School of Business – Print Compilation

Overview

Print Compilation 
(Opens in a new page. Includes all related program information in full)

Business education has been part of the La Salle curriculum since its founding in 1863. The School of Business, one of three schools in the University, was established in 1955, and its MBA program began in 1976.  As a business school in a Catholic, Lasallian University, students are taught fundamental business knowledge and skills within an ethical framework which emphasizes the primacy and value of human dignity. 

The Business School is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International,) which establishes standards designed to ensure excellence. Less than 5 percent of the world’s business schools are accredited by AACSB.  As an AACSB-accredited business school, the Dean’s office and faculty use continuous quality-improvement processes to ensure that the many offerings of the School of Business are of the highest quality. Programs are also regularly evaluated in terms of standards established by various professional bodies, such as the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the American Management Association, University Sales Center Alliance and the American Marketing Association.  Ongoing engagement with alumni, employers and the business executives on the Dean’s Advisory Board ensure that the programs are current and relevant in a rapidly changing global environment.  The school has received external validations of the quality and outcomes of its programs through rankings with U.S. News and World Report and The Princeton Review. Since 1996, La Salle has inducted the top 10 percent of its undergraduate seniors and 7 percent of its juniors into Beta Gamma Sigma (BGS), the international honor society for students enrolled in AACSB-accredited schools. 

Mission

The mission of the School of Business is to offer educational programs that prepare students for a purposeful life by integrating Lasallian values with current business management skills.

Through its faculty, curricular environment, and linkages with the business community, the School of Business creates a value-centered educational community as the setting for its educational programs.

Within this context, it seeks to provide an appropriate blend of contemporary business theory and practice, placing paramount importance on teaching and learning enriched by scholarly research and professional activity.

The primary purpose of the School of Business’ undergraduate program is to prepare students to lead an enriched personal life and to enter upon a successful professional career through exposure to traditional liberal arts and contemporary business education.

The School of Business strives to fulfill its mission by requiring students to develop communication, analytic, and decision-making skills by nurturing in students the ability to define and synthesize, by helping students to form independent, well-reasoned judgments, and by introducing students to common business research methods and practices.

Teaching and learning are of paramount importance. We believe we should

Location/Contact Information

School of Business, Dean’s Office
Founders’ Hall 249
sheehan@lasalle.edu
(215) 951 – 1059

Staff Contact Information

MarySheila E. McDonald
Dean, School of Business
Founders’ Hall 249
mcdonaldms@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1059

Patrick O’Brien
Associate Dean
Founders’ Hall 248
obrienp@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1572

Erin Sheehan
Administrative Assistant/Assistant to Dean and Associate Dean
Founders’ Hall 246
sheehan@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1834

Susan Mudrick
Assistant Dean
Founders’ Hall 241
mudrick@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1104
Oversees the advising system for undergraduate Traditional/Day business students.  Advises students who: study abroad; seek approval for taking courses at other schools to transfer back; have been suspended; are new transfer students; change their majors into the School of Business from one of the other Schools; are returning; seek approval for CLEP exams; dual majors across Schools.  Certifies students for graduation.

Lynnette Clement

Academic Advisor; Director, Organizational Leadership (ORL) and Human Capital Development Programs (HCDP)* 

Founders’ Hall 278

clement@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-3682

Advises Non-Traditional/Evening Accounting and Business Administration majors.  

* The ORL and HCDP are not AACSB Accreditated and have been exempted from our review. 

Penelope Grob
Director, Business Scholars Co-op Program
Founders’ Hall 228
grob@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-5113
Oversees all aspects of the undergraduate Business Scholars Co-op Program, including but not limited to academic advising, mentorship and career preparation for students in the program. 

Elizabeth Schroeder
Director, Business Leadership Fellows Program
Founders’ Hall 243
schroedere@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1314
Oversees the management of the Business Leadership Fellows Program.  Advises students who are interested in participating and/or are Fellows of the program; coaches Fellows on professional development opportunities (including internship and job searching, job shadowing, etc.).

Kristen Garry
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 244
garry@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1058
Handles and/or answers questions to students regarding: changing their majors; withdrawing from classes; withdrawing from the University; seeking to make appointments with Assistant Dean and Director of Business Scholars Co-op; prepares Dean’s Lists and Certificates; general academic-related inquiries.

Elizabeth Scofield
Director of Full-Time MBA Program
Founders’ Hall 233
scofield@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1913
Advises students in BS/MBA Program for MBA courses in fourth year.

John Farrell
Director, MBA Part-Time Graduate Studies
farrelJ@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1057

Nicole Blair
Assistant Director, MBA Part-Time Graduate Studies
blairn@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1057

Eileen O’Donnell
Administrative Assistant, Graduate Studies
odonnelle@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1057

Steve Melick
Executive Director of La Salle Center for Entrepreneurship
Founders’ Hall 242
melick@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1439

School Specific Academic Policies

Independent Studies

In general, the School of Business does not offer independent studies. 

Dual Majors and Waivers

Courses are not waived for students who dual major with both majors in the School of Business.  Limited waivers may be granted to students who dual major across Schools (i.e., one major is in the School of Business and one is outside of the School of Business).  

Taking courses at other schools

Students may take courses at other schools to transfer back to La Salle (as long as University policies on transfer are complied to).  Some courses–including but not limited to Major courses and several Business Core courses–may not be taken at other schools.  Students seeking to take courses at other schools should consult with the Assistant Dean for approval.

Taking MBA courses while still Undergraduate

Students who have 3.5 cumulative GPA’s may opt to take up to two MBA courses during their last year, however, the credits and courses will not count towards undergraduate degree requirements (i.e., the MBA courses would be over and above undergraduate course and credit degree requirements).  Conditions include:  the student has had the course pre-requisites; received approval from the Chairperson of their department; seats are available as determined by the MBA Director.

MBA Basic Core Equivalents

You can reduce the number of courses required to earn a master’s degree in Business Administration at La Salle by earning As or Bs in certain required undergraduate courses.

There is a body of undergraduate course work, drawn primarily from the Business Curriculum, which can be used to waive up to 9 credits of foundation level course work and 3 credits of core level course work for the La Salle MBA degree. All of these undergraduate courses are required for all undergraduate business majors. By earning a minimum “B” grade in the undergraduate course(s), the corresponding MBA course requirement will be waived. These courses are listed in the following chart.

LA SALLE UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

COURSE

ECN 150 Introductory Macroeconomics and
ECN 201 Introductory Microeconomics

MBA 610

BUS 101 Introduction to Financial Accounting

MBA 615

BUS 206 Financial Markets and Institutions and
BUS 208 Fundamentals of Financial Management

MBA 630

Marketing Major Courses

MBA 690*

Accounting Major Courses

MBA 691*

Finance Major Courses

MBA 692*

Business Systems and Analytics Major Courses

MBA 693*

*If two of the following are waived, an elective will be added to the program: MBA 690, 691, 692 and 693 may be waived

For information about admission into the MBA program please contact MBA Office at mba@lasalle.edu or 215-951-1057.

Opportunities Outside the Classroom

Engagement with the business community and opportunities to practice what is learned in the classroom are critical pieces to a holistic business education.  Students are encouraged to participate in the multiple programs and experiences provided by the School of Business including:

The Center for Entrepreneurship and its Open Minds Competition and Business Engagement Center

Aspiring entrepreneurs or individuals with an entrepreneurial mindset who are interested in developing their skills will be supported and inspired through the La Salle Center for Entrepreneurship (LCE). Through mentoring, networking and experiential learning, you’ll discover how to flex your innovative muscles, build leadership skills, explore the business landscape, and take measured risks to achieve your dreams. In addition, alumni and faculty will give back through mentoring as well as pursue their own entrepreneurial goals.

Networking Nights and alumni shadowing

In addition to providing students with the knowledge they need to succeed in a competitive job market, La Salle’s School of Business also helps them make the corporate connections to establish a foothold in the business world. We hold numerous events bringing students and alumni together with a goal of helping students make business world connections, building student confidence, educating students on specific industries trends and job expectations, and ultimately having alumni hire our students.  

In addition, alumni shadowing opportunities are also encouraged.  Students are able to connect with alumni and gain a day-in-the-life experience through these opportunities.  Many of these experiences help our student’s build life-long relationships.  

Our expert faculty members and Career Center have built key industry relationships with top national and international players, providing our students with access to a vast corporate network that includes nearly 25,000 La Salle Business alumni. Our alumni hold senior leadership positions in at least 50 of the 100 largest companies in the mid-Atlantic market, and all of the region’s top 20 firms employ La Salle Business alumni.

These connections have yielded many opportunities for La Salle students after graduation. The alumni network has secured more than 40 percent of all jobs for graduating business majors.

Executives on Campus

For the past five years, more than 200 alumni of La Salle have actively participated in the education of our students through our Executives on Campus program. Alumni business leaders join us on campus for two days of networking, interaction, learning, and mentoring.

Bloomberg Trading Room

The opening of the NEW Bloomberg Trading Room enables student’s to Increase their marketability by obtaining a Bloomberg Certification. Simply complete the eight-hour self-directed e-learning course, Bloomberg Market Concepts (BMC). It is delivered through modules on Economics, Fixed Income, Equities, and Currencies.

The BMC certification is an eye-opener for any résumé and/or LinkedIn profile.

Sales Center

As the only member of the Associated Member of the University Sales Center Alliance (USCA) in the Philadelphia metropolitan area, students are able to take advantage of the state-of-the-art sales training facilities, specific sales courses, sales competitions, mentors, internships, and other forms of actual sales experiences to build the necessary skills to accelerate career opportunities and advancement.  Students who complete the course requirements will be awarded the Certified Sales Student designation from the USCA and two SalesForce.com certifications: sales representative and sales management. For more information on the becoming a Certified Sales Student, please contact the Director of the Sales Center at dipietrom@lasalle.edu or 215-951-3577 and to learn more about the USCA, visit www.universitysalescenteralliance.org.

Case Competitions

Case competitions offer unique hands-on insight into what it really takes to get a job done or a project launched in today’s business environment. Our teams have traveled around the country to participate in high-stakes business problem-solving competitions. In collaboration with major global corporations and other universities, the competitions foster team building, provide real-world experience, and allow students to develop their professional communication skills. Of course, the networking opportunities are invaluable.

Student Case Competitions allow students to work in teams on real or simulated business cases as part regional, national and international collegiate competitions.  Recent case competition was hosted not only in Philadelphia; our students have competed in Arizona, California, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Canada.

Student Organizations

The School of Business offers students multiple ways to get involved as leaders in clubs and honor societies.  Some clubs are affiliated with a major such as Accounting, Finance, Business Analytics or Marketing while other organizations are open to all business majors such as the professional business fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi and the Business of Sports club. The Dean has 2 student advisory boards- the Dean’s Freshmen Advisory Board and the Dean’s Students Advisory Board (comprised of the officers of each of the business school clubs.)

The School of Business currently has thirteen business clubs and organizations specifically designed for students and, in many cases, by students.  In the last year, students have created the Business of Sports, Business of Music, and the Business of Fashion clubs.  Students are able to build leadership skills, increase their networking circles, develop “soft” skills (e.g. communication, attitude, and work ethic), receive help with confirming a selected major, build their resume or simply have an opportunity to meet new people.

Some examples of Organizations and Clubs in the School of Business are:

 

 

International Education Opportunities

A key goal of the La Salle School of Business is to help our students succeed in a world market by interdependence, diversity, and rapid change. In addition to course work focusing on the challenges and opportunities posed by global market trends, we also strongly encourage our students to participate in our Study Abroad and Travel Study programs. They offer a hands-on understanding of the economic, social, political, and environmental forces that are shaping the modern business world – and our lives.

La Salle has strong ties with the American University of Rome in Italy, Universidad La Salle in Mexico City, Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia, and the National University of Ireland in Galway, where students have the opportunity to have semester-long learning experiences. Students may also gain acceptance to semester-long programs in Brazil, China, England, France, Mexico, South Africa, and Spain through the Lasallian International Programs Consortium, as well as to a summer program in Switzerland. In addition, La Salle provides various levels of support for students wanting to study at other destinations. In travel/study courses offered by the School of Business, students study international aspects of various business disciplines in a semester-long course and travel for approximately 10 days to other locations in the world, where they study related business practices and the culture of that area. Previous trips have taken students to France, Germany, Canada, Bermuda, London, and China. Additional travel/study opportunities related to liberal arts areas of study are offered by the University. Opportunities for students to do an internship abroad are being developed.

 

Experiential Education Programs

Experiential Education Programs provide hands-on experience in business organizations. Experiential education programs are designed to give students hands-on work experience related to their majors. Participation provides an opportunity to link the theory and practice of the discipline. Research shows that students who intern or co-op generally have greater success in finding their first jobs after graduation and earn higher starting salaries. Recent participants have included Aramark, Baker Tilly, Johnson & Johnson, PwC, KPMG, EY, Deloitte, Disney, Burlington Stores, CIGNA, IBX, SAP, Sunoco.

The Internship/ Co-op Program and Business Scholars Co-op Program are the experiential education program options for students.

Internship/Co-op Program

Internships and co-ops are available throughout the year (most are taken during the fall or spring semesters) and range from three to six months. Students generally participate during their junior or senior years. Internships may be full time or part time, paid or non-paid. They count as free electives and not as major courses. Students earn three credits for internships and co-ops. As with other courses, they must be rostered prior to the end of the first week of the semester. Co-ops and full-time internships are up to six months long. They are paid positions. A student taking a co-op or full-time internship may graduate in four years by following the model roster on the following page. (For additional information, see Page 17). Part-time internships are one semester long and generally are non-paid. The student ordinarily carries a full academic schedule along with the part-time internship. Up to three co-ops or internships may be taken over the course of a student’s years at La Salle. Contact the Associate Director for Experiential Education in the Career Planning Office at 215.951.1075 for more information.

Business Scholars Co-op Program

La Salle University’s School of Business recognizes the challenges faced by today’s businesses and our highly motivated students. The Business Scholars Co-op Program provides our students with exceptional relevant professional work experiences.  The goal of our program is to meet the academic and introductory work experience needs of well-rounded academically talented students.

Overview

The Business Scholars Co-op Program is similar to traditional applied learning programs.  Highlights of the program are:

A unique characteristic of our program is our accelerated curriculum, which enables students to graduate in only four years, rather than the traditional five years required by programs at other universities.

Co-op students are eligible for their 1st work assignment at the completion of 5 semesters (71 credit hours) of classroom study.  The 1st work assignment, which occurs during the summer following students’ sophomore year, is a three to four-month experience.  The 2nd work assignment is a six to eight-month experience in either spring and summer of students’ junior year or summer following junior year and fall of senior year.

Admissions Criteria

Freshmen students can apply to the Business Scholars Co-op Program who have been accepted for admission by the University.   There are two entry points to the program, the first is while still in high school, criteria during this phase includes a combined SAT Critical Reading and Math scores of approximately 1270 or a composite ACT score of 26 and who have a high school cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 high school scale.  The second entry point is after students have completed their fall freshmen semester at La Salle University and have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and a grade of B or better in their School of Business academic coursework. 

Take advantage of the ability to combine programs, including the University Honors Program or the Four-Year BS/MBA program. The Academic/Work Term Sequence also makes it easy for student-athletes to participate in the program.

View the Business Scholars Co-op Program website for more information.

Contact Information

Penelope C. Grob
Director, Business Scholars Co-op Program
grob@lasalle.edu
215-951-5113

Business Fellows Leadership Program

The Business Leadership Fellows Program provides students with the skills, knowledge, experiences and confidence to differentiate themselves as they enter an increasingly competitive global economy.  The Fellows program is designed to develop confident leaders by integrating the business curriculum with intentional skills training, supervised leadership experiences, multiple experiential learning opportunities (such as internships, co-op, travel study and mentorship) and an emphasis on social responsibility.

The BLFP competitive advantage is rooted in the transformational nature of the program’s design in which each Fellow will:

The program is open to any La Salle student majoring in business who will be a freshman, sophomore, or junior in Fall 2018, including transfer students. Interested students must apply and meet the admission requirements, which include:

View the Business Leadership Fellows Program website for more information.

Contact Information

Elizabeth Schroeder, M.S.
Director, Business Leadership Fellows Program
schroedere@lasalle.edu
215.951.1314

Four-Year Dual BS/MBA Program for Accounting majors allows students to earn their Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in just four years and to meet the 150-hour requirement for CPA certification.

Departments

Majors

Minors

Department of Accounting

Mission Statement

The mission of the Accounting Department--consistent with the missions of La Salle University and the School of Business--is to prepare students to become effective and socially responsible business and community leaders. Dedicated to the Christian Brothers’ traditions of excellence in teaching and concern for individual values of its students, the accounting faculty’s charge is to instill within our students an understanding of accounting as a profession with high ethical responsibilities.

Department Goals

Major(s) Offered

Accounting – B.S.B.A. (4 year)

Accounting – B.S.B.A./M.B.A. Dual Degree (4 year) 

Accounting – B.S.B.A. (4 year Non-Traditional/Evening)

Minor(s) Offered

Accounting

Location/Contact Information

Dr. Kristin Wentzel, Chairperson
wentzel@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 378
215.951.5176

Dr. Susan Borkowski
borkowsk@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 341
215.951.1491

Prof. Paul Brazina
brazina@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 342
215.951.1623

Br. Gerald Fitzgerald
fitzgera@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 377
215.951.1856

Dr. Sharon Hua
hua@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 374
215.951.1498

Dr. C. Andrew Lafond
lafond@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 379
215.951.1977

Dr. Bruce Leauby
leauby@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 431
215.951.1490

Dr. Yusuf Ugras
ugras@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 343
215.951.1240

Ms. Elizabeth Medina
medina@lasalle.edu
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 327
215.951.1008

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Welsh, Zook

PROFESSORS: Borkowski

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Lafond, Leauby, Ugras, Wentzel

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Brazina, Fitzgerald, Hua

Accounting (Non-Traditional/Evening)

Program Description

Accounting, “the Language of Business,” is the core of any business enterprise. Accountants are responsible for communicating and interpreting financial information as a basis for strategic decision-making.

Accounting includes specialties that focus on specific and unique aspects of the financial institution. Cost Management, Information Systems, Auditing, Taxation, and Multinational Operations are areas of advanced study that prepare students to function as executives responsible for business decision-making in both the profit and not-for-profit enterprises. Students can also earn six credits toward graduation by participating in an Experiential Education Program.

Since almost all organizations need accounting information, positions range from manufacturing firms to service industries to hospitals and other not-for profits and all levels of governmental operations. Graduates function as CPAs, internal auditors, bankers, financial planners, budget specialists, merger and acquisition consultants, and tax planners.

Students are encouraged to join one of the three professional student organizations: the Accounting Association, Beta Alpha Accounting Honor Society, and the student chapter of the National Association of Black Accountants.

Why take this major?

Accountants are key business partners in any business organization helping insure that business decisions are based on sound financial information. Since accounting is a key component of all businesses and industries, there are many job possibilities for accounting graduates. Certified Public Accountants (CPAs), internal auditors, financial planners, merger and acquisition consultants, and tax planners are just some of the possible career paths.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Dr. Kristin Wentzel, Chairperson
wentzel@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 378
215.951.5176

Dr. Susan Borkowski
borkowsk@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 341
215.951.1491

Prof. Paul Brazina
brazina@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 342
215.951.1623

Br. Gerald Fitzgerald
fitzgera@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 377
215.951.1856

Dr. Sharon Hua
hua@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 374
215.951.1498

Dr. C. Andrew Lafond
lafond@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 379
215.951.1977

Dr. Bruce Leauby
leauby@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 431
215.951.1490

Dr. Yusuf Ugras
ugras@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 343
215.951.1240

Ms. Elizabeth Medina
medina@lasalle.edu
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 327
215.951.1008

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 22

Total: 42

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 68

Total: 128

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 - Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 - Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 - Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 42 courses in total in order to graduate. 22 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

*Please note:  FYS course is required for Traditional/Day students only

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline Specific

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

REQUIRED FOR MINOR IN ACCOUNTING: 6 COURSES

Recommended Course Sequence

BUS 101 and BUS 102 need to be taken before other upper-level ACC courses.  ACC courses are only offered once a year in the evening and all have pre-requisites so advising on careful selection of courses is critical.

Course Descriptions

ACC 201 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I

Accounting issues related to financial statement preparation and measurement, revenue recognition, and current assets. Students are introduced to liquidity and solvency analyses, International Financial Reporting Standards and enterprise resource planning software. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: BUS 101 with a “C” grade or better

ACC 202 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II

The study of accounting issues related to operational assets, financial instruments, and liabilities and additional financial reporting issues, including share-based compensation and the Statement of Cash Flows. Students are exposed to financial disclosure and International Financial Reporting Standards. The course requires research on Financial Accounting Standards and integrates various topics with enterprise resource planning software. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: ACC 201 with a “C” grade or better

ACC 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Accounting

Part-time, paid or non-paid employment in an accounting setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. Position must be approved by the Accounting Department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective, not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. The number 360 is used if taken in junior year and 460 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well or permisson of the Assistant Dean.

ACC 303 - Cost Accounting

This course focuses on how cost information is produced and used in contemporary organizations, especially its role in strategic decision-making. Topics include cost classifications, cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, variance analysis, budgeting, joint product costs, and service department cost allocations. Employs a case analysis approach to tackle complex business scenarios. Requires the use of regression analysis and Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 102, BUS 202 (can be taken concurrently with BUS 202)

ACC 304 - Auditing, Assurance and Forensic Services

A practical framework for understanding and evaluating the professional auditing standards for assurance services with emphasis on external financial reporting by independent auditors. Major topics include audit reports and standards, evaluation of internal controls, legal liability, professional responsibilities and the code of professional ethics. Application of state-of-the-art computer technology is integrated with a forensic case-based learning approach. Additionally, the essentials of internal control used by diverse organizations to safeguard assets and financial data is covered, and sets the foundation for those interested in forensic accounting and fraud examination careers.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 202 (can be taken concurrently with ACC 202)

ACC 307 - Federal Income Taxation

An introductory course in taxation designed to introduce the student to Federal income taxation focused primarily on individuals with an overview of business entities. The fundamental concepts and more common transactions will be emphasized which will provide an understanding of the impact of tax laws on business and financial decisions. Theory will be developed through the use of a web-based tax research service, CCH IntelliConnect, and applied through preparation of income tax returns using ProSystem fx.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

ACC 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Accounting Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the Program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter-grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship

Full-time, paid employment in an accounting setting to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective, not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the faculty member in the Accounting Department who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 405 - Advanced Accounting I: Accounting for the Multinational Enterprise

With corporate acquisitions dominating the financial markets, Accounting 405 examines US and International Accounting Standards for valuing mergers & acquisitions (M&A), recording transactions, and reporting on consolidated financial statements. The underlying business transactions are analyzed using appropriate valuation methodologies.   Accounting for partnership formation, operations, and dissolution is covered in this course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: ACC 202 and senior standing

ACC 406 - Advanced Accounting II: Special Topics in Financial Reporting

This course covers topics that are essential for the Certified Public Accounting (CPA) Examination and Certified Management Accounting (CMA) Examination including: the structure of US GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS); Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) reporting; fund accounting for government, non-profits and healthcare; bankruptcy and reorganization accounting; and accounting for estates and trusts. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: ACC 202 and Senior standing.

ACC 418 - Taxation of Business Entities

A comprehensive examination of taxation as it relates to the various forms of business entities (C corporations, S corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and limited liability partnerships) and their owners. Theory will be developed through the use of a web-based tax research service, CCH IntelliConnect, and applied through preparation of income tax returns using ProSystem fx. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for the Regulation section of the CPA exam.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 307 and senior standing.

ACC 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, four to eight months assignment in a cooperating firm.
Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Accounting Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the Program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member in the Accounting Department who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of ACC 201 and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 471 - Personal Financial Planning

The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the fundamentals, strategies, and implementation that make up the personal financial planning (PFP) process. An overview of the PFP process is then expanded into a comprehensive study of its essential components, such as risk management, investment planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. Inherent in all aspects of the course will be the underlying tax implications that exist as an integral part of the decision-making. Students will also gain an understanding of the professional responsibilities and regulatory requirements that accompany the PFP process. Each student will then work with a case study in developing a financial plan using the most current technology package used by financial planners in actual practice.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing and a grade of C or better in ACC 307 (Federal Income Taxation).

ACC 478 - AIS, ERP, and Accounting Analytics

This course offers an enhanced understanding of accounting information and enterprise resource planning systems, and accounting analytics from a business user perspective. It includes hands-on experience with SAP’s ERP system, a business intelligence/data visualization application, and discussion of current topics, including block chain, cryptocurrencies, privacy and security issues, disaster recovery, anti-fraud and audit resources, and XBRL.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: ACC 202 and senior standing.

ACC 480 - Accounting Seminar

Research in contemporary accounting topics. The course is designed to develop and improve research skills along with written and oral communication abilities necessary for success in business. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 202 and senior standing.

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Accounting (Traditional/Day)

Program Description

Accounting, “the Language of Business,” is the core of any business enterprise. Accountants are responsible for communicating and interpreting financial information as a basis for strategic decision-making.

Accounting includes specialties that focus on specific and unique aspects of the financial institution. Cost Management, Information Systems, Auditing, Taxation, and Multinational Operations are areas of advanced study that prepare students to function as executives responsible for business decision-making in both the profit and not-for-profit enterprises. Students can also earn six credits toward graduation by participating in an Experiential Education Program.

Since almost all organizations need accounting information, positions range from manufacturing firms to service industries to hospitals and other not-for profits and all levels of governmental operations. Graduates function as CPAs, internal auditors, bankers, financial planners, budget specialists, merger and acquisition consultants, and tax planners.

Students are encouraged to join one of the three professional student organizations: the Accounting Association, Beta Alpha Accounting Honor Society, and the student chapter of the National Association of Black Accountants.

Why take this major?

Accountants are key business partners in any business organization helping insure that business decisions are based on sound financial information. Since accounting is a key component of all businesses and industries, there are many job possibilities for accounting graduates. Certified Public Accountants (CPAs), internal auditors, financial planners, merger and acquisition consultants, and tax planners are just some of the possible career paths.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Dr. Kristin Wentzel, Chairperson
wentzel@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 378
215.951.5176

Dr. Susan Borkowski
borkowsk@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 341
215.951.1491

Prof. Paul Brazina
brazina@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 342
215.951.1623

Br. Gerald Fitzgerald
fitzgera@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 377
215.951.1856

Dr. Sharon Hua
hua@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 374
215.951.1498

Dr. C. Andrew Lafond
lafond@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 379
215.951.1977

Dr. Bruce Leauby
leauby@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 431
215.951.1490

Dr. Yusuf Ugras
ugras@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 343
215.951.1240

Ms. Elizabeth Medina
medina@lasalle.edu
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 327
215.951.1008

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 23

Total: 42

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 72

Total: 128

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 - Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 - Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 - Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 42 courses in total in order to graduate. 23 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline specific

*Please note:  FYS course & BUS 100 is required for Traditional/Day students only

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

REQUIRED FOR MINOR IN ACCOUNTING: 6 COURSES

Recommended Course Sequence

Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Course Descriptions

ACC 201 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I

Accounting issues related to financial statement preparation and measurement, revenue recognition, and current assets. Students are introduced to liquidity and solvency analyses, International Financial Reporting Standards and enterprise resource planning software. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: BUS 101 with a “C” grade or better

ACC 202 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II

The study of accounting issues related to operational assets, financial instruments, and liabilities and additional financial reporting issues, including share-based compensation and the Statement of Cash Flows. Students are exposed to financial disclosure and International Financial Reporting Standards. The course requires research on Financial Accounting Standards and integrates various topics with enterprise resource planning software. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: ACC 201 with a “C” grade or better

ACC 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Accounting

Part-time, paid or non-paid employment in an accounting setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. Position must be approved by the Accounting Department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective, not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. The number 360 is used if taken in junior year and 460 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well or permisson of the Assistant Dean.

ACC 303 - Cost Accounting

This course focuses on how cost information is produced and used in contemporary organizations, especially its role in strategic decision-making. Topics include cost classifications, cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, variance analysis, budgeting, joint product costs, and service department cost allocations. Employs a case analysis approach to tackle complex business scenarios. Requires the use of regression analysis and Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 102, BUS 202 (can be taken concurrently with BUS 202)

ACC 304 - Auditing, Assurance and Forensic Services

A practical framework for understanding and evaluating the professional auditing standards for assurance services with emphasis on external financial reporting by independent auditors. Major topics include audit reports and standards, evaluation of internal controls, legal liability, professional responsibilities and the code of professional ethics. Application of state-of-the-art computer technology is integrated with a forensic case-based learning approach. Additionally, the essentials of internal control used by diverse organizations to safeguard assets and financial data is covered, and sets the foundation for those interested in forensic accounting and fraud examination careers.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 202 (can be taken concurrently with ACC 202)

ACC 307 - Federal Income Taxation

An introductory course in taxation designed to introduce the student to Federal income taxation focused primarily on individuals with an overview of business entities. The fundamental concepts and more common transactions will be emphasized which will provide an understanding of the impact of tax laws on business and financial decisions. Theory will be developed through the use of a web-based tax research service, CCH IntelliConnect, and applied through preparation of income tax returns using ProSystem fx.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

ACC 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Accounting Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the Program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter-grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship

Full-time, paid employment in an accounting setting to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective, not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the faculty member in the Accounting Department who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 405 - Advanced Accounting I: Accounting for the Multinational Enterprise

With corporate acquisitions dominating the financial markets, Accounting 405 examines US and International Accounting Standards for valuing mergers & acquisitions (M&A), recording transactions, and reporting on consolidated financial statements. The underlying business transactions are analyzed using appropriate valuation methodologies.   Accounting for partnership formation, operations, and dissolution is covered in this course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: ACC 202 and senior standing

ACC 406 - Advanced Accounting II: Special Topics in Financial Reporting

This course covers topics that are essential for the Certified Public Accounting (CPA) Examination and Certified Management Accounting (CMA) Examination including: the structure of US GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS); Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) reporting; fund accounting for government, non-profits and healthcare; bankruptcy and reorganization accounting; and accounting for estates and trusts. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: ACC 202 and Senior standing.

ACC 418 - Taxation of Business Entities

A comprehensive examination of taxation as it relates to the various forms of business entities (C corporations, S corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and limited liability partnerships) and their owners. Theory will be developed through the use of a web-based tax research service, CCH IntelliConnect, and applied through preparation of income tax returns using ProSystem fx. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for the Regulation section of the CPA exam.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 307 and senior standing.

ACC 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, four to eight months assignment in a cooperating firm.
Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Accounting Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the Program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member in the Accounting Department who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of ACC 201 and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 471 - Personal Financial Planning

The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the fundamentals, strategies, and implementation that make up the personal financial planning (PFP) process. An overview of the PFP process is then expanded into a comprehensive study of its essential components, such as risk management, investment planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. Inherent in all aspects of the course will be the underlying tax implications that exist as an integral part of the decision-making. Students will also gain an understanding of the professional responsibilities and regulatory requirements that accompany the PFP process. Each student will then work with a case study in developing a financial plan using the most current technology package used by financial planners in actual practice.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing and a grade of C or better in ACC 307 (Federal Income Taxation).

ACC 478 - AIS, ERP, and Accounting Analytics

This course offers an enhanced understanding of accounting information and enterprise resource planning systems, and accounting analytics from a business user perspective. It includes hands-on experience with SAP’s ERP system, a business intelligence/data visualization application, and discussion of current topics, including block chain, cryptocurrencies, privacy and security issues, disaster recovery, anti-fraud and audit resources, and XBRL.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: ACC 202 and senior standing.

ACC 480 - Accounting Seminar

Research in contemporary accounting topics. The course is designed to develop and improve research skills along with written and oral communication abilities necessary for success in business. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 202 and senior standing.

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Accounting B.S./MBA (4-Year)

Program Description

The Accounting Department offers a four-year dual B.S. in Accounting/MBA degree program. The purpose of the program is to allow high-ability students to meet the 150 hours of education required by most states for CPA certification in four years, while earning both an undergraduate and graduate degree. Students move through the traditional undergraduate program at an accelerated pace by taking undergraduate summer classes for two summers following their first and second year, and then completing MBA requirements during their fourth year. Students electing to pursue the dual degree are required to have only 120 credits for the B.S. degree, rather than the 128 credits required for the four-year B.S. in accounting. The remaining 30 credits are graduate MBA credits and include graduate accounting courses. With careful planning, a student in the dual-degree program can participate in the Business Scholars Co-op Program or complete a single full-time internship. Students admitted to the dual-degree program as entering freshmen generally must have an SAT score of 1270 or higher. Currently enrolled students are eligible to join the program no later than the end of their sophomore year if they maintain a GPA of 3.4 or higher. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.4 to remain in the program. Students who decide not to complete the MBA or who do not qualify for acceptance to the MBA program have the option to leave the program with a B.S. after completing two additional accounting electives to meet the 128-credit requirement.

Why take this major?

Students in this program are ready to get down to business. They know they want to work in public accounting. The program allows exceptionally driven students to meet the 150-credit requirement for CPA certification and licensure in Pennsylvania and 47 other states immediately upon graduation, and all in just four years.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Dr. Kristin Wentzel, Chairperson
wentzel@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 378
215.951.5176

Dr. Susan Borkowski
borkowsk@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 341
215.951.1491

Prof. Paul Brazina
brazina@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 342
215.951.1623

Br. Gerald Fitzgerald
fitzgera@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 377
215.951.1856

Dr. Sharon Hua
hua@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 374
215.951.1498

Dr. C. Andrew Lafond
lafond@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 379
215.951.1977

Dr. Bruce Leauby
leauby@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 431
215.951.1490

Dr. Yusuf Ugras
ugras@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 343
215.951.1240

Ms. Elizabeth Medina
medina@lasalle.edu
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 327
215.951.1008

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A. and M.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 21 undergraduate courses

Total: 39 undergraduate courses

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 66 undergraduate credits

Total: 120 undergraduate credits

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 3.4

Cumulative: 3.4

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 - Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 - Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 - Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 39 undergraduate courses courses in total in order to graduate. 21 undergraduate courses courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Major courses

Additional accounting requirements are met in the 4th year MBA program. See the Graduate Catalog. One-year MBA, Accounting Track for program requirements.

 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Course Descriptions

ACC 201 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I

Accounting issues related to financial statement preparation and measurement, revenue recognition, and current assets. Students are introduced to liquidity and solvency analyses, International Financial Reporting Standards and enterprise resource planning software. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: BUS 101 with a “C” grade or better

ACC 202 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II

The study of accounting issues related to operational assets, financial instruments, and liabilities and additional financial reporting issues, including share-based compensation and the Statement of Cash Flows. Students are exposed to financial disclosure and International Financial Reporting Standards. The course requires research on Financial Accounting Standards and integrates various topics with enterprise resource planning software. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: ACC 201 with a “C” grade or better

ACC 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Accounting

Part-time, paid or non-paid employment in an accounting setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. Position must be approved by the Accounting Department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective, not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. The number 360 is used if taken in junior year and 460 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well or permisson of the Assistant Dean.

ACC 303 - Cost Accounting

This course focuses on how cost information is produced and used in contemporary organizations, especially its role in strategic decision-making. Topics include cost classifications, cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, variance analysis, budgeting, joint product costs, and service department cost allocations. Employs a case analysis approach to tackle complex business scenarios. Requires the use of regression analysis and Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 102, BUS 202 (can be taken concurrently with BUS 202)

ACC 304 - Auditing, Assurance and Forensic Services

A practical framework for understanding and evaluating the professional auditing standards for assurance services with emphasis on external financial reporting by independent auditors. Major topics include audit reports and standards, evaluation of internal controls, legal liability, professional responsibilities and the code of professional ethics. Application of state-of-the-art computer technology is integrated with a forensic case-based learning approach. Additionally, the essentials of internal control used by diverse organizations to safeguard assets and financial data is covered, and sets the foundation for those interested in forensic accounting and fraud examination careers.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 202 (can be taken concurrently with ACC 202)

ACC 307 - Federal Income Taxation

An introductory course in taxation designed to introduce the student to Federal income taxation focused primarily on individuals with an overview of business entities. The fundamental concepts and more common transactions will be emphasized which will provide an understanding of the impact of tax laws on business and financial decisions. Theory will be developed through the use of a web-based tax research service, CCH IntelliConnect, and applied through preparation of income tax returns using ProSystem fx.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

ACC 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Accounting Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the Program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter-grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship

Full-time, paid employment in an accounting setting to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions at least six months in duration may qualify). Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective, not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the faculty member in the Accounting Department who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA and completion of ACC 201 with a grade of C or better and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 405 - Advanced Accounting I: Accounting for the Multinational Enterprise

With corporate acquisitions dominating the financial markets, Accounting 405 examines US and International Accounting Standards for valuing mergers & acquisitions (M&A), recording transactions, and reporting on consolidated financial statements. The underlying business transactions are analyzed using appropriate valuation methodologies.   Accounting for partnership formation, operations, and dissolution is covered in this course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: ACC 202 and senior standing

ACC 406 - Advanced Accounting II: Special Topics in Financial Reporting

This course covers topics that are essential for the Certified Public Accounting (CPA) Examination and Certified Management Accounting (CMA) Examination including: the structure of US GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS); Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) reporting; fund accounting for government, non-profits and healthcare; bankruptcy and reorganization accounting; and accounting for estates and trusts. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: ACC 202 and Senior standing.

ACC 418 - Taxation of Business Entities

A comprehensive examination of taxation as it relates to the various forms of business entities (C corporations, S corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and limited liability partnerships) and their owners. Theory will be developed through the use of a web-based tax research service, CCH IntelliConnect, and applied through preparation of income tax returns using ProSystem fx. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for the Regulation section of the CPA exam.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 307 and senior standing.

ACC 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, four to eight months assignment in a cooperating firm.
Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Accounting Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the Program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member in the Accounting Department who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: 2.25 minimum, overall and major, GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of ACC 201 and preferably ACC 202 as well.

ACC 471 - Personal Financial Planning

The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the fundamentals, strategies, and implementation that make up the personal financial planning (PFP) process. An overview of the PFP process is then expanded into a comprehensive study of its essential components, such as risk management, investment planning, retirement planning, and estate planning. Inherent in all aspects of the course will be the underlying tax implications that exist as an integral part of the decision-making. Students will also gain an understanding of the professional responsibilities and regulatory requirements that accompany the PFP process. Each student will then work with a case study in developing a financial plan using the most current technology package used by financial planners in actual practice.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing and a grade of C or better in ACC 307 (Federal Income Taxation).

ACC 478 - AIS, ERP, and Accounting Analytics

This course offers an enhanced understanding of accounting information and enterprise resource planning systems, and accounting analytics from a business user perspective. It includes hands-on experience with SAP’s ERP system, a business intelligence/data visualization application, and discussion of current topics, including block chain, cryptocurrencies, privacy and security issues, disaster recovery, anti-fraud and audit resources, and XBRL.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: ACC 202 and senior standing.

ACC 480 - Accounting Seminar

Research in contemporary accounting topics. The course is designed to develop and improve research skills along with written and oral communication abilities necessary for success in business. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ACC 202 and senior standing.

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Department of Business Systems and Analytics

Mission Statement

The mission of the Business Systems and Analytics Department is to advance the knowledge and promote the use of information systems and business analytics for informed and effective problem solving and decision making. Through its faculty, curriculum, students, department sponsored activities, and partnerships with the alumni and business community, the Business Systems and Analytics major seeks to provide a value-added experience for students by communicating and demonstrating the importance of and the need for information systems and business analytics knowledge and skills in the workplace.

Department Goals

Data and Technology Skills

BSA Learning Goal 1: Use analytic methods and techniques to drive effective, data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to perform data analysis using various analytic techniques and interpret results to solve business problems and make informed business decisions.

BSA Learning Goal 2: Use information systems and technologies to drive effective, data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions.

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to use data management tools and technologies to improve organizational support of data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

BSA Learning Goal 3: Solve business problems and make business decisions with information systems and analytics tools and technologies.

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to formulate problems and develop and apply data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions using information systems and analytics tools and technologies.

Communication Skills

BSA Learning Goal 4: Effectively communicate the results of analytic solutions to business problems and decisions.

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to effectively convey, through oral and written communication, the results of analytic solutions to business problems and decisions.

Major(s) Offered

Business Systems and Analytics

Minor(s) Offered

Business Systems and Analytics

Location/Contact Information

Dr. Madjid Tavana, Chairperson
tavana@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 635
215.951.1129

Dr. Kathryn Szabat
szabat@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 637
215.951.1128

Dr. Nilofar Varzgani
varzgani@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 639
215.951.1049

Dr. Dennis Kennedy
kennedy@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 633
215.951.1363

Mr. Paul Otto
otto@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 636
215.951-1517

Ms. Maria Fiet
flood@lasalle.edu
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 441

215.951.1007                                                                                                                                                             

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Tavana

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Szabat, Kennedy

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Varzgani, Otto

Business Systems and Analytics

Program Description

As the field of business moves deeper into the age of Big Data, analytics plays an increasingly important role in how companies make decision and improve productivity. Effectively aggregating, organizing, and understanding data can be the determining factor in the success or failure of an organization. Companies are seeking skilled employees who are comfortable with working with data and making informed and effective decisions in technology-rich environments.

Studying Business Systems and Analytics at La Salle University will prepare you for beginning your career in business analytics and data sciences. The demand for employers equipped with information systems and business analytics knowledge and skills is steadily on the rise making this an incredibly attractive sector for employment. In addition, Philadelphia is an active hiring market putting graduates of La Salle University in a prime location.

Why take this major?

Student Learning Outcomes

Student learning goals and objectives for the Business Systems and Analytics Department are:

Data and Technology Skills

BSA Learning Goal 1: Use analytic methods and techniques to drive effective, data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to perform data analysis using various analytic techniques and interpret results to solve business problems and make informed business decisions.

BSA Learning Goal 2: Use information systems and technologies to drive effective, data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions.

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to use data management tools and technologies to improve organizational support of data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions.

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

BSA Learning Goal 3: Solve business problems and make business decisions with information systems and analytics tools and technologies.

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to formulate problems and develop and apply data-driven solutions to business problems and decisions using information systems and analytics tools and technologies.

Communication Skills

BSA Learning Goal 4: Effectively communicate the results of analytic solutions to business problems and decisions.

BSA Learning Objective: Demonstrate the ability to effectively convey, through oral and written communication, the results of analytic solutions to business problems and decisions.

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 20

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 61

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 – Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 – Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 – Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 – Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 20 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline Specific

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

(FOR BUSINESS MAJORS): 6 COURSES

Junior standing is a prerequisite for 300- and 400-level courses.

        (FOR NON-BUSINESS MAJORS): 6 COURSES

         Choose one of the following:

 

Recommended Course Sequence

Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Course Descriptions

BSA 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Business Systems and Analytics

Part-time, generally non-paid employment in a company or organizational setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as an elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. The number 360 is used if taken in junior year and 460 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA and completion of BUS 205 and preferably an upper-level major course, or permission of the Assistant Dean

BSA 302 - Applied Regression Modeling and Visualization

This course is a data-driven, applied course focusing on the analysis of data using regression models and visualization techniques. It emphasizes applications to the analysis of business data and makes extensive use of computer statistical packages. Topics include simple and multiple linear regression, residual analysis and other regression diagnostics, model selection, classification (logistic regression), exploratory graphic techniques in modeling, and design principles for creating meaningful displays of data to facilitate decision making. All topics are illustrated on real-world data sets obtained from various disciplines to include accounting, finance, management, sales and marketing, operations, and risk management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202 or equivalent

BSA 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision.The position must be approved by the Business Systems and Analytics Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the program, and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 205 and preferably an upper-level major course

BSA 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship in Business Systems and Analytics

Full-time paid employment in a company or organizational setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision.The position must be approved by the Department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA and completion of BUS 205 and preferably an upper-level major course

BSA 371 - Special Topics in Business Systems and Analytics

This course is designed to address contemporary issues and interests in Business Systems and Analytics. Such topics as as Process modeling and Optimization, Web Analytics, Social Network Analytics, and Business Forecasting will be offered in various semesters.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: varies with topics

BSA 385 - Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management

This course is about the manager’s responsibilities for decision making in the Information Age using Decision Support Systems (DSS) and Expert Systems (ES). DSS topics include: Data Management, Modeling and Model Management, User Interface, Executive and Organizational Systems, Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS), and DSS Building Process and Tools, including Spreadsheets, Natural Language Programming, and Influence Diagramming. ES topics include: Applied Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Acquisition and Validation, Knowledge Representation, Inferencing, and ES Building Process and Tools. Students are required to apply DSS and ES software packages in a hands-on environment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 205 or equivalent

BSA 400 - Business Applications Programming

This course explores a problem solving methodology that employs computer programming and scripting. Emphasis is placed on identifying the capabilities and limitations of statistical computing languages for big data. Students will learn skills and techniques to solve big data problems through a series of steps that involve identification of problems, design of the solution logic, formal representation of program specifications, and implementation of it using selected high level languages such as R, Python, and Hadoop. This is a hands-on course. Students will design and develop several computer programs throughout the term. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 205 or equivalent

BSA 405 - Emerging Trends in Business Systems and Analytics

This course is designed to introduce students to one of several areas of multi-discipinary emerging trends in Business Systems and Analytics. Students will learn the fundamental principles and concepts of a specific topic, its applicable technology, the design and implementation of the systems that support the area of study, and methods for measuring efficacy. Evolving technologies will be addressed as appropriate, and their relevance to business pursuits will be discussed and analyzed. Lectures and case studies will be used to give the student a solid understanding of the topic. A group project to develop and present an area initiative/concept will be the capstone of this course.  This course is offered under different titles and can be repeated for additional credit when taken as a different topic.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Varies by topic

BSA 410 - Systems Analysis and Database Design

Complex business systems and organizations are examined, with the goal of discovering their structure and information flow. Tools such as the Entity-Relationship Diagram, Data Structure Diagram, Data Flow Diagram, Data Dictionary, and Process Specifications are used to develop Systems Specifications. The blueprint developed during the systems analysis phase will be used to design and develop efficient and effective databse applications. To demonstrate acquired skills, students design and develop a relational database application with a database management system and write SQL statements to extract information.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 205 or equivalent

BSA 415 - Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise Systems Development

Intended as a project course in which students are equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and implement information systems for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The course covers transactional processing, management reporting, and the need to transfer data among multiple application files, and application software integration programs. Development and implementation of multiple-application packages, such as integrated accounting programs and financial reporting systems are examined. Multiple applications in these packages include Order Processing, Invoicing, Accounts Receivable, inventory Control, Credit Monitoring and Reporting, Purchasing, Accounts Payable, Payroll, General Ledger, and Financial Statements. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 205 or equivalent

BSA 420 - Data Warehousing and Data Mining in Business

This course introduces data warehousing and data mining concepts. Topics include data warehousing and mediation techniques aimed at integrating distributed, heterogeneous data sources; data mining techniques such as rule-based learning, decision trees, association rule mining, and statistical analysis for discovery of patterns in the integrated data; and evaluation and interpretation of the mined patterns using visualization techniques.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing and BSA 302 (BSA 302 could be taken concurrently)

BSA 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, four-to-eight month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Business Systems and Analytics Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the program, and students who are not in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 205 and preferably an upper-level major course

BSA 480 - Business Systems and Analytics Capstone

This integrative capstone course is designed to examine the effects of technology and its rapidly changing nature on the corporate environment. Students will learn how to think strategically about business systems and analytics within the context of a functioning organization. Classroom lectures and discussions are supplemented by multi-disciplinary real-life projects to design innovative information systems and analytics solutions. This course serves as the culminating experience in the Business Systems and Analytics program.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing and BSA 302 and 420 and 410 (BSA 410 could be taken concurrently)

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Department of Finance

Mission Statement

The mission of the Finance Department - in concert with the missions of the University and the School of Business - is to prepare students for a purposeful life by integrating Lasallian values with current financial management theory and practice. Through its curriculum and interactions with faculty and the external business community, the Finance major will provide students with an educational experience that emphasizes the sound fundamental financial concepts necessary for success in business and for preparing them to begin a meaningful career upon graduation.

Department Goals

Major(s) Offered

Finance

Finance majors must complete requirements for one of the following tracks in Finance:

Minor(s) Offered

Finance Minor for Accounting Majors

Risk Management & Insurance Minor

Location/Contact Information

Finance Department

Founders' Hall 544

(215)951-1784

Staff Contact Information

Dr. Jan Ambrose, Chair
Founders'Hall 537
ambrose@lasalle.edu
(215)951-1332

Dr. Lester Barenbaum
Founders' Hall 540
barenbaum@lasalle.edu
(215)951-1649

Dr. Joshua Buch
Founders' Hall 535
buch@lasalle.edu
(215)951-1030

Dr. Walter Schubert
Founders' Hall 539
schubert@lasalle.edu
(215)951-1034

Dr. Elizabeth Cooper
Founders' Hall 536
coopere@lasalle.edu
(215)951-5138

Dr. Evgenii Radetskii
Founders' Hall 541
radetskiy@lasalle.edu
(215)951-1033

Professor Deborah Vesneski

Founders' Hall 542vesneski@lasalle.edu

vesneski@lasalle.edu

(215)991-3751

Sr. Betty McDonald
Administrative Assistant

bmcdonal@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 533
(215)951-2033

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS EMERITUS: Kane, McNichol

PROFESSORS: Ambrose, Barenbaum, Buch, Schubert

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Cooper

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Radetskii

Finance

Program Description

Finance plays a central and critical role in the functioning of the economy. All enterprises (for-profit, nonprofit, and government) need to finance their strategic undertakings as well as their ongoing operations. Individuals, likewise, need to plan for important future events (e.g., financing their children’s education, weddings, and retirement). The study of finance provides students with the knowledge and tools necessary to work and thrive in today’s dynamic global financial environment.

Students of finance typically follow career paths in financial management (such as working in the finance department of a corporation or government unit or working in a consulting firm), investments (such as brokerage, portfolio management, or security analysis), or financial services (such as working in a bank or an insurance company).

The curriculum of the Finance Department is uniquely designed to meet the needs of students wishing to pursue any of these career paths by offering three different track options within the finance major: the Managerial Finance (MGF) track, the Investment and Financial Analysis (IFA) track, and the Risk Management (RM) track. Students selecting the IFA track commit to preparing for the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) professional designation exam at the end of their senior year.

Understanding the importance of linking theory and practice, the Department recommends that students consider joining Gamma Iota Sigma (the Risk Management and Insurance Club) and/or the Investment Club (in which students manage an actual investment fund). In addition, we advise that, during their University years, students strongly consider undertaking an internship or co-op.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Finance Department--in concert with the missions of the University and the School of Business--is to prepare students for a purposeful life by integrating Lasallian values with current financial management theory and practice.  Through its curriculum and interactions with faculty and the external business community, the Finance major will provide students with an educational experience that emphasizes the sound fundamental financial concepts necessary for success in business and for preparing them to begin a meaningful career upon graduation.

Why take this major?

Finance is the study of facts, principles, and theories related to raising needed funds and the use of those funds.  All individuals, businesses, and governments need to finance their current activities as well as plan for and fund future undertakings, which means that Finance plays a central and critical role in the functioning of the economy as a whole.

To prepare students to work and thrive in today’s dynamic global financial environment, our program emphasizes the linking of theory to practice in the following ways:

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Dr. Jan Ambrose, Chair
Founders'Hall 537
ambrose@lasalle.edu
(215)951-1332

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 20

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 61

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 - Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 - Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 - Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 20 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline Specific

Students take 5 courses from the following, depending on the track they choose:

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Accounting majors who wish to minor in Finance can do so.  Students must successfully complete ACC 202, BUS 206, BUS 208, FIN 304, and two Finance electives at the 300- or 400-level.

Recommended Course Sequence

Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Course Descriptions

FIN 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Finance

Part-time, generally non-paid,employment in a financial/insurance setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the Finance Department for registration information. An internship counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. The number 260 is used if taken in sophomore year, 360 is used if taken in junior year, and 460 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA and completion of BUS 206 or 208, or permission of the Assistant Dean.

FIN 301 - Fundamentals of Risk and Insurance

(Cross-listed with RMI 301)

Introduction to the underlying principles, practices, and the legal aspects of insurance; discussion of industry structure and company operations; and survey of personal lines (auto, homeowners, and life) and commercial lines coverages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

FIN 304 - Financial Decision-Making

This course focuses on how managers can construct a decision-making process and manage the creation of shareholder value. As the majority of financial decisions require an estimate of future events, we will spend considerable time investigating how to achieve the above objectives, subject to the constraints of an uncertain future. Outside readings, case studies, and text material will be used to integrate current financial theory with pragmatic financial decision making. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, 206, and 208

FIN 306 - The Financial Services Industry

An examination of the firms, such as banks, insurance companies, finance companies, securities firms, and mutual funds, that provide financial services to consumers and businesses. Topics include the domestic and international financial environment in which financial service firms operate; financial market risk and its management; ethical and legal issues; and managerial problems specific to each service firm.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, 206, 208

FIN 308 - Financial Services Marketing

(Cross-listed with MKT 308)

Financial Services Marketing is cross-listed with the Marketing Department. The course focuses on how financial institutions design and market their services and products. The marketing mix for financial services, consumer and commercial markets, and their buying behavior are also studied. The impact of regulatory factors on marketing financial services and products is studied. This course is designed especially for marketing and/or finance majors contemplating careers in financial services marketing. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204, 206, 208

FIN 313 - Employee Benefit Planning

(Cross-listed with RMI 313)

A study of the nature and operation of employer-sponsored benefit plans offered in a complex socioeconomic and political environment. Topics include mandated benefits such as Social Security, workers compensation, and unemployment insurance, as well as a more in-depth examination of group life, health, disability, and qualified and non-qualified retirement plans. Emphasis is on benefit plan design, administration, cost, funding, and regulation as viewed from a benefit manager’s financial perspective. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 208

FIN 314 - Risk Management

(Cross-listed with RMI 314)

Designed to acquaint the student with the nature of risk management and the role of the risk manager in business or governmental organizations. Emphasis on the risk management process of identification and measurement of loss exposures and selection of treatment techniques, including finance and control techniques from a holistic perspective. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, 208

FIN 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision.The position must be approved by the department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the Finance Department for registration information. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 206 or 208

FIN 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship in Finance

Full-time, paid employment in a financial/insurance setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the Finance Department for registration information. An internship counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the Experiential Education Advisor in the Finance Department has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA and completion of BUS 206 or 208

FIN 375 - Financial Statement Analysis

Financial Statement Analysis focuses on the interpretation and use of financial statements for decision-making by investors, creditors, and internal management. Financial statements provide users with a scorecard of historical performance and the ability to look forward and project likely future financial performance. Outside readings, case studies, and text material will be used to integrate current financial statement guidelines with financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 208

FIN 401 - Investment Analysis

Focuses on current practice and recent theoretical developments in the securities market. Special emphasis on the stock and bond markets. Deals with the characteristics of individual securities and portfolios. Also criteria and models for alternative portfolio composition, and criteria for evaluation and measurement of portfolio performance, all in a global context. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, 206, 208

FIN 403 - International Finance

The study of multinational business practice, direct foreign investment, and managerial challenges in operating abroad. Foreign exchange markets, exchange rate determination, forecasting and hedging, and other contemporary issues in global finance. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, 206, 208

FIN 420 - Financial Management of The Insurance Firm

(Cross-listed with RMI 420)

A functional course emphasizing the interrelationships among underwriting, investment, regulation, and other aspects of insurance company and insurance agency operations. Spreadsheets are used to demonstrate effective financial management of the insurance firm. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, 206, 208

FIN 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, four- to eight-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the Finance Department for registration information. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for coops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 206 or 208

FIN 470 - Selected Topics in Finance

Selected topics in finance studied in depth under the direction of faculty. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing

FIN 483 - Senior Seminar

Designed as the capstone course for the Investment and Financial Analysis track. In-depth coverage of issues in financial analysis, such as ethics, financial reporting, equity investments, portfolio management, fixed income investments, derivatives, and others. Course includes mock exams for the CFA I exam, and students agree to sit for the actual CFA I exam in June. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing; completion of FIN 304, 375, 401, and either FIN 306 or 420; grade of B or better in BUS 101, BUS 202, BUS 207, BUS 208, and all FIN courses (or a combined GPA in these courses of 3.25 or higher); or permission of the instructor

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Risk Management and Insurance Minor

Requirements

Six courses are required for the minor in Risk Management and Insurance, and must be taken from the following two groups:

Business majors are required to take four RMI courses; Non-business majors are required to take at least three RMI courses.

Faculty

Associate Professor: Ambrose
Assistant Professor: McNichol

Course Descriptions

RMI 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Risk Management

Part-time, generally non-paid, employment in a risk management/insurance setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the RMI Program for registration information. An internship counts as a free elective or as a course towards the RMI minor. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. The number 360 is used if taken in junior year and 460 if taken in senior year. Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA and completion of BUS 206 or 208 or RMI 301, or permission of the Assistant Dean.

Number of Credits: 3

RMI 301 - Fundamentals of Risk and Insurance

(Cross-listed with FIN 301)

Introduction to the underlying principles, practices, and legal aspects of insurance; discussion of industry structure and company operations; and survey of personal lines (auto, homeowners, and life) and commercial lines coverages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

RMI 313 - Employee Benefit Planning

(Cross-listed with FIN 313)

A study of the nature and operation of employer-sponsored benefit plans offered in a complex socioeconomic and political environment. Topics include mandated benefits such as Social Security, workers compensation, and unemployment insurance, as well as a more in-depth examination of group life, health, disability, and qualified and non-qualified retirement plans. Emphasis is on benefit plan design, administration, cost, funding, and regulation as viewed from a benefit manager’s financial perspective. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 208

RMI 314 - Risk Management

(Cross-listed with FIN 314)

Designed to acquaint the student with the nature of risk management and the role of the risk manager in business or governmental organizations. Emphasis on the risk management process of identification and measurement of loss exposures and selection of treatment techniques including finance and control techniques from a holistic perspective. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, BUS 208

RMI 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the Finance Department for registration information. A co-op counts as a free elective or as a course towards the RMI minor. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 206 or 208.

Number of Credits: 3

RMI 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship in Risk Management

Full-time, paid employment in a risk management/insurance setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the RMI Program for registration information. An internship counts as a free elective or a course towards the RMI minor. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the Experiential Education Advisor in the Finance department has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year. Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA and completion of BUS 206 or 208 or RMI 301.

Number of Credits: 3

RMI 420 - Financial Management of The Insurance Firm

(Cross-listed with FIN 420)

A functional course emphasizing the interrelationships among underwriting, investment, regulation, and other aspects of insurance company operations. Statutory accounting principles are studied. Spreadsheets are used to demonstrate effective financial management of the insurance firm. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 202, BUS 206, BUS 208

RMI 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, four-to-eight-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Department; consult the Experiential Education Adviser in the Finance Department for registration information. A co-op counts as a free elective or as a course towards the RMI minor. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 206 or 208

Number of Credits: 3

Department of Management and Leadership

Mission Statement

The mission of the Management and Leadership Department is to enable graduates to distinguish themselves by demonstrating extraordinary team, management, and ethically-grounded leadership skills throughout their professional careers.

Department Goals

Upon completion of the Management and Leadership program, students will be able to demonstrate:

Major(s) Offered

Management and Leadership

Minor(s) Offered

Management and Leadership (available only to students not majoring in the School of Business)

Entrepreneurship Minor

Location/Contact Information

Dr. Lynn Miller, Chairperson
miller@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 448
215.951.1144

Dr. Charles Fornaciari
fornaciari@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 446
215.951.1765

Dr. Steven Meisel
meisel@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 444
215.951.1364

Prof. Carolyn Plump
plump@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 443
215.951.1492

Dr. Karen Reardon
reardonk@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 436
215.951.1906

Dr. James Smither
smither@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 447
215.951.1797

Dr. William VanBuskirk
vanbuski@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 445
215.951.1885

Dr. Anne Walsh
awalsh@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 451
215.951.2097

Ms. Maria Fiet
flood@lasalle.edu
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 441
215.951.1007

Full-Time Faculty

EMERITUS PROFESSORS: Gauss, Seltzer, Walsh

PROFESSORS: Fornaciari, Meisel, Miller, Smither, Van Buskirk

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Plump, Reardon

Management and Leadership

Program Description

The Management and Leadership program focuses on developing work-related interpersonal competencies that have been found to be highly predictive of employability and career success across industries. Students in this major learn professional skills such as how to facilitate discussions and lead team projects, correct problem behaviors, keep employees motivated, conduct employment interviews and performance appraisals, address conflict, handle negotiations, and argue persuasively. Unique to this major are assessment workshops in which students are observed as they confront common management challenges; afterwards, students review video recordings of themselves and receive personalized feedback to create plans for self-development.

While the Management and Leadership major focuses on developing broad competencies that have been found to be essential for career success, developing distinctive capabilities through the in-depth study of a second discipline can also enhance the likelihood of a successful career and fulfilling personal life. The Management and Leadership major therefore requires students to complete either a second major or a minor (either within or outside of the School of Business). Students who major in non-business fields have the option of completing a minor in Management and Leadership.

The mission of the Management and Leadership Department is to enable graduates to distinguish themselves by demonstrating extraordinary team, management, and ethically-grounded leadership skills throughout their professional careers.

Program Student Learning Outcomes and Goals for the Management and Leadership Department are that, upon completion of the Management and Leadership program, students will be able to demonstrate:

Why take this major?

To thrive in today’s challenging marketplace, businesses need attentive managers and inspirational leaders, people who can motivate employees and meet the ever-changing expectations of customers.

Management and leadership skills are essential for a successful career and promotion in any industry. Our Management and Leadership program is designed to develop these professional skills via courses in leadership, team building, influence, interpersonal communication, and organizational analysis.

While technical skills can be critical in landing an entry-level job, the management and leadership major is designed to support your unique professional goals and is only offered as a second major. The program is designed to complement the disciplinary knowledge and skills of the student’s primary major in accounting, finance, international business, business systems and analytics, or marketing, or a minor in risk management. A minor in management and leadership can also be designed by students majoring in a non-business field.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Management and Leadership program, students will be able to demonstrate:

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 19 (plus a minor or second major)

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 58 (plus credits required to complete for a minor or second major)

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 – Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 – Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 – Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 – Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 19 (plus a minor or second major) courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

MGT 311- Influence in Organizations

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline Specific

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

All Management and Leadership majors must complete either a second major or a minor in another discipline. 

Minor Requirements

Required for minor in Management and Leadership (not available to students in the School of Business): 6 courses

Recommended Course Sequence

Successful completion of BUS 203 is required for all 300- or 400-level Management courses. Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Course Descriptions

MGT 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Management

Part-time, generally non-paid employment in an organizational setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as an elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: MGT 360 is for juniors and 460 is for seniors

Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA, BUS 203, and preferably an upper-level major course

MGT 307 - Designing Organizations for Competitive Advantage

This course develops an understanding of the interaction of organizational structure and processes, examines relationship of internal and external environments, studies organizational design, and utilizes current theories of organizational behavior as practical tools in analyzing specific organizations. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 309 - Management Perspectives on Globalization

This course prepares students to appreciate business issues from a multicultural perspective. It will provide a broad overview of the basic issues for-profit businesses and non-profit organizations face. Topics covered will include: the impact of different political, economic, and legal systems; the importance of understanding cultural trends as they relate to managing the workforce and marketing one’s product; global issues regarding social justice and corporate social responsibility; environmental sustainability; technological advances; and opportunities and threats in the global business world. Offered as a travel study course, this course requires permission of the instructor.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: course requires permission of instructor

Prerequisites: sophomore or above

MGT 310 - Ethical and Legal Decision Making: Challenges for Workplace Leaders

Et Tu? What will you do? This course, grounded in law and ethics, focuses on the challenges of legal and ethical decision making in the workplace. Using case studies, role play, and other active learning exercises, the course explores corporate social responsibility and the ethical and legal obligations of executives and directors of for-profit and non-profit enterprises. Topics may include sustainability, corporate by-laws and ethics policies, whistle-blowing, executive compensation, employment practices, diversity, privacy, social media, and public safety.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

MGT 311 - Influence in Organizations: A Skills-Based Approach

This course helps students develop practical influence skills that are important to success in all organizations and professional work. The skills that are emphasized include: effective feedback, persuasion, upward influence, and negotiation to facilitate action to a desired goal. The course provides both concepts and hands-on experience with opportunities for students to observe, analyze, and practice influence. A key part of the course is participation in a skills development assessment workshop. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 312 - Managing Human Resources: A Skills-Based Approach

This course helps students develop the skills that practicing managers need to address the human resource issues they confront in their day-today work. Students will learn to identify potential Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) problems and respond appropriately to them, create job descriptions and specifications, conduct employment interviews, evaluate the usefulness of other selection procedures (i.e., job knowledge tests, personality inventories), design and conduct on-the-job training, appraise employee performance and conduct a performance review discussion, and conduct themselves appropriately during union-organizing drives. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Management and Leadership Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the program, and students who are not in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 203 and preferably an upper-level major course

MGT 353 - Dispute Resolution

Dispute resolution and conflict management describe a set of theories, principles, and techniques that build upon skills of analysis and communication. Managers negotiate every day to resolve conflicts between individuals and groups both within and outside the organization. Readings, exercises, and cases are utilized to study the complex human activity that is dispute resolution. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 354 - Growing A Business: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

(CROSS-LISTED WITH ENT 354)
The actual art and practice of managing a small enterprise. Concepts and methods for decision making and being competitive. Actual cases with live situations and outside speakers from all areas—business, government, and organized labor—impinging on the small entrepreneur today.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ENT 201 and ENT 301 or BUS 101 and BUS 208 or ISBT 333 and ISBT 334

MGT 355 - Power, Motivation, And Leadership

This course focuses on social influence processes in organizations by examining theories and research regarding power, motivation, and leadership. We will examine not only the effectiveness of various management approaches for accomplishing the goals of the organization, but also the impact of these approaches on the satisfaction and development of employees. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 356 - Managing in The Global Economy

Changes in the world business environment are bringing new opportunities and challenges to firms and individuals. In Philadelphia, an increasing number of companies and public agencies are involved in international business. This course will study the area connections to the global economy through discussions with experts in global trade and with representatives of international businesses.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 357 - Managing Cultural Diversity in The Workplace

This course is designed to teach students how to manage the growing multicultural workforce in the United States. Students will be exposed to the basic concepts and issues of intercultural communication and cross-cultural relations and will explore the challenge that managing cultural diversity presents to organizations and individuals. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship in Management

Full-time paid employment in an organizational setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision.The position must be approved by the Department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA, BUS 203, and preferably an upper-level major course

MGT 371 - Special Topics

Designed to address contemporary issues and interests in management. Such topics as total quality management, nonprofit management, sports management, compensation analysis, and employment law will be offered in various semesters.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 203

MGT 375 - Project Management

This course introduces students to the knowledge and skills required to effectively manage projects across a range of business and technical disciplines. It also provides an overview of the Project Management Institute’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. The course begins by describing the similarities and differences between project management and general management, as well as project management life cycles, phases, stakeholders, and process groups. Students become familiar with project management software and use this software as they complete assignments and a course project. The course reviews the core project management knowledge areas, including integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resources, communications, risk, and procurement. Students work in teams that apply key skills and knowledge areas presented in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore status

MGT 411 - Effective Teamwork and Leadership: A Skills-Based Approach

This course is designed to identify and develop the skills necessary to be effective in team and work group environments. These skills include the abilities to work in diverse team situations, apply knowledge of group dynamics, and negotiate in effective and ethical ways. Particular emphasis is placed on self-awareness, which is developed through participation in a skills-assessment center as well as completion of various self-assessment instruments and assignments. The format for this course includes a series of experiential learning opportunities designed to focus attention on particular issues of team functioning. Students who have taken MGT 352 (which is no longer offered) should not enroll in this course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MGT 311

MGT 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, four-to-eight-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Management and Leadership Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Director of the program, and students who are not in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (gradingfor internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA (or more for students in BSCP), BUS 203, and preferably an upper-level major course

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

 

Department of Marketing

Mission Statement

The mission of the Marketing Department—consistent with the missions of the University and the Business School—is to prepare our students for a life of purpose upon graduation. Through the active mentoring of our faculty and alumni, students will develop the necessary critical and analytical marketing skills to enter the marketing profession with the highest ethical sensibilities. 

Department Goals

Major(s) Offered

Marketing

Minor(s) Offered

Marketing (available only to students not majoring in the School of Business)

Location/Contact Information

Founder's Hall Third Floor                                                                                                                                                                                           215.951.1008

Dr. Swee-Lim Chia, Co-Chairperson
chia@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 331
215.951.1627

Dr. Pingjun (June) Jiang, Co-Chairperson
jiang@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 634
215.951.1728

Prof. Michael DiPietro
dipietrom@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 329
215.951.3577

Prof. Rita Dynan
dynan@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 430
215.951.3625

Dr. Meghan Pierce
piercem@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 330
215.951.1493

Dr. Ashish Kalra
kalra@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 332
215.951.1481

Ms. Elizabeth Medina
medina@lasalle.edu
Administrative Assistant
Founders’ Hall 327
215.951.1008

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSORS: Jiang, Talaga (Emeritus)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Chia, Jones (Emeritus)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: DiPietro, Dynan, Kalra, Pierce

Marketing

Program Description

Many people believe that marketing consists only of advertising and personal selling. Although marketing includes these activities, the purpose of marketing in an organization is much broader; the purpose of marketing is to create and retain satisfied customers. Marketing begins by understanding consumer behavior, discovering customers’ needs and then developing programs to satisfy those needs.

The decisions made in creating marketing programs are essential to the success of any organization. Which customer groups shall we serve? What kind of products and services will we offer? How should they be priced, promoted, and distributed to the customer? The fundamental marketing concept is that organizations can achieve their goals by satisfying consumer needs.

The Marketing curriculum at La Salle University gives students the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in a variety of marketing related fields. Marketing classes and projects develop such skills as making effective presentations, creating advertising campaigns, analyzing consumer behavior, and conducting marketing research studies. In all Marketing classes, an emphasis is placed on involving students with real-world problems that will advance their ability to make sound business decisions.

Marketing majors are encouraged to participate in the Marketing Department’s Internship Program. Here, participants work part-time in a marketing position under faculty supervision. The Department of Marketing has a tradition of interacting with students as they make both academic and career decisions. Marketing graduates may work in business, government, or non-profit organizations. Those who major in marketing are prepared to enter a wide variety of career fields; these include personal selling, retailing, public relations, advertising, direct marketing, marketing research, and marketing management.

Why take this major?

Marketing is a dynamic and cross-disciplinary field, integrating social, economic and quantitative sciences. It is at the core of every business and is the foundation to identifying consumer needs and creating a sustainable competitive advantage. Marketing knowledge ranges from developing creative content to capture consumer imagination, to innovating new products and customer experiences, to analyzing big data and market trends in response to marketplace disruptions.

Our students have the opportunity to acquire essential marketing skills necessary to begin a business career while still pursuing a broad range of interests. They gain an understanding of marketing through semesterlong research projects with real clients and examine case studies of successful for-profit and nonprofit organizations.

Marketing in Real Life

Marketing is an exciting and multifaceted career choice, allowing future Explorers to engage their imaginative and innovative sides while harnessing their analytical and problem solving skills. 

Career opportunities for those with a Marketing degree include:

Quote

“You can’t just ask customers what they want and then try to give that to them. By the time you get it built, they’ll want something new.”  Steve Jobs, former CEO of Apple

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Marketing major, students will have learned how to:

Program Contact Information

Swee-Lim Chia
Co-Chair
Founders' Hall, room 331

(215)991-3551

Pingjun (June) Jiang
Co-Chair
Founders' Hall, room 634

(215)951-1728

 

Elizabeth Medina

Administrative Assistant

Founders' Hall, room 338

(215)951-1008

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 20

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 61

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 – Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 – Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 – Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 – Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 20 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

MKT 402 - Marketing Management

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline Specific: 5 courses

Required

Choose two of the following:

Marketing internships (MKT 360, 365, 460, and 465) and co-ops (MKT 350 and 450) count as electives and cannot be counted toward required courses for the major.

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Required for Minor in Marketing for non-business majors**: 6 courses

• BUS 100 • ECN 150 • BUS 204

• One course from the following: BUS 101, BUS 203, AND BUS 205

• Two courses from the following:* MKT 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 370, and 371

* Business majors cannot have a minor in marketing. Business majors who wish to have more than one business concentration should become dual business majors.

** Successful completion of BUS 204 is required for all 300- or 400-level marketing courses.

Recommended Course Sequence

Successful completion of BUS 204 is required for all 300- or 400-level Marketing courses.  Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Course Descriptions

MKT 260, 360, 460 - Part-Time Internship in Marketing

Part-time, paid or non-paid employment in a marketing setting to provide on-the-job training. Involves approrpiate job-related learning assignments and reports under faculty supervision.   Positions must be approved by the Marketing Department for academic credit. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. An internship counts as a free elective, not as a required course in the major. A student may elect to take a second marketing internship for three additional credits in subsequent semesters. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis. The number 360 is used if taken in the junior year and 460 if taken in the senior year.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 Minimum GPA and completion of BUS 204 and at least one upper-level marketing course, or permission of the Assistant Dean

MKT 301 - Personal Selling

Examines the importance and practice of professional, consultative selling in business-to-business relationships. Students learn and practice interpersonal problem-solving communication skills in sales roleplays. Students learn how to respond to different buyer types, to develop benefit-based sales presentations, and to engage in ethical selling practices.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 302 - Advertising and Promotional Management

Focuses on the economic and social aspects of non-personal promotion, including the important methods and techniques of research which form the basis of any promotional campaign. Includes a practical treatment of digital marketing media, sales promotion programs, advertising copy, layout and media; measurement of promotional effectiveness; and advertising departments and agencies.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204 or equivalent

MKT 303 - Sales Management

The activities of a sales manager in directing and controlling a sales force; recruiting, selecting, training, compensating, motivating, and supervising sales personnel; establishment of sales territories, quotas, and budgets. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 304 - Business to Business Marketing

A study of business activities involved in the marketing of products and services to organizations (i.e., commercial enterprises, non-profit institutions, government agencies, and resellers). Emphasis also is on organizational and interfunctional interaction, buyer behavior, global interdependence and competition, and negotiation. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 305 - International Marketing

A managerial view of the marketing function from a global perspective. Describes and explores the complexities, problems, and opportunities of world-wide marketing. The Spring course is travel-study and requires permission of the instructor. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 306 - Internet Marketing

The course examines the foundation, operation and implications of the Internet and digital economy. Topics include: Internet technologies, online market mechanisms, interactive customers, knowledge-based products, smart physical products and services, pricing in the digital economy, online auctions and e-marketplaces, digital governance, policies for the Internet economy and an outlook for the new economy. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 307 - Services Marketing

The course focuses on the unique challenges of managing services and delivering quality service to customers. Theory and practice in developing customer relationships through service quality, customer retention and service recovery are central to the course. The course is applicable to organizations whose core product is service (e.g., banks, hotels, hospitals, educational institutions, professional services) and to organizations that depend on service excellence for competitive advantage (e.g., high tech manufacturers, automotive, industrial products). 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 308 - Financial Services Marketing

(Cross-listed with FIN 308)

This course focuses on how financial institutions such as banks, investment firms, investment bankers, stock brokerages, investment advisors, venture capitalists, insurance companies, credit card issuers, and other financial institutions design and market their services and products. The marketing mix for financial services, consumer and commercial markets, and their buying behavior also are studied. Finally, the impact of regulatory factors on marketing financial services and product is studied. The course is designed especially for marketing and/or finance majors contemplating a career in financial services marketing. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204, BUS 206, BUS 208.

MKT 309 - Retailing

This course focuses on the set of business activities that adds value to the products and services sold to consumers for their personal or family use. This course is designed to introduce students to critical issues in retailing today, and the strategic and financial aspects in merchandise buying and store management. Related topics include: location analysis, store organization, personnel, planning, buying and pricing techniques, and customer service policies. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 310 - New Product Development

This course explores the role of new product development, a major source of growth for firms, and its innovation in relation to a firm’s growth plans. It focuses on the new product development process and teaches students how ideas for new products are created in a firm and then successfully launched into the market. The course covers the major phases of new product development: the planning stage, the evaluation and testing stage, the development and design stage, and the launch stage. Specific topics include opportunity identification, idea generation, concept testing, product design and strategic launch planning.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 311 - Applied Digital Marketing Analytics

The continuous and rapid introduction of new platforms, tools, data sources, and media consumption devices makes today’s digital media landscape more complex than ever before.   In this course you will learn the approach and develop skills to make sense to consumer data that exists across the entire digital landscape. This course focuses on web analytics including basic terminology, how to identify and monitor key website metrics, and how to pull reports and glean insights for web tracking tools including Google Analytics. Emphasis will be on how to analyze and interpret the data and make corresponding changes to digital marketing strategies to ensure better user experience and maximum conversion rate of visitors to customers in the digital world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 350 - Cooperative Education (Junior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately four-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision.The position must be approved by the Marketing Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the director of the program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A student may elect to take a second marketing co-op for three additional credits in subsequent semesters. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 204 and at least one upper-level marketing course.

MKT 365, 465 - Full-Time Internship in Marketing

Full-time paid employment in a cooperating firm to provide on-the-job training. Involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the department. Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services before registering or for further information. A student may elect to take a second marketing internship for three additional credits in subsequent semesters. An internship does not count as a required course in the major, but is counted as an elective. Grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., notpass/fail, basis (grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship.The number 365 is used if taken in junior year and 465 if taken in senior year. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA and completion of BUS 204 and at least one upper-level marketing course.

MKT 370 - Special Topics

Designed to address contemporary issues and interests in Marketing. Such topics as Supply Chain Management, Retailing and Managing Customer Relationships will be offered in various semesters. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 371 - Consumer Behavior

A study of the consumer with applications for marketing strategy development. Looks at the cultural, social, and psychological influences on consumers and the consumer decision process. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204

MKT 401 - Marketing Research

The use of scientific method in the solution of specific marketing problems and in the conduct of general market research studies: methods of marketing research, gathering data, tabulation and analysis, interpretation of results, and report presentation. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 204, BUS 202

MKT 402 - Marketing Management

As the capstone course for marketing majors, integrates all other marketing courses. Includes a study of actual business cases employing a managerial approach to marketing. Emphasizes decision making and strategy development in marketing under rapidly changing market conditions. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: All other required marketing courses for the major or permission of the instructor.

MKT 450 - Cooperative Education (Senior Standing)

This is a full-time, paid, approximately fourto eight-month assignment in a cooperating firm. Involves job-related learning under faculty supervision. The position must be approved by the Marketing Department. For registration information, students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program should consult with the director of the program and students who are not in the Business Scholars Program should consult with the Associate Director for Experiential Education in Career Services. A co-op counts as a free elective and not as a course in the major. Grading for co-ops is on a pass/fail basis (grading for internships is on a letter grade, i.e., not pass/fail, basis); the faculty member who is supervising the experience has the discretion as to whether to roster it as a co-op or internship. Students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program must take it pass/fail. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: 2.5 minimum GPA (higher for students in the Business Scholars Co-op Program) and completion of BUS 204 and at least one upper-level marketing course.

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Department of Organizational Leadership

Mission Statement

The Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership program is an online program offering learners an experiential learning environment that fosters critical-thinking, through the application of technical and professional expertise needed to make strategic real world business decisions, develop leadership skills as well as practice effective communication.

The curriculum provides many opportunities for learners to practice leadership skills within an organization; recognizing, planning, implementing, and evaluating the impact of change within an organization.

Department Goals

Knowledge

Skills

Attitudes

Major(s) Offered

Organizational Leadership - BA

Location/Contact Information

Lynnette Clement, Director
clementl@lasalle.edu

Founders’ Hall 278
215.991.3682

Organizational Leadership

Program Description

The Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership program is an online program offering learners an experiential learning environment that fosters critical thinking, through the application of technical and professional expertise needed to make strategic real world business decisions. 

The curriculum provides many opportunities for learners to practice the role of an organizational development consultant; recognizing, planning, implementing, and evaluating the impact of change within an organization.

Organizational Leadership Program Competencies

Knowledge

Skills

Attitudes

A Bachelor of Arts degree in Organizational Leadership enhances an individuals' potential for both formal and informal leadership positions. Graduates are equipped with the interpersonal skills needed to develop key business relationships necessary to influence decision makers within their organizations. They gain the skills to unlock their potential to become effective, constructive leaders who will implement change within complex organizations.

Online Format*

The Organizational Leadership courses listed below are offered in a seven-week online format (Fall, Spring or Summer). 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

*This schedule is subject to change and is based upon sufficient enrollment.

Students in the Organizational Leadership program must successfully complete a minimum of 120 credits to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree. At least half of the courses required in the major must be completed at La Salle University. The students last 30 credits must be completed at La Salle.  Students must complete the program with at least a minimum 2.00 GPA. 

This program has been designed to help students achieve their educational goals quickly, without sacrificing quality.

The University core liberal arts curriculum is offered in an online and face-to-face format. Some Arts and Science courses are not offered online, so students have the flexibility of taking courses in person during the evening or day. Course instructors are experienced industry professionals with advanced degrees. There is an emphasis on carefully blending organizational theory with practice. Students in the program are expected to participate in online discussions, submit written papers, and complete projects as assigned. Undergraduate students must enroll in at least 6 credits (two courses) to be eligible to apply for financial aid.

Why take this major?

A Bachelor of Arts degree in Organizational Leadership enhances an individuals' potential for both formal and informal leadership positions. Graduates are equipped with the interpersonal skills to develop key business relationships necessary to influence decision makers within their organizations. They gain the skills to unlock their potential to become effective, constructive leaders who will implement change within complex organizations.

Student Learning Outcomes

In the Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership program, students learn how to:

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 12

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 36

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 12 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

The below schedule is subject to change and is based upon sufficient student enrollment.  In any semester, courses can be cancelled due to low enrollment.

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer Semester

Please note:  These are all online courses. For international students, Online students cannot obtain visas to the US if they are enrolled in an online program.

Course Descriptions

ORL 201 - Introduction to Organizational Leadership

This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of organizational leadership, providing the framework within which other courses in the major will fit. Issues of diversity, leadership, and community will be covered, as well as the micro and macro aspects of organizations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

ORL 301 - Human Resources Leadership

This course focuses on how human resources add value to the organization. It focuses on HR strategy aligned to business strategy to deliver value and improve organizational performance. Students will analyze their organization’s mission/vision and values. They will discuss external realities and people strategies designed to enable their organization to achieve its mission goals. Students will examine the design, delivery, and evaluation of human resources policies and programs.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

ORL 303 - Writing at Work

There is a very strong need for a writing intensive course that will stress the day-to-day writing requirements of a leader at work. This course will focus on writing in a global marketplace, ethical issues in business writing, collaborative writing, basic business correspondence, report writing and written presentations. The course will also address how to edit the writings of others at work.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

ORL 304 - Leadership Skills: Understanding, Assessment, And Development

Students in this course will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the critical skills that are necessary to develop in order to support successful leadership in organizations. This course begins with the premise that the most fundamental skill is the skill of self-assessment. By partaking in a myriad of assessment activities, students will gain an understanding of their own personal assets and liabilities. Throughout the course, students will gain an understanding of the most important skills associated with leadership based on sound research. Students will have the opportunity to apply this theoretical knowledge by developing leadership development plans.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

ORL 310 - Organizational Leadership and Change in Complex Adaptive Systems

This course examines how change takes place within complex adaptive systems. It also examines the role of leadership and focuses on specific skills that are required to be an effective leader and agent of change in a complex adaptive system.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

ORL 314 - Team Analysis and Leadership Skill Development

Students in this course will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of current theories and thinking regarding teams and team development. This course will afford students the opportunity to develop their leadership skills in a team environment. Analysis and experience will be the foundation of the skill development.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Online

ORL 320 - Organizational Assessment, Diagnosis, Intervention, And Evaluation

This course is an overview of the theories and strategies to diagnose and intervene within an organization to increase the effectiveness of the organization, including its employee performance. The course will provide opportunities for learners to practice the role of an organizational development consultant, including learning the interpersonal skills to develop the key business relationships necessary to influence decision makers within the organization. Since the field of organizational eadership (ORL) is dynamic, the course will leverage the latest books, articles, and ORL strategies. The course will require students to make presentations sharing their ORL analysis of an organization (either professional or personal affiliation) using the strategies and tools learned in the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

ORL 330 - Social Media Marketing

The learning expectation for this course is to become familiar with various social media and marketing techniques and how they are used for communications and engagement in a enterprise environment. The learner will develop strategies for using social media and recognize best practices and successful initiatives used by companies that are successful in social media campaigns.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

ORL 340 - Analytics, Metrics and Operational Leadership

This course focuses on enterprise intelligence, enterprise analytics and metrics. It will examine the fundamentals of enterprise metrics including user models and case studies.  It will look at lifecycle, how to implement enterprise analytics, and the confluence of people, data, process and technology.   The course will discuss why good data sources and the ensuring analytics are vital to the health of an organization and how to apply it to your own experience and profession. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

ORL 350 - Corporate Conversation and Leadership

This course is designed to introduce students to leadership perspectives and the role that communication plays in developing effective leadership and management skills.  The course explores communication variables involved when leaders attempt to influence members to attain goals.  Course topics include: high-potential leadership challenges, conversations that build relationships, conversations to develop others, conversations for decision making and taking action.  This course will also focus on your own personal development and building your authentic leadership voice. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

ORL 401 - Senior Capstone Project

The Capstone Project provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate and incorporate what they have learned throughout their course of study in organizational leadership at La Salle. It requires students to apply the knowledge and skills they have learned to address a specific real or invented organizational concept of their own choosing. Students will be required to research and describe in detail the situation, analyze the environment, identify the stakeholders, and then develop a comprehensive and realistic approach to ensure that their intervention addresses the situation effectively. The Capstone also requires strong peer review of the the Capstone Project.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Online

Interdisciplinary Programs

Business Administration (Non-Traditional/Evening)

Program Description

Overview of Majors Available to Business Students

All Non-Traditional/Evening Students earning a B.S. in Business Administration degrees complete a common set of 13 Business Core courses. In addition, the students select a major in either Accounting or Business Administration.

The Business Administration Major

Business Administration (BUS) is an interdisciplinary major in which Non-Traditional/Evening Students select four 4 upper-level business courses beyond the Business Core, with no more than two courses in any one discipline.

 

 

Why take this major?

This major provides students with broad knowledge of different aspects of business. It prepares students to work in a wide range of for-profit, non-profit, and government organizations. 

Student Learning Outcomes

Although the Business Administration major is tailored to the interests of the student, all Business Administration majors are expected to demonstrate skill development in the following areas:

Program Contact Information

Lynnette Clement
Director of Human Capital Development and Organizational Leadership Programs
clementl@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 278
215.991.3682

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 18

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 54

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 – Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 – Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 – Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 18 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

BUS 304 - Predictive Analytics

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline Specific

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Business Administration majors may not dual major with another major in the School of Business.  They may, however, dual major with a major outside of the School of Business.

Minor Requirements

A minor in Business Administration is available to students with majors outside of the School of Business. 

Required for the Minor in Business Administration: 6 courses

*ECN 150 and BUS 100 or 101 should be taken prior to the other four courses.

**BUS 101 is a prerequisite to BUS 206.

Sophomore standing is a prerequisite for 200-level courses.

Recommended Course Sequence

Most 200-level BUS courses should be taken during the sophomore year since many are prerequisites to Major courses that you will take.

Business Administration majors should see the various business disciplines (Accounting, Finance, etc.) for descriptions of upper-level business courses that can be used to complete the requirements of the major. Course descriptions may also be found within the "Courses: A-Z" listing. 

Course Descriptions

All course descriptions may be found in the main menu under Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Business Administration (Traditional/Day)

Program Description

Overview of Majors Available to Business Students

All students earning B.S. in Business Administration degrees complete a common set of 14 Business Core courses. In addition, students enrolled as Traditional/Day Students complete requirements for at least one 4-8 course major offered by the School of Business. Most students choose to specialize in one or more of the following areas: Accounting, Business Systems & Analytics, Finance, International Business, Marketing, and Management & Leadership. Some students, however, do not wish to complete a specialized major. For these students, a customizable, interdisciplinary major in Business Administration (BUS) is available. BUS majors in the Traditional/Day program complete six upper-level business courses beyond the Business Core, with no more than two courses in any one discipline.

Students who are new to La Salle and not ready to declare a major in Business can select Undecided Business Administration (UBA) as a major until they are ready to choose an area of specialization. 

A six-course minor in Business Administration, described more fully under "Minor Requirements" below, is available only to non-business students. The minor requires the completion of various Business Core courses that introduce students to different aspects of business.

The Business Administration Major

The Business Administration major is a flexible course of study in which the student consults with Faculty Advisors to design a sequence of upper-level courses in line with his or her academic and career interests. Students are encouraged to develop multidisciplinary and generalizable skill sets in areas such as financial planning, risk management, analytics, cost management, contract law, human resource management, and sales.  The Business Administration major is an especially good fit for students interested in entrepreneurship, small business management, and other careers that do not require a specialized educational background.

Although internships and co-ops do not count toward requirements for the Business Administration major, students are nevertheless strongly encouraged to supplement their portfolios with such experiential education opportunities (as well as relevant extracurricular activities). Students who have completed the sophomore year and have a GPA of at least 2.5 may apply to receive credit for internships and co-ops.

Why take this major?

This major may be of particular interest to:

Student Learning Outcomes

Although the Business Administration major is tailored to the interests of the student, all Business Administration majors are expected to demonstrate skill development in the following areas:

Program Contact Information

Business Administration major:

Lynn Miller
Professor
miller@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 448
215.951.1144

Business Administration minor:
Susan Mudrick
Assistant Dean
mudrick@lasalle.edu
Founders' Hall 241
215.951.1104

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 21

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 64

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 – Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 – Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 – Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 21 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

Discipline Specific

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Business Administration majors may not dual major with another major in the School of Business.  They may, however, dual major with a major outside of the School of Business.

Minor Requirements

A minor in Business Administration is available to students with majors outside of the School of Business. (Non-business students should also consider specialized minors in Accounting, Business Systems & Analytics, Marketing, Management & Leadership and Risk Management & Insurance.)

Required for the Minor in Business Administration: 6 courses

*ECN 150 and BUS 100 or 101 should be taken prior to the other four courses.

**BUS 101 is a prerequisite to BUS 206.

Sophomore standing is a prerequisite for 200-level courses.

Recommended Course Sequence

Most 200-level Business Core courses should be taken during sophomore year since many are pre-requisites to Major courses that you will take. Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Business Administration majors should see the various business disciplines (Accounting, Finance, etc.) for descriptions of upper-level business courses that can be used to complete the requirements of the major. Course descriptions may also be found within the "Courses: A-Z" listing. 

Course Descriptions

All course descriptions may be found in the main menu under Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

Business Administration Minor

Entrepreneurship Minor

Description

The entrepreneurship minor is available to all undergraduate students in the University, regardless of their major. This is an interdisciplinary, tailored program that will include a range of business and non-business electives for students to complete in order to obtain a well-rounded academic and hands-on experience toward their specific career interests. Students interested in starting a business someday, joining an existing family-run business, or becoming more entrepreneurial in their careers working for another company will earn the confidence to think and act while learning how to assemble the tools and resources to be successful in their ventures.

Contact

Frank Mallon
Assistant Professor
mallon@lasalle.edu
Olney Hall 269
215.951.1183

Required Courses for Minor

6 Courses:

Interested students must contact a program administrator to determine the Controlled Electives approved for each of them. The student will also be required to conduct an interview with an entrepreneur in his or her field of study to make those course recommendations.

NOTE: ISBT 333 may be substituted for ENT 201, and ISBT 334 may be substituted for ENT 301.

Course Descriptions

ENT 201 - Principles of Entrepreneurship

This course introduces students to the unique challenges associated with recognizing an innovative concept or unique opportunity within an industry or market, and then the strategic means of effectively introducing a business to that market to exploit this unique opportunity.  This course is cross disciplinary and invites students from any major to participate.  If students wish to pursue a minor in Entrepreneurship this is one of the courses that will be required to satisfy the requirements for that minor. Formerly BUS 170.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENT 301 - Entrepreneurial Applications

This course is conducted in a team format that requires students to work together to identify unique market opportunities for innovative concepts and then actively work outside the classroom to validate and then develop new business operations to serve an under or non-served market. Regular group presentations with critical feedback are required to assist the teams in identifying the optimal concept and means of delivering that concept to the market. This course is a required course for any student seeking to minor in Entrepreneurship.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ENT201, ISBT 333 or Business major junior status

ENT 354 - Entrepreneurial & Small Bus Mgt

(CROSS-LISTED WITH MGT 354)
The actual art and practice of managing a small enterprise. Concepts and methods for decision making and being competitive. Actual cases with live situations and outside speakers from all areas—business, government, and organized labor—impinging on the small entrepreneur today.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ENT 201 and ENT 301 or BUS 101 and BUS 208 or ISBT 333 and ISBT 334.

International Business

Program Description

Every business is a global business in the interconnected 21st century. From the smallest e-commerce entrepreneur to the global company on multiple continents, every business has the potential to expand its reach beyond a local operation and capitalize on emerging opportunities, no matter where they are. International business majors will learn how to assess and understand this dynamic and multifaceted environment and develop essential skills in ethical and cultural awareness. 

To major in international business at La Salle, you must meet the requirements of either a second major (this can be outside the School of Business) or a minor in Risk Management and Insurance (RMI). Students with a second major outside the School of Business must fulfill all business core, math, economics and psychology/sociology courses that are required of business majors. A second major in a functional business area, such as accounting, marketing and finance, is important for an initial career placement and is emphasized more in the early stages of business careers. International business skills and knowledge are generally utilized after mastering these functional skills.

Contact

Swee-Lim Chia
Associate Professor
chia@lasalle.edu
Founders’ Hall 331
215.951.1627

Why take this major?

International business is an interdisciplinary program.  In addition to courses in business, students are encouraged to take courses from political science, education and economics. Experiencing a foreign culture first-hand is also an essential requirement.

International business prepares students for a variety of career choices in culturally-diverse businesses in all industries, whether here at home or at an international location.

Career opportunities for those with an International Business degree include:

Student Learning Outcomes

The goals of the program are:

Program Contact Information

Degree Earned

B.S.B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 18 (plus second major or minor in Risk Management and Insurance)

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 55 (plus credits for second major or minor in Risk Management and Insurance)

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 - Applied Business Calculus

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 155 - Introduction to Computer Applications for Business

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

BUS 150 - Presentation and Collaboration Skills for Business

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 18 (plus second major or minor in Risk Management and Insurance) courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Business Core

The Business Core, required of all majors in business, provides students with skills and knowledge across a wide array of business disciplines. Courses in the Business Core introduce students to all areas in which they can major and provide a foundation upon which upper-level major courses build.

International Business Major - 4 courses

Choose 4 courses:

OR

Choose 3 courses from:

AND

Choose 1 from the following:

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

International business majors are required to meet the requirements of either a second major (this can be outside the School of Business) or a minor in Risk Management and Insurance.

Recommended Course Sequence

Model rosters should be followed for course sequencing.

Course Descriptions

All course descriptions may be found in the main menu under Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z

Business Core Course Descriptions

BUS 100 - Business Perspectives

An integrative freshmen course that addresses business processes at an introductory level by examining key business areas through the preparation of a business plan. Students gain an appreciation for how each part of a business functions on its own and how business processes interact with each other. The course culminates in our signature Bankers Day event in which each team presents their final business plan to a panel of business executives for evaluation. The course emphasizes cross-disciplinary experiential learning, group dynamics, and personal interaction with faculty, business professionals and entrepreneurs in a small-class environment. Students are introduced to team-building, entrepreneurship, and business plans at the beginning of their academic program in order to build and develop their skills over the next three years. Students should take this course as early on as possible. Generally the course is not open to seniors.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 101 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The course introduces financial reporting by focusing on the fundamental principles of recording business transaction with emphasis on the presentation and interpretation of corporate financial information. Topics include an overview of financial reporting and the accounting cycle, as well as, accounting and reporting of operating, investing and financing activities of a business. Assignments employ both Excel and SAP.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

BUS 102 - Accounting for Financial and Managerial Decision-Making

An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting with a special emphasis on using accounting information in decision making.  Topics covered include corporate capital stock structure, planning and control systems, cost management systems, pricing decisions, and capital expenditure decisions.  Assignments employ Excel.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, CSC 155 and MTH 114 (CSC 155 and/or MTH 114 can be taken concurrently)

BUS 200 - Business Professionalism and Career Preparation

The course will focus on critical professional development skills to enable students to connect their education to experiential learning opportunities and post-graduation goals. Students will become aware of industry trends relating to job opportunities, current job search techniques, personal branding strategies, the value of developing a well-connected network, and how to deliver flawless documents to targeted organizations. The course will combine the theories on professional development with real-life applications through assignments and participation in professional events to allow students to see themselves as a professional, rather than just a student. At the end of the course, students will understand the importance of demonstrating these professional skills throughout their collegiate experience (e.g. dressing professionally for presentations, developing quality resumes and cover letters, networking with alumni and guests, etc.) 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Sophomore standing

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

BUS 202 - Descriptive and Predictive Analytics

This course explains what happened and what will happen in business organizations using basic statistical methods relevant to descriptive and predictive analytics. The availability of massive amounts of data and technologies to process these data enables business organiza­tions to use analytical approaches to decision-making. Descriptive analytics is the use of data to find out what has happened in the past or is currently happening; statistical techniques include descriptive statistics and visualization. Predictive analytics is the use of data to find out what could happen in the future; statistical techniques include regression analysis. This course will cover these techniques, descriptive statistics, visualization, and regression analysis, with emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making. This course will also cover probability, probability distributions, and statistical infer­ence. Students will perform data analysis using statistical software packages.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114; CSC course recommended as a pre-requisite but may be taken concurrently

BUS 203 - Organizational Behavior and Skill Development

This course examines the behavior of individuals and groups in organizations, with the goal of understanding performance in the new workplace. It is designed to enhance the career potential of people with management and team leadership responsibilities in all areas of business. Topics include: motivation, theories and practice of leadership, individual and group decision making, conflict resolution, communication, international aspects of organizational behavior, perception, individuality, working in groups and teams, and ethical issues of organizational life. The course also emphasizes interactive and experiential learning to demonstrate the issues of organizational behavior. Through active participation, students will develop skills in leadership, communication, negotiation, teamwork, and group decisionmaking. Career awareness and skill assessment will be done through brief lectures, personal inventories, and career planning experiences.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 204 - Principles of Marketing with Applications

An overview of marketing concepts and principles applicable to business and other organizations. These include: factors influencing the marketing environment and buyer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; product development, pricing, promotion and distribution to satisfy the needs of selected target markets. Approximately one-third of the course is dedicated to planning and to applying marketing-based concepts to profit and non-profit enterprise situations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

BUS 205 - Business Systems for Analytics

This course studies how business systems work and examines challenges confronting business organizations in the information age and beyond. One major challenge is to efficiently and effectively use three most important organizational resources, information, technology, and people, to provide service and value. To meet this challenge, the course studies business systems and strategies that organizations can utilize to organize data into information and synthesize information into knowledge. The course examines design and development of relational database management systems using Microsoft Access (structured query language), decision support systems using Microsoft Excel (what-if analysis, pivot tables, and decision tree analysis), enterprise information systems using SAP (ERPsim), and web-based systems using Google Analytics. The concepts, models, and frameworks are derived from both academic and professional sources.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: CSC 155

BUS 206 - Financial Markets and Institutions: Principles and Applications

An introduction to the basics of institutional finance. Financial instruments are generated and traded by participants in financial markets with financial intermediaries facilitating the process. Concepts, terminology, and current practices in each of these areas are examined, along with the impact they have on the economy. Students work on “mini cases” which employ actual data to help better understand the principles examined in the course. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101

BUS 208 - Fundamentals of Financial Management

An introduction to the major concepts and techniques of financial management with an emphasis on time value of money, security valuation, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and financial statement analysis. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 102, MTH 114, CSC 155

BUS 303 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

A study of the American legal system exploring how courts decide cases and the values that play a role in such adjudication. The nature, formation, and application of law to individuals and business. The development of law, with emphasis on the Constitution, personal and business torts, the employment relationship, discrimination, international legal perspectives, and an exploration of legal ethics and the ethics of corporations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: sophomore standing

BUS 304 - Prescriptive Analytics

In this course students learn how to run business operations effi­ciently and effectively using prescriptive analytics tools and tech­niques in managerial decision making. The course introduces stu­dents to several quantitative models used in contemporary analyt­ics. Analysis of business scenarios using computer software allows a focus on the conceptual understanding of prescriptive models. Pre­scriptive topics covered include: decision analysis, Bayesians anal­ysis, stochastic and deterministic forecasting, inventory manage­ment, linear programming and optimization, simulation, and project management.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: MTH 114, BUS 202, AND BUS 205

BUS 400 - Business Strategy

This is the capstone course for Business majors. It takes the perspective of company’s senior management, who are tasked with building and sustaining a competitive advantage for the firm. It explores how the functions of the business are continuously shaped in response to the company’s internal and external environments. The course includes industry analysis, company and competitor assessment, approaches to strategy formulation and implementation, and business ethics.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: senior standing

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150


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