Biology

Program Description

The Biology Department of La Salle University is dedicated to the Lasallian tradition of excellence in teaching. We are committed to developing the full intellectual, personal, and social potential of our students in an environment of mutual respect and cooperation.

The faculty of La Salle's Biology Department serves qualified students interested in pursuing further education and careers in the health professions, the physical sciences, the life sciences, and science education. In addition, we provide for non-science majors a variety of foundation level courses that explore biological issues of interest and concern to the general public.

La Salle has a long and proud tradition of training undergraduates for admission to health profession schools. We believe it important to provide these undergraduates with courses that emphasize the general principles of the life sciences and that address a diverse range of current scientific issues. We are equally committed to preparing students for graduate work in the life sciences, for careers in scientific/clinical technology, or for careers in science education by providing them with broadly-based theoretical and laboratory training. We feel the development of critical thinking skills and the establishment of a firm understanding of the foundational principles of the life sciences are the best preparation for more specialized professional and graduate training.

We believe the academic experience should provide an opportunity for mutual advancement and sharing of excitement for science through supportive yet challenging dialogue among faculty and students.

Why take this major?

The Biology program fosters a deep understanding of foundational knowledge in the life sciences and encourages students to apply this understanding in laboratory research projects that develop critical thinking skills and scientific reasoning. This training allows students to pursue a broad range of opportunities related to the life sciences including medical or graduate school and careers in the health professions, scientific/clinical technology, or science education.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Locate, recognize, evaluate and apply foundational knowledge in biology in an accurate and effective manner.
  • Apply scientific and quantitative reasoning to explore, analyze and question biological phenomena.
  • Use the tools and technologies of modern biology appropriately to collect data and address scientific hypotheses.
  • Communicate scientific information effectively both orally and in writing.

Program Contact Information

David Zuzga

Chair

Holroyd Hall 235

zuzga@lasalle.edu

(215) 991-3773

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 18

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: Minimum of 66

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 210 Cellular Biology and Genetics

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 18 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics
BIO 220 -  Structure and Function of Organisms
BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution, Ecology
BIO 412 - Biochemistry
BIO 413 - Molecular Biology

Additional 300/400-level biology courses to total a minimum of 11 courses

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 201 - Organic Chemistry I
CHM 202 - Organic Chemistry II
PHY 105 -General Physics I
PHY 106 - General Physics II
MTH 120 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

REQUIRED FOR MINOR IN BIOLOGY:

BIO 210
BIO 220
BIO 230

Three additional courses from the 300/400 level

Freshman Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 210   Biology 220  
Chemistry 111   Chemistry 112  
       

Sophomore Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 230   Biology Elective  
Chemistry 201   Chemistry 202  
Math 113 or Math 120   Math 120  
       

Junior Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology 412   Biology 413  
Biology Elective   Biology Elective  
Physics 105   Physics 106  

Senior Year

 
Fall   Spring  
Biology Elective or Capstone   Biology Elective or Capstone  
Biology Elective      
       

* This is a "typical" schedule. Some students will take Biology 210 after the Fall semester of their freshman year.

Course Descriptions

BIO 157 - Life Science: An Environmental Approach

This foundation biology course for non-majors places emphasis on the unifying concepts of ecology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of environmental issues, and establish a relevance to students' lives. Topics will include human influence on patterns and products of change in living systems, energy matter and organization, and human interaction and interdependence with other living systems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 158 - Life Science: A Human Approach

This foundation biology course for non-majors places emphasis on the unifying concepts of human biology. It is intended to demonstrate interconnections between the life and physical sciences, provide opportunity for in-depth exploration of life, and establish a relevance to students' lives. Topics will include: maintaining dynamic equilibrium in humans, human reproduction and inheritance, and human growth and differentiation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 161-162 - Anatomy and Physiology

This basic course in the structure and functioning of the human body places emphasis on the interrelationships of the major organ systems. It is intended for Allied Health students. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory; two terms.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: BIO 161 is a prerequisite for BIO 162.

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology

Topics of this course include structure, growth, and identification of medically important microorganisms; role of specific pathogens in the etiology of human disease; immunology; chemotherapeutic and antibiotic control of infectious diseases. It is intended for Allied Health students. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics

This course provides an introduction to the principles of cellular and molecular biology and genetics. Topics include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular reproduction, and molecular and classical genetics. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students must be eligible for Math 113 or Math 120 and Chem 111

Prerequisites: High school or college chemistry.

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

BIO 220 - Structure and Function of Organisms

This course is an introduction to the principles of plant and animal form and function. Emphasis will be placed on the correlation of structure and function of the major organ systems of plants and animals. Laboratory sessions will focus on physiological phenomena. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 210

BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution, And Ecology

Topics in this course include an integrated study of evolutionary principles and mechanisms, the diversity of life, ecosystem structure and dynamics, human interaction with ecosystem components, and the biological basis of behavior. Three hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 220

BIO 301 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

This course examines the comparative systemic anatomy of the vertebrate classes, hypotheses of origin, and radiation of the phylum Chordata. Laboratory dissections of representative Chordates from amphioxus to mammal. Two hours lecture; four hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 303 - Microbiology

This course addresses the structure, growth, identification, and control of microorganisms of major medical, environmental, and industrial importance; molecular control and genetics of bacteria and viruses; immunology; microbial pathogenesis; and epidemiology of infectious diseases of humans. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: C- or higher grade in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 305 - Mammalian Physiology

This lecture-laboratory course examines the metabolic processes and associated physiochemical phenomena of mammals. Current physiological hypotheses of the nervous, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, and digestive systems, as well as special senses, will be studied. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 306 - Neurobiology

This course involves a lecture-laboratory study of the nervous system, including principles of membrane biophysics, cellular neurophysiology, systems neurophysiology, and neuroanatomy. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 310 - Genetics

This course is an introduction to genetics at the molecular, cytological, and organismal level. Included are the thorough coverage of Mendelian and other basic transmission genetics phenomena in the light of our knowledge of DNA and cell structure and function; mutation and mutagenesis; and an introduction to recombinant DNA. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 314 - Biometrics

This course addresses the analysis of experiments and research data in quantitative biology. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including probability distributions, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 317 - Invertebrate Zoology

Topics of this course involve life processes, phylogenetic advances, and basic classification of the major pre-chordate phyla with emphasis on their evolution and ecology. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 318 - Evolution

This course involves a presentation and analysis of the evidence for the evolution of life. Major topics include the origin of life and cellular organelles as well as the development of the diversity of life present today. Heavy emphasis will be placed on the ideas of Charles Darwin as expanded and modified by evidence from modern population genetics, cytogenetics, and molecular biology. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 319 - The Plant Kingdom

Topics of this course involve functional anatomy, phylogeny, and basic systematics of non-vascular and vascular plants. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 400 - Marine Biology

This course offers a contemporary view of the dynamics establishing community structure in pelagic, estuarine, mangrove tidepool, coral reef, hydrothermal vent, and intertidal ecosystems. Structural, functional, behavioral, and adaptive modifications of marine organisms will be examined. Three hours lecture; field trip(s) typically included.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 402 - Cell Biology

This course examines the physical properties, chemical structure, and metabolism of simple and specialized cells, as well as recent advances in the techniques of cell culture and investigation. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 403 - Principles of Ecology

This course addresses the basic concepts of ecology and a broad introduction to overall biosphere functioning. Major topics include energy flows; nutrient cycles; environmental conditions and their importance; plants and animals at the individual, population, and community level; and the overall functioning and development of the major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 404 - Field Ecology

This course involves field and laboratory projects/research at La Salle's Penllyn Biostation and other sites. Six hours laboratory and field work.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 403 or permission of instructor

BIO 405 - Histology

This course focuses on an examination of the minute and ultra structure of mammalian primary tissues together with their functional relationships in the formation of major organ systems; histological basis of function is stressed. Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 406 - Developmental Biology

This course focuses on the molecular and genetic analysis of development and differentiation. Some descriptive morphogenesis is considered. Two hours lecture; two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 412 - Biochemistry

The course demonstrates the principles of basic biochemistry while focusing on the interrelationships between those biochemical pathways that provide energy and those that provide the basic molecular species for synthesis. Topics include bioenergetics, low molecular weight biosynthesis, enzyme function and kinetics, and metabolic control. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 413 - Molecular Biology

This is a survey course that will examine the basic concepts of molecular biology. Topics include mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication, transcription, and translation, recombinant DNA technology, molecular aspects of gene interaction and recombination, cellular transformation, and the molecular biology of the nervous and immune systems. The laboratory focuses on utilizing the basic techniques currently employed in molecular biology (molecular cloning, ELISA, genetic recombination, gel electrophoresis, etc.) Three hours lecture; three hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 412

BIO 420 - Genomics

The Genomics course will be a hybrid lecture and hands-on computer course. This course will focus on the topic of genome organization and the bioinformatic tools that are used to study genomes. We will investigate the genome structure of viral, microbial, and eukaryotic genomes and the different databases used to store and access this data. DNA sequence analysis using the BLAST algorithm and multiple sequence alignments will be studied. Identifying genes and genomic elements using different computational tools will be performed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 430 - The Biology of Cancer

The cellular and molecular mechanisms driving cancer's hallmark phenotypes will be explored. These include proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, activating invasion and metastasis, reprogramming of energy metabolism and evading immune destruction. Within these conceptual frameworks, primary scientific literature will be examined and clinical implications of the research evaluated. Students will choose a specific area of interest, allowing them to develop an in-depth understanding of the current "state-of-the-art" in a field of research. Students will gain an informed understanding of the inherent challenges cancer presents and assess the prospects of treating and ultimately curing the disease.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 460 - Cooperative Education/Internship

This is normally a full-time, paid employment at a cooperating institution/company to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions may qualify). It involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. Position must be approved by Department Chair. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 470 - Special Topics in Biology

Periodically, a course will be offered that deals in detail with a topic of interest in current biological research. Students may be asked to write library research paper(s) and present a seminar.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

BIO 480-481 - Biological Research

This research is for election by qualified students contemplating advanced studies. It is intended to provide actual research experience under staff supervision. Students are required to present a seminar on their work and to prepare a poster. Hours to be arranged.

Number of Credits: 3 each

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A final grade of C- or higher in BIO 230 is required in order to advance to 300/400-level BIO courses.

ENV 152 - Oceanography

This course provides a study of the physical processes that affect the oceans of the earth. Emphasis will be on tides, currents, waves, chemistry of the sea, and geology of ocean basins. Three hours lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 153 - Introduction to Environmental Science

This course is an introduction to the field of environmental science, including the historical development of the subject, the current state of knowledge, and the development of humans and the impact they have had on our environment. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory a week. The course includes mandatory field trips.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 155 - Earth Science

This course covers various topics pertaining to the earth and its place inthe universe. Major aspects of geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy are studied. Emphasis is placed on the interactions of earth systems, and the evolution of our plane

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information. Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data. Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology. This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

GEO 202 - Mineralogy

Hand specimen identification of minerals is emphasized in this course. Study of the growth, internal structure, and physical properties of minerals is addressed. Six hours of lecture and laboratory are required.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

GEO 305 - Environmental Geochemistry

This course provides a practical background in basic geochemical principles that can be applied to environmental problems, such as global warming, acid rain, smog, acid mine drainage, nuclear waste disposal, and water pollution. Three-hour lecture/three-hour laboratory is required.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, CHM 112, ENV 153