relations
COM 408: Media & Journalism Practicum COM 640: Professional Media Development 
COM 415: Communication Management Capstone COM 672: Communication Graduate Elective Course

 

Why take this major?

In addition to the various reasons for pursuing a Communication major, the 5-year BA/MA in Strategic Communication offers the following advantages:

In addition to those career benefits, there are some advantages for staying in school for a fifth year:

Student Learning Outcomes

The Communication Department at La Salle University has aligned our measures of student learning with the NationalCommunication Association's (2015) learning outcomes in communication.

Students graduating with a degree in Communication should be able to:

Program Contact Information

Katie N. Dunleavy, Graduate Director

227A Communication Center

dunleavy@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-3520

Degree Earned

Students earn both a B.A. and, if they continue into the Strategic Communication graduate program, the M.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 15 for the B.A., 10 to 12 for the M.A., depending on the number of undergraduate COM classes double-counted.

Total: 38-40 for the B.A., 10-12 for the M.A.

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 45 credits for the B.A.; 30-36 credits for the M.A., depending on the number of undergraduate COM classes double-counted.

Total: 120 credits for the B.A.; 30-36 credits for the M.A., depending on the number of undergraduate COM classes double-counted.

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: A 3.0 minimum is required for admission to the MA program.

Cumulative: A 3.0 minimum is required for admission to the MA program.

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 for the B.A., 10-12 for the M.A. courses in total in order to graduate. 15 for the B.A., 10 to 12 for the M.A., depending on the number of undergraduate COM classes double-counted. courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

It is possible to complete a dual major while enrolled in the 5-year BA/MA program in Communicaiton. However, only Communication courses may double-count toward the MA prgoram.

Recommended Course Sequence

Students in the 5-year program would generally follow the recommended course sequence for the undergraduate Communication program. Most classes that would double count toward the MA degree would be taken during the senior year.

 

Course Descriptions

COM 101 - Mass Media and Society

This course is an introduction to the mass media and their impact on society. Students will investigate the historical, technological, and social developments of a variety of media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, film, and emerging technologies. Students will be asked to consider evidence, assumptions, and assertions about the effects of media in order to draw conclusions about the responsibility of media professionals and the public when creating, sharing, and consuming content. The course will also examine legal and ethical issues of the media and how politics and economics affect the form, function, and content of media.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

COM 102 - Interpersonal Communication

This course examines the factors that influence interpersonal communication, effective and ineffective interpersonal communication practices, and the effects of interpersonal communication on our personal and professional lives. Specific topics include how culture influences communication, conflict management, the power of language, and the influence of communication on relationship development, maintenance, and deterioration.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 150 - Presentation Skills

The presentation skills course teaches students how to research, structure, and deliver effective oral presentations. It requires active student participation in order to build both skills and confidence. Among the topics covered in the course are: analyzing the audience; identifying, selecting, and critically evaluating content; organizing content in a logical manner; matching presentation content to presentation goals; using visual aids effectively; dealing with speaking anxiety; and effective, respectful collaboration in preparing presentations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 8.1.a - Oral Communication/ILO 12.1 - Collaborative Engagement

COM 203 - Media Writing

In this course, students will learn a variety of creative writing techniques for visual media projects. Students will work with various written formats including creative concepts, dual column and master scene scripts, treatments, and storyboards. Students will work within an interactive writers' room to craft effective advertisements/public service announcements, documentary concepts, original film and television scripts, and projects for emerging and interactive media forms. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 204 - Media Criticism

In this gateway course to the Media & Journalism track, students will learn the language of mediated storytelling by describing and analyzing the ways in which stories are creatively and artistically crafted for various formats and purposes, including television, film, online video, documentary, and news. Students will be exposed to various types of contemporary visual media, and discuss the ways in which production techniques play a role in creative expression and telling effective stories.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

COM 205 - Communication Theory and Research

This course introduces students to significant theories of communication, including interpersonal communication, mass media, and persuasion theories. Students will be introduced to the humanistic, social scientific, and critical traditions. A focus of the course is on practical application of theory to real world problems and situations. The course is geared toward sophomore or early junior-year students.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101 and COM 102

COM 206 - News Writing and Reporting

This course teaches students how to report and write news stories that are accurate, fair and complete. Students will learn the basic elements of reporting—how to observe events, how to interview people, and how to use other research tools. Students will also learn how to write and structure news stories for different media platforms including print, broadcast and online. This course also meets ILO 8a.2 (effective written communication within the major).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 207 - Principles of Public Relations

Public relations has been called "the unseen power" that influences culture, business, politics, and society. This class introduces students to the wide-ranging field of public relations, the role it plays in managing organizational relationships of all kinds, and the skills required to succeed in one of the fastest-growing communication professions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 208 - Introduction to Digital Video

This course introduces students to the fundamental theories and practices of audio and video production. Students will learn how the preproduction, production, and postproduction stages apply to media. Emphasis is on storytelling, the importance of audience research and planning, scheduling, and selecting and employing proper resources. Students will experience the process using fundamental production techniques of audio and video through hands-on projects.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 215 - Group and Team Communication

Successfully working within a group or team setting is important for our academic, professional, and personal lives. This course blends the theory and practice of successful group communication. Through experiential activities, students will learn about group roles, collaboration, and effective and ineffective decision-making and problem solving.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 220 - Intercultural Communication

Communication between members of different cultural groups is complex and challenging, and can lead to misunderstanding and a lack of trust. This course focuses on uncovering historical patterns that influence values, beliefs, and behaviors within cultural groups, and how these issues influence communication practices. A particular focus is on increasing knowledge and skills to improve communication between races and other ethnic and cultural groups.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

COM 267 - Communication and Conflict Management

Communication can be the source of conflict, can reflect conflict, or can be a tool to resolve conflict. This course focuses on productive and unproductive conflict management processes, with a particular focus on the techniques associated with negotiation and dispute resolution.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 300 - Communication Ethics

This course provides students with an overview of ethical standards relevant to social behavior and an in-depth study of contemporary ethical issues facing communicators. Students will apply ethical perspectives such as virtue, universalism, utilitarianism, egalitarianism, dialogic ethics, postmodernism, and the feminist ethic of care to contemporary ethical issues in interpersonal, organizational, public, and mass mediated communication contexts. Concepts of truth, confidentiality, conflict of interest, social justice, and other issues will be addressed.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

COM 301 - Media Industries

This course explores how the media industries of television, radio, and the web have grown and changed through exploration of the economics, regulation, and effects of current entertainment and news media. Students will analyze how media companies make decisions based on research, discuss up to the minute news related to the business practices of media conglomerates, and learn the impact of media business decisions on society and culture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 101

COM 306 - News Writing and Reporting

In this course, students will learn how to report and write feature stories making use of storytelling techniques such as scene-setting, descriptive language, the narrative arc, character development, use of dialogue, explication, and literary devices such as metaphors, flashbacks, foreshadowing and parallel construction. The techniques learned in this class will be applicable to print, broadcast and online presentation.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 206

COM 308 - Communication Law and Ethics

The course is designed to review the history, development, and interpretation of the First Amendment in the U.S. by our court system and its impact upon journalists, professional communicators, and citizens, along with the ethical principles that underpin effective communication practices. Topics include privacy, defamation, press freedom, media regulations, and the law of emerging technologies. Students will learn to apply statutes, case law, and ethical theories to First Amendment issues and disputes. This course also meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding and reasoning within the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 310 - Communication Portfolio

The portfolio assists students with synthesizing and applying what they have learned in Communication courses to the task of bridging from undergraduate studies to post-graduation. Students will build a portfolio that can be used to demonstrate knowledge and skills.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

COM 312 - Persuasion, Power, and Influence

This course emphasizes theory-based analysis of persuasive messages across a variety of contexts and situations, ranging from interpersonal settings to mass mediated-campaigns. Students will also be taught techniques of presenting and selecting evidence with the goal of enhancing the student's abilities to strategically analyze and create persuasive messages. Students will be asked to consider assumptions and draw conclusions about the persuasive efficacy of messages by applying concepts from theory and research. This course also meets ILO 4.2 (critical analysis and reasoning in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 315 - Advanced Interpersonal Communication

Through reading and reflection, students will assess their own interpersonal communication skills. Students will also explore interpersonal programs of research, such as: forgiveness, jealousy, distance relationships, and bullying.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 316 - Communication Research and Analysis

This course introduces students to the strategic process of collecting and analyzing information in professional settings. The practical focus of course assignments will be on using research to solve problems. Students will be introduced to situation analysis, designing and implementing surveys, interviewing, focus groups, and content analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 317 - Organizational Communication

This course surveys classic concepts and theories associated with organizational communication such as leadership, organizational culture, and the role of organizations in society. Contemporary issues such as globalization, technology, and ethical decision making in organizations are also featured, as well as a focus on the practical skills necessary for successful organizational encounters and socialization. This course meets ILO 10.2 (ethical understanding & reasoning within the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 319 - Advanced Personal and Professional Presentations

This advanced course is designed to maximize professional success through an in-depth focus on achieving presentation goals. Students will learn how to effectively present themselves as skilled content experts in professional settings.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 150

COM 325 - Nonverbal Communication

Nonverbal communication refers to the many ways that we send messages without relying on words. This course focuses on specific nonverbal structures (e.g., touch, gesture, facial expression, appearance), the functions of nonverbal communication (e.g., impression formation, deception, etc.), and cultural variations in nonverbal communication rules and interpretations.

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 337 - Advertising Copywriting

This course provides experience with writing for advertising. Students will explore the theoretical and research basis for communication and will examine the role of both strategy and creativity in the development and implementation of communication campaigns. Students will write for print, broadcast, and other media.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 338 - Social Media

This course addresses the many positive and negative implications associated with society's reliance on social media platforms. Using a perspective rooted in digital literacy, the course examines how social media is used in both personal and professional contexts, and how me might use social media to communicate competently, ethically, and strategically.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 345 - Communication and Sex, Gender, And Sexuality

This course focuses on the influence of sex, gender, and sexuality on communication in a variety of contexts. The course will review the recent theories and research literature on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality. The course will present information on communication and sex, gender, and sexuality as it relates to individual identity development, personal relationships, and social relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

COM 350/450 - Cooperative Education

This experience is normally a full-time, paid employment in a cooperating firm to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors. Position must be approved by Department Chair.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Restrictions: Junior or Senior status, 2.75 GPA, approval of Department Chair

COM 357 - Public Relations Writing

Writing is one of the top-rated skills for public relations professionals. This writing intensive course introduces students to the principles of planning and pre-writing as the basis for successful writing efforts. Students will learn how to produce a variety of pieces for print and electronic media, including press releases, backgrounders, brochures, newsletter articles, and public service announcements, as well as other tools designed to engage an organization's key stakeholders. This course meets ILO 8b.2 (effective writing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COM 358 - Advanced Media Production

In this course students learn to apply more advanced audio and video production techniques. Students will develop and strengthen their production skills through hands-on projects both in the field, and utilizing the tools of the television studio, for both news and creative productions that can be distributed across various media platforms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 208

COM 365 - Communication in Relationships

This course focuses on contemporary research and theories associated with communication in close relationships. We will address cultural norms regarding "good" communication and "good" relationships, as well as what research suggests are the realities associated with communication and relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 102

COM 368 - Video Editing

Combining the study and critique of media examples with hands-on experience, this course examines the techniques, equipment, and theories involved in achieving structure in film and video through editing. Students will strengthen and expand their editing skills through class exercises and outside projects, while also studying past and present film and video productions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Com 208

COM 387 - Public Relations Cases and Campaigns

Public relations (PR) practitioners face a daunting range of choices when trying to manage key relationships. This course is designed to help students approach public relations strategically and to apply public relations techniques and theories to communication programs and campaigns. The course will also explore current trends in PR practice and how they influence planning.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COM 207

COM 407 - Public Relations Management

This capstone in Public Relations uses a combination of case studies and service-learning to provide students with an in-depth study of public relations theory and practice. In addition to exploring a particular practice area in greater depth, students work with community organizations on public relations projects to apply what they have learned. Students complete journal assignments throughout the semester that ask them to reflect on both their professional development and understanding of the needs addressed by the community partners with which they work. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior Standing

Prerequisites: COM 207, 357, 387

COM 408 - Media and Journalism Practicum

This capstone in Media and Journalism builds upon the skills students have developed throughout their coursework, including planning, writing, production, and editing. Students will synthesize various skills and work as a team to produce multimedia storytelling projects within the local community. Students will have the opportunity to create advanced-level work, cooperate as a team, and reflect on their role as media storytellers. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

 

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 306 or 358

COM 415 - Communication Management and Development

With an emphasis on developing communication competence, this capstone in Communication and Social Interaction challenges students to apply theoretical and practical understanding of interpersonal communication to professional situations. Students will use problem-based learning to address communication needs. As part of the course, students will reflect on their own communication patterns and will actively develop competencies to increase professional success. This course meets ILO 2.2 (reflective thinking and valuing in the discipline).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior standing

Prerequisites: COM 102, 205, 315

COM 461/462/463 - Internship

Students may intern in communication industries. Working approximately 15 hours a week under professional supervision, students learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of professional positions. The course requires meetings with the faculty supervisor, reflection papers, and interaction and evaluation by the site supervisors.

Number of Credits: 3 credits

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, 2.75 GPA, and recommendation of the Chair.

Department of Economics

Mission Statement

The Economics Department is committed to providing students with a rigorous and relevant economic education necessary for informed citizenship. The Department is committed to teaching and research, believing that research informs what is taught and how it is taught. For its majors, the Department seeks to develop a deep understanding of how markets and economies work and do not work. Furthermore, the Department seeks to assure that majors and minors are capable of applying the tools of economic reasoning to consider questions of policy, efficiency, and equity.

Major(s) Offered

Economics

Economics & International Studies

Minor(s) Offered

Economics

Entrepreneurship

Location/Contact Information

H. David Robison, Chair

265 Hayman Hall

robison@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1184

 

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Mshomba, Robison

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Paulin

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Pellillo, Mallon

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: George

Economics

Program Description

The Economics Department is committed to providing students with a rigorous and relevant economic education necessary for informed citizenship. The Department is committed to teaching and research, believing that research informs what is taught and how it is taught. For its majors, the Department seeks to develop a deep understanding of how markets and economies work and do not work. Further, the Department seeks to assure that majors and minors are capable of applying the tools of economic reasoning to consider questions of policy, efficiency, and equity.

Why take this major?

Economics is a major which provides students analytical tools to improve decision making and to address real-world problems. This major offers room for double-majoring or multiple minors, as well great flexibility for careers. Students learn to analyze and evaluate macroeconomic issues like the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on inflation and unemployment, and microeconomic issues like how firms decide how much to produce and the impact of taxes and regulations. Emphasis is also placed on considering what policies and actions are consistent with social justice. Some students go on to corporate and non-profit positions. Others go on to graduate programs in law, public policy, applied economics, and PhD programs in economics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Dr. David Robison

Professor and Chair, Department of Economics

265 Hayman Hall

robison@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1184

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 15

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 49

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 or MTH 120

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 15 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I
ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I
ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science
ECN 314 - Econometrics
ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II
ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II
ECN 441 - History of Economic Thought
ECN 481 - Seminar in Economics
Five ECN electives
MTH 114 or MTH 120
One additional Social Science course

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

12 courses, 2 ECN electives are waived as is the extra Social Science course.

 

Minor Requirements

Any 6 ECN courses. BUS 202 counts as a substitute for ECN 213 and can be counted towards the minor.

Recommended Course Sequence

The suggestion below is merely a suggestion. Because many students double major or change majors and arrive in the ECN Department as sophomores or juniors, the suggested order and timing is not all that common among students.

Freshman Year:

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Global Economy I

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: The Business Firm and Market Analysis I

MTH 114 or MTH 120 A calculus-based math course

Sophomore Year

ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

ECN 314 - Econometrics

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: The Business Firm & Market Analysis II

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Globla Economy II

Junior Year

ECN 441

At least 3 other ECN electives

The additional Social Science elective

Senior Year

ECN 481 - Economics Seminar

Two additional ECN electives

 

Course Descriptions

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

After introducing students to the what and how of economic thinking, the course explores the causes of national economic prosperity and economic problems such as unemployment and inflation. It also discusses the role of fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international economic relations among the U.S. and other countries.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II

This course studies how business firms interact with consumers and one another in product and resource markets. Besides distilling profit-maximizing criteria for different firms in different markets, the course also evaluates how the operation of firms impacts the welfare of society in general.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 201; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II

This course analyzes the factors behind countries' long-term growth and also those responsible for short-term fluctuations in their levels of output and prices. It also demonstrates how economic booms and busts have prompted economists to search for explanations and possible policies for addressing these instabilities. Finally, the course compares and contrasts U.S. historical experience with that of other nations.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 270, 370, 470 - Special Topics in Economics

Topics include Labor Markets, Employment and Wages; Women in the Economy; European Union; Economics of Sports; Economics of Entertainment; and Law and Economics.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

ECN 287, 288 - Economics Internship

Working approximately 10 to 15 hours per week under professional supervision, students learn experientially the linkages between their formal studies and the demands of particular positions. Under faculty supervision, students complete informal and formal written assignments and an oral presentation that describe their duties and interpret their intern experience.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 201, at least sophomore standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 314 - Econometrics

This course introduces the student to advanced statistical techniques used by economists, other social scientists, and people in business and law to test theories, predict future events, and provide empirical support for various types of hypotheses. The course emphasizes the applied nature of econometrics. As such, the student will construct, estimate, and evaluate well-specified regression models through computer application-based exercises using SAS statistical software.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 213 or BUS 202 or permission of Chair

ECN 331 - International Economics

This course involves an introduction to the theory of international trade. Topics include specialization and the gains from trade, tariffs, and protectionist policies, trade imbalances, the role of international institutions, foreign exchange markets, and monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 332 - Political Economy of Africa

This course examines the political and economic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa and provides a historical perspective on these conditions. Issues examined include the political and economic consequences of colonialism, post-independence political forces and economic policies, and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 334 - The Political Economy of Latin America

This course begins by examining aspects of the indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans in what has come to be called "Latin America." Throughout, it considers issues such as colonialism, militarism, race, gender relations, and religion that have shaped the societies, polities, and economies of nations from Mexico and the Caribbean to those of the Southern Cone. The goal of the course is to afford class members the opportunity to better understand Latin America's history as a basis for comprehending its likely future. Cross-listed with HIS334 and POL 334.

Number of Credits: 3

ECN 335 - International Trade and Trade Wars

This course provides an overview of the U.S. in the global economy and the history of the World Trade Organization (WTO), an examination of the WTO's dispute settlement mechanism, and an examination of major trade disputes that involve the U.S. The course ultimately explores how international trade laws, politics, diplomacy, and multi-national corporations in pursuit of profits interact.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 337 - Political Economy of Eastern Europe

This course first explores the structure and outcomes of a centrally-planned economic system in contrast to a market-based economic system. Second, it examines how the transition from planned to market took place (or is still under way) in Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union. Lastly, it considers a wide range of contemporary political and economic challenges facing countries across the region, from building democratic institutions and strengthening the rule of law to establishing competitive markets and addressing social and economic injustices.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 340 - American Economic History

This course describes and analyzes long-term economic growth and development since colonization. It stresses changes in demographic, technological, and institutional factors as they interact with the market system. Basic economic concepts and theories of growth are applied to significant historical questions.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 351 - Environmental Economics

Provides an introduction to the trade-offs (costs versus benefits) associated with environmental issues. Evaluating trade-offs requires an examination of the magnitude or current environmental problems and some consideration of how to measure the costs and benefits of regulatory changes. Approximately half the course will be devoted to examining the current regulations, how the regulatory process works, and the economic implications of the regulations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 or permission of Chair

ECN 354 - Economics of the Entertainment Industry

The course surveys the economics of the entertainment industry with an emphasis on the importance of market structure (perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, monopoly) in determining behaviors and profitability. In this course, we will apply many microeconomic, and a few macroeconomic, concepts to evaluate structure, workings, and profitability of various segments in the entertainment industry, ranging from movies to music, TV, radio, publishing, casinos, and theme parks. Case studies will be used to highlight the issues facing particular firms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 356 - Healthcare Economics

This course explores the economics of health and health care. It introduces students to different economic perspectives on the determinants of health, how health insurance markets are organized, and the challenges facing the U.S. health care system. The course also examines how health care services are financed and delivered in other countries. Special attention is paid to recent health care reforms, including the Affordable Care Act.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 385, 386 - Cooperative Education

This experience will be a full-time paid employment in a cooperating firm such as a bank, economics forecasting company, or public utility; a nonprofit company such as a Community Development Corporation; or a government agency such as a county planning department or a statistical analysis office. Under faculty supervision, students also complete job-related learning assignments that involve oral and written presentations.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 214; ECN 221; and junior standing or senior standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 441 - History of Economic Thought

The course details the development of economics as a coherent analytical discipline through a historical study of its main schools and contributors, including the Physiocrats; the Classical Economists (especially Jevons, Walras, and Clark), Marshall, and Keynes. Lesser figures are treated as time allows. Attention throughout is given to the changing philosophical and cultural background of economic thought.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 455 - Public Finance

This course involves an analysis of the revenue and expenditure activity of government with particular emphasis on the rationale of federal government activity. Also considered are the issues of distribution, efficiency, equity, and stability in the economy.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150; ECN 201

ECN 481 - Seminar in Economics

This course is intended to be a capstone course for economics majors, one that aids the student in integrating the material from diverse economics courses. It stresses techniques for the preparation of written research reports. Students will ordinarily deliver to the seminar an oral presentation of their research results.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

This capstone course for Economics and International Studies majors aims to assist students to research, integrate, and communicate information about the global economy. Specifically, students will learn to conduct research on economic problems and policies of countries and regions of the world not native to them. Students will compose a 250 to 300 word abstract of their seminar papers in two languages, English and a second language. Further, students will be expected to demonstrate at least one of the following competencies: a) to write, in a non-native language, summaries of research in sources written in non-native language; b) to write the seminar paper in a non-native language; or c) to present research results orally in a non-native language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN/POL 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

This course focuses on basic statistical methods used in the analysis of economic and political phenomena and decision-making. Emphasis is on the application of statistical techniques and the sound interpretation of statistical results. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, simple regression, and correlation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Economics and International Studies

Program Description

The Economics Department is committed to providing students with a rigorous and relevant economic education necessary for informed citizenship. The Department is committed to teaching and research, believing that research informs what is taught and how it is taught. For its majors, the Department seeks to develop a deep understanding of how markets and economies work and do not work. Further, the Department seeks to assure that majors and minors are capable of applying the tools of economic reasoning to consider questions of policy, efficiency, and equity.

The ECI major includes the core economics courses, a foreign language, and other internationally-focused courses.

Why take this major?

Like the Economics major, the Economics and International Studies major provides students analytical tools to improve decision making and address real-world problems. This major offers room for double-majoring or multiple minors, as well as great flexibility for careers. With a language requirement and courses with an international focus, students learn to analyze both domestic and global issues such as those pertaining to trade policies, economic integration, and capital mobility. Emphasis is also placed on considering what policies and actions are consistent with social justice. Some students go on to corporate and non-profit positions. Others go on to graduate programs in law, international relations, public policy, applied economics, and PhD programs in economics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Dr. David Robison

Professor and Chair, Department of Economics

Olney 265

robison@lasalle.edu

215-951-1184

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 17

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 55

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 or MTH 120

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 17 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I
ECN 201 - Principles of Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I
ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science
ECN 314 - Econometrics
ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II
ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II
ECN 331 - International Economics
A second international ECN course
ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies
MTH 114 or MTH 120
Three courses in a single foreign language
Two internationally-focused HIS courses
Two other internationally-focused courses in any discipline as approved by advisor

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

The guide below is merely a suggestion. Because many students double major or change majors and become ECI majors as sophomores, the suggested order and timing is not common among students.

Freshman Year:

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Global Economy I

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: The Business Firm and Market Analysis I

MTH 114 or MTH 120 A calculus-based math course

Language course 1

Language course 2

Sophomore Year

ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

ECN 314 - Econometrics

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: The Business Firm & Market Analysis II

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Globla Economy II

Language course 3

Junior Year

ECN 331

Second internationally-focused ECN course

Two internationally-focused History Courses

One other internationally-focused course

Senior Year

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

One other internationally-focused course

Course Descriptions

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

After introducing students to the what and how of economic thinking, the course explores the causes of national economic prosperity and economic problems such as unemployment and inflation. It also discusses the role of fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international economic relations among the U.S. and other countries.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II

This course studies how business firms interact with consumers and one another in product and resource markets. Besides distilling profit-maximizing criteria for different firms in different markets, the course also evaluates how the operation of firms impacts the welfare of society in general.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 201; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II

This course analyzes the factors behind countries' long-term growth and also those responsible for short-term fluctuations in their levels of output and prices. It also demonstrates how economic booms and busts have prompted economists to search for explanations and possible policies for addressing these instabilities. Finally, the course compares and contrasts U.S. historical experience with that of other nations.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 270, 370, 470 - Special Topics in Economics

Topics include Labor Markets, Employment and Wages; Women in the Economy; European Union; Economics of Sports; Economics of Entertainment; and Law and Economics.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

ECN 287, 288 - Economics Internship

Working approximately 10 to 15 hours per week under professional supervision, students learn experientially the linkages between their formal studies and the demands of particular positions. Under faculty supervision, students complete informal and formal written assignments and an oral presentation that describe their duties and interpret their intern experience.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 201, at least sophomore standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 314 - Econometrics

This course introduces the student to advanced statistical techniques used by economists, other social scientists, and people in business and law to test theories, predict future events, and provide empirical support for various types of hypotheses. The course emphasizes the applied nature of econometrics. As such, the student will construct, estimate, and evaluate well-specified regression models through computer application-based exercises using SAS statistical software.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 213 or BUS 202 or permission of Chair

ECN 331 - International Economics

This course involves an introduction to the theory of international trade. Topics include specialization and the gains from trade, tariffs, and protectionist policies, trade imbalances, the role of international institutions, foreign exchange markets, and monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 332 - Political Economy of Africa

This course examines the political and economic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa and provides a historical perspective on these conditions. Issues examined include the political and economic consequences of colonialism, post-independence political forces and economic policies, and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 334 - The Political Economy of Latin America

This course begins by examining aspects of the indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans in what has come to be called "Latin America." Throughout, it considers issues such as colonialism, militarism, race, gender relations, and religion that have shaped the societies, polities, and economies of nations from Mexico and the Caribbean to those of the Southern Cone. The goal of the course is to afford class members the opportunity to better understand Latin America's history as a basis for comprehending its likely future. Cross-listed with HIS334 and POL 334.

Number of Credits: 3

ECN 335 - International Trade and Trade Wars

This course provides an overview of the U.S. in the global economy and the history of the World Trade Organization (WTO), an examination of the WTO's dispute settlement mechanism, and an examination of major trade disputes that involve the U.S. The course ultimately explores how international trade laws, politics, diplomacy, and multi-national corporations in pursuit of profits interact.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 337 - Political Economy of Eastern Europe

This course first explores the structure and outcomes of a centrally-planned economic system in contrast to a market-based economic system. Second, it examines how the transition from planned to market took place (or is still under way) in Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union. Lastly, it considers a wide range of contemporary political and economic challenges facing countries across the region, from building democratic institutions and strengthening the rule of law to establishing competitive markets and addressing social and economic injustices.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 340 - American Economic History

This course describes and analyzes long-term economic growth and development since colonization. It stresses changes in demographic, technological, and institutional factors as they interact with the market system. Basic economic concepts and theories of growth are applied to significant historical questions.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 351 - Environmental Economics

Provides an introduction to the trade-offs (costs versus benefits) associated with environmental issues. Evaluating trade-offs requires an examination of the magnitude or current environmental problems and some consideration of how to measure the costs and benefits of regulatory changes. Approximately half the course will be devoted to examining the current regulations, how the regulatory process works, and the economic implications of the regulations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 or permission of Chair

ECN 354 - Economics of the Entertainment Industry

The course surveys the economics of the entertainment industry with an emphasis on the importance of market structure (perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, monopoly) in determining behaviors and profitability. In this course, we will apply many microeconomic, and a few macroeconomic, concepts to evaluate structure, workings, and profitability of various segments in the entertainment industry, ranging from movies to music, TV, radio, publishing, casinos, and theme parks. Case studies will be used to highlight the issues facing particular firms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 356 - Healthcare Economics

This course explores the economics of health and health care. It introduces students to different economic perspectives on the determinants of health, how health insurance markets are organized, and the challenges facing the U.S. health care system. The course also examines how health care services are financed and delivered in other countries. Special attention is paid to recent health care reforms, including the Affordable Care Act.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 385, 386 - Cooperative Education

This experience will be a full-time paid employment in a cooperating firm such as a bank, economics forecasting company, or public utility; a nonprofit company such as a Community Development Corporation; or a government agency such as a county planning department or a statistical analysis office. Under faculty supervision, students also complete job-related learning assignments that involve oral and written presentations.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 214; ECN 221; and junior standing or senior standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 441 - History of Economic Thought

The course details the development of economics as a coherent analytical discipline through a historical study of its main schools and contributors, including the Physiocrats; the Classical Economists (especially Jevons, Walras, and Clark), Marshall, and Keynes. Lesser figures are treated as time allows. Attention throughout is given to the changing philosophical and cultural background of economic thought.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 455 - Public Finance

This course involves an analysis of the revenue and expenditure activity of government with particular emphasis on the rationale of federal government activity. Also considered are the issues of distribution, efficiency, equity, and stability in the economy.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150; ECN 201

ECN 481 - Seminar in Economics

This course is intended to be a capstone course for economics majors, one that aids the student in integrating the material from diverse economics courses. It stresses techniques for the preparation of written research reports. Students will ordinarily deliver to the seminar an oral presentation of their research results.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

This capstone course for Economics and International Studies majors aims to assist students to research, integrate, and communicate information about the global economy. Specifically, students will learn to conduct research on economic problems and policies of countries and regions of the world not native to them. Students will compose a 250 to 300 word abstract of their seminar papers in two languages, English and a second language. Further, students will be expected to demonstrate at least one of the following competencies: a) to write, in a non-native language, summaries of research in sources written in non-native language; b) to write the seminar paper in a non-native language; or c) to present research results orally in a non-native language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN/POL 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

This course focuses on basic statistical methods used in the analysis of economic and political phenomena and decision-making. Emphasis is on the application of statistical techniques and the sound interpretation of statistical results. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, simple regression, and correlation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Department of Education

Mission Statement

The vision of the Education Department incorporates the global de La Salle Christian Brothers tradition of teaching excellence and service. Our vision is to provide opportunities for educators to become forward thinking, research-minded, developmentally and social justice-oriented professionals who respond to the needs of all students.

La Salle educators are knowledgeable, intellectually curious, reflective, collaborative, confident, proactive, and committed to equity in education. Through collaborations with partnership schools, community organizations, and education-related agencies and organizations, educators are prepared to cultivate, value, and respond to the cultural and linguistic resources of all students, families, and communities they serve.

La Salle educators set the standard in their schools and communities by going beyond traditional expectations of the profession. The Education Department privileges project-based, problem-posing, service learning, and engaged pedagogies grounded in Lasallian values and dispositions.

Major(s) Offered

Education

 

Teacher Preparation Programs

La Salle University offers teacher preparation programs in secondary education (grades 7-12), early elementary PreK–4/special education PreK–8 (ESEC), middle- level (grades 4-8) social studies, English, or mathematics with the option of adding PreK-4 special education (ESMD or ESML). These programs are approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) and lead to a B.A in Education. Upon successful completion, recommendation for Instructional I certification in the area(s) pursued by the certification candidate is made by the Education Department to the state.

Students may declare a major in education in the freshman year, however, formal application for admission (candidacy) to the teacher education certification programs must be made by completion of 60 credits (which typically occurs at the end of the sophomore year). GPA and Basic Skills Testing requirements must be met in order to pass PDE candidacy requirements for all areas of certification. Students must also successfully complete all clearance and field experiences required by major and area of certification. The policies and procedures for applying for admission to the programs and for advancement through the various stages of candidacy are contained in the Candidacy Requirements in the Department of Education Student Handbook. All education majors are responsible for knowing and adhering to these policies and procedures for candidacy.

Field Experience and Certification Requirements

Students are required to complete a minimum of two hours per week of fieldwork each semester. Early Elementary and Middle-Level juniors are required to complete one full day of field work in partnership schools. The Director of Placements and Partnerships makes placements for all education majors enrolled in education programs.

In accordance with the provisions of Act 34 of 1985 of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, students engaging in mandatory field experiences each semester and applicants for an Instructional I certificate in the Commonwealth must also undergo background checks yearly. All students are required to obtain both a Criminal History and Child Abuse form. Education majors must have the Act 34 Request for Criminal Background check completed yearly. Prior to entering any field experience, including student teaching, students must submit proof of screening for tuberculosis. This test may be completed at the Student Health Center or by the student’s personal physician. This screening test is repeated yearly. Application forms relating to child abuse, criminal checks, and liability insurance will be distributed during orientation sessions for education majors each fall term. Forms are also available in the Education department office (Hayman 254). Students may be required to show school administrators the results of both the background checks and tuberculin tests and keep copies of the results on file in the Department of Education office.

For more information about these requirements, see the Director of Placements and Partnerships. Further information about applying for certification is contained in the Department of Education Student Handbook and the Handbooks for the Professional Year or Semester. All education majors are responsible for knowing and adhering to the policies and procedures that pertain to applying for certification.

Note: Student Teaching and Teacher Certification Students apply for Stage II candidacy in the education certification programs and, if approved, are recommended for the student teaching experience upon successful completion of all course requirements and pre-student teaching field experiences, with the indexes and grades specified in the Handbook. Department faculty consider the fitness of the individual for the professional position he or she has selected. Upon successful completion of student teaching and passing all relevant tests, a student may apply for Instructional I certification in PA. PDE certification regulations require that an applicant for a teaching certificate be known by the preparing institution as a person of good moral character and possessing sound personal qualities, professional knowledge, professional dispositions, and pedagogical competencies that warrant issuance of a teaching certificate. In addition, all applicants must meet certain physical and medical standards to obtain an Instructional I certificate to teach in the public schools of Pennsylvania.

Any candidate applying for an Instructional I certificate is required by Pennsylvania State Board regulations to pass the appropriate sections of the Praxis Series Tests (Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers), which are administered by the Educational Testing Service and Pearson (ETS Core or PAPA, and PECT). Information about the Praxis Tests and Pennsylvania Tests is available in the Education department office (Hayman 254). Other states may also require prospective teachers to take these or other examinations.

Five-Year Options

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master of Arts degree. To apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs, students must complete the Curriculum Change Form, found in the Education Department, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Students should consult with the Chair of Education as to the specific undergraduate courses that will apply to their graduate degree.

Several Five-Year options are available for early childhood, middle level, or second­ary education majors. They are:

Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors

At the end of each semester, an audit is done of each student's file. Any student NOT meeting program requirements will be dismissed from the program. Please note: transfer and Summit students will be reviewed based on “year in the program”. Candidacy begins junior year (Year 3). The audit is based on the following:

Freshmen Audit:

Sophomores Audit:

Junior Audit:

 

Students not majoring in education are invited to register for education courses that carry no prerequisites. Please contact the Education Department with questions about registering for courses.

Minor(s) Offered

Education

Concentrations

Middle Level majors select an area of concentration in grades 7 and 8 in Social Studies, Math, or English.

Location/Contact Information

Laura Roy, Chair

educdept@lasalle.edu

254 Hayman Hall

(215) 951-1190

Full-Time Faculty

Professors: Bednar, Williams

Associate Professors: Lewinski, Liang, Mosca, Richardson, Roy

Assistant Professor: Byrne

Visiting Assistant Professor: Baker

Professor Emeriti: Feden, Vogel, Yost

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th

Program Description

Middle-Level certification students are preparing for Pennsylvania Instructional I certification in grades 4–8. Upon completion of the program and certification, they will be able to teach any subject in grades 4–6 and the concentration content area (English/ Language Arts; Mathematics; or Social Studies) in grades 7 and 8. Middle-Level Social Studies majors will also minor in American Studies. Students in this program may also choose to earn a Pennsylvania certification in special education (PreK-8).

Why take this major?

This dual major prepares students to teach in regular education or special education classrooms. Given that schools are in need of highly qualified educators who can work with students in regular education, inclusion, and special education classroom, this major makes graduates markatable to schools both locally and globally. Elementary teachers also have the opportunity to impact the lives of children early and set a positive tone for later educational experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Laura A. Roy, Chair

roy@lasalle.edu

254 Hayman Hall

(215) 951-1190

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 15-16

Total: 40-41

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 53

Total: 121-124

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Cumulative: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 Explore in Sci & Math I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 Math:Myths & Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 Intro Csc:Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 200 US Republic To 1877

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40-41 courses in total in order to graduate. 15-16 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 Human Learning/Cognition/Dev

EDC 104 Education Diversity in America

EDC 120 Foundations of Literacy

IMS 262 Explore in Sci & Math II

EDC 218 Physical & Cultural Geography

EDC 217 Learning & Teaching of Math

EDC 219 Integrated Social Science

EDC 220 Read/Wrt/Think Content Areas

EDC 307 Differentiated Instruction

EDC  309 DIATI Lab

EDC 224 Adolescent Development

EDC 431 Middle Level Education

EDC 474 Student Teaching: Elem Educ

EDC 475 Teach/Rsch Meth I

 

 

Concentrations

English

Mathematics

Comprehensive Social Studies

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Middle level, 4-8 majors must minor in American Studies.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

*IMS 162 (4 cr)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

*IMS 262 (4 cr) (F)

EDC 218 (F/S)

EDC 217 (F/S)

EDC 219 (F/S)

EDC 220 (F/S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 307 (3 cr) and EDC 309 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 320 (F)

**EDC 224

 

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

 

EDC 431 (2 cr) (S)

EDC 475 (3 cr) (S)

EDC 474 (12 cr) (S)

*Consult with advisor. Waived for some areas of concentration.

**Not required. Education elective option.

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th B.A./M.A. (5-Year)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th/Special Ed

Program Description

Middle-Level, Special Education certification students are preparing for Pennsylvania Instructional I certification in grades 4–8 and a PreK-4 Special education certification. Upon completion of the program and certification, they will be able to teach any subject in grades 4–6 and the concentration content area (English/ Language Arts; Mathematics; or Social Studies) in grades 7 and 8 and special education. Middle-Level Social Studies majors will also minor in American Studies.

Why take this major?

This dual major prepares students to teach in regular education or special education classrooms. Given that schools are in need of highly qualified educators who can work with students in regular education, inclusion, and special education classroom, this major makes graduates markatable to schools both locally and globally. Elementary teachers also have the opportunity to impact the lives of children early and set a positive tone for later educational experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Laura A. Roy, Chair

roy@lasalle.edu

254 Hayman Hall

(215) 951-1190

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 16-18

Total: 40-41

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 60

Total: 121-125

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Cumulative: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 Explore in Sci & Math I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 Math:Myths & Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 Intro Csc:Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 200 US Republic To 1877

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40-41 courses in total in order to graduate. 16-18 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 Human Learning/Cognition/Dev

EDC 104 Education Diversity in America

EDC 120 Foundations of Literacy

IMS 262 Explore in Sci & Math II

EDC 218 Physical & Cultural Geography

EDC 217 Learning & Teaching of Math

EDC 219 Integrated Social Science

EDC 220 Read/Wrt/Think Content Areas

EDC 307 Differentiated Instruction

EDC  309 DIATI Lab

EDC 320 Literacy in Inclusive Classes

EDC 308 Assess/Accommodat/Disabilities

EDC 310 AAASD Lab

EDC 325 Teaching ENG Language Learners

EDC 431 Middle Level Education

EDC 474 Student Teaching: Elem Educ

EDC 475 Teach/Rsch Meth I

 

Concentrations

English

Mathematics

Comprehensive Social Studies

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Middle level, 4-8 majors must minor in American Studies.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

*IMS 162 (4 cr)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

*IMS 262 (4 cr) (F)

EDC 218 (F/S)

EDC 217 (F/S)

EDC 219 (F/S)

EDC 220 (F/S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 307 (3 cr) and EDC 309 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 320 (F)

**EDC 224

EDC 308 (3 cr) and EDC 310 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 325 (S)

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

 

EDC 431 (2 cr) (S)

EDC 475 (3 cr) (S)

EDC 474 (12 cr) (S)

*Consult with advisor. Waived for some areas of concentration.

**Not required. Education elective option.

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Grades 4th thru 8th/Special Ed B.A./M.A. (5-Year)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education – Pre-K thru 4th

Program Description

Why take this major?

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Laura A. Roy, Chair

roy@lasalle.edu

254 Hayman Hall

(215) 951-1190

Degree Earned

Must be approved by Advisor and Chair

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: Must be approved by Advisor and Chair

Total: Must be approved by Advisor and Chair

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: Must be approved by Advisor and Chair

Total: Must be approved by Advisor and Chair

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Cumulative: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 - Mathematics: Myths and Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 - Introduction to Computing Using Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 - Presentation Skills or PHL 155 - The Quest for Meaning: An Inside-Out Course

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 300 - US Republic to 1877 and AMST 100 - Introduction to American Studies

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose an American ARTH

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 250 - Literature and Culture

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete Must be approved by Advisor and Chair courses in total in order to graduate. Must be approved by Advisor and Chair courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition, and Development
EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America
EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy
EDC 217 - Teaching Mathematics
EDC 219 - Integrated Social Studies
EDC 220 - Teaching Literacy in the Content Areas
EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, and Technology Integration
EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, and Adaptations for Students with Disabilities
EDC 309 - Diati Lab
EDC 310 - AAASD Lab
EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom
EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners
EDC 326 - Early Childhood Foundations
EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child
EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching
EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods
EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education
EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum
IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I
IMS 262 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics II

Note: ESEC majors are also required to take 30 total AMST credits. Fifteen of those credits are included in the progress sheet. Fifteen additional credits are selected by the student. 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Pre-K thru 4th/Special Ed

Program Description

Early elementary and special education (ESEC) majors are also required to major in American Studies. La Salle University's ESEC combined program of study is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Successful completion leads to recommendations for Instructional I certification in early elementary education (PreK–4) and special education (PreK–8). A Department faculty member advises and meets individually with each student during pre-registration throughout the four-year program. This process ensures that all students are following the prescribed sequence of courses leading to a B.A. and a recommendation for certification. ESEC majors also major in American Studies. To meet state requirements, ESEC majors must choose Art for their Fine Arts requirement.

Why take this major?

This dual major prepares students to teach in regular education or special education classrooms. Given that schools are in need of highly qualified educators who can work with students in regular education, inclusion, and special education classroom, this major makes graduates highly desirable candidates for schools both locally and globally. Teachers in the early grades have the opportunity to impact the lives of children by setting a positive tone for later educational experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Laura A. Roy, Chair

roy@lasalle.edu

254 Hayman Hall

(215) 951-1190

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 20-21

Total: 42-43

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: Major Credits: 75; AMST Credits: 15 additional (30 total)

Total: 127-130

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Cumulative: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors.

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 - Mathematics: Myths and Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 151 - Introduction to Computing Using Packages

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 - Presentation Skills or PHL 155 - The Quest for Meaning: An Inside-Out Course

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 200 - US Republic to 1877 and AMST 100 - Introduction to American Studies

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose an American ARTH meeting ILO 9.1

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 250 - Literature and Culture

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 42-43 courses in total in order to graduate. 20-21 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition, and Development
EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America
EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy
EDC 217 - Teaching Mathematics
EDC 219 - Integrated Social Studies
EDC 220 - Teaching Literacy in the Content Areas
EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, and Technology Integration
EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, and Adaptations for Students with Disabilities
EDC 309 - Diati Lab
EDC 310 - AAASD Lab
EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom
EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners
EDC 326 - Early Childhood Foundations
EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child
EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching
EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods
EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education
EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum
IMS 162 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics I
IMS 262 - Exploring in Science and Mathematics II

Note: ESEC majors are also required to take 30 total AMST credits. Fifteen of those credits are included in the progress sheet. Fifteen additional credits are selected by the student. 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

ESEC majors are required to dual major in American Studies.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

IMS 162 (4 cr)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

EDC 219 (F/S)

EDC 220 ((F/S)

IMS 262 (F)

EDC 326 (F/S)

EDC 217 (F/S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 307 (3 cr) and EDC 309 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 320

EDC 308 (3 cr) and EDC 310 (1 cr) (F/S)

EDC 325

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

EDC 477 (3 cr) (F/S)

EDC 410 (2 cr) (F/S)

EDC 478 (10 cr) (F/S)

473 (12 cr) (F/S)

475 (3 cr) (F/S)

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Pre-K thru 4th/Special Ed B.A./M.A. (5-Year)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education – Secondary Education

Program Description

The Secondary Education program is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to a recommendation for Instructional I certification in Social Studies (History major), English, Communication, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Spanish (PreK-12). Students may select religion as a dual major option, but it does not lead to teacher certification.

Why take this major?

Secondary Education majors have the benefit of choosing a dual (second) major and immersing themselves in this content. Upon graduation and certification, secondary education teachers can work in middle or high schools.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Laura A. Roy, Chair

roy@lasalle.edu

254 Hayman Hall

(215) 951-1190

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 9-10

Total: 38-40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 39-42

Total: 120-124

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: See Department Candidacy Requirements for All Education Certification Majors (information found on Education department page of the catalog).

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 courses in total in order to graduate. 9-10 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Secondary Education Majors are required to double major in: Social Studies (History major), English, Communication, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Spanish (PreK-12). Students may select religion as a dual major option, but it does not lead to teacher certification. 

Secondary Education majors will have designated course work for their associated discipline. See the Education Department Student Handbook and advisors for your second major for specific courses.

EDC 103 Human Learning/Cognition/Dev

EDC 104 Education Diversity in America

EDC 224 Adolescent Development

EDC 324 Differentiating Inst: Ed Tech

EDC 304 Develop Reading

EDC 306 Foundations of Education

EDC 401 Art & Science of Teaching

EDC 470 Prac & Prof of Teaching

EDC 472 Seminar

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Secondary Education majors will have designated course work for their associated discipline. See the Education Department Student Handbook and advisors for your second major for specific courses.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year Fall

Freshman Year Spring

EDC 104 (F/S)

EDC 103 (F/S)

EDC 101 (F/S) (Education Elective)

EDC 120 (F/S)

Sophomore Year Fall

Sophomore Year Spring

EDC 224 (F)

EDC 218 (F)

EDC 336 (S)

Junior Year Fall

Junior Year Spring

EDC 324 (F)

EDC 304 (S)

Senior Year Fall

Senior Year Spring

EDC 401 (6 cr) (F)

EDC 470 (9 cr)

EDC 472 (3 cr)

 

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be informed by educational research. Specific issues that arise from the student-teaching experience (taken concurrently) are addressed. Emphasis is placed on helping the student make the transition from theory to practice. This seminar is open only to seniors who have been accepted into Stage II candidacy, completion of all required courses in accordance with the criteria outlined in the Department of Education Student Handbook.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 473 or EDC 474

EDC 477 - Seminar in Special Education

This course provides a forum for discussion and deep reflection on issues that arise during the special education practicum, which is a prerequisite to this course. Special emphasis is placed on behavior management practices in self-contained and/or inclusion settings as well as topical issues in special education. Students will revisit Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS), Response to Intervention (RTI), transition planning, and teaching and management practices that are rooted in the behavioral, social-cognitive, and humanistic theories. In addition, students will research, design, and implement a behavior management plan and monitor its effectiveness through data collection and analysis procedures. For ESEC and ESML majors only with senior status that have been accepted into Stage II candidacy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Corequisites: EDC 478

EDC 478 - Special Education Practicum

La Salle students will be placed in special education settings for twelve weeks during the semester and work with students with special needs under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and supervisor. One day a week will be spent on campus attending courses and EDC 477: Seminar in Special Education.

Number of Credits: 10

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 477

IMS 162 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics I

This integrated science and mathematics course is designed for the early elementary and middle level pre-service teachers. It focuses on an interconnected set of scientific knowledge, skills, and pedagogy that are needed by teachers to ensure successful student learning. The main purpose of the course is to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication. In addition, the course aims to improve the teacher candidates' attitudes toward science and mathematics and their confidence in teaching integrated science and mathematics in the school.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

IMS 262 - Explorations in Science and Mathematics II

This integrated science/math course, with a focus on advanced subject matter content and pedagogy, is the second part of the 8-credit IMS course sequence designed for the Pre K-4 and middle level (4-8) education majors. Special attention is given to how children learn science and math, and how science/math should be taught in line with the academic standards documents and research findings. The course also aims to expose the teacher candidates—at a university level—to fundamental scientific/mathematical ideas and processes of science, and develop their skills in critical thinking and communication.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: IMS 162

Education – Secondary Education B.A./M.A. (5-Year)

The Department of Education offers several Five-Year options leading to a Master’s of Arts degree. Students may apply for any of the Five-Year/M.A. programs upon admission to La Salle as an undergraduate, or decide later in their program, prior to earning their bachelor’s degree, to pursue a Five-Year/M.A. program. Up to nine-credits of undergraduate course work may count for graduate credit in these programs depending upon the undergraduate major. Please consult with your academic advisor.

Education Studies

Program Description

Education Studies is designed for students who want to apply knowledge and strategies of teaching and learning in non-school settings that do not require teaching certification. It is the most flexible undergraduate major offered by the Department of Education at La Salle University. Each Education Studies major will enroll in one or more field experiences that serve as a culminating activity directed toward preparing Education Studies majors for entry into the field of education.

This degree is designed to introduce students to the meaning and purpose of education including the nature and purpose of liberal arts. The program is broadly conceived to acquaint students with a historical view of the academic discipline as well as practical understanding of teaching and learning in a variety of contexts both in and outside of traditional schools.Through careful advising, Education Studies students will select another major to satisfy the goals of the individual students.

Why take this major?

Students majoring in Education Studies gain knowledge enabling them to be informed citizens, teachers, and parents who understand how to interact constructively with educational organizations and schools. The Education Studies major amplifies the Lasallian mission of justice and community engagement. Grounded in the principles and practices of social justice and equity, this degree prepares students to center the notion of community by privileging the linguistic and cultural resources of their educational context, valuing engaged scholarship and advocacy practices, and seeking leadership opportunities to make transformative change.

Education Studies majors have an expanded career field outside of the traditional PK-12 classroom. Graduates can seek employment in the following areas:

Education Studies majors also have the potential to explore entrepreneurial endeavors in education by dual majoring in Business.

Student Learning Outcomes

Critical Habits of Mind:

Social Justice, Equity, and Community Engagement:

Engaged Scholarship:

Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Education:

Program Contact Information

Laura A. Roy, Chair

roy@lasalle.edu

254 Hayman Hall

(215) 951-1190

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 9-10

Total: 38-40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 31-34

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.5

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

IMS 162 Explorations in Math and Science

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

EDC 101 Education in an Urban Context

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SOC 262 Dynamics of Race and Ethnecity in Contemporary Societies

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 courses in total in order to graduate. 9-10 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

EDC 103 Human Learning, Cognition & Development

EDC 104 Educational Diversity in America

ENV 153 or ENV 155 or IMS 262

EDC 350 How People Learn

EDC 306 Foundations

EDC 460 Education Seminar

EDC 461 Education Internship

*Education Electives are also required - consult with your academic advisor.

*Dual majors consult with your academic advisor for additional required courses.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Education Studies majors may choose a dual major based on their career goals. See the second major requirements for a list of courses.

Minor Requirements

Minor in Education

Choosing a minor in education will provide students with a background in education and pedagogy that is useful in a number of careers, but does not lead to the attainment of a teaching certification. Students will learn how to motivate people, develop the ability to plan, organize, and present information, and understand how to evaluate outcomes. Students will also learn how to effectively work in diverse education and community contexts. These aspects of the Education Minor are all skills that are adaptable to many fields including, but not limited to, public health, social work, sociology, psychology, business, and communication.

Choosing 6 of the following courses will lead to a minor in Education:

 EDC 103: Human Learning, Cognition, and Development

 EDC 104: Educational Diversity in America

EDC 120: Foundations of Literacy OR EDC 220: Teaching Literacy in the Content Areas

If interested in Early Elementary Education, choose 1 course from these options:

If interested in Secondary Education, choose EDC 224: Adolescent Development

EDC 233: Autism: A Family Focus

If interested in the 5th Year Program, choose 1 course from these options (instead of EDC 233):

EDC 326: Early Childhood Foundations OR EDC 336: Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

NOTE: The Chair may choose other courses for the minor based upon a student's transcript review.

Recommended Course Sequence

Four Year Cycle of Courses

Education Studies Major with Minor or Dual Major

Freshman Fall (15 credits)

Freshman Spring (16 credits)

EDC 103: Human Learning, Cognition & Development 3 cr.

ENG 110: College Writing I, 3 cr. (ILO 8b)

REL 100: Religion Matters 3 cr. (ILO 100)

CSC: 151: Introduction to Computing 3 cr. (ILO 6)

FYS: 130: First Year Seminar 3cr. (ILO 1)

 

EDC 104 Educational Diversity in America 3 cr.

EDC 101 Education in an Urban Context 3 cr. (ILO 10)

IMS 162: Explorations in Math and Science 4 cr. (ILO 3b)

ENV 153 or ENV 155: 3cr. (ILO 3a) or IMS 262

ILO 10 3cr.

 

Sophomore Fall (15 credits)

Sophomore Spring (15credits)

EDC 220: Reading, Writing and Thinking in the Content Areas 3 cr.

ENG 210: College Writing II, 3 cr. (ILO 5)

ILO 8a & 12 3 cr.

Minor or major

Minor or major

SOC 262 Dynamics of race and ethnicity in contemporary societies 3 cr. (ILO 11)

ILO 4 3 cr.

ILO 9 3 cr.

Education Elective 1

Minor or Dual Major

Junior Fall (15 credits)

Junior Spring (15 credits)

EDC 350: How People Learn

Education Elective 1

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

Elective

EDC 306 Foundations

Education Elective 2

Minor or Dual Major

Elective (ILO 4)

Elective

Senior Fall (15 credits)

Senior Spring (15 credits)

Education Elective 3

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

EDC 460 (3 credit)

EDC 461 (6 credit)

Minor or Dual Major

Minor or Dual Major

 

Total Undergraduate Credits: 120 credits

Course Descriptions

EDC 101 - Education in an Urban Context

This three-credit course will use the rich resources of the great city of Philadelphia to provide prospective educators with a general introduction to the roles, responsibilities and skills necessary for success in the profession, whether they pursue traditional classroom teaching roles or non-traditional roles in alternative learning settings that may include non-profits, youth service organizations, and cultural/arts/science venues. During this course you will explore a number of cultural and historic venues as you travel about the city under the close guidance of education department faculty members. You will meet some interesting citizens who have lived out their lives in the city, engage in lively seminar discussions focused on your explorations, and hone your creative skills by completing assignments carefully deigned to help you develop your critical thinking abilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 103 - Human Learning, Cognition and Development

This is one of the gateway courses into the education programs at La Salle University. It is an introduction to the role of the teacher with an emphasis on how students learn. The course focuses on the study of the nature and scope of educational psychology as it relates to human learning and introduces educational research. The course, which emphasizes speaking and writing, provides prospective education majors with the opportunity to explore the profession from different theoretical perspectives, such as cognitive and behavioral psychology. Students come to understand how people develop cognitively, socially, and emotion ally and how individuals learn. Students combine an in-depth analysis of self, foster higher levels of critical reflection, learn theories and concepts in educational psychology, and participate in field experiences to enhance connections between theory and practice (Open to non-majors, but field experience may be required by course instructors; required freshman course for ESEC, ESML and EDC majors).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 104 - Educational Diversity in America

From both developmental and ecological perspectives, this course explores the diversity of individuals in society and schools, including race, ethnicity, regional background, exceptionality, socio-economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, and religion. Personal beliefs and attitudes surrounding issues of human diversity and its impact on the family, community, and society are examined. The course provides an understanding of the legal and ethical issues in educating students from diverse backgrounds and with disabilities. Additionally, the course highlights the characteristics of students with special needs and ways to accommodate their needs in the classroom setting. (The course is open to non-majors (field experience may be required by course instructors); required course for all ESEC, ESML and EDC majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 120 - Foundations of Literacy

Foundations of Literacy is a course designed to help preservice teachers understand and promote literacy development of students in preschool through eighth grade. Emphasis is placed on providing rich and meaningful literacy experiences that invite engagement and that help children develop skill, confidence, and enjoyment in the processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visual representation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 217 - Teaching and Learning of Mathematics

This course focuses on how students learn mathematics with implications for teaching mathematical concepts, skills, problem-solving, and critical thinking. The course provides a basis for understanding the changing mathematics curriculum, offers opportunities to plan and evaluate instructional techniques and materials, and examines the integration of mathematics with other content areas, such as science, children's literature, and social studies. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 218 - Physical and Cultural Geography

This course provides prospective Education majors with increased knowledge and understanding of the world in geographical terms, relating especially to physical landforms and structures, maps, human impact on and interaction with the environment, population, and political and economic systems. The course will place special emphasis on cultural geography, that is the variation of human systems from location to location. In addition, this course highlights the role of economics and trade in our expanding global market economy, including the study of comparative economic systems and the distribution of natural and man-made resources. (The course is open to non-majors.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 219 - Integrated Social Sciences

This course and its related fieldwork addresses social sciences subject matter pedagogy content in accordance with standards required by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Education. It integrates social sciences into a thematic whole and addresses core concepts in each discipline while simultaneously addressing pedagogical methods of teaching these disciplines to young children using evidence-based instructional practices. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 220 - Reading, Writing, And Thinking in The Content Areas

The purpose of this course is to address the theory and practice of teaching reading across content areas in grades pre-K through 8. Students will examine various theories, instructional materials, teaching procedures and strategies, and themselves as teachers and students. They will also examine literacy as a whole and include strategies on the teaching of writing and the art of classroom discussion. The goal of this course is to help preservice teachers become reflective teachers of literacy in a diverse society. Using inquiry, based on theory, research, and their own investigation in classrooms, students will learn to be reflective teachers of reading, writing, and discussion. Through active participation and practice, students in this course will come to a deeper understanding of literacy instruction. The students will leave the course with many practical, usable classroom ideas to employ in all subject areas. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104.

EDC 224 - Adolescent Development

Using an educational technology framework, this course explores the unique universe of the adolescent. Issues under discussion will include cognitive, moral, language, sexual, physical, and social development. Students use an educational technology framework to examine the adolescent in a variety of contexts, including family, peers, school, work, and leisure. This course is developed for secondary education majors only and is open to students in other majors to study adolescent development. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103 and EDC 104

EDC 233 - Autism: A Family Focus

This course is cross-listed with INST 233.

As the diagnosis rate for Autism escalates, it becomes apparent that the disorder presents unique challenges for the autistic individual, for those persons who are close to the autistic individual, and for the larger society. This course will take a multidisciplinary perspective to explore these topics, using Psychology and Education as a conceptual framework. We use a focus on the family as the central theme around which the course is constellated. A unique aspect of this course is the adoption of a family with an Autism Spectrum Disorder member by each student; communication with the family continues throughout the semester and is an integral part of assessment. (This course is open to non-majors)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 304 - Reading for Secondary Educators

This course provides undergraduate secondary education majors with the opportunity to understand reading as a strategic interactive process that affects the learner's efforts in all academic areas. Students will explore currently held views of the reading process, instructional techniques, and assessment concerns related to secondary education. Class sessions employ a variety of formats, including lecture, demonstration, discussion, and hands-on experiences. Course projects provide practical application of the theoretical, instructional, and diagnostic issues presented. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, EDC 224, and EDC324

EDC 306 - Foundations of American Education: Developing A Critical Understanding of Educational Thought and Practice

This course promotes disciplined analysis of the meaning and effects of educational institutions and provides resources for developing a critical understanding of educational thought and practice. This course also encourages the development of value positions regarding education and schooling in America based on critical study. Students gain resources for the development of policy-making perspectives and skills. Open to nonmajors.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 307 - Differentiated Instruction, Assessment, And Technology Integration

This course focuses on the application of learning and developmental theories as they relate to unit planning, assessment, and classroom management in inclusive educational settings. The entire course is devoted to understanding issues relating to accommodating diversity through developmentally appropriate practice, the 4MAT planning system, Gardner's Multiple Intelligence theory, varied instructional methods, technology, culturally relevant teaching, and multiple means of assessing students. Students are required to integrate technology into their teaching through various projects using PowerPoint, Excel, Microsoft Word, and Movie Maker programs. This course is taken with a one-credit lab (EDC 309) in which teacher candidates implement unit, technology, assessment, and classroom management plans in the classroom setting every Friday under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and University supervisor.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 309

EDC 308 - Assessment, Accommodations, And Adaptations for Students with Disabilities

This course provides students with a thorough understanding of pedagogy as it relates to students who are placed in inclusion classrooms or special education settings. Students are enrolled in field experiences (EDC 310 lab) that allow them to apply knowledge related to diagnostic assessment, individualized education plans, transition plans, special education law, assistive technology, behavior management, conflict resolution, instructional accommodations, special education populations, and special methods. In addition, a major focus is placed upon critical thinking and reflective practice. The course is designed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Standards for certification in early elementary and special education.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 310

EDC 309 - DIATI Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 307 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 307

EDC 310 - AAASD Lab

Students are involved in applying skills learned in EDC 308 to their work with school students in specific field placement sites in designated Professional Development Schools. Students work in these schools as pre-professionals under the guidance of La Salle faculty and cooperating teachers.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Corequisites: EDC 308

EDC 320 - Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Classroom

This course prepares preservice teachers with foundational knowledge and skills needed to be effective teachers of literacy to PreK-4 students in regular education settings who demonstrate significant problems in reading and writing. It prepares teachers to use diagnostic assessments as a basis for planning preventive and remedial instruction. Emphasis is placed on understanding and analysis of learning problems and the design and implementation of instructional interventions in reading and language arts. A field experience is required of all students, and course content and assignments are linked to this experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 324 - Differentiating Instruction for Adolescents Through Educational Technology

This course will extend and refine the core concepts first developed in EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224 and will provide contexts for developing and adjusting content-based instruction with specific emphasis on differentiating content lessons for special-needs and ELL populations. The course is heavily dependent upon a variety of digital and analog product technologies and is problem- and project-based in nature. A field experience (two hours each week) is required in conjunction with this course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 103, EDC 104, and EDC 224

EDC 325 - Teaching English Language Learners

This course provides a general overview of the ways to support English Language Learners (ELL) in the inclusive classroom. Information on Pennsylvania state standards for ELL students will be addressed and evidence-based strategies/approaches of oral language development will be emphasized. Theory will be connected to practice in field-based experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 326 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education

This course provides an introduction and overview of the field of early childhood education from both a historical and contemporary context. Course content engages teacher candidates in the exploration of their role as professionals in the field of early childhood education. Issues impacting the field of early childhood education in America will be investigated. Major philosophies and theories related to the development of young children and their implications for teaching and learning in an inclusive early childhood setting will be explored. Course content delves further into early childhood curriculum models in the US and understanding learning in early childhood education integrates all domains of development including social, emotional, language, cognitive, physical, and the arts. Understanding how to develop an inclusive classroom environment that embraces diversity and builds family and community relations is emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 336 - Foundations of Secondary Education and Curriculum

This course examines schooling and its problems in historic, social, economic, legal, organizational, philosophical and global contexts. The intents and effects of middle level and high school educational institutions past and present are evaluated. Schooling-related controversies are dissected and the organizational complexities of secondary school structures are analyzed. Numerous levels of assessment and accountability are researched. Theories and practices of curriculum development and standards are studied and applied to the construction of a values based curriculum. The course provides resources for the development of educational policy-making perspective skills. It stresses the knowledge, skills and dispositions that make teachers effective curriculum and school leaders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 350 - How People Learn

Based upon claims made by leading educators and psychologists that what we know about learning does not support current teaching practice, this course will engage us in an investigation of the rapidly exploding knowledge base available to those interested in how human beings acquire and represent knowledge. Together, we will derive the implications of this knowledge base about learning for the practice of teaching, and engage in a substantial, authentic project that will help put the information in a real-world context.

Among other things, you will articulate and explore your personal theory of how people learn, distinguish education from schooling, understand how experts differ from novices, identify gaps between pedagogical theory and classroom practice, and learn about what the best teachers and educators do.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: EDC 101, EDC 103, EDC 104

EDC 369 - Teaching Science as Integrated Inquiry

This course will focus on how to develop student understanding of science and nature of scientific inquiry through inquiry-centered approaches that are in harmony with the contemporary research on cognitive science, motivation, and learning and instruction. It will also address science education standards, curriculum, research, and classroom application. The course is taught using active learning strategies / tools such as scientific inquiries / investigations, demonstrations, field trips, teaching trials, discussion, and instructional technologies. Throughout the semester, students will be provided with many opportunities to engage in personal and collaborative inquiry about teaching and learning science.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 401 - The Art And Science Of Teaching

This course emphasizes teaching and learning within an educational technology framework. The focus is on elements of the educational process characterized by teacher involvement in decision-making: schoolbased curriculum development, instructional design, instructional methods, instructional materials and resources, educational technology using idea and product technologies, methods of evaluation, classroom management, and adjusting curriculum and instruction to the needs of special populations. Emphasis is placed upon the act of teaching as both art and science. Field experiences (two hours each week) and research papers are required. For Secondary Education majors only. This course has been designated as the writing emphasis course for Secondary Education majors. Students will be required to purchase approximately $50.00 in additional materials.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing and acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and EDC 103, 104, 224, 324, 304, and 336.

EDC 410 - Physical Education and Health for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess physical education, adaptive physical education, and health for preschool through fourth grade in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules. Students will be able to apply state and national guidelines for physical education and health to the development of an integrated mini-unit on health content appropriate to the population that they will teach in their practicum in special education. They will also be able to apply the appropriate state guidelines to the development of annotated games and activities appropriate for the population that they will teach. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 412 - Schools, Families and Communities

Strong collaborations between education professionals, families, and their communities are necessary for effective schooling. This course helps beginning teachers understand the diverse nature of the family in America and how to develop the types of relationships that are critical for the education of children. Emphasis will be on the family perspective. The course will highlight communication strategies and the promotion of family participation. Emphasis will be placed on the effective and dynamic relationship between schools, families, and communities in helping all children succeed in the school environment. The course is taken during the senior semester of the practicum in special education for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 415 - Creativity and the Arts for the Developing Child

This course prepares pre-service teachers to plan for, teach, and assess the visual arts, music, theater, dance, and play to preschool through grade 4 in accordance with the Pennsylvania Department of Education Framework for Pre-K Through Grade 4 Program Guidelines. The course is presented in modules connected by the common theme of creativity. Connections to prominent education theorists on creativity and the arts will be made. Students will develop pedagogy through creating an interdisciplinary unit encompassing each of the areas of art and based on a core concept in a content area. There are no prerequisite courses. The course is taken during the senior semester of student teaching for ESEC majors.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 431 - Middle Level Foundations

This course focuses exclusively on middle level philosophy, transition, learning, and management so that teacher candidates seeking certification in grades 4-8 will have a deeper understanding of pre- and emerging adolescent issues requiring specific educational approaches. The course also focuses on the adolescent in the context of the family, peer group, community, and society. A twelve-week student teaching experience follows this course to allow teacher candidates an opportunity to apply middle level principles to their teaching experiences.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Corequisites: Course is completed during the student teaching semester

EDC 460 - Education Internship Seminar

This three-credit course is a research seminar that accompanies the education internship experience . The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the work expected of them in a multitude of learning organizations. Students will contact an action-research study and design an implementation plan based on action research for internship experience. This seminar does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 461 - Education Internship

This six-credit internship course is an experiential program element within the Education Studies program that completes student preparation for professional life in the non-traditional educational setting. The experience operationalizes the research-based plan in EDC 460. The internship experience addresses identified, site-specific needs under the tutelage of a site expert and the coaching of the seminar instructor. This authentic application of knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework is realized in the context of job performance expected of them in the assigned learning organization(s). Students will be challenged to analyze, reflect upon and adjust educational plans and activities assigned by the internship host for purposes of achieving set goals. This internship does NOT meet certification requirements.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

EDC 470 - Special Methods of Teaching (The Professional Semester)

This course provides the secondary education major with full-time student-teaching experience in a grade 7-12 classroom. Under the direction of a certified cooperating teacher and a University supervisor, the student teaches for 12 weeks on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule. The student-teaching experience is supplemented by tutorials/seminars on selected professional issues and practice. The seminars are held for two weeks at the start of the semester on a five-day-a-week, full-day schedule, and evenings during the semester. To be eligible for student teaching, the student is required to make formal application for Stage II candidacy in the Secondary Education (EDC) program.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy, and all other coursework for both majors (Education and Content area)

EDC 473 - The Professional Semester: Student Teaching

For one semester of the professional year, pre-service teachers are engaged in student teaching in classrooms under the guidance of experienced teachers and a University supervisor. This experience takes place in a school in Philadelphia or the surrounding suburbs. For ESEC and ESML majors only.

Number of Credits: 12

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance into Stage II candidacy

Corequisites: EDC 475

EDC 475 - The Professional Semester: Teaching and Research Methods

The focus of this seminar is on applying knowledge and skills that students have gained in their previous coursework to the everyday work of teaching in elementary or middle-level classrooms, specifically interpersonal communication and professionalism, design of developmentally appropriate instructional units, adaptation of units to accommodate learner differences, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, and classroom management. An action research project that responds to a teaching dilemma, concern, question, or interest is also required. Topics are addressed in the context of the broader skills of problem solving and educational decision making that must be