Social Work

Program Description

The Social Work Program provides a rigorous curriculum that builds on a liberal arts foundation. Courses address the knowledge, skills, and values associated with professional social work practice. Students integrate theory and practice during 600 hours of field practicum across three semesters.

The Social Work Program is offered in full-time, part-time, and accelerated formats.

The full-time program format is offered during the day in fall and spring semesters on Main Campus. Students take a minimum of four courses to maintain full-time status. The part-time program format is offered during fall, spring and summer semesters on Main Campus. Students typically take 2-3 courses each semester. The accelerated program format is designed as a degree completion program for students who have completed a significant number of general education courses. Courses in this 16-month program are offered primarily in 4-6 week modules in a hybrid format over the calendar year. The accelerated program takes place at the Montgomery County Campus in Plymouth Meeting, PA.

Some course offerings in the program are online or hybrid; most courses are offered face-to-face. Both full and part-time faculty teach in all program formats.

The Social Work Department at La Salle University offers the Bachelor of Social Work and is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accrediting body for baccalaureate and masters social work programs.

CSWE Commission on Accreditation establishes the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (2015) to assure that social work programs are meeting accreditation standards. The standards to which accredited social work programs are held can be viewed at www.cswe.org/epas or by accessing the link on the La Salle University Social Work Program website. The curriculum is designed to develop the student's knowledge, skills and values in social work and mastery of nine (9) social work competencies.

 

CRITERIA FOR ACCEPTANCE INTO THE MAJOR

Social work is a professional degree program and as such, students must formally apply to the Social Work Program for admission to the major. This is a separate process in addition to general admission to the University and prepares students for similar application processes for graduate school and future careers. A student can declare social work as a major upon admission to the University; however, the student is only formally accepted into the Social Work Program with the successful application process described below.

The application for admission to the La Salle University Social Work Department must be submitted during the semester the student is enrolled in SWK 340: Preparation for Professional Practice, and no later than Septamber 30.

The student must meet the following criteria for admission into the Social Work Program:

  • An overall GPA of 2.30 (Students with a GPA below 2.30 may apply for conditional acceptance to the program)
  • A final grade of C (75%) or better in all Social Work courses
  • An affinity with and commitment to the values and ethics of the social work profession as set forth in the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics
  • Two letters of recommendation. One recommendation should be from a person associated with a community service experience in which the student has participated. The second recommendation will be an academic reference from a University faculty member other than La Salle University Social Work Department full-time faculty. A second recommendation from a person associated with a community service experience may be substituted for the academic reference with permission from the Social Work Department Chair.
  • Autobiographical statement. The student will complete a personal statement (maximum of four pages, typewritten and double-spaced) discussing the motivations for choosing social work as a profession and describing significant people and life events that have been instrumental in the decision to seek a degree in social work. The student will address areas of special interest or concern relevant to social work. Note: The autobiography statement completed in SWK160 will be accepted, with appropriate revisions in content and form, to fulfill this requirement.
  • Copy of current college/university transcript.
  • Copy of current criminal clearance.* (Date of clearance must be within one year from date of submission to Social Work Department.)
  • Copy of current child abuse clearance.* (Date of clearance must be within one year from date of submission to Social Work Department.)
  • Review of the NASW Code of Ethics and signed application form.** NASW Code of Ethics: https://www.socialworkers.org/about/ethics
  • The student will submit the completed application to the Social Work Department Chair.
  • The full-time Social Work Department faculty will review the student's application, and each will vote on the student's candidacy.
  • The student will be notified of the Department faculty's decision in writing. The admission decisions include:
    • full admission
    • conditional admission
    • no admission

* A history of criminal conviction and/or child abuse does not automatically preclude admission to the Social Work Department. The student is required to proactively share this information with the Field Director and with the field practicum supervisor in the agency. The student is responsible for informing the Social Work Department of any changes in criminal and/or child abuse status.

** In the event of a violation of the NASW Code of Ethics, the student may not be granted admission to or continuation in the Social Work Program.

CONTINUATION POLICY

Continuation in the Social Work Program requires that a student majoring in social work receive a grade of C (75%) or better in all SWK courses. A student is permitted to take a course a maximum of three times to achieve a grade of C or better.

In some cases, a student may not proceed to a upper-level course without first receiving a C or better in a lower-level course.

A student must have an overall GPA of 2.5 and a GPA of 2.5 in the social work major to graduate with the BSW degree.

Why take this major?

Social work is a discipline that seeks to facilitates the health and well-being of individuals, families, and communities through personal, interpersonal and social change. Social workers use their knowledge and skills in a vast array of traditional and non-traditional settings including mental health centers, hospitals, schools, law practices, athletic organizations, libraries, community centers and in local, national and international government.  

Students in our social work major integrate theory and practice through coursework and 600 hours of supervised fieldwork. Our faculty are committed teachers, scholars and practitioners who support and challenge students to grow personally, academically, and professionally.

In the Lasallian spirit, we maintain close advising relationships with our students and encourage collaboration and community among students and between faculty and students.

With a BSW degree...

You'll be a professional as soon as you graduate

Those with a bachelor's degree in social work may become licensed and immediately begin working in the field.

You'll get a job in your field!

Over 95% of graduates of La Salle's Social Work Program secure a job in the field within six months of graduating and/or continue on to graduate school; some are even offered jobs as soon as they finish their internships.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects rapid growth of social work employment (16% through 2026 – much higher than the average of all occupations).

You could complete graduate school in just one year rather than two!

With a BSW from a CSWE-accredited school such as La Salle, you can enter an MSW program as an Advanced Standing student if you meet the graduate school requirements.

You'll have opportunities to work in a variety of roles and in a range of settings, including

Counseling individuals and families, facilitating groups, working with communities toward social change, working directly with people of all ages—from children to senior citizens. Social workers are found in mental health centers, hospitals, clinics, schools, nursing homes, private practice, child welfare agencies, police departments, courts, and countless other non-profit and for-profit organizations.

Why Social Work at La Salle?

A curriculum that integrates theory and practice

600 hours of supervised internship

Day, Evening, and Accelerated program formats to fit your schedule

Personalized attention from faculty who are social work practitioners as well as educators

Supportive community of students and faculty

Integration of Lasallian values

The program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)

Student Learning Outcomes

Students in social work programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) are required to meet the following competencies.

SOCIAL WORK COMPETENCIES

  • Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior
  • Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice
  • Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice
  • Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice
  • Engage in Policy Practice
  • Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Program Contact Information

Janine Mariscotti, M.S.W., L.C.S.W.

Program Director & Chair

Hayman Hall, Room 369

mariscot@lasalle.edu

socialwork@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1114

Degree Earned

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 15

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 45

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.50

Cumulative: 2.50

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 158 - Life Science: A Human Approach

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

SOC 301 - Principles of Statistics, HSC 217 - Statistics for Health Professionals, or PSY 310 - Statistics I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

POL 151 - Principles of American Government

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 15 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

SWK 160 Introduction to Social Work
SWK 280 Dynamics of Human Development & Diversity
SWK 281 Dynamics of People in Diverse Environments
SWK 291 Social Policy
SWK 340 Preparation for Professional Practice
SWK 365 Social Work Research
SWK 341 Generalist Practice I: Assessment & Intervention with Individuals
SWK 381 Professional Practicum I
SWK 440 Generalist Practice II: Assessment & Intervention with Families & Groups
SWK 441 Generalist Practice III: Assessment & Intervention with Organizations & Communities
SWK 480 Professional Practicum I
SWK 481 Professional Practicum III
SWK 495 Professional Considerations in Social Work

SWK Elective

SWK Elective

 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

The requirements for a dual major with Social Work are based on the student's choice of second major. Please contact the Department Chair for additional information.

Minor Requirements

Human Services Minor

Students who complete the Human Services Minor will:

  • Learn the values and ethics that serve as a foundation for professional social work practice.
  • Be introduced to the importance of social justice as a foundation for social work and social welfare.
  • Be exposed to the role of biological, social, psychological, spiritual, and cultural contexts in the lives of individuals and families, groups and communities.
  • Understand the unique impact of these contexts on special population groups including racial and ethnic minority groups, women, gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender persons, children, older adults, and people with disabilities.
  • Be introduced to the broad array of human services and populations served.

Required Courses for the Minor in Human Services:

  • SWK 160
  • SWK 280
  • SWK 291
  • SWK 340
  • SWK 281, 341, 365 or a SWK elective
  • SWK elective

FULL-TIME DAY

Fall 1: SWK 160

Fall 2: SWK 280, 291                                  Spring 2: SWK 281, SWK Elective

Fall 3: SWK 340, SWK ELECTIVE              Spring 3: SWK 341, 365, 381

Fall 4: SWK 440, 480                                  Spring 4: SWK 441, 481, 495

 

PART-TIME EVENING

Spring or Sum 1: SWK 160

Fall 1: SWK 280, 340                                  Spring 1: SWK 281, 341, 381

Sum 2: SWK 291, 365, SWK ELECTIVE

Fall 2: SWK 440, 480, SWK ELECTIVE      Spring 2: SWK 441, 481, 495

 

ACCELERATED

Sum 1: SWK 160

Fall 1: SWK 280, 281, 291, 340

Spring 1: SWK 341, 365, 381, SWK ELECTIVE

Sum 2: SWK 440, 480, SWK ELECTIVE

Fall 2: SWK 441, 481, 495

 

Course Descriptions

SWK 160 - Introduction to Social Work

This course is designed to give the student an overall orientation to the field of social work. It is a basic survey course that examines the social work profession from its beginnings to the present day. The course addresses problems and injustices experienced by individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and societies and the social work profession's response to these challenges. The student will be introduced to the generalist model of social work practice and the theoretical perspectives that inform social work practice, particularly the systems perspective and the empowerment approach. Social work fields of practice and levels of social work involvement will also be examined. Throughout the course, social work values and ethics will be explored. This course includes a 20-hour service-learning component.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

SWK 240 - Relationships and Sexuality

This course is designed for social work and other undergraduate students to explore issues in relationships and sexuality. This course examines human sexuality from a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual perspective within a developmental framework. Students will have opportunities to examine and clarify personal and societal values, consider issues of diversity, and apply ethical perspectives to issues of sexuality with particluar emphasis on underrepresented groups including children, LGBTQ persons, older adults and people with disabilities. Students will learn to apply specific approaches to ethical decison making to ethical dilemmas of interpersonal relationships and sexuality.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

SWK 250 - Resilience and Strength: An Introduction to Puerto Rico

There is a saying in Latin America - "Puerto Rico: tan lejos de Dios y tan cerca de los EE.UU." (Puerto Rico: So far from God and so close to the United States). This course will look at la Isla del Encanto - the Enchanted Island - and the challenges it has faced throughout its history as well as the strength and resilience of the people in facing those challenges. It will examine Puerto Rico from multiple perspectives: historical; its relationship to the US; and, through the eyes of the local Diaspora.

This course is a community-based learning course. Throughout the semester we will visit with local organizations that are run by or work with Puerto Ricans in the diaspora in Philadelphia. We may even visit with an organization or two in New York City. Students will be expected to work with a local organization to carry out a project designed by the organization.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

SWK 270, 370, 470 - Special Topics

These special topics courses are designed to address contemporary issues in generalist social work practice. Topics include gerontology, mental health, child welfare, family violence, drug and alcohol intervention, trauma, immigration, global social work, and social and economic justice. Students are advised to check with the Department Chair about current offerings and to provide suggestions for future topics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

SWK 280 - Dynamics of Human Development & Diversity (Formerly HBSE I)

This course explores the lives of individuals as members of families, groups, organizations and communities. In this course, students consider and critically evaluate the assumptions and values of various bio-psycho-social theories of individual and family development. The role of biological, social, psychological, spiritual, and cultural contexts in the lives of individuals and families will be reviewed. The unique impact of these contexts on diverse population groups including racial and ethnic minority groups, women, LGBTQ persons, children, older adults, and people with disabilities will be evaluated. In addition, the course will examine issues of diversity in individual development and family lifestyle and life cycle development. Emphasis will be placed on the social work profession's ethical responsibility for enhancing personal and social functioning and advancing social justice for individuals and families.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SWK 281 - Dynamics of People in Diverse Environments (Formerly HBSE II)

This course examines the foundational aspect of social work practice, that is, the development of the "person in environment." The course focuses on people as members of groups, organizations, communities and global society. The impact of these systems on special population groups including racial and ethnic minority groups, immigrants, minority religious groups, women, gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender persons, children, older adults, and people with disabilities will be evaluated. The social work profession's ethical responsibility for enhancing individual and social functioning and advancing social, economic, and environmental justice will be emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SWK 291 - Social Welfare Policy

This course will provide an examination of the historical roots of the United States' response to human needs through social welfare policy, including the distribution of power, status, and resources. The experience of oppression and discrimination of vulnerable groups will be stressed. Social policy is discussed using historical and social justice lenses, stressing critical thinking in how these policies can be improved to better serve individuals, groups and communities, especially those who have historically experienced oppression and discrimination. Ethical issues associated with the allocation of resources will be highlighted.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SWK 340 - Preparation for Professional Practice

This course is designed to prepare the student for the professional practicum in social work. The course will familiarize the student with the roles of the student intern and will guide the student in developing skills for the social work relationship, as well as an understanding of profession practice. The course will assist the student in identifying diverse and vulnerable populations that pose the most challenge for students so that they can gain understanding of, and comfort and experience interacting with various social groups. The course will also introduce interviewing and empathic listening skills and provide opportunities for students to practice these skills.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: SWK 160, SWK 280 (SWK 280 may be taken concurrently)

SWK 341 - Generalist Social Work Practice I

The first of three courses in the Social Work Practice sequence, this course focuses on the processes of ethical engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation in generalist social work practice with individuals. Skills are developed in initiating the social work relationship, assessing individual client strengths and challenges, advocating for individuals, developing intervention plans, evaluating outcomes, and appropriately ending the professional relationship.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Restrictions: Open to Social Work majors and Human Services minors only. Social Work majors must be formally accepted into the Social Work Department in order to enroll in this course.

Prerequisites: SWK 160, SWK 340 or concurrent with SWK 280, SWK 281

Corequisites: This course is a co-requisite with SWK 381 and successfully completing and passing both courses is required in order to progress to upper level courses.

SWK 350 - Loss and Grief

This course investigates the processes of attachment, loss, and grieving. The course explores loss, in life and in preparation for death, and addresses both acceptable and disenfranchised loss and grief. Theories of bereavement and basic counseling and companioning skills are presented.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

SWK 360 - Working with Children and Families

This elective course will examine the ethical perspectives of social justice and the ethical dilemmas of working with vulnerable children and families. We will critically examine current policies and practices relating to children and families' circumstances and be able to apply appropriate social work perspectives that encourage sound practice, while reflecting upon the influence of historical events and persons. The course will enable students to bring skills and knowledge to bear in assessing and intervening in situations involving children and families.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid, Online

ILO Met: ILO 10.1 - Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

SWK 365 - Social Work Research Methods

Research Methods for Generalist Social Work Practice is a one-semester course. The purpose of this course is to prepare the BSW practitioner to understand the research process, take part in a research project through the steps of design, develop a survey instrument, and seek approval for the project from the La Salle University Institutional Review Board. The student will also be required to read and critique current research articles. The student will be exposed to a variety of social research processes and methods, including qualitative and quantitative methodologies; program evaluation; and needs assessment research. Emphasis on understanding and applying social work values to research will be included. Students will be asked to examine ethical dilemmas which face researchers and those studying research, especially as this relates to work with vulnerable populations.

The student will be introduced to SPSS, statistical analysis software broadly used in social work research. Efforts will also be made to incorporate into the class research analysis of current ethical, advocacy, or practice issues, as identified by the instructor and/or students.

The underlying values for this course are taken from the NASW Code of Ethics, which will permeate course content and process. Special emphasis will be placed on how research interfaces with successful social work practice.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

SWK 381 - Professional Practicum I

This is the first of three field practicum courses, to be followed by SWK 480 and 481 Professional Practice II and III respectively. The purpose of this course is four-fold: 1) to provide students with an opportunity to integrate bio-psycho-socio-spiritual perspective and social work theory and practice; 2) to provide students with an educationally directed experience in order to enhance the development of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills; 3) to empower students to begin to identify with the social work profession and its values, and 4) to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate competency in generalist social work.

In this 200-hour field practicum experience, students begin to develop competency in generalist social work in an approved setting under the supervision of a professional social worker.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Open to Social Work majors only. Social Work majors must be formally accepted into the Social Work Program in order to enroll in this course.

Corequisites: SWK 341 (This course is a corequisite with SWK 341 and successfully completing and passing both courses is required in order to progress to upper level courses)

SWK 440 - Generalist Social Work Practice II

This course focuses on social work engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation with families and groups. It provides an investigation of and skill development in generalist social work practice, focusing on systems theory and empowerment perspective. Students gain knowledge and skills for effective and ethical generalist social work practice with families and groups.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Open to Social Work majors only.

Prerequisites: SWK 341, SWK 381

Corequisites: SWK 480 NOTE: This course is a corequisite with SWK 480 and successfully completing and passing both courses is required in order to progress to upper level courses.

SWK 441 - Generalist Social Work Practice III

This course is the third in a three-part sequence in generalist social work practice. This course specifically focuses on engagement, assessment, and interventions/collaborations/evaluation with organizations and communities. As with the other courses in this sequence, there will be a focus on the integration of micro, mezzo, and macro skills for effective generalist practice. Social work values and ethics provide a foundation for this and all social work courses.

Students will acquire knowledge and skills for engagement, assessment and interventions/ collaboration/evaluation with organizations and communities utilizing a systems framework within the empowerment tradition in social work. In this course students will be introduced to a variety of approaches to macro social work practice so that they will gain the necessary skills and knowledge for engagement, assessment, and intervention/collaboration/evaluation on a macro level.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Open to Social Work majors only.

Corequisites: SWK 481 (This course is a corequisite with SWK 481 and successfully completing and passing both courses is required in order to progress to upper level courses)

SWK 480 - Professional Practicum II

This course provides students with an educationally directed field experience designed to enhance the development of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills in generalist social work. Students complete 200 hours of fieldwork in an approved setting under the supervision of a professional social worker.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Open to Social Work majors only. Social work majors must be formally accepted into the Social Work Program in order to enroll in this course.

Prerequisites: SWK 341, SWK 381

Corequisites: SWK 440 (This course is a corequisite with SWK 440 and successfully completing and passing both courses is required in order to progress to upper level courses)

SWK 481 - Professional Practicum III

A continuation of SWK 480: Professional Practicum II, this course provides a social work practice experience in which students integrate the social work theory, skills, and values they are learning in the classroom. While the focus of this practicum is assessment and intervention with organizations and communities, the student will continue to develop and practice skills intervening with individuals, families, and/or groups. Students complete 200 hours of fieldwork in an approved setting under the supervision of a professional social worker.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Open to Social Work majors only.

Prerequisites: SWK 440, SWK 480

Corequisites: SWK 441 (This course is a corequisite with SWK 441 and successfully completing and passing both courses is required in order to progress to upper level courses)

SWK 495 - Professional Considerations in Social Work

This course strengthens the student's emerging identity within the social work profession. Students review and critique theoretical frameworks and practice situations studied throughout the social work curriculum, with an emphasis on social work values and ethics. As the capstone course, students have a final opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the nine (9) competencies identified by the Educational Policy & Accreditation Standards (EPAS) of the Council on Social Work Education.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Open to Social Work majors only.

Prerequisites: SWK 440, SWK 480

Corequisites: Taken concurrently with or following the completion of SWK 441 and SWK 481.