History

Program Description

In accordance with our belief that History is, as G.R. Elton once put it, "the only living laboratory we have of the human experience," the History Department of La Salle University seeks to immerse its students as broadly as possible in that experience. In the best tradition of the Christian Brothers, we aspire to teach our students, "where we find them," regardless of means or status. Toward that end we take to heart the words of the University's mission statement, seeking "to educate the whole person by fostering a rigorous free search for truth." We believe that showing students the full reach of the human past "prepares students for the lifelong pursuit and exploration of wisdom, knowledge, and faith that lead to engaged and fulfilling lives marked by a commitment to the common good."

Why take this major?

History is a great major to keep your career options open, because majors acquire invaluable critical reading, writing, and thinking skills essential for jobs in all fields. History majors have ended up in just about every career imaginable, but it is an especially good major for careers in museums/archives, government (at the federal, state, or local levels), law, and teaching.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Identifying the major features of foundational American history and World history, and using the past to understand contemporary issues.
  • Understanding a range of historiographic approaches.
  • Demonstrating competency in analyzing and evaluating secondary sources.
  • Demonstrating competency in locating, contextualizing, and analyzing primary sources.
  • Applying skills (I-IV) to ask historical questions and create evidence-based written arguments (synthesizing historical events).
  • Valuing self-directed learning

Program Contact Information

Stuart Leibiger, Chair

345 Hayman Hall

leibiger@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1090

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 12

Total: 38-40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 36

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO**

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO**

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO**

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO**

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 courses in total in order to graduate. 12 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

**Note: All History majors must take HIS 200, or HIS 202, or HIS 205 AND they must take HIS 206, or HIS 251, or 255. Because of the distinct discipline requirement, a student may only apply one of these six courses toward the core. Majors may therefore choose one of the following two options:

Option A:

    • ILO 4: HIS 200 or HIS 202 or HIS 205
    • ILO 9: Choose course within ILO
    • ILO 10: Choose course within ILO
    • ILO 11: Choose course within ILO (to be taken in addition to HIS 206 or HIS 251 or HIS 255)

Option B:

    • ILO 4: Choose course within ILO (to be taken in addition to HIS 200 or HIS 202 or HIS 205)
    • ILO 9: Choose course within ILO
    • ILO 10: Choose course within ILO
    • ILO 11: HIS 206 or HIS 251 or HIS 255

Americas Concentration: 5 Americas 300-349 electives and 3 Afro-Eurasian 350-399 electives

fro-Eurasian Concentration: 5 Afro-Eurasian 350-399 electives and 3 more Americas 300–349 electives

All History majors are required to take: HIS 480 Seminar I and HIS 481 Seminar I

Concentrations

Americas Concentration

Afro-Eurasian Concentration

Please see above.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Double Majors: Students whose second major is History are not required to take His 480 and His 481.

Minor Requirements

REQUIRED FOR HISTORY MINORS: 6 COURSES

Minors must take the two core History courses listed above, plus any four upper-level (300 and above) electives.

Advanced Placement credit in history is granted to students who score 4 or above.

Fall Year 1: Core Americas (ILO 4.1)

Spring Year 1: Core Afro-Eurasian (ILO 11.1)

Fall Year 2: Two Upper-Level Electives

Spring Year 2: Two Upper-Level Electives

Fall Year 3: Two Upper-Level Electives

Spring Year 3: Two Upper-Level Electives

Fall Year 4: His 480

Spring Year 4: His 481

Course Descriptions

HIS 200 - U.S. Republic to 1877

This course examines the creation of the United States, the modern world’s first truly successful experiment in republican government (representative democracy). After tracing the 17th-century founding and 18th-century maturation of the British North American colonies, it covers the causes and results of the American Revolution, the political, social, and economic history of the early republic, how the Market Revolution transformed the lives of Americans, and how the Civil War resolved the ambiguous legacies of the American Revolution. (Formerly His 300.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 202 - Themes in American History: A Biographical Approach

This introductory survey course covers United States history through the lives of representative Americans. Course readings consist of a series of paired biographies of major figures who confronted the pivotal issues and challenges of their times. Course themes include the establishment of the colonies, the emergence of American national identity, the founding and preservation of the republic, the struggle against slavery and racism, the spread of capitalism and industrialization, the rise of foreign affairs, the influence of immigration, the growth of the federal welfare state, and the creation of an inclusive society. Overall, the course addresses the experiences of different races, classes, genders, and ethnicities. (Formerly HIS 155.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 205 - US Since 1877

The second half of the survey begun by the Core concentration course, HIS 200, is presented in this study. It addresses the Progressive Movement, American involvement in World War I, the Roaring Twenties, America between the wars, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam Era, and the United States at the dawn of the 21st century. (Formerly His 305.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 206 - The Americas before 1492

This course is an introduction to the cultures and civilizations of the Americas prior to the period of sustained European contact. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will examine how the American continents were peopled and how different groups developed in terms of society, culture, religion, politics, and economy. The course will emphasize material culture by looking at and learning to interpret a wide array of material sources, including archaeological sites, artifacts, buildings, landscapes, and many types of symbolic expression.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

HIS 250 - Global History To 1500

This course examines the development of the first civilizations in Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean, and the Americas, with the aim of exploring their distinctive approaches to human needs and social organization. Students are also introduced to historical methodology, historiography, and different perspectives on how we view the past. (Formerly His 151.)

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

HIS 251 - Global History From 1500 To the Present

This course offers a study of the evolution and interactions of the cultures of Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Oceania from 1500 to the present, designed to give students a greater understanding of the relationships among modern nations so necessary in today's shrinking globe. Students also have the opportunity to further hone their skills in the areas of the historian's craft introduced in HIS 151.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

HIS 255 - 20th Century Global History

This course is a survey of global history during the 20th century. Key topics include the rise of modern ideologies, imperialism and neocolonialism, global conflicts (World Wars I and II and the Cold War), decolonization, economic integration and globalization. These topics will be examined through the lens of how the peoples of different countries and world regions shaped and were in turn shaped by the century's major developments.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

HIS 302 - American Revolution

Revolutions have shaped the modern world. Perhaps the most important of these revolutions gave birth to the United States, an experiment in republican government. Covering 1740-1790, this course analyzes the colonies' separation from Great Britain, an upheaval whose promise Americans have sought to fulfill for more than 200 years. Topics include the causes, results, stages, and historiography of the Revolution. This course examines how revolutionary the American Revolution really was, politically, militarily, socially, and ideologically. (Formerly His 402.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 307 - Latin America: The Colonial Period

This course surveys Latin American history from the pre-contact era (with an emphasis on Aztec, Mayan, and Inca cultures) through the Spanish and Portuguese empires. It employs social, cultural, and political history perspectives.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 308 - Latin America In Revolution

This course is an introduction to the history of post-independence Latin America. It studies the political, social, and economic history of the former American colonies of Spain and Portugal from their revolutions for independence through the present day. It is structured by three major themes: revolutions and reactions, nation building, and international relations. It pays close attention to the ways in which different social groups—men and women; people of Indian, African, European, and Asian descent; the upper, middle, and lower classes; city dwellers and country dwellers—participated in significant events.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 313 - Jeffersonian-Jacksonian Democracy

This course is a detailed analysis of the development of the American political system in an increasingly democratic society. (Formerly HIS 413.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 315 - Fiery Trial: Civil War

The Civil War has been called the defining moment in our nation's history. Not only did the conflict emancipate four million slaves, but it also settled a longstanding debate over American federalism and proved once and for all the success of the Founders' experiment in republican government. Covering 1850-1877, this course analyzes the causes, course, and aftermath of the most momentous war in American history. It explores political, constitutional, military, economic, and social issues. (Formerly HIS 415.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 324 - History of Philadelphia

Philadelphia was America's "First City" both in size and influence. Although its importance later declined, the city has continued to be an American icon. This course covers the development of Philadelphia from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on social, political, and economic history. It considers how the peoples of the city have shaped it, the role Philadelphia has played in national history, and the nature of historical memory about the city. Lectures and discussion are complemented by field trips and student research.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 326 - Oral History

Through this course, students will become proficient in the methods and theory of oral history. Students will read and discuss books and articles that explain oral history theory and methods and that demonstrate how historians use oral history interviews to construct interpretive historical narratives. Students will learn how to plan, conduct, process, transcribe, and digitally preserve oral history interviews. Themes may include political history, family history, labor and class history, gender history, African-American history, and military history.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 327 - Modern America

This course examines the growth of government involvement at home and abroad since 1939 with readings and analysis of original documents. (Formerly HIS 425.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 329 - History of US Women

An in-depth analysis of the experience of women in American culture is examined in this course. Special attention is given to the women's rights movement, women in the Industrial Revolution, and women in World War I and World War II.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 330 - The Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1913

This course focuses on the nationalization of American life, including the building of the railroad network, the rise of industry, the labor movement, immigration, and urbanization. (Formerly HIS 429.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 331 - America's Military Past

The impact of the American military establishment upon American society and the formation of defense strategy and foreign policy are the topics of emphasis in this course.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 332 - Introduction to Public History

Public History is the field within historical studies that communicates historical information to the general public within a variety of media. This semester, we will look at some of the ways which professional public historians participate in and lead those activities. Public historians follow a variety of career tracks: curators and collections care specialists; archivists; historic site managers and interpreters; historic preservationists and historic district advocates; historic archeologists and architects, and a variety of other fields are all part of the world of public history. This upper-level elective class is intended to be an overview, a glimpse at a variety of issues that face public historians in these various area. We will examine how Americans have used the past, issues that face us as we interpret history and heritage, and the numerous career potentials available to professionals who wish to devote their careers to public history. (Formerly HIS 430.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 333 - The American Immigrant

This course focuses on the history of immigration to America and the ethnic impact upon American institutions.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 334 - The Political Economy of Latin America

This course begins by examining aspects of the indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans in what has come to be called "Latin America." Throughout, it considers issues such as colonialism, militarism, race, gender relations, and religion that have shaped the societies, polities, and economies of nations from Mexico and the Caribbean to those of the Southern Cone. The goal of the course is to afford class members the opportunity to better understand Latin America's history as a basis for comprehending its likely future. Cross-listed with ECN 334 and POL 334.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 337 - African-American History

This course covers African-American history from colonization to the modern Civil Rights Movement.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 340 - Topics in U.S. History

This course is an examination of selected topics illustrating the political, social, and cultural history of the modern world.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 341 - Russia And America Since 1741

Topics emphasized in this course include Russian colonization of Alaska, Russian diplomatic relations with the United States, Russian emigration to America, the Cold War, trade, and cultural exchanges between the Soviet Union and the United States.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 342 - History of the Westward Movement in America

This course is a study of the American frontier, emphasizing pioneer life, federal Indian policy, and the settlement of the Great Plains and Far West.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 347 - Presidential Elections

This course provides an historical analysis of presidential campaigns from 1900 to 1980, stressing the evolution of political techniques, issues, political parties, and presidential personalities.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

HIS 349 - The United States in the Pacific Basin

This course explores the interrelationship of the United States and the East Asian world in the modern period. (Formerly HIS 447.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 355 - Topics in Modern European History

This course is an examination of selected topics illustrating the political, social, and cultural history of modern Europe.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 357 - Twentieth-Century Third World

This class traces the recent history of the world outside the "core," using case studies to try to understand the big picture of global history and see how historical changes affected the daily lives of individuals in the Third World. The topics covered will include the impact of the world wars and the Cold War; the circumstances of empire, the processes of decolonization, and the experiences of independence; and the history of local economies in the face of globalization. (Formerly HIS 303.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 358 - Women and History

Selected topics on the history of women in Europe from the Classical Period to the 21st century will be explored in this course. (Formerly HIS 328.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 359 - Europe To 1400

This course traces the unfolding of Western civilization from pre-history to the Renaissance. The legacies of Greece and Rome; the heritage of both early Christian Europe and the Byzantine and Islamic civilizations; and the contribution of later medieval society to the governmental, economic, and intellectual growth of Europe. (Formerly HIS 310.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 360 - Europe from 1400 To the Present

This course surveys the decline of feudal institutions, emergence of modern European states, expansion into the Western hemisphere, the impact of the Renaissance, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, rise of nationalism, development of modern totalitarianism, and the impact of two world wars on Western society. (Formerly HIS 311.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 361 - Imperialism in the Modern World

This course examines the causes and consequences of imperialism in the modern world. It considers and compares imperial institutions, ideologies, economies, and cultures. It also studies the variety of ways in which subject peoples shaped these encounters and evaluates the significance of these experiences for the post-colonial global order. (Formerly His 325.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 362 - World War II

This course will examine the origins of World War II, its theaters of military operations in Europe, the Pacific, Asia, and North Africa, the impact of total war on combatants and civilians, and the memory of World War II. Students will learn how to apply historical methods such as document analysis, oral history, visual history, and public history to the study of World War II and how it is remembered.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 365 - Greek Civilization

This course is a survey that stresses the development of Greek civilization until the death of Alexander the Great. (Formerly HIS 335.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 366 - The Roman Empire

This is a survey course that places a special emphasis upon the Roman Republic and the Empire until 476 A.D. (Formerly HIS 336.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 367 - The Early Middle Ages

This course is a study of the period from 284 A.D. until circa 1000 A.D., emphasizing the synthesis of Roman, Christian, and barbarian cultures. (Formerly HIS 338.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 368 - The Later Middle Ages

This course is a study of the period from circa 1000 A.D. until the Renaissance, focusing on the social, economic, intellectual, and political revival of Europe. (Formerly HIS 339.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 369 - The Holocaust

The Holocaust was the most significant human rights tragedy in twentieth-century history. This course examines the history and memory of the Nazi campaign from 1933 to 1945 to stigmatize, isolate, and destroy European Jews. Roots of the Holocaust are addressed by examining European antisemitism. The Holocaust is placed into the context of Nazi consolidation of power and World War II. The course focuses on key events in the Holocaust, including Nazi policies to isolate Jews from 1933 on, the removal of German citizenship from Jews, the Night of the Broken Glass (Kristallnacht), deportations of Jews to concentration camps, the mass shootings of Jews on the Eastern Front during World War II, and the gassing of Jews to death in camps and mobile vans. Topics such as Allied response to the Holocaust, liberation of prisoners from the camps, treatment of displaced persons, and the Nuremburg trials are addressed. Students are introduced to intentionalist and functionalist arguments concerning the origins of the Holocaust. Much consideration is given to the role of perpetrators in carrying out the Holocaust and of bystanders who failed to intervene. Memory of the Holocaust is analyzed through documentary films, oral histories, memorials, and the phenomenon of Holocaust denial.

Number of Credits: 3

HIS 380 - Twentieth Century Europe

Beginning with World War I and ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union, this course surveys major events of twentieth-century European history.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 381 - Muscovy and the Russian Empire, 1462-1917

This course is an examination of the history of the Muscovite state and of the Russian empire from 1462 to 1917. Central themes will include autocratic rule, statebuilding, imperial expansion, church-state relations, Westernization, serfdom, popular rebellion, modernization, and revolution. (Formerly HIS 348.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 382 - 20th-Century Russia and the USSR

Major themes of this course include revolution, collapse of the empire and creation of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, industrialization, Stalinist repression, World War II, reform, and the collapse of the Soviet Union. (Formerly HIS 452.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 383 - Modern Europe: 1789 To 1914

A survey of Europe in the "long nineteenth century," this course begins with the French Revolution and ends with the outbreak of World War I. It focuses on the political and social history of France, Germany, and Russia. (Formerly HIS 343.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 384 - Topics in African History

History 384 is an introductory survey of African history from the origins of humanity to the events of the recent past, with special attention paid to the early modern and modern eras. The course focuses on the global role of Africans in the history of the world, the importation of commodities and culture, the ways outsiders have portrayed Africa and Africans, the daily lives and experiences of the continent's inhabitants, and the challenges of using the available sources for "doing" African history. (Formerly HIS 344.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 385 - Modern Ireland

This course is an examination of the major political, social, and economic developments in Ireland since the Famine of 1845. (Formerly HIS 440.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 386 - East Asia in the Modern World

Changes in Modern Asia as a result of the rise of industrialism, urbanism, nationalism, and Western influence will be examined in this course. (Formerly HIS 346.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 388 - Recent Britain: Empire to Welfare State

This course analyzes the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of modern Britain. It explores the development of parliamentary government, democracy, the modern state, empire, capitalism, and urban-industrial society as well as the cultural changes accompanying and informing these transformations. British modernity was indeed precocious, and this course evaluates the context, causes, and consequences of that experience. (Formerly HIS 458.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 389 - Political Economy of Africa

This course examines the political and economic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa and provides a historical perspective on these conditions. Issues examined include the political and economic consequences of colonialism, post-independence political forces and economic policies, and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa. Course is offered only every other Spring (i.e. of odd numbered years).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

HIS 390 - Traditional China To 1840

This course will trace the social, political, cultural, and economic origins of the Chinese dynastic system, the elaboration and triumph of Confucianism, and the expansion of the empire south of the Yangtze and west to Central Asia. The course will conclude with an overview of the initial Western intrusion into this wealthiest and most populous of traditional civilizations. (Formerly HIS 350.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 391 - Modern China, 1840 To the Present

Beginning with the traumas of the Opium Wars and Taiping Rebellion, this course will provide an overview of China's initial attempts at using foreign technology to safeguard the Confucian polity, the rending of the social fabric during the Republican and Civil War eras, and the eventual triumph of Chinese Communism. The economic reforms of Deng Xiaoping and the events leading to Tiananmen Square will receive particular attention. (Formerly HIS 351.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 392 - Traditional Japan To 1840

For nearly two millennia, the people of Japan have shown a remarkable ability to marry religious, political, and cultural innovations from abroad with vigorous indigenous institutions. The result has been one of the world's most remarkable cultural syntheses. This course will trace the origins and development of the imperial system, the influence of Shinto and Buddhism, the development and elaboration of the early Shogunates, and conclude with an examination of Tokugawa society on the eve of Japan's "opening" to the west. (Formerly HIS 352.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 393 - Modern Japan, 1840 To the Present

This course will assess the astounding transformation of Japan from Tokugawa seclusion to the dynamic superpower of today. Along the way, such topics as the impact of the Meiji Restoration, Japan's "special relationship" with China and the Asian mainland, the grand catastrophe of World War II, and the resurgence of a demilitarized economic colossus in the Pacific Rim will be examined. (Formerly HIS 353.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 394 - The Modern Middle East

This course investigates the history of the modern Middle East since the 18th century. It examines the political, economic, social, and cultural transformations of this period in the Ottoman Empire, its successor states, Egypt, and Iran. Topics include the encounter with Western imperialism, modernization, ideological change, revolution, and war. (Formerly HIS 354.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 396 - Topics in Modern Non-Western History

This course provides an examination of selected topics illustrating the political, social, and cultural history of the non-Western world. (Formerly HIS 356.)

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 460 - Directed Readings

This course involves readings of certain basic books relating to a specific historical topic, theme, or era; assignments discussed in seminar-tutorial fashion.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 470 - Special Topics in Third World Areas

Central America, the Middle East, China, India, etc.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 475 - Internship

Working under a public historian, a student will expand his/her understanding of American History through hands-on participation at a historical site, museum, or archive. The internship requires meetings with a faculty supervisor, an on-site project, a major paper, and an evaluation by the site historian.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 480 - Seminar

Methodology and historiography; bibliographical essay required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 481 - Seminar

Writing a research paper.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

HIS 482-485 - Seminars

Number of Credits: 6-Mar

How Offered: Face-to-Face