Sociology

Program Description

The Sociology Program's mission is to provide majors with an understanding of the scientific study of human groups in modern societies and the social and cultural forces that affect them. The sociological perspective is central to grasping the social and cultural forces that remake our lives on a daily basis.

Why take this major?

The Sociology Program's mission is to provide majors with an understanding of the scientific study of human groups in modern societies and the social and cultural forces that affect them. The sociological perspective is central to grasping the social and cultural forces that remake our lives on a daily basis.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Awareness how systems of oppression (poverty, racism, sexism, classism) shape society
  • Provide the intellectual toolbox that allows students to understand the social hierarchies in here in the US and globally.
  • Provide student with the training that they are both thoroughly literate in data analysis, research method and writing.

Program Contact Information

Charles Gallagher, Chair

350 Hayman Hall

gallagher@lasalle.edu

(215) 991-2850

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 12

Total: 38-40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 36

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

SOC 301 - Principles of Statistics

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 150 Principles of Sociology

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 courses in total in order to graduate. 12 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Sociology Core: (8 courses)

SOC 150 Principles of Sociology (SOC 150 is a prerequisite for all upper level SOC courses)
SOC 151 Social Problems and Social Policy
SOC 231 Love, Relations, Family or SOC 260 Men and Woman in Cont. Society
SOC 262 Dynamics of Race and Ethnicity
SOC 301 Stat 1
SOC 302 Stat 2
SOC 310 Social Theory
SOC 480 Methods (Cross listed with CRJ 480)

Sociology majors must take at least four of these courses:
SOC 233 Work and Occupations
SOC 238 Environment and Society
SOC 265 Sociology of Law
SOC 237 The City: Conflict and Change
SOC 270 Sociology of Education
SOC 306 Complex Organizations
SOC 308 Social Inequality in Contemporary Society
SOC 312 Social Movements in Contemporary Society
CRJ 161 Intro to Criminology
CRJ 340 Crimes of the Powerful
CRJ 350 Violence in Society
CRJ 387 Gender, Crime and Justice
SOC 481  Research Methods (Cross listed with CRJ 483)
SOC 340 Internship -- Students who meet the GPA requirements, have junior standing, and can be recommended by the chair should be strongly encouraged to take an internship.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

REQUIRED FOR DUAL SOCIOLOGY/CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEGREE:

Dual Sociology and Criminal Justice Majors must take these TEN classes:

  • CRJ 161 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CRJ 261 Criminology
  • CRJ 480 Research Methods (Cross-listed with SOC 480)
  • CRJ 495 Senior Seminar: Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice or SOC 481 Research Seminar (Counts as CRJ 483)
  • SOC 150 Principles of Sociology
  • SOC 151 Social Problems and Social Policy (Counts as CRJ 151)
  • SOC 262 Dynamics of Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary Societies
  • SOC 231 Love, Interpersonal Relationships, and Family or SOC 260 Men and Women in Contemporary Society
  • SOC 301 Principles of Statistics
  • SOC 302 Statistical Analysis and Data Base Design
  • SOC 310 Sociological Theory

Dual majors must take at least FOUR of these Sociology courses:

  • SOC 238 Environment and Society
  • SOC 265 Sociology of Law (CRJ Elective)
  • SOC 270 Sociology of Education
  • SOC 306 Complex Organizations in Contemporary Society
  • SOC 308 Social Inequality in Contemporary Society
  • SOC 312 Social Movements in Contemporary Society

Dual majors must take least FOUR of these Criminal Justice courses:

  • CRJ 161 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CRJ 340 Crimes of the Powerful
  • CRJ 350 Violence in Society
  • CRJ 387 Gender, Crime and Justice
  • CRJ 201 Social Problems and Social Justice (Counts as SOC 151)
  • CRJ 280 Criminal Law
  • CRJ 320 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (Cross-listed with SOC 320)
  • CRJ 324 Policing: Theory and Dynamics
  • CRJ 325 Criminal Courts
  • CRJ 326 Institutional and Community Corrections
  • CRJ 483 Criminal Justice Research
  • SOC 265 Sociology of Law
  • CRJ 340 Crimes of the Powerful
  • ENG 308 Legal Writing
  • SOC Internship (SOC 340) or CRJ Internship (CRJ 481-482). Students who meet the 2.75 GPA requirements, have junior standing, and can be recommended by faculty and the department chair are strongly encouraged to take a Sociology (SOC 340) or CRJ Internship (CRJ 481-482)

Minor Requirements

The sociology minor requires 6 sociology classes.

Sociology majors should take SOC 150 as a first class and then take lower level requirements. In their junior year students should take SOC 301 (Principles of Statistics) in the fall semester and SOC 302 (Statistical Analysis and Data Base Design) in the spring semester. In their senior year students take SOC 480 (Research Methods) in the Fall and SOC 481 (Research Seminar) in the spring semester.

Course Descriptions

SOC 150 - Principles of Sociology

SOC 150 introduces students to the ways human groups cooperate and conflict with one another and the expected and unanticipated consequences of these relations in American society as well as in the worldwide community. The overarching goal of the course is to help students understand how individual human development is a group experience from infancy to old age, how the social world impacts their lives, and how they, in turn, affect the lives of others in this social world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 151 - Social Problems and Social Policy

Cross-listed with CRJ 151

This course is an exploration of how social conflict and social organization affect human and societal well-being. Topics: mental health, personal safety, economic well-being, and intergroup relations in an industrial society and a developing nation.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 231 - Love, Interpersonal Relationships, And Family

This course examines the myths, trends, and the reasons behind these trends in the changing world of interpersonal relations. Topics include mate selection, marriage and its alternatives, parenting, parting by divorce or death, and trying again.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 233 - Work and Occupations

This course is an analysis of the social organization of work in modern societies, including the concept of career, the development of professionalization, the nature of work-satisfaction, and the impact of bureaucratization. Special attention is given to occupational subcultures such as law, medicine, public service, the military, and education.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 237 (257) - The City: Conflict and Change

This course is a study of world cities; their growth and influence on personality; urban violence and its control; neighborhood development and metropolitan planning; and the effects of national and international economic forces on cities in developing and industrial nations.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 238 (258) - Environment and Society

This course is an analysis of the human and social structural causes of modern environmental problems and a presentation of a systematic approach toward environmental protection reforms.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 260 - Men and Women in Contemporary Society

This course explores male and female gender roles in the contemporary United States and in the world. An examination of socialization in childhood and adulthood, sexual politics, and power structures and dynamics within the family and the workplace. Special attention to the effects of class and race on gender role formation.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 262 - Dynamics of Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary Societies

This course is an analysis of the dynamics of race and ethnic relations and of the intersection of race, gender, and class in historical and contemporary contexts. An inquiry into the issues of pluralism and diversity in unity.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SOC 263 - Anthropology

This course explores the spread of humans on earth; racial variations and their significance; cultures in less complex societies and industrial societies across the world; and the impact of these cultures and societies on one another.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 265 - Sociology of Law

This course analyzes the law as a social process in historical and comparative perspectives, in particular historical legal traditions such as the British common law, the Napoleonic code, and some other legal systems.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 270, 370, 470 - Special Topics in Sociology

These are courses designed to cover special or emerging interests in sociology. Topics have included: sociology of conflict, the Holocaust and its causes, computers and society, sociology of sports, and social gerontology. Special permission needed to be used to meet major requirements.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 301 - Principles of Statistics

This course introduces students to statistical analysis for social sci- ences: Presentation and interpretation of data, descriptive statistics, theory of probability and basic sampling distribution, statistical inference including principles of estimation and tests of hypotheses, introduction to correlation and regression, and first principles in the construction and critique of quantitative arguments for research questions in the social and behavioral sciences and public policy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.b - Quantitative Reasoning

SOC 302 - Statistical Analysis and Data Base Design

In this course, students learn about the principles of data analysis using statistics, with emphasis on developing critical thinking skills and performing analyses on real data sets. After completing this course, students will be able to design and analyze basic statistical studies, to understand and criticize statistical methods in research projects and the media, and to appreciate the power and utility of statistical thinking. Examples and methods are drawn primarily from the behavioral, natural, and social sciences, and from public policy. The course will cover the following topics: database design, survey and experimental design, exploratory data analysis, and modeling.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SOC 301 or permission of instructor

SOC 305 - Society and The Individual

This course is a study of the influence of society and culture, as mediated by the social group, on the social, cultural, and personal behavior of the individual.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 306 - Complex Organizations in Contemporary Society

A study of the founding, transformation, and disbanding of organizations, the pace of organizational evolution in modern societies as well as the sources of change and stability in contemporary organizations in the U.S. and in other societies, particularly organizational structures, processes, environments, culture, innovation, and effectiveness.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 308 - Social Inequality in Contemporary Society

This course analyzes the structure of social stratification and the impact of globalization and economic restructuring on structured inequality in the United States and in the world, using the structural perspective and the world system theory.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 309 - Health, Healing, And Health Care

This course provides an introduction to the sociology of health, healing and health care, and to social epidemiology. Examines the relationship between healthcare providers and their patients, with special attention to alternative health care providers and bioethics. Analyzes the health care systems in the United States and in some developed and developing countries.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 310 - Sociological Theory

This course is a study of the basics of contemporary sociological theory and its classical roots, with an emphasis on helping students apply theoretical thinking to everyday life events.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SOC 150

SOC 312 - Social Movements in Contemporary Society

This course examines the dynamics of social change and of specific social movements, such as the environmental justice movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, the health movement, and others.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 320 - Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

Cross-listed with CRJ/SWK 320 (formerly CRJ 220)

This course addresses a comparative and historical survey of juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice. Study of the nature, magnitude, and social location of youth crime; analysis of causal theories; and overview of programs aimed at delinquency prevention and control.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 340 - Sociological Internship and Practice

This elective course requires 15 hours per week (for three credits) of a supervised internship. Students may take an internship in place of a sociology elective, beginning the summer between sophomore and junior year. To receive 3 credits, the internship must be approved in advance by the internship director for the department. The department recommends that you take 4 regular classes and the internship will count as your 5th class that semester. Your grade is determined from a midterm question and answer, a final paper and your on-site supervisor's evaluation of your internship performance.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Rising junior or senior status, and minimum overall GPA of 2.7

SOC 355 - Drugs, Crime, and Justice

Cross-listed with CRJ 355

This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of a variety of issues related to drug use, abuse, addiction, drug-related crime and drug control. The course begins with an examination of the effects of drugs on individuals and society, including prevalence rates, theories of addiction and the harms and benefits of use and abuse. The next unit assesses the relationship between criminal activity and drug use, abuse and criminalization. The final unit critically evaluates various drug control strategies, including supply reduction, demand reduction and possible alternatives.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 385 - Theories of Deviance

Crosslisted with CRJ 385

This course is an intensive analysis of contemporary theories of deviant behavior. Theories examined through seminar discussions of primary materials and critiqued by consideration of research findings. Social policy implications discussed and specific criminal justice programs considered in the light of these theories.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

SOC 480 - Research Methods

This course is an introduction to the social research processes, using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Construction of a research proposal.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Taken concurrently with SOC 301

SOC 481 - Research Seminar

The experience provides an opportunity to conduct original research in one area of social reality employing a research method of the student's choosing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SOC 302 (or taken concurrently); SOC 480