English

Program Description

The English major at La Salle focuses on the study of literature but complements such study with additional attention to examining the various modes of writing (through courses in creative, professional, business, legal, and Web-based writing) and to considering the role language plays in everyday life and in the continuing history of literature (through courses in grammar, the history of language, and language and prejudice). In so doing, the major prepares students for a number of careers, including teaching at the secondary level, for graduate and professional education, and for a variety of roles in which they can prove themselves responsible, contributing members to society as a whole.

The English major at La Salle provides students with contexts, frameworks, and opportunities to read widely and deeply in a variety of literatures in English and translation; to write well in academic, creative, and professional modes; and to make connections between what they read and the communities in which they live. In doing so, the English major participates in La Salle's broader mission "as a Catholic university rooted in the liberal arts tradition" that "challenges students to contemplate life's ultimate questions as they develop their faith, engage in a free search for truth, and explore their full human potential."

Why take this major?

English is the perfect major to prepare students for a number of careers and for post-graduate study in a number of areas. Our gradautes have gone on to careers in teaching, in creative writing, in journalism, in medicine and in the law, in public service, in business and management, in technology.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Write clearly and persuasively in ways appropriate to the study of literature, writing, and/or language.
  • Read literary and cultural texts with an awareness of their thematic, formal, and social dimensions.
  • Analyze literary and cultural texts using a variety of critical approaches.
  • Construct arguments using academic research on a variety of literary and cultural texts.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with canonical and non-canonical texts and the historical development of Anglo-American traditions.

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

13

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

39

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 13 courses in total in order to graduate. 13 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/ Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

*For the Major in English (13 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 248 - Survey of Amer Lit to 1865
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
Two courses at the 400 level: ENG 402, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315, 316, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
1-4 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 315, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
*Double Major in English and Secondary Education (13 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 248 - Survey of Amer Lit to 1865
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
Two courses at the 400 level: ENG  417 and 438
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315 and 438
ENG 318 and 1 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
*For  the Double Major in English and another discipline other than Secondary Education(10 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
One course at the 400 level: ENG 402, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315, 316, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
1-2 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 315, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

*Double Major in English and Secondary Education (13 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 248 - Survey of Amer Lit to 1865
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
Two courses at the 400 level: ENG 417 and 438
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315 and 438
ENG 315 and 1 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447

NOTE: There is a maximum number of courses taken outside the department that students can count toward their 13 course major. No more than 5 courses taken outside the department can count toward the 13 course major. Such courses include AP credit, courses taken while studying abroad, courses taken at another institution, and Honors courses taught by faculty in English--Honors 111 + Honors 112 count as a single course: traditionally English 245. This rule also applies to the full double majors in Secondary Education and English where students take 13 courses in both Secondary Education and in English.

 

*For the Double Major in English and another discipline other than Secondary Education (10 courses)
ENG 180 - Introduction to Literary Study
ENG 245 - Survey of Brit Lit to 1798
ENG 246 - Survey of Brit Lit since 1798
ENG 249 -Survey of Amer Lit since 1865
ENG 324 - Shakespeare
ENG 480 - Capstone
One course in literature before 1900: ENG 351, 351, 367, 370-379, 437 (all with permission of the chair) or ENG 441, 442, 446
One course at the 400 level: ENG 402, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
Two courses in literature at the 300 or 400 level: ENG 315, 316, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447
1-2 free electives for the major: ENG 243, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 315, 316, 318, 330, 351, 352, 353, 357, 367, 370-379, 492, 405, 406, 410, 417, 437, 438, 441, 442, 443, 446, 447

NOTE: There is a maximum number of courses taken outside the department that students can count toward their 10 course double major. No more than 4 courses taken outside the department can count toward the 10 course double major. Such courses include AP credit, courses taken while studying abroad, courses taken at another institution, and Honors courses taught by faculty in English--Honors 111 + Honors 112 count as a single course: traditionally English 245.

Minor Requirements

*Minor in English

ENG 150 or ENG 180

ENG 245 or 246 or 248 or 249 or 250

Four electives, at least two of which must be at the 300 or 400 level.

*Minor in Creative Writing

ENG 204

ENG 353

Two 300-400 level creative writing courses

Additional literature course with ENG designation

Any additional literature or creative writing course with ENG designation.

NOTE: There is a maximum number of courses taken outside the department that students can count toward their 6 course minor in English or in Creative Writing. No more than 2 courses taken outside the department can count toward the 6 course minor. Such courses include AP credit, courses taken while studying abroad, courses taken at another institution, and Honors courses taught by faculty in English--Honors 111 + Honors 112 count as a single course: traditionally English 245.

Fall Freshmen
English 110
English 180
3 core courses

Spring Freshmen
English 245
English 248
3 core courses

Fall Sophomore
English 246
English 249
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Spring Sophomore
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Fall Junior
English 324
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Spring Junior
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Fall Senior
English 480
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Spring Senior
Mix of core courses, controlled electives in the major, free electives

Course Descriptions

ENG 110 College Writing I: Persuasion

This course introduces students to rhetorical analysis and argument, while helping students to improve their writing skills and to develop a writing process suited for college-level work. Students learn to read critically from a variety of texts, disciplines, and media. They learn to synthesize texts to develop original arguments aimed at an academic audience. The course establishes a community of learners whose writing engages in ethical inquiry and reasoned debate, and it prompts students to use writing to make meaningful connections between and among their academic, social, and political lives.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students must earn a grade of C or better to ENG 110 to enroll in ENG 210.

ILO Met: ILO 8.1.b - ENG 110

ENG 150 Introduction to Literature

This introductory course, designed for students who are not majoring in English, takes an historical and generic approach to literature. Students will study works from multiple genres, including film. Syllabus will vary by section, but all sections are designed to teach students how to read, write, and think about primary texts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ENG 180 Introduction to Literary Study

Required of all day English majors but open to all studnets in place of ENG 150, this course in literature introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices of literary studies, provides a general overview of literary periods, genres and theories, and offers directed practice in the use of library and database resources essential for the study of English.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ENG 204 Introduction to Creative Writing

This course offers an introduction to writing in a variety of literary genres and to the workshop format of reading and discussing student writing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 210 College Writing II: Research

This course builds upon the writing skills and rhetorical knowledge students gained in ENG 110, training them to conduct academic research and to compose innovative and original research papers that are appropriate for upper-division coursework in a variety of disciplines. Built around shared texts, concerns, or themes, this course is driven by individual research projects that students develop through consultation with the instructor and in conversation with the projects of their peers. Students learn to develop strong research questions, and they learn to find, critically evaluate, and synthesize a broad range of academic texts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENG 110.

ILO Met: ILO 5.1 - ENG 210

ENG 230 Web Design and Development

Web Design and Development is an introduction to the practice of World Wide Web document design, grounded in an understanding of the Web's development and theories of graphics and communication. The course focuses on researching, creating, revising, and editing Web sites, using "hard code" and applications-based layout and editing. Cross-listed with DART 230.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 243 Religion and Contemporary Literature

This course offers a study of religion and religious themes in literature. Attention will be paid both to literary critical concern and to religious analysis of poetry, fiction, and drama. Cross-listed as REL 243.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 245 Survey of British Literature and Culture To 1798

This survey course considers important authors, works, and literary movements in British literature from its beginnings to 1798 within the context of shifts in history and culture. Students gain not only an overview of significant works within this time frame, including early Celtic literature, but also a broad understanding of the cultural and aesthetic underpinnings indicated by terms like Medieval literature, Renaissance or Early Modern literature, and Restoration and 18th-century literature.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 246 Survey of British Literature and Culture Since 1798

This survey course considers important authors, works, and literary movements in British literature from 1798 to the present within the context of shifts in British history and culture. Students gain not only an overview of significant works within this time frame, including Irish literature, but also a broad understanding of the cultural and aesthetic underpinnings indicated by terms like Modernism and Post-Modernism.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 248 Survey of American Literature and Culture To 1865

This survey course considers important authors, works, and literary movements of early American literature from its beginnings to the Civil War. Students gain not only an overview of significant works within this time frame, but also a broad understanding of the cultural and aesthetic underpinnings indicated by terms like the Age of Faith, the Age of Reason and Revolution, Transcendentalism, and the American Renaissance.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 249 Survey of American Literature and Culture Since 1865

This survey course is the standard second half of the college survey of American literature written during the great transformations from 1865 to the present. Students will deepen their awareness of literary movements such as Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Students will also improve their familiarity with the works of important writers during this period.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 250 Literature and Culture

In this intermediate literature course, students discuss a literary theme in its cultural contexts. Topics vary by section (Literature and the Family, Literature and Gender, Literature and Food, and so on) and will be discussed in terms of multiple genres, including film, and different historical and social contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 302 Language and Prejudice

This course studies how language affects the way we view ourselves and others in our culture. Case studies of language in relation to sexism, racism, and politics will be supplemented by discussions of introductory concepts of language systems and stylistic analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

ENG 303 Writing for Business

By providing instruction in planning and executing effective business writing, this course helps students learn to write the documents required of them as professionals: letters, resumes, memos, proposals, abstracts, and reports.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

ENG 305 Fiction Writing I

This course offers an introduction to the writing of fiction using a workshop format.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 306 Poetry Writing

This course offers an introduction to the writing of poetry using a workshop format.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 307 Playwriting

This course will offer a study of the art of playwriting from the traditional and contemporary points of view, and provides guided writing of a one-act play.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Legal Writing is a challenging yet practical course in the reading, planning, and writing of effective legal documents (legal letters and memoranda, briefs, contracts, and personal statements for applications to law schools). It is designed for students planning careers in areas such as law, business, communication, and media studies.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 309 Topics in Creative and Professional Writing I

This course offers instruction in various types of specialized writing such as grant writing, creative nonfiction, and satire. Topics and emphases vary each time the course is offered, so students may take this course for credit more than once.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 310 Editing and Publishing

This course takes a workshop approach to provide students with experience in judging manuscripts, proofreading, typographical design, and production of short documents: e.g., forms, resumes, flyers, brochures, and newsletters. ENG 310 offers an introduction to, and directed practice in, the use of desktop publishing software.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 315 Young Adult Literature

In this course, attention will be paid to the reading and discussion of contemporary young adult fiction representing a variety of themes and genres. Other topics include adolescent psychology, the history and development of young adult literature, current trends in young adult literature, and the young adult in film and other mass media. In addition, this course prepares prospective and actual teachers, librarians, and parents to understand and to direct the reading of young adults.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 316 Literary Theory and Criticism

Students in ENG 316 read and discuss major critical theories that have dominated literary and cultural studies in the last several decades.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 318 Advanced Composition and the Writing Process

ENG 318 is an advanced course in writing and rewriting skills designed to show students how to write more effectively for different purposes and to different audiences in such genres as essays, articles, and reviews. Attention will be paid to a writer's method and audiences and to the several steps in the writing process.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ENG 110

ENG 324 Shakespeare

This course considers selected poems and plays, including tragedies, comedies, history plays, and romances, exploring the literary, dramatic, and historical dimensions of Shakespeare's art.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 351 Gender and Ethnicity

The course focuses on texts that represent various representations of gender or ethnicity in Western literature (primarily American ethnic literature and/or writers representing diaspora). The course may include literature from any time period, or be narrowed to specific groups, nationalities, or historic periods (i.e., Asian American women writers during World War II) or broadened to include cross-cultural, cross-gendered representations (i.e., British and French women writers).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

ENG 352 Genre and Form

In this course, students examine literature through the lens of form and genre. Specifically, topics may include history of the elegy, history of the novel, literature of detection, science fiction, autobiography and memoir, environmental writing, or satire. Students will leave this course with a deeper understanding of how a specific genre is represented across time periods and from various cultural traditions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 353 Contemporary Literature

This course examines fiction or drama or poetry from roughly 1950 to the present. It may include both Western and non-Western texts (including works in translation). The focus of the course in any given semester may be in one or more genres, with an emphasis on applying various critical methods for analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ENG 357 Living American Writers

Students read from the works of four or five well-known American writers who visit the class to discuss their work. Although topics of discussion will vary according to the writers being studied, consideration will be given to such matters as canonicity, the role of the writer in the broader culture, literary form, theme as it evolves over the course of an author's career, and the business of publishing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 367 Literature and Film

This course examines the uneasy relationship between literature and film, a relation long debated by writers and filmmakers alike. Specifically, students will study an eclectic selection of literary works and an equally eclectic collection of films based on those works. The literary texts will be drawn from different genres and national literary traditions, and the films will be drawn from different cinematic traditions and genres. Cross listed as FLMS 367

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 9.1 - Creative and Artistic Expression

ENG 370-79 Special Topics

Specially designed courses in literature built around a topic chosen by the instructor. Topics vary from semester to semester.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 402 Topics in Creative and Professional Writing II

This course includes special topics in advanced writing, including memoir writing, magazine writing, advanced business writing, advanced poetry writing, and writing about the environment. Topics and emphases vary each time the course is offered, so students may take this course for credit more than once.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 405-06 Advanced Fiction Workshop

ENG 405 and ENG 406 offer students further direction in the writing of fiction within a workshop. Students may repeat these courses for credit.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ENG 305

ENG 410 Publication Design

Publication Design reviews and extends knowledge of copyediting and layout and design for both print and Web. The emphasis is on the use of Adobe InDesign to produce a range of documents, from logos, advertisements, and personal identity packages to magazine pages, magazine dummies, and Web layouts. Copy from La Salle journalism students will be used for some layout and photography exercises and posted to the Web. ENG 310 or experience with InDesign is helpful, but not required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 417 History and Structure of the English Language

This course studies the ways in which the language we call English has developed over the centuries, the kinds of English that are spoken in the world today, and the underlying structure of these varieties of English and their different grammars. ENG 417 combines theory with text, using works by authors from the 7th century to the 21st as base texts in which to analyze how English has continued to develop as an important linguistic force throughout the world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 437 World Literature, The Western Tradition

This course surveys the literature of Western Europe from the ancient Greeks to the modern period, emphasizing drama and narrative in their many forms. Literary works will be studied in relationship to their historical and cultural contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 438 World Literature, The Non-Western Tradition

This course considers primarily 20th- and 21st-century readings in selected works from Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, and the Pacific Rim, emphasizing literature as a reflection of its cultural background.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 441 Studies in British Literature and Culture To 1700

In this course, students intensively study aspects of Medieval British and Renaissance literature and culture up to the beginnings of the modern period. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors, examining them in light of their historical and cultural contexts, as well as their continental counterparts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 442 Studies in British Literature and Culture 1700-1900

In this course, students intensively study British Restoration and 18th- and 19th-century literature, and the culture. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical, literary, and cultural contexts, as well as competitive or complementary continental traditions.

Number of Credits: 3

ENG 443 Studies in British Literature and Culture Since 1900

In this course, students intensively study British literature and culture from 1900 to the present. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical and cultural contexts, as well as continental traditions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 446 Studies in American Literature and Culture To 1900

In this course, students intensively study American literature from its beginnings to 1900. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical and cultural contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 447 Studies in American Literature and Culture Since 1900

In this course, students intensively study American literature from 1900 to the present. Although topics may vary from section to section, this course concentrates on selected authors from this time period, examining them in the light of their historical and cultural contexts.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENG 461-462 Internship

Students may intern at a variety of sites including advertising and public relations firms, publishing and broadcasting companies, for-profit and nonprofit organizations, and social service or health care agencies. Student interns work under professional supervision to learn how to apply their education to the everyday demands of the world of work. Students can earn 3 credits for internships requiring 12-15 hours per week of work, and 6 credits for internships requiring 24-30 hours per week of work. In addition, students can complete two 3-credit internships in different semesters.

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Interested students must have at least a junior or senior standing, a 2.75 grade point average both overall and in the major, and the recommendation of the internship coordinator.

ENG 480 Capstone Seminar

The major and double major in English conclude with a capstone seminar in which students pursue an independent research, pedagogical, or writing project of significant depth and scope directed by a faculty facilitator and in consultation with faculty knowledgeable in each student's field of inquiry. The goal of the capstone seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to pursue a topic of interest in a sustained way and to support each student's project through the discussion and application of advanced research in the discipline and a workshop in which the student is able to present material in draft on the way to the production of the final project. The capstone provides a forum in which students can share ideas, provide feedback to one another, and solve problems related to scholarly research, pedagogy, and creative projects. ENG 480 may also be taken by students minoring in English.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face