School of Nursing and Health Sciences – Print Compilation

Overview

Print Compilation 
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The School of Nursing and Health Sciences is home to the Departments of Urban Public Health and Nutrition, Communication Sciences and Disorders, and Nursing. The programs within these departments are flourishing and are well-respected inside and outside of the University. Faculty and staff are committed to students and the work they are doing and students live our mission of caring for vulnerable, underserved, and diverse populations through their clinical and service activities. Our focus is on promoting the health and education of individuals, families, and communities through an interprofessional lens.

Where applicable, our programs are fully accredited which reflects adherence to specific standards for the curricula for the major. As undergraduate students, this is an important consideration since most graduate programs in healthcare disciplines are looking for graduates of accredited programs.

The undergraduate Nutrition program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND®); the undergraduate and graduate programs in Public Health by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), the undergraduate and graduate programs in Nursing by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE); and the graduate Speech Language and Hearing program by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

Mission Statement

Mission

Consistent with Lasallian values, the mission of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences is to provide scientifically-based education programs to prepare students as proficient, caring health professionals engaged in evidence-based practice, advocacy, service, and life-long learning.

Vision

La Salle University School of Nursing and Health Sciences leads in the implementation of curricula based on the health needs of populations that mobilize social, political, and healthcare and educational resources and aimed at the welfare of vulnerable, underserved, and diverse populations through educational and service programs. Faculty implement programs of research, scholarship, leadership, and practice that promote the health and education of people.

Goals

Location/Contact Information

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Dean’s Office
St. Benilde, Room 4000
crawfordc@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1432

Staff Contact Information

Kathleen Czekanski, PHD, RN, CNE
Dean, School of Nursing and Health Sciences
St. Benilde, Room 4000
czekanski@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1432

 

Meredith Kneavel, PhD
Associate Dean, School of Nursing and Health Sciences
St. Benilde, Room 4408
kneavel@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1530

 

Clarissa Crawford
Administrative Assistant Dean’s Office/ Assistant to the Dean and Associate Dean
St. Benilde, Room 4403
crawfordc@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1431
Schedules appointments with the Dean and Associate Dean; sends letters to students who are on the Dean’s List.

 

Mary Dorr, MSN, RN
Assistant Dean, School of Nursing and Health Sciences
St. Benilde, Room 1101
dorr@laslle.edu
(215) 951-1646
Advises students; assists students who want to study abroad; approves courses taken outside of La Salle for transfer credits; approves students seeking CLEP exam approval; meets with students who want to change major into the School of Nursing and Health Sciences; discussed minors offered in School of Nursing and Health Sciences; posts transfer credits for accepted transfer students; conducts graduation audits; reviews validation paperwork for transfer for incoming freshmen; review AP credits for transfer.

 

Sheila McLaughlin, MSN, RN
ACHIEVE Evening & Weekend and RN-BSN Program
St. Benilde Room 1104
mclaughlins@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1471
Advises ACHIEVE – Evening & Weekend Undergraduate NUR students and RN-BSN   students; approves students seeking CLEP exam approval: posts transfer credits for   accepted transfer students; conducts graduation audits.

 

Christine Reilly
Administrative Assistant
St. Benilde Room 1100
reillyc@lasalle.edu
(215) 991-3589
Assists with processing of University withdrawals and Course withdrawals; sends letters to students placed on Academic Censure; assists with notification of students who receive specific scholarships; assists with general academic-related inquiries; sends letter to incoming students who receive AP credits.

Opportunities Outside the Classroom

International Education Opportunities: Opportunities to enhance a student’s international exposure are offered through study abroad and travel/study options. La Salle has strong ties with the American University of Rome in Italy, Universidad La Salle in Mexico City, Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia, and the National University of Ireland in Galway, where students have the opportunity to have semester-long learning experiences. Students may also gain acceptance to the summer UniLaSalle-Campus de Beauvais program in France.  Nutrition students have the opportunity to study in France and participate in an intensive, interdisciplinary program that combines culinary arts and health sciences.

Student Nutrition Organization

La Salle Explorers Advocating Nutrition (LEAN) seeks to promote awareness of good nutritional health through education and service activities for students, faculty, and staff of La Salle University and its surrounding community.

 

Departments

Majors

Minors

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

Mission Statement

The Mission of La Salle University’s Communication Sciences and Disorders Undergraduate Program is to prepare students to apply for graduate study by providing them with the basic knowledge of human communication and swallowing processes within the context of a liberal arts education.

La Salle University’s Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Program provides a research-oriented, clinically-based curriculum grounded in theoretical, ethical, and clinical knowledge in communication sciences and disorders. Students learn to think critically and communicate effectively. They are prepared to meet professional credentialing including American Speech-Language-Hearing Association certification as speech-language pathologists. Students gain knowledge and skills to evaluate, treat, and advocate for individuals with communication and swallowing disorders in a pluralistic society. Students learn to analyze and integrate research into clinical practice and value life-long learning.

Department Goals

Major(s) Offered

4-Year B.S. in CSD

5-Year B.S. in CSD and M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology

Minor(s) Offered

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Location/Contact Information

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders                                                                                                                                                             St. Benilde Tower 2201                                                                                                                                                                                                        215.951.1982

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSOR: Klein; Kleinow; Ruiz

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Bitetti; Husak; Mancinelli; Costello

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Program Description

The Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) major emphasizes the biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, linguistic, and cultural bases of basic human communication and swallowing. It is an interdisciplinary program in which students acquire knowledge in biological science, physical science, statistics, and social/behavioral science.   

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is the national professional, credentialing, and scientific organization for speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech-language-hearing scientists. Students can learn more about undergraduate education in communication sciences and disorders and information about speech-language pathology and related professions from the ASHA website: https://www.asha.org/Students/undergraduate-students/.

The National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association

The National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) is a pre-professional membership association for students interested in communication sciences and disorders. La Salle University formed an ASHA recognized NSSLHA chapter in 2002. Membership in the La Salle NSSLHA chapter is available to undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in one of the Communication Sciences and Disorders programs.

Student NSSLHA members can increase their involvement in the field by visiting professional work sites, engaging in group outreach programs, attending panel discussions, fundraising, and more. NSSLHA membership allows students to engage in leadership activities locally and nationally by promoting dialogue between students, professionals, and community members. For more information, please visit the NSSLHA Web site: www.nsslha.org.

CSD Student Handbook

The Communication Sciences and Disorders Student Handbook contains program-specific rules, guidelines, and procedures for progression and will be made available to all students.

Why take this major?

The Communication Sciences and Disorders major provides students with the knowledge needed to enter a master’s degree program in speech-language pathology, the entry-level degree for professional practice as a speech-language-pathologist. Speech-language pathologists care for people of all ages and cultural backgrounds with communication and swallowing disorders. They assess, treat, and help prevent speech, language, cognitive-communication, voice, swallowing, fluency, and related disorders. A bachelor’s degree in CSD can also lead to other career areas, including careers in rehabilitation science, health care, and education.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Jennifer Kleinow, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Professor, Chair, and Graduate Program Director

2203 St. Benilde Tower

kleinow@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1232

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 17

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 51-53

Total: 120 to 122

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 3.0

Cumulative: 3.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 161 Anatomy and Physiology I (with lab) or BIO 158 Life Science: A Human Approach

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217 Statistics for Health Professionals

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 Healthcare Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 150 Principles of Sociology or SOC 151 Social Problems and Social Policy

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 103 Elementary Spanish for Nursing and Health Sciences I preferred (or any other global language)

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 17 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

COSD 100 – Introduction to Language and Communication

COSD 102 – Introduction to Communication Disorders

COSD 200 – Phonetics

COSD 202 – Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms

COSD 203 – Speech and Language Development

COSD 211 – Acoustic Bases of Speech and Hearing

COSD 304 – Introduction to Audiology

COSD 306 – Neurological Bases of Communication and Behavior

COSD 308 – Clinical Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology

COSD 314 – Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology

COSD 409 – Multicultural Perspectives on Communication Disorders

COSD 413 – Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology

COSD 435 – Communication Sciences and Disorders Undergraduate Capstone

 

Supporting Courses:

PHY 270 – Physics for Health Sciences or CHM 161 – Chemistry of Life Science and CHL 161 – Laboratory

PSY 155– Introduction to Psychology

 

Electives:

COSD 201 – Introduction to Sign Language

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) and Spanish Double Major

The Communication Sciences and Disorders/Spanish double major aims to provide its students with the pre-clinical, linguistic, and cultural foundations, which in addition to a master’s degree in speech-language pathology, are necessary to treat and work with patients that are bilingual English/Spanish, as well as those that are Spanish speakers with limited English proficiency.  Those wishing to become CSD/Spanish double majors must have their Spanish assessed by a Language faculty member to begin their studies at the appropriate level. After placement, students will follow the carefully designed course sequence prepared by the CSD and Languages departments. 

Requirements: Fulfill the requirements of the CSD major, as outlined by the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and 10 Spanish courses starting at the intermediate level or higher. 

Minimum Requirements for Spanish:

SPN 205- Intermediate SPN for Nursing and Health Sciences I
SPN 206- Intermediate SPN for Nursing and Health Sciences II

SPN 301- Adv. Conversation and Composition I
SPN 302- Adv. Conversation and Composition II

SPN 420- Spanish for Speech Pathologists
SPN 421- Bilingualism in Spanish/English Speakers
SPN 422- Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Phonology
SPN 423- Introduction to Spanish Dialectology

1 300/400 level Literature or Culture Course on Spain

1 300/400 level Literature or Culture Course on Latin America or SPN 307- Commercial
   Spanish. 

*Students placing above the intermediate level will not take SPN 205 or 206.  Instead of these intermediate courses, students will take additional 300/400 level Spanish courses to fulfill their requirements.  Heritage speakers of Spanish will take SPN 203 and SPN 204, Spanish for Heritage Speakers I and II, instead of SPN 301 and SPN302.  

Minor Requirements

Required for Minor in CSD

Total of 19 credits, including two upper-level courses (300 and/or 400)

The required core sequence of courses for CSD Minor

CSD Minors must select an additional two courses from the following:

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Freshman Year

ENG 110 (ILO 8b)

SPN 103 (ILO 11)

COSD 100

FYS (ILO 1)

BIO 161 or BIO 158 (Core3a)

15 or 16 Credits

Spring Freshman Year

COSD 102

SPN 104 or elective

REL 100 (ILO 2)

PHY 270 or CHM 161

Any ILO 8/12

15-16 Credits

Fall Sophomore Year

COSD 200

SOC 150 or SOC 151 (ILO 4)

ENG 210 (ILO 5)

COSD 202

Any ILO 9

15 Credits

Spring Sophomore Year

COSD 203

Any ILO 10

PSY 155

HSC 217 (ILO 3b)

COSD 211

15 Credits

Fall Junior Year

CSC 154 (ILO 6)

COSD 304

COSD 306

Elective

Elective

15 Credits

Spring Junior Year

COSD 308

COSD 314

Elective

Elective

Elective

15 Credits

Fall Senior Year

COSD 409

COSD 413

Elective

Elective

Elective

15 credits

Spring Senior Year

COSD 435

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective

15 credits

Course Descriptions

COSD 100 - Introduction to Language and Communication

This course presents an introduction to linguistics, which is the study of human language and communication.  Each major branch of linguistics is surveyed with an emphasis on the structure, content, and use of English.  This course also explores language variation and the relationship between language and culture, language and the brain, and how children develop language.  Students practice techniques for linguistic analysis, and clinical applications to the fields of speech-language pathology and psychology are discussed. This class is cross-listed with PSY 242.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COSD 102 - Introduction to Communication Disorders

This course is an introductory survey of normal processes and disorders of speech, language, and hearing. The behavioral and social consequences of communication disorders in people throughout the life span are presented. Different categories, symptoms, and causes of communication disorders are examined. The roles of the Speech-Language Pathologist and Audiologist in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders are discussed. Preferred American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) practice patterns pertaining to a variety of professional situations are surveyed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

COSD 200 - Phonetics

This course involves the exploration and study of American English pronunciation through the application of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students will be trained in transcription of English phonemes and allophones and introduced to distinctive feature analysis, phonological rules, prosodic features, and dynamics of articulation, American dialectical variants, and developmental phonology.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

COSD 201 - Introduction to Sign Language

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL). Students will acquire basic ASL skills needed to communicate in a wide variety of situations.

Number of Credits: 3

COSD 202 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the structural organization (anatomy), function (physiology), and neural control for speech production and hearing. The course will emphasize both normal and disordered systems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: BIO 158 or BIO 210 or BIO 161 or permission of instructor.

COSD 203 - Speech and Language Development

This course explores the specific nature, sequence, and patterns of language development from birth through adolescence and its relation to other aspects of child development. Conditions that place infants and children at risk for speech and language disorders are explored. Patterns of normal language development are discussed as a guide for the evaluation and treatment of children with developmental language disorders. This course is cross-listed with PSY 342.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 100 or permission of instructor

COSD 211 - Acoustic Bases of Speech and Hearing

This course explores the physical characteristics of speech sounds and the psychophysical processes involved in speech production, hearing, and speech perception. This course introduces the physical properties of sound waves, resonance, the source-filter theory, spectrogram reading, decibels, and speech perception. Computer applications with practical implications are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 200 or permission of instructor

COSD 304 - Introduction to Audiology

This course is a survey of the field of audiology, including the measurement of hearing and the nature and causes of hearing impairment in infants, children, and adults. Students are introduced to strategies used by audiologists and physicians in managing hearing impairment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

COSD 306 - Neurological Bases of Communication and Behavior

This course is an examination of the structure (neuroanatomy), organization (neurophysiology), and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems as they relate to speech, language, hearing, and cognition. Behavioral manifestations of normal and abnormal brain functioning are contrasted.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 202 or permission of instructor

COSD 308 - Clinical Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology

This course introduces the communication sciences and disorders  major to the clinical and supervisory process. Basic information regarding certification, professional standards, and ethics are discussed. Goal setting, lesson planning, methods of observing, describing and recording behavior, informal assessment and related topics are also discussed. Behavioral observation and computer technology in the measurement and modification of speaker/listener attributes are examined. Students develop clinical writing skills appropriate to various speech-language pathology settings. This course is an introduction to the clinical process and requires observation of a wide variety of clinical cases.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: For CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200, COSD 203, or permission of instructor

COSD 314 - Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology

This course provides the student majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders  with a framework for understanding the diagnostic process in Speech-Language Pathology. General topics in the area of diagnostics are discussed, including obtaining and interpreting assessment information. Report writing and presentation of findings are examined. Observations of diagnostic testing by an ASHA certified SLP are required. Principles and procedures common to the diagnosis of most communication and swallowing disorders are considered. Assessments of culturally and linguistically different individuals are surveyed. The ASHA Code of Ethics is emphasized. Standardized testing as well as alternatives to standardized testing are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200, COSD 203, or permission of instructor

COSD 409 - Multicultural Perspectives on Communication Disorders

This course presents students with issues related to cross-linguistic and cross-cultural differences as they affect clinicians in the field of communication sciences and disorders. Topics include important sociolinguistic concepts, cross-cultural communication, assessment alternatives, and intervention strategies. Non-biased diagnosis and remediation of speech, language, fluency, voice, and hearing disorders among culturally and linguistically diverse groups are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200 or permission of instructor

COSD 413 - Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology

This course examines the organization, administration, and implementation of speech and language pathology services in varied settings.  These settings include public and private schools; special schools; clinics; rehabilitation hospitals and agencies; acute-care hospitals; and private practices.  The course emphasizes the professional role of the SLP and discusses the ethical, legal, and professional standards of practice.  The impact of external pressures, e.g., fiscal and efficacy issues, on the practice of speech-language pathology is also addressed.  Multicultural variables impacting the practice of speech-language pathology from the legal and ethical perspectives are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COSD 308 or permission of instructor

COSD 435 - Communication Sciences and Disorders Undergraduate Capstone

This course reviews and integrates knowledge of normal human communication and contrasts it with disordered human communication and swallowing, preparing the student for graduate education. As part of the review the student will complete clinical observation hours as an introduction to the clinical practicum experience and requires observation of a wide variety of clinical cases. Goal setting, lesson planning, methods of observing, describing and recording behavior, informal assessment and related topics are also discussed. The student develops clinical writing skills appropriate to various speech-language pathology service delivery settings.  

This meets ILO 2.2 Students examine how their personal, professional, religious, or spiritual values inform their disciplinary worldviews.

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors

Prerequisites: COSD 409 and COSD 413

COSD 501 - Introduction to Clinical Practicum

This course is the first supervised clinical speech-language pathology experience in the graduate degree program.  Students enrolled in this course complete requirements through a clinical assignment in the La Salle University Speech-Language-Hearing Community Clinics (LSU-SLHCC). Students supervised by an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist, apply theoretical knowledge, continue to develop clinical managementskills, self-analysis and evaluation abilities, and become familiar with professional practices and issues in the discipline of speech-language pathology in general and in this unique practicum setting.  Emphasis is placed on selection and administration of diagnostic instruments.  Students write reports and daily progress notes, and conduct family/patient counseling. Students may have the opportunity to communicate with other health care and educational professionals as needed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 502 - Introduction to Aural Habilitation/Rehabilitation

This course examines principles and strategies in management of problems related to hearing impairment in children and adults. Development and maintenance of communication through speech reading, auditory training, and the use of technology in aural habilitation/rehabilitation are investigated. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 503 - Speech Sound Disorders

This course reviews the development of speech sound production and speech perception skills in children. Factors affecting phonological development and auditory-motor learning are discussed. Prominent theories of phonology are reviewed and critiqued and assessment and modification of atypical articulatory patterns are emphasized. The differential diagnosis of oral motor versus phonological disorders is explored. Case studies are used to illustrate methodologies and to plan remediation. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 511 - Fluency and Stuttering

This course provides information about normal fluency as well as the history, theories, development, nature, and symptomatology of stuttering and other fluency disorders in children and adults. Controversies regarding theoretical explanations about the nature of stuttering that influence management strategies are discussed. Clinical case studies are used to illustrate methodologies and to plan remediation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 512 - Language Disorders in Young Children

This course offers a theoretical and applied approach to childhood language disorders from birth through six years. It provides an overview of language development and early assessment and intervention in the field of child language pathology within and across the domains of semantics, pragmatics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. Clinical applications and controversies in case management are emphasized through case presentations, article reviews, and research presentations. Diagnostic information including language sampling, stages of emergent literacy, and stages of play are discussed in relation to early intervention. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 513 - Acquired Language Disorders

Neuropathology, symptomatology, and speech-language rehabilitation of individuals with aphasia and related disorders due to stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc. are examined in adults and children. Other neurologically based disorders such as dementia, apraxia, and dysarthria are contrasted for differential diagnosis. Evaluation, treatment, and prognosis for recovery are reviewed. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 514 - Language Learning Disabilities in School-Age Children and Adolescents

This course focuses on language learning disabilities in school-age children and adolescents and the cognitive/linguistic processes involved in the classroom performance of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It explores the role of the speech-language pathologist in the evaluation and treatment of students with language learning disabilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 512 or permission of instructor

COSD 515 - Voice Disorders

This course investigates the etiology, symptomatology, development, diagnosis, intervention, and prevention of voice disorders in children and adults. Controversies about current treatment strategies are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 516 - Clinical Practicum and Procedures

This clinical practicum course provides observation and supervised clinical experience focusing on the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders, counseling of clients and families, development of treatment plans, and writing of evaluation and progress reports. Emphasis is placed on increasing diagnostic and therapeutic skills with children and adults with communication disorders. COSD 516 takes place in an affiliated, clinic, rehabilitation facility, school, or other appropriate setting under the supervision of an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist. Students meet with the University Clinical Instructor to reflect on and discuss procedures within the clinical experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

Prerequisites: COSD 503 and COSD 512 and permission of Program Director

COSD 517 - Clinical Practicum in Audiology

This supervised clinical experience focuses on conducting pure-tone air conduction hearing screening and screening tympanometry for the purpose of the initial identification and/or referral of individuals with communication disorders or possible middle ear pathology. Emphasis is also placed on aural rehabilitation and related counseling services for individuals with hearing loss and their families. The role of the speech-language pathologist in the assessment of central auditory processing disorders is discussed. Counseling clients and their families and clinical report writing are emphasized. 

Number of Credits: 1

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 518 - Research Design in Communication Disorders

This course explores the relationships among research, theory, and practice. Critique of published research focuses students on literature review and purpose methods and findings of studies with applicability of research to clinical situations. Treatment and outcome variables, sampling, measurement theory, qualitative and quantitative analyses, and the use of computers in data analysis are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

Prerequisites: A statistics course such as HSC 217 or equivalent or permission of instructor

COSD 519 - Cleft Palate and Other Maxillofacial Disorders

This course focuses on the development of craniofacial structure, classification of clefts, syndromes associated with clefts and other craniofacial anomalies, understanding of the need for surgical repair, and the role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in the diagnosis and treatment of related speech/language disorders. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 520 - Dysphagia: Diagnosis and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders

This course examines anatomy and physiology of normal swallowing and respiration and the anatomic and physiologic disturbances affecting swallowing in infants, children, and adults. Radiographic and bedside diagnostic and treatment procedures are presented. Indications and methods for non-oral and modified oral feeding are discussed. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 521 - Advanced School Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology

Candidates for the Educational Specialist I School Speech & Language Pathologist PK-12 or the Teacher Instructional Certificate I for Speech and Language Impaired PK-12 engage in an advance school practicum experience in public or private schools in the greater Philadelphia area under the supervision of a school-based ASHA certified speech-language pathologist and a University Supervisor. Students investigate how speech and language affects the child’s achievement and functioning in the school environment and assess the child’s communication ability in relation to academic achievement with consideration of age appropriate curriculum in the classroom.  Students learn Federal and State special education regulations as they relate to developing and modifying the Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) and other legal documents. They also participate in parent-teacher conferences pertaining to the child’s communication and education, organize a caseload, and provide appropriate assessment and intervention in areas including speech, language, voice and fluency for children who may range in grade from preschool through high school.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 516 and permission of the Graduate Program Director

COSD 526 - Alternative and Augmentative Communication

This course investigates theories and practices in clinical management of severely impaired or non-speaking persons. Application of graphics, signs, gestural means of communication, use of aids and devices, development of interactive communication behaviors, and development and use of computer-assisted communication strategies are surveyed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 516

COSD 527 - Motor Speech Disorders

This course provides an overview of the neurological disorders that affect speech production. Procedures for assessing speech disorders associated with neuromotor impairments are investigated. Neuropathology, symptomatology, and speech-language habilitation/rehabilitation of individuals with apraxia and/or dysarthria are emphasized. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 528 - Counseling in Communication Disorders

This course provides an overview of counseling in communication disorders and in the helping professions. Components of the therapeutic relationship including the interpersonal nature of communication, attending to clients, clinical interviewing, and recognizing communication patterns are surveyed. Counseling theories, goal setting, and strategic interventions with clients and their families are critiqued. This course includes active learning strategies and case study analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 530 - Special Topics in Communication Disorders

Current scientific and professional problems and issues in communication disorders are investigated. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 12 credits.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

COSD 537 - Geriatric Communication Disorders

Speech, hearing, language, and cognitive problems associated with normal aging and/or various pathological conditions are explored. The course emphasizes evaluation and intervention strategies.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 538 - Atypical Language Development and Disorders

This course addresses the language learning problems associated with special populations of children. Characteristics of children with specific language impairment, autism spectrum disorder, emotional/behavioral disorders and cognitive impairments will be analyzed from theoretical and practical perspectives. Current theories and controversies pertaining to clinical application are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 611 - Fluency and Stuttering II

This course is an in-depth exploration of controversies and issues in the evaluation and management of persons with fluency disorders and stuttering. The phenomenology of stuttering is explored. The role of the client and the client’s environment are addressed as they relate to treatment at various stages of life.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 511 or permission of instructor

COSD 613 - Acquired Language Disorders II

The course explores the advanced study of aphasia syndromes and neuropathology with an emphasis on theoretical models of normal and disordered language processing, critique of diagnostic testing procedures, and current approaches to treatment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 513 or permission of instructor

COSD 614 - Clinical Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology

This course provides advanced knowledge and skills in assessment principles, process, and applied practice. Through a case-based approach, students apply content knowledge to clinical cases in order to improve decision-making across assessments of speech sounds, language, voice, fluency, swallowing, and neurologically-based disorders. Students interact with actual and virtual clients and professionals to measure, analyze, and integrate information for diagnosis and clinical reporting. Clinical decision-making skills and rationale for test selection, administration, diagnosis, interpretation, and recommendations are considered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 616 - Advanced Clinical Practicum and Case Study

(repeated as necessary to fulfill ASHA Certification requirements)

This course continues the supervised clinical speech-language pathology experience of COSD 516 necessary to fulfill ASHA Clinical Practicum Requirements. Students enrolled in this course will complete requirements in an affiliated hospital, clinic, rehabilitation facility, school, or other appropriate setting treating patients/clients 18 years or older. Students are supervised by an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and application of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with individuals with a variety of communication disorders. Students meet with the University Clinical Instructor to present and discuss case studies. Feedback and reflection regarding clinical decision-making are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 516

COSD 617 - Advanced Pediatric Aural Habilitation for Speech-Language Pathologists

This course provides investigation of theory, research and clinical application of auditory-oral principles for therapeutic intervention with deaf and hard of hearing children.  Focus is on the application of theoretical and research-based principles for the development of assessment and treatment plans, including writing of behavioral objectives specific to the needs of this population.  Issues related to advances in technology, equipment management, multi-disciplinary collaboration and family counseling are discussed.  Emphasis is placed on increasing diagnostic and therapeutic skills with deaf and hard of hearing children in the education setting who are developing oral language skills. The lecture portion of this course is designed to provide a framework for students to increase their knowledge base. Students reflect on and discuss cases, issues and procedures relevant to use of an auditory-oral approach in intervention with deaf and hard of hearing children.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 502 or permission of instructor

COSD 618 - Communication and Autism Spectrum Disorders

This course provides an overview of autism spectrum disorders and the principles for speech-language pathologists in the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of autism spectrum disorders. Professional issues relating to assessment and treatment of children on the autism spectrum are discussed along with appropriate evaluation protocols, behavioral strategies, treatment methodologies, promoting social-communication, along with appropriate materials and practical supports to enhance communication.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 619 - Medical Speech-Language Pathology

This course introduces the graduate student in speech-language hearing science to medical speech pathology as it is practiced in the acute care setting. The student will be introduced to the five major service areas in the acute care setting that interface most commonly with Speech-Language Pathology Services.  Those areas are:  Neurology, Radiology, Trauma/Neurosurgery, ENT, and Medicine.  The information necessary to interact with these services and treat their patients will be provided. The student will also have the opportunity to do site visits, prepare a detailed case study that will be presented in class, submit a research paper in a selected service area, and spend an entire workday with a Neurologist and an ENT during office hours. A written structured reflection on that experience will be required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 513 and COSD 520 or permission of instructor

COSD 620 - Pediatric Dysphagia

This course provides information about the anatomy and physiology of normal and abnormal pediatric swallowing, and explores its evaluation and treatment in the context of a neuro-developmental approach. The course facilitates the development of skills in the diagnosis and treatment of swallowing and feeding disorders in different pediatric clinical populations. The role of the speech-language pathologist as part of an interdisciplinary management team is emphasized. Problem-based learning and experiential learning are utilized to illustrate the complex medical and social issues related to pediatric dysphagia.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 520 or permission of the instructor

COSD 622 - Applied Instrumentation in Speech-Language Pathology

This course focuses on the pros and cons of instrumentation in Speech Language Pathology (SLP). Current instrumentation commonly used in the evaluation and treatment of swallowing, voice, and speech disorders will be closely reviewed. A comprehensive review of clinical and theoretical research will be conducted to comprehend the clinical benefits and disadvantages of instrumentations. The instruments being discussed will be available for hands on experience to further enhance comprehension of their applications. The following instruments will be included: Electrical Stimulators (VitalStim), Surface Electromyography (sEMG), Modified Barium Swallow Study (MBS), Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES), Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing and Sensory Testing (FEESST), Computer Speech Lab (CSL), and Videostroboscopy. Emphasis will be given to the instrumentation’s purpose, application, risk and management, disinfection, and proper maintenance.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 520 or permission of the instructor

COSD 630 - Seminar in Communication and Swallowing Disorders

This seminar investigates current technological applications and controversies as they relate to communication and swallowing disorders. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 12 credits.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

COSD 635 - Integrative Capstone in Communication Disorders

This seminar course is designed as a comprehensive integration and analysis of the field of Speech-Language Pathology. This course provides a formative and summative evaluation of the students’ work. Formatively, students will develop a portfolio that contains pieces of work that exemplify their progress throughout the academic program. Summatively, the course provides students with an opportunity to review clinical research across the discipline and gain new insights to the field. Students formally present information from scholarly investigations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 514, COSD 515, COSD 518, COSD 527, and COSD 616 or COSD 521 and permission of Program Director

COSD 640 - Thesis Research in Communication Disorders

This course is an opportunity to pursue descriptive and/or experimental research. This thesis option will result in approved, original, scholarly research within the field of communication disorders under the supervision of a member of the faculty to produce an acceptable thesis. Students present their thesis orally to faculty and students in lieu of the master’s comprehensive examination. Students may re-register for this course until completion of thesis.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 518 and permission of faculty member and Program Director

Communication Sciences and Disorders B.S./M.S. (5-Year)

Program Description

La Salle University offers a unique five-year Communication Sciences and Disorders major, leading to a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science in speech-language pathology. Speech-language pathologists care for people of all ages and cultural backgrounds with communication and swallowing disorders. They assess, treat, and help prevent speech, language, cognitive-communication, voice, swallowing, fluency, and related disorders. The education of speech-language pathologists involves undergraduate coursework in communication sciences and disorders and graduate coursework and clinical experiences in speech-language pathology. A master’s degree is the recognized credential in speech-language pathology. It is required for national certification, state licensure, and Pennsylvania teacher requirements for speech-language pathologists.

Accreditation

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Speech-Language Pathology program at La Salle University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), 2200 Research Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20850-3289, 800-498-2071.

Certification and Licensure

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is the national professional, credentialing, and scientific organization for speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech-language-hearing scientists. To practice in most work settings, speech-language pathologists must hold a master’s degree and become certified by ASHA. This certification is called the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) and requires completing specific program coursework, including practicum, completing a supervised Clinical Fellowship (CF), and passing a national examination. 

For more information about ASHA certification, please visit https://www.asha.org/certification/.

All 50 states require speech-language pathologists to be licensed to practice. For state-specific licensure information (including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware), please visit State-by-State (asha.org).

La Salle University’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders has received approval for teacher certification for the Educational Specialist I School Speech & Language Pathologist PK-12 or the Teacher Instructional Certificate I for Speech and Language Impaired PK-12 from the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Earning one of these certificates is required to work in the various school systems in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania State Board regulations require candidates applying for either certificate to pass the appropriate Praxis test administered by the Educational Testing Service. Information about the Praxis Series Tests is available at http://www.ets.org/praxis/pa.  Other states may also require prospective teachers to take this or other examinations. In addition to all of the requirements for completing the Master’s degree, the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders faculty must recommend candidates for Instructional I certificates.  Recommendations are predicated upon completing all course requirements with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in CSD courses. 

Clinical Experiences

The Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology offers clinical education at various practicum sites. The CSD Department has established strong ties with more than 250 schools, hospitals, private practices, and rehabilitation facilities in the greater Philadelphia area for supervised clinical practicum affiliations. Currently, these include acute-care hospitals (pediatric and adult); rehabilitation hospitals (pediatric and adult); specialized schools; elementary, middle, and high schools in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware; intermediate units in Pennsylvania and educational services units in New Jersey; and private practices in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware.

The National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association

The National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) is a pre-professional membership association for students interested in communication sciences and disorders. La Salle University formed an ASHA recognized NSSLHA chapter in 2002. Membership in the La Salle NSSLHA chapter is available to undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in one of the Communication Sciences and Disorders programs.

Student NSSLHA members can increase their involvement in the field by visiting professional work sites, engaging in group outreach programs, attending panel discussions, fundraising, and more. NSSLHA membership allows students to engage in leadership activities locally and nationally by promoting dialogue between students, professionals, and community members.

Visit the NSSLHA Web site: www.nsslha.org.

CSD Student Handbook

The Communication Sciences and Disorders Student Handbook contains program-specific rules, guidelines, and procedures for progression and will be made available to all students.

Why take this major?

The Five-Year B.S. to M.S. Program in Speech-Language Pathology is an accelerated program in which students can earn a bachelor's and master's degree in five years.  A master's degree is the entry-level degree needed to become a speech-language pathologist. This program is reserved for the most competitive students. Students with outstanding academic backgrounds can be admitted directly into the Five-Year Program as freshmen. High-achieving students admitted to the Communication Sciences and Disorders B.S. program as first-year students may be invited to apply to the Five-Year Program during their sophomore year. Please see the Communication Sciences and Disorders Student Handbook for criteria for the 5-Year B.S./M.S. program invitation.

Student Learning Outcomes

The following objectives reflect entry-level competency in all the basic human communication and swallowing areas, including articulation, fluency, voice and resonance, receptive and expressive language, hearing, including the impact on speech and language, swallowing, cognitive and social aspects of communication, and communication modalities.

The codes listed at the end of each objective refer to the current ASHA Certification Standards in Speech-Language Pathology.

Program Contact Information

Jennifer Kleinow, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Professor, Chair,  and Graduate Director

2203 St. Benilde Tower

kleinow@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1232

Degree Earned

B.S. and M.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 24

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 72-74

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 3.5

Cumulative: 3.5

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

BIO 161 Anatomy and Physiology I (with lab) or BIO 158 Life Science: A Human Approach

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217 Statistics for Health Professionals

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 Healthcare Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 150 Principles of Sociology or SOC 151 Social Problems and Social Policy

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

SPN 103 Elementary Spanish for Nursing and Health Sciences I preferred (or any other global language)

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 24 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Major Courses

COSD 100-Introduction to Language and Communication
COSD 102-Introduction to Communication Disorders
COSD 200-Phonetics
COSD 202-Anatomy and Physiology of Speech, Hearing, Mechanisms
COSD 203-Speech and Language Development
COSD 211-Acoustic Bases of Speech and Hearing
COSD 304-Introduction to Audiology
COSD 306-Neurological Bases of Communication and Behavior
COSD 308-Clinical Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology
COSD 314-Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology
COSD 409-Multicultural Perspectives in Communication Disorders
COSD 413-Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology
COSD 501-Introduction to Clinical Practicum
COSD 502-Introduction to Aural Habilitation/Rehabilitation
COSD 503 -Disorders of Articulation and Phonology
COSD 511-Fluency and Stuttering
COSD 512-Language Disorders in Young Children
COSD 513-Acquired Language Disorders
COSD 514-Language Learning Disabilities in School-Age Children and Adolescents
COSD 515-Voice Disorders
COSD 516-Clinical Practicum and Procedures
COSD 518-Research Design in Communication Disorders
COSD 520-Dysphagia
COSD 521-Advanced School Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology
COSD 527-Motor Speech Disorders
COSD 528-Counseling Seminar in Communication Disorders
COSD 614- Clinical Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology
COSD 616- Advanced Clinical Practicum and Case Study
COSD 619- Medical Speech-Language Pathology
COSD 635- Integrative Capstone in Communication Disorders
COSD Grad SLP Elective
COSD Grad SLP Elective

Supporting Courses

PHY 270: Physics for Health Sciences or CHM 161: Chemistry of the life Sciences and CHL 161: Laboratory
PSY 155: Introduction to Psychology

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) and Spanish Double Major

The Communication Sciences and Disorders/Spanish double major aims to provide its students with the pre-clinical, linguistic, and cultural foundations, which in addition to a master’s degree in speech-language pathology, are necessary to treat and work with patients that are bilingual English/Spanish, as well as those that are Spanish speakers with limited English proficiency.  Those wishing to become CSD/Spanish double majors must have their Spanish assessed by a Language faculty member to begin their studies at the appropriate level. After placement, students will follow the carefully designed course sequence prepared by the CSD and Languages departments. 

Requirements: Fulfill the requirements of the CSD major, as outlined by the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, and 10 Spanish courses starting at the intermediate level or higher. 

Minimum Requirements for Spanish:

SPN 205- Intermediate SPN for Nursing and Health Sciences I
SPN 206- Intermediate SPN for Nursing and Health Sciences II

SPN 301- Adv. Conversation and Composition I
SPN 302- Adv. Conversation and Composition II

SPN 420- Spanish for Speech Pathologists
SPN 421- Bilingualism in Spanish/English Speakers
SPN 422- Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Phonology
SPN 423- Introduction to Spanish Dialectology

1 300/400 level Literature or Culture Course on Spain

1 300/400 level Literature or Culture Course on Latin America or SPN 307- Commercial
   Spanish. 

*Students placing above the intermediate level will not take SPN 205 or 206.  Students will take additional 300/400 level Spanish courses to fulfill their requirements instead of these intermediate courses.  Heritage speakers of Spanish will take SPN 203 and SPN 204, Spanish for Heritage Speakers I and II, instead of SPN 301 and SPN302.  

Recommended Course Sequence

Fall Freshman Year

ENG 110 (ILO 8b)

SPN 103 (ILO 11)

COSD 100

FYS (ILO 1)

BIO 161 or BIO 158 (Core3a)

15 or 16 Credits

Spring Freshman Year

COSD 102

SPN 104 or elective

REL 100 (ILO 2)

PHY 270 or CHM 161

Any ILO 8/12

15-16 Credits

Fall Sophomore Year

COSD 200

SOC 150 or SOC 151 (ILO 4)

ENG 210 (ILO 5)

COSD 202

Any ILO 9

15 Credits

Spring Sophomore Year

COSD 203

Any ILO 10

PSY 155

HSC 217 (ILO 3b)

COSD 211

15 Credits

Fall Junior Year

CSC 154 (ILO 6)

COSD 304

COSD 306

Elective

Elective

15 Credits

Spring Junior Year

COSD 308

COSD 314

Elective

Elective

Elective

15 Credits

Fall Senior Year

COSD 409

COSD 413

COSD 501

COSD 503

COSD 512

COSD 518

18 Credits

Spring Senior Year

COSD 513

COSD 515

COSD 516

COSD 520

COSD Grad Elective (opt)

12-15 credits

Summer Fifth Year

COSD 614

COSD 619

COSD Grad Elective (opt)

COSD Grad Elective (opt)

6-12 Credits

Fall Fifth Year

COSD 514

COSD 527

COSD 616 or COSD 521

COSD 528

COSD Elective (opt)

12 to 15 credits

Spring Fifth Year

COSD 502

COSD 511

COSD 635

COSD 616 or COSD 521

COSD Elective (opt)

12-15 Credits

All CSD Five-Year students must take 2 graduate electives

 

 

Course Descriptions

COSD 100 - Introduction to Language and Communication

This course presents an introduction to linguistics, which is the study of human language and communication.  Each major branch of linguistics is surveyed with an emphasis on the structure, content, and use of English.  This course also explores language variation and the relationship between language and culture, language and the brain, and how children develop language.  Students practice techniques for linguistic analysis, and clinical applications to the fields of speech-language pathology and psychology are discussed. This class is cross-listed with PSY 242.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

COSD 102 - Introduction to Communication Disorders

This course is an introductory survey of normal processes and disorders of speech, language, and hearing. The behavioral and social consequences of communication disorders in people throughout the life span are presented. Different categories, symptoms, and causes of communication disorders are examined. The roles of the Speech-Language Pathologist and Audiologist in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders are discussed. Preferred American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) practice patterns pertaining to a variety of professional situations are surveyed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

COSD 200 - Phonetics

This course involves the exploration and study of American English pronunciation through the application of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students will be trained in transcription of English phonemes and allophones and introduced to distinctive feature analysis, phonological rules, prosodic features, and dynamics of articulation, American dialectical variants, and developmental phonology.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

COSD 201 - Introduction to Sign Language

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL). Students will acquire basic ASL skills needed to communicate in a wide variety of situations.

Number of Credits: 3

COSD 202 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the structural organization (anatomy), function (physiology), and neural control for speech production and hearing. The course will emphasize both normal and disordered systems.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: BIO 158 or BIO 210 or BIO 161 or permission of instructor.

COSD 203 - Speech and Language Development

This course explores the specific nature, sequence, and patterns of language development from birth through adolescence and its relation to other aspects of child development. Conditions that place infants and children at risk for speech and language disorders are explored. Patterns of normal language development are discussed as a guide for the evaluation and treatment of children with developmental language disorders. This course is cross-listed with PSY 342.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 100 or permission of instructor

COSD 211 - Acoustic Bases of Speech and Hearing

This course explores the physical characteristics of speech sounds and the psychophysical processes involved in speech production, hearing, and speech perception. This course introduces the physical properties of sound waves, resonance, the source-filter theory, spectrogram reading, decibels, and speech perception. Computer applications with practical implications are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 200 or permission of instructor

COSD 304 - Introduction to Audiology

This course is a survey of the field of audiology, including the measurement of hearing and the nature and causes of hearing impairment in infants, children, and adults. Students are introduced to strategies used by audiologists and physicians in managing hearing impairment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

COSD 306 - Neurological Bases of Communication and Behavior

This course is an examination of the structure (neuroanatomy), organization (neurophysiology), and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems as they relate to speech, language, hearing, and cognition. Behavioral manifestations of normal and abnormal brain functioning are contrasted.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 202 or permission of instructor

COSD 308 - Clinical Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology

This course introduces the communication sciences and disorders  major to the clinical and supervisory process. Basic information regarding certification, professional standards, and ethics are discussed. Goal setting, lesson planning, methods of observing, describing and recording behavior, informal assessment and related topics are also discussed. Behavioral observation and computer technology in the measurement and modification of speaker/listener attributes are examined. Students develop clinical writing skills appropriate to various speech-language pathology settings. This course is an introduction to the clinical process and requires observation of a wide variety of clinical cases.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: For CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200, COSD 203, or permission of instructor

COSD 314 - Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology

This course provides the student majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders  with a framework for understanding the diagnostic process in Speech-Language Pathology. General topics in the area of diagnostics are discussed, including obtaining and interpreting assessment information. Report writing and presentation of findings are examined. Observations of diagnostic testing by an ASHA certified SLP are required. Principles and procedures common to the diagnosis of most communication and swallowing disorders are considered. Assessments of culturally and linguistically different individuals are surveyed. The ASHA Code of Ethics is emphasized. Standardized testing as well as alternatives to standardized testing are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200, COSD 203, or permission of instructor

COSD 409 - Multicultural Perspectives on Communication Disorders

This course presents students with issues related to cross-linguistic and cross-cultural differences as they affect clinicians in the field of communication sciences and disorders. Topics include important sociolinguistic concepts, cross-cultural communication, assessment alternatives, and intervention strategies. Non-biased diagnosis and remediation of speech, language, fluency, voice, and hearing disorders among culturally and linguistically diverse groups are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

Restrictions: CSD majors and minors

Prerequisites: COSD 102, COSD 200 or permission of instructor

COSD 413 - Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology

This course examines the organization, administration, and implementation of speech and language pathology services in varied settings.  These settings include public and private schools; special schools; clinics; rehabilitation hospitals and agencies; acute-care hospitals; and private practices.  The course emphasizes the professional role of the SLP and discusses the ethical, legal, and professional standards of practice.  The impact of external pressures, e.g., fiscal and efficacy issues, on the practice of speech-language pathology is also addressed.  Multicultural variables impacting the practice of speech-language pathology from the legal and ethical perspectives are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COSD 308 or permission of instructor

COSD 435 - Communication Sciences and Disorders Undergraduate Capstone

This course reviews and integrates knowledge of normal human communication and contrasts it with disordered human communication and swallowing, preparing the student for graduate education. As part of the review the student will complete clinical observation hours as an introduction to the clinical practicum experience and requires observation of a wide variety of clinical cases. Goal setting, lesson planning, methods of observing, describing and recording behavior, informal assessment and related topics are also discussed. The student develops clinical writing skills appropriate to various speech-language pathology service delivery settings.  

This meets ILO 2.2 Students examine how their personal, professional, religious, or spiritual values inform their disciplinary worldviews.

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD majors

Prerequisites: COSD 409 and COSD 413

COSD 501 - Introduction to Clinical Practicum

This course is the first supervised clinical speech-language pathology experience in the graduate degree program.  Students enrolled in this course complete requirements through a clinical assignment in the La Salle University Speech-Language-Hearing Community Clinics (LSU-SLHCC). Students supervised by an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist, apply theoretical knowledge, continue to develop clinical managementskills, self-analysis and evaluation abilities, and become familiar with professional practices and issues in the discipline of speech-language pathology in general and in this unique practicum setting.  Emphasis is placed on selection and administration of diagnostic instruments.  Students write reports and daily progress notes, and conduct family/patient counseling. Students may have the opportunity to communicate with other health care and educational professionals as needed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 502 - Introduction to Aural Habilitation/Rehabilitation

This course examines principles and strategies in management of problems related to hearing impairment in children and adults. Development and maintenance of communication through speech reading, auditory training, and the use of technology in aural habilitation/rehabilitation are investigated. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 503 - Speech Sound Disorders

This course reviews the development of speech sound production and speech perception skills in children. Factors affecting phonological development and auditory-motor learning are discussed. Prominent theories of phonology are reviewed and critiqued and assessment and modification of atypical articulatory patterns are emphasized. The differential diagnosis of oral motor versus phonological disorders is explored. Case studies are used to illustrate methodologies and to plan remediation. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 511 - Fluency and Stuttering

This course provides information about normal fluency as well as the history, theories, development, nature, and symptomatology of stuttering and other fluency disorders in children and adults. Controversies regarding theoretical explanations about the nature of stuttering that influence management strategies are discussed. Clinical case studies are used to illustrate methodologies and to plan remediation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 512 - Language Disorders in Young Children

This course offers a theoretical and applied approach to childhood language disorders from birth through six years. It provides an overview of language development and early assessment and intervention in the field of child language pathology within and across the domains of semantics, pragmatics, syntax, morphology, and phonology. Clinical applications and controversies in case management are emphasized through case presentations, article reviews, and research presentations. Diagnostic information including language sampling, stages of emergent literacy, and stages of play are discussed in relation to early intervention. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 513 - Acquired Language Disorders

Neuropathology, symptomatology, and speech-language rehabilitation of individuals with aphasia and related disorders due to stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc. are examined in adults and children. Other neurologically based disorders such as dementia, apraxia, and dysarthria are contrasted for differential diagnosis. Evaluation, treatment, and prognosis for recovery are reviewed. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 514 - Language Learning Disabilities in School-Age Children and Adolescents

This course focuses on language learning disabilities in school-age children and adolescents and the cognitive/linguistic processes involved in the classroom performance of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It explores the role of the speech-language pathologist in the evaluation and treatment of students with language learning disabilities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 512 or permission of instructor

COSD 515 - Voice Disorders

This course investigates the etiology, symptomatology, development, diagnosis, intervention, and prevention of voice disorders in children and adults. Controversies about current treatment strategies are discussed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 516 - Clinical Practicum and Procedures

This clinical practicum course provides observation and supervised clinical experience focusing on the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders, counseling of clients and families, development of treatment plans, and writing of evaluation and progress reports. Emphasis is placed on increasing diagnostic and therapeutic skills with children and adults with communication disorders. COSD 516 takes place in an affiliated, clinic, rehabilitation facility, school, or other appropriate setting under the supervision of an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist. Students meet with the University Clinical Instructor to reflect on and discuss procedures within the clinical experience.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

Prerequisites: COSD 503 and COSD 512 and permission of Program Director

COSD 517 - Clinical Practicum in Audiology

This supervised clinical experience focuses on conducting pure-tone air conduction hearing screening and screening tympanometry for the purpose of the initial identification and/or referral of individuals with communication disorders or possible middle ear pathology. Emphasis is also placed on aural rehabilitation and related counseling services for individuals with hearing loss and their families. The role of the speech-language pathologist in the assessment of central auditory processing disorders is discussed. Counseling clients and their families and clinical report writing are emphasized. 

Number of Credits: 1

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 518 - Research Design in Communication Disorders

This course explores the relationships among research, theory, and practice. Critique of published research focuses students on literature review and purpose methods and findings of studies with applicability of research to clinical situations. Treatment and outcome variables, sampling, measurement theory, qualitative and quantitative analyses, and the use of computers in data analysis are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

Prerequisites: A statistics course such as HSC 217 or equivalent or permission of instructor

COSD 519 - Cleft Palate and Other Maxillofacial Disorders

This course focuses on the development of craniofacial structure, classification of clefts, syndromes associated with clefts and other craniofacial anomalies, understanding of the need for surgical repair, and the role of the Speech-Language Pathologist in the diagnosis and treatment of related speech/language disorders. 

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 520 - Dysphagia: Diagnosis and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders

This course examines anatomy and physiology of normal swallowing and respiration and the anatomic and physiologic disturbances affecting swallowing in infants, children, and adults. Radiographic and bedside diagnostic and treatment procedures are presented. Indications and methods for non-oral and modified oral feeding are discussed. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students and CSD five-year seniors

COSD 521 - Advanced School Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology

Candidates for the Educational Specialist I School Speech & Language Pathologist PK-12 or the Teacher Instructional Certificate I for Speech and Language Impaired PK-12 engage in an advance school practicum experience in public or private schools in the greater Philadelphia area under the supervision of a school-based ASHA certified speech-language pathologist and a University Supervisor. Students investigate how speech and language affects the child’s achievement and functioning in the school environment and assess the child’s communication ability in relation to academic achievement with consideration of age appropriate curriculum in the classroom.  Students learn Federal and State special education regulations as they relate to developing and modifying the Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) and other legal documents. They also participate in parent-teacher conferences pertaining to the child’s communication and education, organize a caseload, and provide appropriate assessment and intervention in areas including speech, language, voice and fluency for children who may range in grade from preschool through high school.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 516 and permission of the Graduate Program Director

COSD 526 - Alternative and Augmentative Communication

This course investigates theories and practices in clinical management of severely impaired or non-speaking persons. Application of graphics, signs, gestural means of communication, use of aids and devices, development of interactive communication behaviors, and development and use of computer-assisted communication strategies are surveyed.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 516

COSD 527 - Motor Speech Disorders

This course provides an overview of the neurological disorders that affect speech production. Procedures for assessing speech disorders associated with neuromotor impairments are investigated. Neuropathology, symptomatology, and speech-language habilitation/rehabilitation of individuals with apraxia and/or dysarthria are emphasized. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 528 - Counseling in Communication Disorders

This course provides an overview of counseling in communication disorders and in the helping professions. Components of the therapeutic relationship including the interpersonal nature of communication, attending to clients, clinical interviewing, and recognizing communication patterns are surveyed. Counseling theories, goal setting, and strategic interventions with clients and their families are critiqued. This course includes active learning strategies and case study analysis.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 530 - Special Topics in Communication Disorders

Current scientific and professional problems and issues in communication disorders are investigated. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 12 credits.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

COSD 537 - Geriatric Communication Disorders

Speech, hearing, language, and cognitive problems associated with normal aging and/or various pathological conditions are explored. The course emphasizes evaluation and intervention strategies.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 538 - Atypical Language Development and Disorders

This course addresses the language learning problems associated with special populations of children. Characteristics of children with specific language impairment, autism spectrum disorder, emotional/behavioral disorders and cognitive impairments will be analyzed from theoretical and practical perspectives. Current theories and controversies pertaining to clinical application are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 611 - Fluency and Stuttering II

This course is an in-depth exploration of controversies and issues in the evaluation and management of persons with fluency disorders and stuttering. The phenomenology of stuttering is explored. The role of the client and the client’s environment are addressed as they relate to treatment at various stages of life.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 511 or permission of instructor

COSD 613 - Acquired Language Disorders II

The course explores the advanced study of aphasia syndromes and neuropathology with an emphasis on theoretical models of normal and disordered language processing, critique of diagnostic testing procedures, and current approaches to treatment.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 513 or permission of instructor

COSD 614 - Clinical Diagnostics in Speech-Language Pathology

This course provides advanced knowledge and skills in assessment principles, process, and applied practice. Through a case-based approach, students apply content knowledge to clinical cases in order to improve decision-making across assessments of speech sounds, language, voice, fluency, swallowing, and neurologically-based disorders. Students interact with actual and virtual clients and professionals to measure, analyze, and integrate information for diagnosis and clinical reporting. Clinical decision-making skills and rationale for test selection, administration, diagnosis, interpretation, and recommendations are considered.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 616 - Advanced Clinical Practicum and Case Study

(repeated as necessary to fulfill ASHA Certification requirements)

This course continues the supervised clinical speech-language pathology experience of COSD 516 necessary to fulfill ASHA Clinical Practicum Requirements. Students enrolled in this course will complete requirements in an affiliated hospital, clinic, rehabilitation facility, school, or other appropriate setting treating patients/clients 18 years or older. Students are supervised by an ASHA certified speech-language pathologist. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and application of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with individuals with a variety of communication disorders. Students meet with the University Clinical Instructor to present and discuss case studies. Feedback and reflection regarding clinical decision-making are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 516

COSD 617 - Advanced Pediatric Aural Habilitation for Speech-Language Pathologists

This course provides investigation of theory, research and clinical application of auditory-oral principles for therapeutic intervention with deaf and hard of hearing children.  Focus is on the application of theoretical and research-based principles for the development of assessment and treatment plans, including writing of behavioral objectives specific to the needs of this population.  Issues related to advances in technology, equipment management, multi-disciplinary collaboration and family counseling are discussed.  Emphasis is placed on increasing diagnostic and therapeutic skills with deaf and hard of hearing children in the education setting who are developing oral language skills. The lecture portion of this course is designed to provide a framework for students to increase their knowledge base. Students reflect on and discuss cases, issues and procedures relevant to use of an auditory-oral approach in intervention with deaf and hard of hearing children.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 502 or permission of instructor

COSD 618 - Communication and Autism Spectrum Disorders

This course provides an overview of autism spectrum disorders and the principles for speech-language pathologists in the diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of autism spectrum disorders. Professional issues relating to assessment and treatment of children on the autism spectrum are discussed along with appropriate evaluation protocols, behavioral strategies, treatment methodologies, promoting social-communication, along with appropriate materials and practical supports to enhance communication.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

COSD 619 - Medical Speech-Language Pathology

This course introduces the graduate student in speech-language hearing science to medical speech pathology as it is practiced in the acute care setting. The student will be introduced to the five major service areas in the acute care setting that interface most commonly with Speech-Language Pathology Services.  Those areas are:  Neurology, Radiology, Trauma/Neurosurgery, ENT, and Medicine.  The information necessary to interact with these services and treat their patients will be provided. The student will also have the opportunity to do site visits, prepare a detailed case study that will be presented in class, submit a research paper in a selected service area, and spend an entire workday with a Neurologist and an ENT during office hours. A written structured reflection on that experience will be required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 513 and COSD 520 or permission of instructor

COSD 620 - Pediatric Dysphagia

This course provides information about the anatomy and physiology of normal and abnormal pediatric swallowing, and explores its evaluation and treatment in the context of a neuro-developmental approach. The course facilitates the development of skills in the diagnosis and treatment of swallowing and feeding disorders in different pediatric clinical populations. The role of the speech-language pathologist as part of an interdisciplinary management team is emphasized. Problem-based learning and experiential learning are utilized to illustrate the complex medical and social issues related to pediatric dysphagia.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 520 or permission of the instructor

COSD 622 - Applied Instrumentation in Speech-Language Pathology

This course focuses on the pros and cons of instrumentation in Speech Language Pathology (SLP). Current instrumentation commonly used in the evaluation and treatment of swallowing, voice, and speech disorders will be closely reviewed. A comprehensive review of clinical and theoretical research will be conducted to comprehend the clinical benefits and disadvantages of instrumentations. The instruments being discussed will be available for hands on experience to further enhance comprehension of their applications. The following instruments will be included: Electrical Stimulators (VitalStim), Surface Electromyography (sEMG), Modified Barium Swallow Study (MBS), Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES), Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing and Sensory Testing (FEESST), Computer Speech Lab (CSL), and Videostroboscopy. Emphasis will be given to the instrumentation’s purpose, application, risk and management, disinfection, and proper maintenance.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 520 or permission of the instructor

COSD 630 - Seminar in Communication and Swallowing Disorders

This seminar investigates current technological applications and controversies as they relate to communication and swallowing disorders. Students may re-enroll for a maximum of 12 credits.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

COSD 635 - Integrative Capstone in Communication Disorders

This seminar course is designed as a comprehensive integration and analysis of the field of Speech-Language Pathology. This course provides a formative and summative evaluation of the students’ work. Formatively, students will develop a portfolio that contains pieces of work that exemplify their progress throughout the academic program. Summatively, the course provides students with an opportunity to review clinical research across the discipline and gain new insights to the field. Students formally present information from scholarly investigations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 514, COSD 515, COSD 518, COSD 527, and COSD 616 or COSD 521 and permission of Program Director

COSD 640 - Thesis Research in Communication Disorders

This course is an opportunity to pursue descriptive and/or experimental research. This thesis option will result in approved, original, scholarly research within the field of communication disorders under the supervision of a member of the faculty to produce an acceptable thesis. Students present their thesis orally to faculty and students in lieu of the master’s comprehensive examination. Students may re-register for this course until completion of thesis.

Number of Credits: 3

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: CSD graduate students

Prerequisites: COSD 518 and permission of faculty member and Program Director

Department of Nursing

Mission Statement

Consistent with Lasallian values, the Mission of the Nursing Program is to provide scientifically based nursing curricula to educate clinically competent, caring, nursing professionals with a commitment to excellence in practice, service, life-long learning, and scholarship.

Department Goals

Major(s) Offered

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

Location/Contact Information

La Salle University, School of Nursing & Health Sciences

1900 W. Olney Avenue

St. Benilde Tower

Philadelphia, PA 19141

215.951.1944

Staff Contact Information

S. Powell, Administrative Assistant

St. Benilde Tower, Rm. # 1112

215-951-1944

powells@lasalle.edu

Full-Time Faculty

PROFESSOR: Czekanski, Dillon, Kurz, Wolf (Dean Emerita)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS:  Donohue-Smith, Frizzell, Kinder, Laske, Tait, Wilby

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Alberts, Byrne, DiGiacomo, Harkins, Hoerst,  Maloney, Matecki, Monforto, Overbaugh, Palovcak, Szulewski, Uribe, Wool 

INSTRUCTORS: Blumenfeld, Grosshauser, Kenney,  McGovern, Neumeister, O’Leary, Terrell

Nursing

Program Description

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (prelicensure, day program) 

The traditional, day program is a full-time course of study leading to the BSN degree. Students must have earned 34 credits in a prescribed curriculum composed of core and support courses prior to taking nursing major courses in the sophomore level. The 16 nursing courses are taught during the fall and spring sessions. Didactic portions of the courses are taught during the day and clinical experiences are planned for daytime as well as evening hours.

Accreditation

The baccalaureate degree program in nursing at La Salle University is accredited by
the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001,
202-887-6791.

The undergraduate nursing program is approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing.

Clinical Experiences

The undergraduate nursing program of La Salle University's School of Nursing and Health Sciences has established strong ties with a number of senior centers, adult day care centers, hospitals and other health-care facilities within Philadelphia and surrounding areas (including Montgomery, Bucks, and Delaware Counties as well as New Jersey). Clinical experiences associated with coursework may be assigned at institutions such as Abington Memorial Hospital, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Belmont Center for Comprehensive Care, Bryn Mawr Rehab, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Cooper Medical Center, Doylestown Hospital,  Friends Hospital, Shriner's Hospital for Children, Holy Redeemer Hospital and Medical Center, Jefferson Health, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital,  Lankenau Hospital,  Paoli Hospital,  Presbyterian Medical Center, St. Mary Medical Center, Temple University Hospital, and various public, parochial, and private schools in Philadelphia and the surrounding counties. 

Students are responsible for their own means of transportation to and from clinical sites.

Requirements to Progress to Graduation

Progression in the Nursing Major

Students in the nursing major must meet specific academic standards for continued progression in the major. Students must maintain a 2.75 semester GPA in nursing major courses in order to progress.  Students must also earn a minimum of a grade of C in NUTR 165 Principles of Nutrition and HSC 217 Statistics for Health Professionals.

Requirements for Graduation

In order to earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing, all students must fulfill requirements for graduation as outlined in the Undergraduate Nursing Program Student Handbook. These requirements include:

GPA Requirement for BSN 

Students will be admitted into the Nursing major in the sophomore year. In order to be formally accepted into the sophomore year and begin nursing major courses, the student must have earned the following:

Students should be aware that the grading system and requirements for a passing grade in the undergraduate nursing program as well as most programs within the School of Nursing and Health Scienc­es are different than those of the general University. Specific grad­ing scales are published in the SONHS Undergraduate and Graduate Student Handbooks.

Additional Requirements

Before sophomore year, clearances must be obtained.  These include a cleared child abuse check, a cleared criminal record check from the state of Pennsylvania and primary residence state, a cleared FBI nationwide fingerprint check, and a negative urine drug screen.

Why take this major?

Students earning a Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing degree qualify to complete an application to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN® exam). Once licensed as a Registered Nurse, a program graduate is prepared to provide holistic, professional nursing care to patients in a variety of health care settings including but not limited to acute and long-term care, occupational health, outpatient settings, rehabilitation centers, and a variety of community based agencies. Nursing professionals also seek career options in areas such as correctional facilities, education, pharmaceutical or medical device sales and in areas focused on informatics and technology applications. Nurses work in multidisciplinary teams to improve client outcomes in a diverse, global society ever mindful of cultural and lifespan considerations. Program graduates from La Salle University are prepared to advance the evidence base for nursing practice.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the program, the student is prepared to:

Program Contact Information

Pat DiGiacomo, EdD, MSN, RNC
Chair UG Nursing Program, School of Nursing and Health Sciences
St. Benilde Tower, rm #1107

digiacomop@lasalle.edu

215-951-1218

 

Shira Powell

Undergraduate Nursing, Administrative Assistant 

St. Benilde Tower, rm. #1112

powells@lasalle.edu

215-951-1944

Degree Earned

BSN

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 16

Total: 35

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 62

Total: 123

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.75

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150 - Mathematics: Myths and Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 - Health Care Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 - Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 150 - Principles of Sociology

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 35 courses in total in order to graduate. 16 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Nursing Major Courses

NUR 201 - Pathophysiology
NUR 202 - Health Assessment
NUR 203 - Introduction to Professional Nursing Practice
NUR 204 - Pharmacology
NUR 205 - Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice
NUR 331 - Adult Health Nursing I: Care of the Client with Chronic Illness
NUR 332 - Introduction to Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice
NUR 333 - Family Nursing: Childbearing Families
NUR 334 - Genetics and Genomics
NUR 335 - Family Nursing: Childrearing Families
NUR 421 - Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing
NUR 423 - Public Health/Vulnerable Populations
NUR 424 - Senior Seminar I - Synthesis of Clinical Concepts
NUR 425 - Adult Health Nursing II: Care of the Client with Acute and Complex Conditions
NUR 427 - Nursing Leadership and Management: Concepts and Practice
NUR 428 - Senior Seminar II - Synthesis of Clinical Concepts

Nursing Support Courses

BIO 161 - Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 162 - Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology
CHM 161 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences
HSC 217 - Statistics for the Health Science Professionals
PSY 155 - Introduction to Psychology
PSY 210 - Developmental Psychology

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year

Fall  17 credits 

Spring  17 credits

Sophomore Year

Fall  16 credits

Spring 15 credits

Junior Year

Fall  16 credits

Spring  16 credits

Senior Year 

Fall  14 credits

Spring 12 credits

 

Total Clinical Hours: 924                          Total Credits:  123

Course Descriptions

HSC 217 - Statistics for Health Science Profs

This course is an introduction to statistical concepts and data analysis. The elements of statistical thinking are presented as a means of using data for problem solving. Students apply statistical concepts to elementary data analysis using the statistical methods commonly used in health-care research. Examples of statisical applications in nursing and allied health research are provided. As part of this course, the students are introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (IBM SPSS).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.b - Quantitative Reasoning

NUR 201 - Pathophysiology

This course applies knowledge from basic science courses to explore conditions of disrupted homeostasis and related disease processes within the major body systems. Students develop an understanding of the signs and symptoms associated with selected pathophysiological disruptions and adaptive human responses to health threats across the lifespan as a basis for determining nursing care needs.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, and Chem 161

Corequisites: NUR 202 and NUR 203

NUR 202 - Health Assessment

This course focuses on the development of the theoretical and practical base necessary to assess the health status of clients across the life span and health care continuum. Students learn assessment of the healthy client. This course takes a holistic approach to the assessment of the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of clients.

 

Number of Credits: 3 (2 didactic/1 lab)

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, and Chemistry 161

Corequisites: NUR 201 and NUR 203

NUR 203 - Introduction to Professional Nursing Practice

In this course students examine professional values, standards, and guidelines as a basis for evidence-based nursing practice. Students apply the nursing process at a beginning level to clients in selected settings focusing on health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention education.

 

Number of Credits: 4 (3 credits didactic/1 credit clinical)

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, Chemistry 161 and PSY 210

Corequisites: NUR 201 and NUR 202

NUR 204 - Pharmacology

This course examines pharmacotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of illness and in the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health. Pharmacotherapeutic aspects of client care are introduced and supported by evidenced based findings to improve client care. Emphasis is on principles of safe administration of medications and patient education for major drug classifications.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, Chem 161, NUR 201, NUR 202, NUR 203

Corequisites: NUR 205

NUR 205 - Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice

This course builds on the knowledge, skills, and values of professional nursing practice introduced in earlier courses. Students apply the nursing process in holistic plans of care for adult clients with the emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention strategies and QSEN competencies.

Number of Credits: 6 (3 didactic/3 clinical)

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 201, 202, 203, NUTR 165

Corequisites: NUR 204

NUR 331 - Adult Health I: Care of the Client with Chronic Illness

This course focuses on the application of the nursing process to promote and restore health of chronically ill clients. Principles of rehabilitation and chronicity care are integrated into nursing care. Students increase their independence as a member of the nursing profession collaborating with the interprofessional team in a variety of settings

Number of Credits: 7 (3 didactic/4 clinical)

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 203, NUR 204, NUR 205

Corequisites: NUR 332

NUR 332 - Introduction to Nursing Research and Evidence-based Practice

This course promotes an understanding of the essential elements of the research process as applied in the development, appraisal, and dissemination of evidence to support clinical nursing practice. Students identify a problem in the nursing or client system and conduct a scholarly inquiry of published empirical literature. Emphasis is placed on the critique of nursing research and the use of evidence as a basis for practice.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Courses permitting admission to the major; all 200-level Nursing major courses, ENG 110, ENG 210, HSC 217, MTH 150

Corequisites: NUR 331

NUR 333 - Family Nursing: Childbearing Families

This course focuses on the culturally competent, holistic, family-centered nursing care of the developing family unit. Students apply family and developmental theories to the care of childbearing families. Health promotion and health education are emphasized for diverse clients in a variety of settings.

Number of Credits: 4 (2 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 331, NUR 332, PSY 155

Corequisites: NUR 334, NUR 335

NUR 334 - Genetics and Genomics

This course examines the influence of genetics and genomics on the continuum of health and illness for individuals and families across the life span. Through critical examination of exemplar cases, students explore the professional role and clinical competencies of the nurse in caring for clients facing the complex physiological, psychological, social, cultural, and ethical issues related to actual or potential genetic conditions.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CSC 154, COM 150, NUR 331, NUR 332,

Corequisites: NUR 333, NUR 335

NUR 335 - Family Nursing: Childrearing

This course focuses on culturally competent, holistic, family centered nursing care and application of the nursing process to promote and restore the health of children. Physiological and psychosocial alterations are explored from a systems perspective with special emphasis on the developmental and diverse needs of the infant, children and adolescents. The maintenance of health through the illness experience is emphasized with children and their families in secondary and tertiary settings.

Number of Credits: 4 (2 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155, NUR 331, NUR 332

Corequisites: NUR 333, NUR 334

NUR 421 - Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing

This course examines theoretical principles and evidence-based practice standards employed in the holistic nursing care of diverse clients with psychiatric disorders. Students implement the nursing process in the context of client-centered, collaborative therapeutic interventions. The promotion of mental health and the restoration and maintenance of optimal health outcomes in clients with various psychiatric disorders are emphasized.

 

Number of Credits: 5 (3 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 333, NUR 334, NUR 335

Corequisites: NUR 423, NUR 424

NUR 423 - Public Health Nursing

This course examines the various roles and essential competencies of the professional nurse in addressing population-focused and global public health issues. Students apply public health science, epidemiology, systems-level assessment, health policy development, and program planning in population based-nursing care. Strategies to promote health and prevent disease in diverse clients through collaborative efforts with multiple stakeholders are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 5 (3 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SOC 150, All 300-level Nursing major courses

Corequisites: NUR 421, NUR 424

NUR 424 - Senior Seminar I: Synthesis of Clinical Concepts

This course provides students an opportunity to review, examine, and synthesize concepts integral to providing safe quality nursing care to clients with prevalent chronic diseases and health conditions. Students develop critical thinking skills and demonstrate clinical competency as they synthesize information from the basic sciences and prior nursing courses into comprehensive client-centered plans of care.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: All 300-level Nursing major courses

Corequisites: NUR 421, NUR 423

NUR 425 - Adult Health II: Care of the Client with Acute and Complex

This course focuses on the application of the nursing process in the management of acute and complex health care needs of diverse adult clients. Students employ critical thinking and leadership skills to manage groups of acutely ill adult clients. Students gain confidence in role development as providers, designers, coordinators, and managers of client-centered care.

Number of Credits: 7 (3 didactic/4 clinical)

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 421, NUR 423, NUR 424

Corequisites: NUR 427, NUR 428

NUR 427 - Nursing Leadership and Management: Concepts and Practice

This course analyzes leadership roles and management functions of the professional nurse as provider and manager/coordinator of care for diverse clients within dynamic and complex healthcare delivery systems. Students practice decision-making skills and acquire leadership and management competencies to address nursing practice issues at an individual and organizational level.

Number of Credits: 4 (3 didactic/1 clinical)

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of all 300-level Nursing courses; NUR 421, NUR 423, NUR 424

Corequisites: NUR 425, NUR 428

NUR 428 - Senior Seminar II: Synthesis of Nursing Clinical Concepts

This course provides students with focused learning opportunities to review, examine, and synthesize theoretical and clinical knowledge from previous courses across the nursing curriculum. Through use of evidence-based assessments, students demonstrate mastery in the integration of clinical reasoning with professional role and clinical care concepts essential for the entry-level nurse to provide safe quality nursing care to diverse clients.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: NUR 421, NUR 423, NUR 424

Corequisites: NUR 425, NUR 427

Nursing – Accelerated RN to BSN Online

Program Description

The accelerated Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing online program provides scientifically based nursing curricula to educate clinically competent, caring, nursing professionals with a commitment to excellence in practice, service, and scholarship. The program emphasizes quality and safety in patient care while also instilling lifelong learning as a hallmark of professional nurses, while serving as a foundation for graduate study.

Students will learn to implement culturally appropriate strategies for health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention, and use clinical judgment and decision-making skills when assessing and evaluating the health status of individuals and families.

The La Salle University Accelerated R.N.-BSN Program is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

As a special service to students and prospective students, a nurse academic adviser is available to discuss the nature of the program and individual options for progression through the program. For an appointment with the nursing academic adviser, call 215.951.1471 (Main Campus).

Why take this major?

The RN to BSN online program provides a flexible and convenient avenue for registered nurses to advance their education and develop in-demand skill sets.

Student Learning Outcomes

Program Contact Information

Sheila McLaughlin

Assistant Director of the ACHIEVE and RN to BSN Programs

Room 1104 St. Benilde

mclaughins@lasalle.edu

215-951-1471

 

Degree Earned

BSN

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 9 courses

Total: 32

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 27

Total: 122

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217 - Statistics for Healthcare Professionals

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 - Heathcare Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 32 courses in total in order to graduate. 9 courses courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

 

NUR 300 - Articulation Credits for RN License

NUR 301 - Professional Nursing Practice and Health Information Systems

NUR 314 - Health Assessment

NUR 318 - Issues in Pharmacology

NUR 408 - Nursing Research

NUR 410 - Evidence -Based Practice

NUR 413 - International Public Health Nursing

NUR 418  -Nursing Leadership, Management, and Organizational Dynamics

NUR 465  -Safety Strategies for Healthcare Delivery Systems

NUR Elective

   

 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Course Descriptions

HSC 217 - Statistics for Health Science Profs

This course is an introduction to statistical concepts and data analysis. The elements of statistical thinking are presented as a means of using data for problem solving. Students apply statistical concepts to elementary data analysis using the statistical methods commonly used in health-care research. Examples of statisical applications in nursing and allied health research are provided. As part of this course, the students are introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (IBM SPSS).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.b - Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 493 - - Holistic Health Approach

This course explores philosophical, theoretical, and the practice of holistic health care. The foundations of holistic health care lies in the belief that healing interventions need to take into consideration the whole person with the goal of bringing about unity, harmony, and integrity of the individual with one's internal and external environments. A focus of this course will be hands-on practice with each of these strategies with the intention that students will be able to integrate these holistic healing approaches into their practice. Strategies included in this course will be: relaxation techniques, guided imagery foot reflexology, and therapeutic touch. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

NUR 301 - Professional Nursing Practice and Health Information Systems

This course examines professional nursing practice and clinical practice competencies specified by professional nursing organizations, nursing accrediting agencies, and private foundation and federal reports. Students expand knowledge of workforce issues and informatics to enhance patient and health care provider safety, evidence-based practice, and patient-centered care. Professional writing, electronic portfolio development, and informatics skills are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

NUR 314 - Health Assessment

The purpose of this course is to refine and expand the skills of history and taking and physical assessment of the human system in health. Students analyze qualitative and quantitative data to determine health deviations from the normal healthy state. They collect data systematically using appropriate assessment techniques and tools to complete a physical assessment. The course stresses the documentation of findings using appropriate terminology for each system. There is emphasis on the communication of findings to both the client and other health-care professionals. Course objectives and clinical evaluations are based on ANA Standards of Practice.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: NUR 301

NUR 318 - Developments and Controversies in Pathophysiology and Pharmacology

Controversies and knowledge development in pathophysiology and pharmacology are investigated and their impact on nursing care through the lifespan are examined. Factors influencing health and illness, such as genetics, ethnicity, and environment, are discussed in relation to disease occurrence and treatment. Relationships among disease states and varying approaches to drug therapies are examined using evidence-based approaches. Technology at point-of-care nursing practice is used, including personal digital assistants (PDAs) and clinical data repositories (CDRs), to develop competencies responding to just-in-time critical values and knowledge for patient-centered care.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 301

NUR 408 - Nursing Research

The purpose of this course is to stimulate a refinement of and appreciation for the potential of the research process in the development of nursing, client, and health-care systems. This course emphasizes the research approach in nursing and the necessity for theory-based and evidence-based practice. Problem identification, literature review, hypothesis formulation, research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis will be explored. Students are required to identify a problem in the nursing or client system, propose a method for its investigation, and present the proposal for critique by peers. Emphasis is placed on the critique of published nursing research and on the notion that an applied discipline is only as strong as its research and theoretical base.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: HSC 217 and all NUR 300-level nursing courses

NUR 410 - Evidence-Based Practice

This course focuses on the integration of evidence into clinical nursing practice. Sources of evidence will include nursing research, integrative reviews, practice guidelines, quality improvement data, and case studies. Students have the opportunity to evaluate evidence critically for its validity and applicability to nursing practice. Historical perspectives of evidence-based nursing practice also will be explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 408

NUR 413 - International Public Health Nursing

This course expands the theoretical and experiential base gained in prior nursing and non-nursing courses by introducing students to populationbased nursing with a special focus on global and international health issues. Emphasis is placed on identifying trends in the health and health care of populations as well as exploring strategies to address health promotion, primary, secondary and tertiary disease prevention, and protection goals for particular at-risk and high-risk population groups throughout the world. The course orients the student to health-care needs and interests of families, aggregates, communities, and nations as a whole, rather than solely focusing on needs and interests of individual clients. Health-care strategies, population-level interventions, community resources, and opportunities for interdisciplinary and interagency collaboration are identified. Relevant political, economic, social, and ethical implications of particular healthcare strategies are examined. Specific countries and public health issues will be selected to compare and contrast with the U.S. health-care-delivery system. Students reflect upon contemporary literature related to national and international public health issues.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 301

NUR 418 - Nursing Leadership, Management, And Organizational Dynamics

Students explore the political, organizational, social, cultural, and economic factors affecting nursing practice. Acute care, long-term care, and community-based settings are examined regarding their organizational structures, health-care financing, and reimbursement challengers. Budgeting principles are analyzed with an emphasis on creating a budget on a spreadsheet for a program of nursing services. Clinical data repositories and interdisciplinary efforts are scrutinized within the context of patient-centered, safe care, and process improvement initiatives.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 301

NUR 465 - Safety Strategies for Healthcare Delivery Systems

This course explores medication and other health-care errors that threaten patient safety. The impact of health-care errors is examined from the perspectives of consumers, health-care providers, professional organizations, legislators, hospitals, and health-care delivery agencies. Systems improvement initiatives are investigated with the goal of preventing health-care errors. Interdisciplinary and collaborative roles of consumers, legal counsel, and health-care providers, including nurses, pharmacists, and physicians, are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: NUR 301

Nursing – ACHIEVE

Program Description

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (prelicensure, evening program) ACHIEVE

The ACHIEVE Program is the part-time evening/weekend program leading to the BSN degree. Students must have earned 58 credits in designated coursework prior to taking nursing major courses. In addition to these 58 credits, all students must take REL 100 Religion Matters. The curricular plan for ACHIEVE students is taught over nine continuous semesters once prerequisite courses are met. The 16 nursing courses are taught during the fall, spring, and summer sessions. Didactic portions of the courses are taught in the evenings during the week. Clinical experiences are planned for day and evening weekend hours.

GPA Requirement for BSN 

Students will be admitted into the Nursing major in the sophomore year. In order to be formally accepted into the sophomore year and begin nursing major courses, the student must have earned the following:

Students should be aware that the grading system and requirements for a passing grade in the undergraduate nursing program as well as most programs within the School of Nursing and Health Scienc­es are different than those of the general University. Specific grad­ing scales are published in the SONHS Undergraduate and Graduate Student Handbooks.

Additional Requirements

A cleared child abuse check, a cleared criminal record check from the state of Pennsylvania and primary residence state, a cleared FBI nationwide fingerprint check, and a negative urine drug screen.

Progression in the Nursing Program

Students in the nursing major must meet specific academic stan­dards for continued progression in the major. Students must main­tain a 2.75 semester GPA in nursing major courses in order to progress; if a student does not maintain the GPA, the student will no longer be permitted to progress in the nursing major. Students entering nursing major courses must also earn a min­imum of a grade of C in NUTR 165 Principles of Nutrition and HSC 217: Statistics for Health Professionals.

Why take this major?

Students earning a Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing degree qualify to complete an application to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN® exam). Once licensed as a Registered Nurse, a program graduate is prepared to provide holistic, professional nursing care to patients in a variety of health care settings including but not limited to acute and long-term care, occupational health, outpatient settings, rehabilitation centers, and a variety of community based agencies. Nursing professionals also seek career options in areas such as correctional facilities, education, pharmaceutical or medical device sales and in areas focused on informatics and technology applications. Nurses work in multidisciplinary teams to improve client outcomes in a diverse, global society ever mindful of cultural and lifespan considerations. Program graduates from La Salle University are prepared to advance the evidence base for nursing practice.

Student Learning Outcomes

At the completion of the program, the student is prepared to:

Program Contact Information

Patricia DiGiacomo, EdD, MSN, RNC
Chair, Undergraduate Nursing Program,
St. Benilde Tower, #1107
digiacomop@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1218


Sheila McLaughlin, MSN, RN
ACHIEVE Evening & Weekend and RN-BSN Program
St. Benilde Tower, # 1104
mclaughlins@lasalle.edu
(215) 951-1471

Degree Earned

B.S.N.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 16

Total: 35

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 62

Total: 123

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.75

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

NUTR 165 Principles of Nutrition

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 150: Math: Myths and Realities

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 Heathcare Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

SOC 150 Principles of Sociology

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 35 courses in total in order to graduate. 16 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Nursing Support Courses

4 credits: BIO 161 - Anatomy and Physiology I
4 credits: BIO 162 - Anatomy and Physiology II
4 credits: BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology
4 credits: CHM 161 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences

3 credits:  HSC 217 - Statistics for the Health Professions

3 credits: PSY 155 - Introduction to Psychology
3 credits: PSY 210 - Developmental Psychology

Required Major Courses

NUR 201 - Pathophysiology
NUR 202 - Health Assessment
NUR 203 - Introduction to Professional Nursing Practice
NUR 204 - Pharmacology
NUR 205 - Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice
NUR 331 - Adult Health Nursing I: Care of the Client with Chronic Illness
NUR 332 - Introduction to Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice
NUR 333 - Family Nursing: Childbearing Families
NUR 334 - Genetics and Genomics
NUR 335 - Family Nursing: Childrearing Families
NUR 421 - Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing
NUR 423 - Public Health/Vulnerable Populations
NUR 424 - Senior Seminar I - Synthesis of Clinical Concepts
NUR 425 - Adult Health Nursing II: Care of the Client with Acute and Complex Conditions
NUR 427 - Nursing Leadership and Management: Concepts and Practice
NUR 428 - Senior Seminar II - Synthesis of Clinical Concepts

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Recommended Course Sequence

Sample Progress Chart for ACHIEVE Prelicensure Students

Fall 1 (7 credits)

Spring 1 (6 credits)

Summer 1 (6 credits)

3 credits: NUR 201 – Pathophysiology

4 credits: NUR 203– Introduction to Professional Nursing Practice (3 didactic/1 clinical)

3 credits: NUR 202 – Health Assessment

3 credits: NUR 204 – Pharmacology

3 credits: REL 100 - Religion Matters (if not already completed)

6 credits: NUR 205 – Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice (3 didactic/ 3 clinical credits)

Fall 2 (7 credits)

Spring 2 (7 credits)

Summer 2 (6 credits)

7 credits: NUR 331 – Adult Health Nursing I: Care of the Client with Chronic Illness (3 didactic//4 clinical credits)

3 credits: NUR 332 – Introduction to Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice

4 credits: NUR 333 – Family Nursing: Childbearing Families (2 didactic/2 clinical credits)

2 credits: NUR 334 – Genetics and Genomics

4 credits: NUR 335 – Family Nursing: Childrearing Families (2 didactic/2 clinical credits)

Fall 3 (6 credits)

Spring 3 (9 credits)

Summer 3 (8 credits)

5 credits: NUR 421 – Psych/Mental Health Nursing (3 didactic/2 clinical credits)

1 credits: NUR 424 – Senior Seminar I- Synthesis of Clinical Concepts

5 credits: NUR 423 – Public Health/Vulnerable Populations (3 didactic/2 clinical credits)

4 credits: NUR 427 – Nursing Leadership and Management: Concepts and Practice (2 didactic/2 clinical credits)

7 credits: NUR 425 – Adult Health Nursing II: Care of the Client with Acute and Complex Conditions (3 didactic/5 clinical credits)

1 credit:  NUR 428 – Senior Seminar II- Synthesis of Clinical Concepts

 

Course Descriptions

HSC 217 - Statistics for Health Science Profs

This course is an introduction to statistical concepts and data analysis. The elements of statistical thinking are presented as a means of using data for problem solving. Students apply statistical concepts to elementary data analysis using the statistical methods commonly used in health-care research. Examples of statisical applications in nursing and allied health research are provided. As part of this course, the students are introduced to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (IBM SPSS).

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.b - Quantitative Reasoning

NUR 201 - Pathophysiology

This course applies knowledge from basic science courses to explore conditions of disrupted homeostasis and related disease processes within the major body systems. Students develop an understanding of the signs and symptoms associated with selected pathophysiological disruptions and adaptive human responses to health threats across the lifespan as a basis for determining nursing care needs.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, and Chem 161

Corequisites: NUR 202 and NUR 203

NUR 202 - Health Assessment

This course focuses on the development of the theoretical and practical base necessary to assess the health status of clients across the life span and health care continuum. Students learn assessment of the healthy client. This course takes a holistic approach to the assessment of the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of clients.

 

Number of Credits: 3 (2 didactic/1 lab)

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, and Chemistry 161

Corequisites: NUR 201 and NUR 203

NUR 203 - Introduction to Professional Nursing Practice

In this course students examine professional values, standards, and guidelines as a basis for evidence-based nursing practice. Students apply the nursing process at a beginning level to clients in selected settings focusing on health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention education.

 

Number of Credits: 4 (3 credits didactic/1 credit clinical)

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, Chemistry 161 and PSY 210

Corequisites: NUR 201 and NUR 202

NUR 204 - Pharmacology

This course examines pharmacotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of illness and in the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health. Pharmacotherapeutic aspects of client care are introduced and supported by evidenced based findings to improve client care. Emphasis is on principles of safe administration of medications and patient education for major drug classifications.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: BIO 161, 162, 163, Chem 161, NUR 201, NUR 202, NUR 203

Corequisites: NUR 205

NUR 205 - Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice

This course builds on the knowledge, skills, and values of professional nursing practice introduced in earlier courses. Students apply the nursing process in holistic plans of care for adult clients with the emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention strategies and QSEN competencies.

Number of Credits: 6 (3 didactic/3 clinical)

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 201, 202, 203, NUTR 165

Corequisites: NUR 204

NUR 331 - Adult Health I: Care of the Client with Chronic Illness

This course focuses on the application of the nursing process to promote and restore health of chronically ill clients. Principles of rehabilitation and chronicity care are integrated into nursing care. Students increase their independence as a member of the nursing profession collaborating with the interprofessional team in a variety of settings

Number of Credits: 7 (3 didactic/4 clinical)

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 203, NUR 204, NUR 205

Corequisites: NUR 332

NUR 332 - Introduction to Nursing Research and Evidence-based Practice

This course promotes an understanding of the essential elements of the research process as applied in the development, appraisal, and dissemination of evidence to support clinical nursing practice. Students identify a problem in the nursing or client system and conduct a scholarly inquiry of published empirical literature. Emphasis is placed on the critique of nursing research and the use of evidence as a basis for practice.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Courses permitting admission to the major; all 200-level Nursing major courses, ENG 110, ENG 210, HSC 217, MTH 150

Corequisites: NUR 331

NUR 333 - Family Nursing: Childbearing Families

This course focuses on the culturally competent, holistic, family-centered nursing care of the developing family unit. Students apply family and developmental theories to the care of childbearing families. Health promotion and health education are emphasized for diverse clients in a variety of settings.

Number of Credits: 4 (2 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 331, NUR 332, PSY 155

Corequisites: NUR 334, NUR 335

NUR 334 - Genetics and Genomics

This course examines the influence of genetics and genomics on the continuum of health and illness for individuals and families across the life span. Through critical examination of exemplar cases, students explore the professional role and clinical competencies of the nurse in caring for clients facing the complex physiological, psychological, social, cultural, and ethical issues related to actual or potential genetic conditions.

Number of Credits: 2

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CSC 154, COM 150, NUR 331, NUR 332,

Corequisites: NUR 333, NUR 335

NUR 335 - Family Nursing: Childrearing

This course focuses on culturally competent, holistic, family centered nursing care and application of the nursing process to promote and restore the health of children. Physiological and psychosocial alterations are explored from a systems perspective with special emphasis on the developmental and diverse needs of the infant, children and adolescents. The maintenance of health through the illness experience is emphasized with children and their families in secondary and tertiary settings.

Number of Credits: 4 (2 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155, NUR 331, NUR 332

Corequisites: NUR 333, NUR 334

NUR 421 - Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing

This course examines theoretical principles and evidence-based practice standards employed in the holistic nursing care of diverse clients with psychiatric disorders. Students implement the nursing process in the context of client-centered, collaborative therapeutic interventions. The promotion of mental health and the restoration and maintenance of optimal health outcomes in clients with various psychiatric disorders are emphasized.

 

Number of Credits: 5 (3 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 333, NUR 334, NUR 335

Corequisites: NUR 423, NUR 424

NUR 423 - Public Health Nursing

This course examines the various roles and essential competencies of the professional nurse in addressing population-focused and global public health issues. Students apply public health science, epidemiology, systems-level assessment, health policy development, and program planning in population based-nursing care. Strategies to promote health and prevent disease in diverse clients through collaborative efforts with multiple stakeholders are emphasized.

Number of Credits: 5 (3 didactic/2 clinical)

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: SOC 150, All 300-level Nursing major courses

Corequisites: NUR 421, NUR 424

NUR 424 - Senior Seminar I: Synthesis of Clinical Concepts

This course provides students an opportunity to review, examine, and synthesize concepts integral to providing safe quality nursing care to clients with prevalent chronic diseases and health conditions. Students develop critical thinking skills and demonstrate clinical competency as they synthesize information from the basic sciences and prior nursing courses into comprehensive client-centered plans of care.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Hybrid

Prerequisites: All 300-level Nursing major courses

Corequisites: NUR 421, NUR 423

NUR 425 - Adult Health II: Care of the Client with Acute and Complex

This course focuses on the application of the nursing process in the management of acute and complex health care needs of diverse adult clients. Students employ critical thinking and leadership skills to manage groups of acutely ill adult clients. Students gain confidence in role development as providers, designers, coordinators, and managers of client-centered care.

Number of Credits: 7 (3 didactic/4 clinical)

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUR 421, NUR 423, NUR 424

Corequisites: NUR 427, NUR 428

NUR 427 - Nursing Leadership and Management: Concepts and Practice

This course analyzes leadership roles and management functions of the professional nurse as provider and manager/coordinator of care for diverse clients within dynamic and complex healthcare delivery systems. Students practice decision-making skills and acquire leadership and management competencies to address nursing practice issues at an individual and organizational level.

Number of Credits: 4 (3 didactic/1 clinical)

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Completion of all 300-level Nursing courses; NUR 421, NUR 423, NUR 424

Corequisites: NUR 425, NUR 428

NUR 428 - Senior Seminar II: Synthesis of Nursing Clinical Concepts

This course provides students with focused learning opportunities to review, examine, and synthesize theoretical and clinical knowledge from previous courses across the nursing curriculum. Through use of evidence-based assessments, students demonstrate mastery in the integration of clinical reasoning with professional role and clinical care concepts essential for the entry-level nurse to provide safe quality nursing care to diverse clients.

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

Prerequisites: NUR 421, NUR 423, NUR 424

Corequisites: NUR 425, NUR 427

Department of Urban Public Health & Nutrition

Mission Statement

Reflecting Lasallian values and the mission of La Salle University, the mission of the Department of Urban Public Health and Nutrition is to educate students from diverse backgrounds in the disciplines of public health and nutrition science so they are equipped to prevent and treat disease and to promote the health and wellness of individuals, families, and urban populations. We accomplish our mission through teaching, research, service, and evidence-based practice, while focusing on the equitable treatment of individuals and populations.

Department Goals

Urban Public Health and Nutrition Department Goals

Research Goals

Service Goals

Workforce Development Goal

Diversity Goal

Major(s) Offered

4-year B.S. in Nutrition (Didactic Program)

5-year B.S in Nutrition and M.S. in Nutrition and Dietetics Practice(Coordinated Program in Dietetics)

Public Health

Public Health B.S.P.H./M.P.H (5-year)

Minor(s) Offered

Public Health

Nutrition

Location/Contact Information

Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH
Chair, Department of Urban Public Health and Nutrition
Director and Assistant Professor
Master of Public Health Program
La Salle University School of Nursing and Health Sciences
St. Benilde Tower – Office 3333
La Salle University
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, Pa 19141
robertsonjames@lasalle.edu

215.951.5032

 

Valerie Bradley, BA
Administrative Assistant, Department of Urban Public Health and Nutrition
La Salle University, School of Nursing and Health Sciences
St. Benilde Tower, Room 3014
bradley@lasalle.edu

215.951.1120

 

Laura B. Frank, PhD, MPH, RD, LDN
Associate Professor
Director, Didactic Program in Nutrition 
Department of Urban Public Health and Nutrition
La Salle University School of Nursing and Health Sciences
3004 St. Benilde Tower
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141
frankl@lasalle.edu

215.991.3617

 

Liz Zorzanello Emery, EdD,MS,RD,CNSC,LDN
Assistant Professor and Director, 5-year Master's Coordinated Program in Dietetics
La Salle University School of Nursing and Health Sciences
3019 St Benilde Tower
1900 W. Olney Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19141
emery@lasalle.edu

215.991.3618

Staff Contact Information

Valerie S. Bradley, B.A., Administrative Coordinator

bradley@lasalle.edu

Full-Time Faculty

Public Health

PROFESSOR:  Kneavel, Rodriguez

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Robertson-James, Rexing, Taylor

Nutrition

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Frank

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Emery,  Krick, Laura

Nutrition – Coordinated Program in Dietetics (5-Year)

Program Description

The Nutrition 5 year B.S./M.S. Coordinated Program in Dietetics is an accelerated Bachelor's to Master's program with a unique focus on urban health. The master's degree includes a minimum of 1,200 hours of supervised practice in clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and food service management during the final two years of the program. Upon successful completion of both degrees including the supervised practice, graduates are eligible to sit for the national Registration Examination for Dietitians (RD Exam). Graduates who successfully pass the RD Exam become Registered Dietitian Nutritionists(RDNs), also known as Registered Dietitians (RDs).

As of January 1, 2024 a master's degree will be required for all graduates wishing to become RDNs. To obtain the RDN credential, graduates must pass a national examination administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. After becoming an RDN, graduates are eligible to apply for licensure in the State of Pennsylvania and other states where the practice of dietetics is regulated through licensure. RDNs are employed in health-care settings as medical team members and as managers of nutrition programs for hospitals, long term care facilities, school foodservice programs, and community health organizations. They are also employed in fitness settings, supermarkets, food and beverage industries, service management companies, the pharmaceutical industry, higher education, private practice, and other businesses.

Details can be found in the Coordinated Program Handbook .

Program Mission

Consistent with Lasallian values, the mission of the Master’s Coordinated Program is to educate and empower students to engage in evidence-based practice in Nutrition and Dietetics with a commitment to excellence in practice, advocacy, life-long learning, and scholarship. The program combines a liberal arts education with scientific, theoretical, and practical coursework for preparation of entry-level Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs), preparing graduates to promote health and wellness in individuals, serve diverse and disadvantaged populations, and to assume leadership roles in their field.

Program Goals

Goal 1:  Prepare graduates to become competent entry-level dietetic practitioners through successful completion of the Coordinated Program.

Objectives:

Goal 2:  Prepare graduates who respond to changing food, nutrition, and health care needs of individuals, groups, and urban communities.

Objectives:

Accreditation

La Salle University’s Didactic Program in Nutrition and Coordinated Program in Dietetics are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 800.877.1600, x5400.

Why take this major?

The 5-year Bachelor's to Master's Coordinated Program is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND)and culminates in a B.S. in Nutrition and M.S. in Nutrition and Dietetics Practice. It includes 1200-hours of supervised practice designed to meet competencies needed for entry-level practice in the field of Dietetics. Graduates are eligible to sit for the Registration Examination for Dietitians after successful program completion. 

 

Program Requirements

Students must have successfully completed or be enrolled in all of the required courses for the 5-year program up through and including the Spring Semester of Junior Year. Students must have a GPA >/= 3.2 including courses transferred in for the major, earned a B or above in NUTR 310, 320, 341, 342, and any 400 level NUTR courses, and have a C or better in all science and nutrition courses. Students who have met minimum requirements for admission to the Coordinated Program as of Spring, 2022 will be able to apply for the first cohort of the Master's Coordinated Program. High-achieving students offered direct admission to the 5-year program as freshmen must meet these standards in order to remain in the program. Students not meeting the required GPA and course grade requirements will earn a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition if all requirements are met, but will not progress to the Master’s Program.

 

Student Learning Outcomes

Competencies for registered dietitians (CRDN)s as specified by ACEND and Urban Health competencies (URB)are listed after corresponding outcomes.

At the completion of this program the student will be able to:

Program Contact Information

Robin Danowski, MS, RD, LDN

Assistant Professor and Director

St. Benilde Tower, room 3019

danowski@lasalle.edu

215-991-3618

Degree Earned

B.S.Nutr., M.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: B.S. Nutr: 31 courses

Total: B.S. Nutr: 41, M.S.: 10 courses

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: B.S. Nutr: 106

Total: B.S. Nutr: 127, M.S.: 45 credits

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: B.S.Nutr.: 3.2, M.S.: 3.2

Cumulative: B.S.Nutr: 3.2, M.S.: 3.2

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHM 161 Chemistry of the Life Sciences

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217 Statistics for Health Science Profs

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 Healthcare Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

POL 151 Principles of American Government or ECN 150 Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete B.S. Nutr: 41, M.S.: 10 courses courses in total in order to graduate. B.S. Nutr: 31 courses courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Major Courses

NUTR 165- Principles of Nutrition
NUTR 200 -Life Cycle Nutrition
NUTR 230- Food Science
NUTR 300- Community Nutrition
NUTR 310- Management in Nutrition and Dietetics
NUTR 320- Quantity Food Preparation and Management
NUTR 340- Professional Practice in Nutrition
NUTR 341 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I
NUTR 342 -Medical Nutrition Therapy II

PHLT 408 - Research Methods
PHLT 489 - Race, Ethnicity, and Public Health
NUTR 420 – Nutrition Education and Counseling
NUTR 430 - Practicum in Foodservice Management
NUTR 440 – Capstone in Nutrition
NUTR 441 – Food and Culture
NUTR 450 - Sustainable Food Systems/Food Justice
NUTR 510 - Nutrition Communications
NUTR 512 - Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism
NUTR 514 - Cases in Clinical Nutrition
PHLT 635 - Health Policy
NUTR 601 - Practicum in Community Nutrition I
NUTR 602 - Practicum in Community Nutrition II
NUTR 605 - Practicum in Foodservice Management
NUTR 608 - Practicum in Medical Nutrition Therapy I
NUTR 609 - Practicum in Medical Nutrition Therapy II
NUTR 612 - Seminar in Dietetics Practice

Support Courses

BIO 161 -Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 162 - Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 163- Clinical Microbiology
PSY 155- Introduction to Psychology
CHM 262- Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences
CHM 263 -Biochemistry for Life Sciences
PHLT 408 - Research Methods

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

A minor in nutrition is available to any undergraduate day student in the University.

Required for a Minor in Nutrition:

Recommended Course Sequence

Freshman Year

Fall Semester

ENG 110 - College Writing I
NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition
BIO 161 - Anatomy and Physiology I
CSC 154 - Health Informatics
Religion 100

Spring Semester

PSY 155 - Introduction to Psychology  
CHM 161 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences 
BIO 162 - Anatomy and Physiology II 
COM 150 - Presentation Skills
FYS 130 *

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester

CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences   
NUTR 200 - Life Cycle Nutrition
NUTR 230 - Food Science
ENG 210 - College Writing II
POL 151 or ECN 150 - Principles of American Government or Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

Spring Semester

CHM 263 - Biochemistry for Life Sciences
NUTR 300 - Community Nutrition 
NUTR 340 - Professional Practice in Nutrition  
Choose course within ILO 9, 10, or 11
BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology 

Junior Year

Fall Semester

NUTR 310 - Management in Nutrition and Dietetics 
NUTR 341 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I
NUTR 420 - Nutrition Ed and Counseling
NUTR 441 - Food and Culture
Choose course within ILO 9,10,or 11

Spring Semester

NUTR 320 - Quantity Food Prep/Management
NUTR 342 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II 
HSC 217 - Statistic for Health Science
NUTR 450 - Sustainable Food Systems/Food Justice
Choose course within ILO 9,10,or 11

Fourth Year

Fall Semester

NUTR 601 - Practicum in Community Nutrition I
PHLT 408 - Research Methods  
PHLT 489 - Race, Ethnicity, and Public Health
NUTR 512 -  Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism                                

Spring Semester

NUTR 602 - Practicum in Community Nutrition II
NUTR 440 - Capstone in Nutrition
NUTR 514 -  Cases in Clinical Nutrition
PHLT 635 -  Health Policy

Summer Semester

NUTR 605 - Practicum in Foodservice Management

Fifth Year

Fall Semester

NUTR 608 - Practicum in Clinical Nutrition I
NUTR 510 - Nutrition Communications

Spring Semester

NUTR 609 - Practicum in Clinical Nutrition II
NUTR 612 - Seminar in Dietetics Practice

Course Descriptions

NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition

Topics for this course include basic knowledge of food nutrients; functions, interactions, and balance of carbohydrates proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and water in normal human physiology; nutrient deficiency diseases; energy metabolism; nutrition and fitness. It consists of three hours of lecture and is required for all subsequent nutrition courses.

Number of Credits: 3

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

NUTR 200 - Life Cycle Nutrition

This course examines human nutritional needs and U.S. dietary guidance for health maintenance and disease prevention during infancy, early and middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood as well as pregnancy and lactation. The course consists of three hours of lecture. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, BIO 161

Corequisites: BIO 162

NUTR 230 - Food Science

This course examines chemical and physical proprieties of food, principles of food selection, consumer trends, use of established food guides in meal planning, methods and techniques of food preparation, sensory evaluation of food, food safety, and government regulation of food. The course consists of three hours of lecture, and two hours of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Non-nutrition majors must obtain permission of the Director to register for this course.

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, CHM 161

NUTR 300 - Community Nutrition

This course illustrates the role of nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention through an examination of health and nutrition policy, programs, and population data. Emphasis is placed on the information and skills necessary to solve nutrition problems in local, state, and national communities. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200

NUTR 310 - Management in Nutrition and Dietetics

The course focuses on dietetic management principles including systems theory, leadership, quality management and methodology, cost-effectiveness, human resources, labor law, financial management, budgeting, and marketing. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165

NUTR 320 - Quantity Food Preparation and Management

The course looks at management systems and procedures used in quantity food production; menu planning; recipe standardization; purchase, receipt, and storage of food and supplies; facility design, equipment, and materials; financial management; and food safety and sanitation.  The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 230, NUTR 310, BIO 163

NUTR 340 - Professional Practice in Nutrition

The course explores the various roles of nutrition professionals within the broader health-care system including inter-professional collaboration for comprehensive care. The course provides an overview of nutrition careers in clinical, community, foodservice management, and business settings and emphasizes historical, legal, and ethical considerations for professional practice. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition Majors Only

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200

NUTR 341 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I

The course focuses on the pathophysiology of nutrition-related disease; normal and therapeutic diets in the prevention and treatment of disease; the Nutrition Care Process: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation; documentation of nutrition care; and drug-nutrient interactions. Course materials will cover disorders of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, and skeletal systems as well as energy imbalance. The course consists of three hours of lecture and one hour of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students are permitted to re-take this course once to seek to improve their grade

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, BIO 161, BIO 162, CHM 161, CHM 262, and CHM 263

NUTR 342 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II

This course is a continuation of Medical Nutrition Therapy I that focuses on the pathophysiology of nutrition-related disease; normal and therapeutic diets in the prevention and treatment of disease; the Nutrition Care Process: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation; documentation of nutrition care; and drug-nutrient interactions. Course materials will cover disorders of the gastrointestinal, hepatic, and renal systems; food allergy and intolerance; genetics in nutrition; enteral and parenteral nutrition support. The course consists of three hours of lecture and one hour of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students are permitted to re-take this course once to seek to improve their grade

Prerequisites: NUTR 341

NUTR 420 - Nutrition Education and Counseling

This course focuses on communication strategies for effective health behavior change. Topics include food behavior; verbal and non-verbal communication; interviewing skills; cultural competency; health literacy; counseling theories and the counseling process; learning theories and educational principles; and educational methods and tools. Three hours of lecture.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, PSY 155

NUTR 440 - Capstone in Nutrition

Emphasizes the integration of nutrition knowledge and the interpretation and application of nutrition-oriented research including evidence-based practice. Students identify a research question or hypothesis, design a research plan, collect and analyze data, and write a research paper utilizing peer-reviewed scientific literature and other appropriate sources.  Students also create and orally present a poster representing their work. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition Majors Only

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, NUTR 340, NUTR 420, PHLT 408 and HSC 217.

NUTR 441 - Food and Culture

This course examines the cultural and culinary traditions that shape an individual's eating habits, including the activities by which people produce, prepare, present, and consume food. Aspects of food culture including religion, health beliefs, geographic and historical/traditional factors in global cultures and within regions of the United States are explored. The course focuses on the development of cultural competency and cultural humility in nutrition practice.  Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 230, NUTR 300

NUTR 450 - Sustainable Food Systems and Food Justice

Encompasses current issues involving food agriculture, activities, people and resources involved in getting food from field to plate. Current food practices and marketing are investigated in terms of the cost/benefit to the individual, and society.  Three hours of lecture. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300.

NUTR 460 - Nutrition Externship

Students experience field work under the supervision of a nutrition professional and faculty member. Permission of the Director is required. Hours to be arranged with five hours minimum field work per week (minimum of 50 hours per semester) required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition majors only unless approved by the Director

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300

NUTR 470-475 - Special Topics in Nutrition

The course provides an in-depth examination of a current topic in the field of nutrition. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200.

NUTR 474 - Special Topics: Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered Careers and Credential

This course will help prepare the student to take the credentialing examination to become a Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered (NDTR).  Roles and responsibilities of the NDTR as well as career paths are explored. 

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Student must be a senior in the Didactic Program in Nutrition to register for this course.

NUTR 510 - Nutrition Communications

This course focuses on the development of effective written and oral communication skills for the nutrition professional.  Students will learn how to tailor communication to a variety of audiences using a wide range of communication platforms.  Special focus is placed on designing materials that are culturally and age appropriate, and meet the literacy level of the audience. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program or approval of Program director.

NUTR 512 - Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism

This course will include application of basic sciences to the science of Nutrition, with emphasis on macronutrients and micronutrients in health and disease.  Students will apply in-depth knowledge of the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients in clinical scenarios

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program or approval of Program director.

NUTR 514 - Cases in Clinical Nutrition

This course provides an application of the Nutrition Care Process to a variety of disease states.  Students will gain experience with assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation of nutrition problems using a case based and simulation approach.  Students will gain competence in the application of medical terminology and standardized language for the Nutrition Care Process

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 512

NUTR 517 - Nutrition Entrepreneurship

This course, in cooperation with La Salle’s Entrepreneurial Center, will include the basics of entrepreneurship; the essentials of starting a nutrition consulting business or private practice; insurance and reimbursement; coding and billing practices; and HIPAA concerns. Guest speakers with businesses in corporate wellness, sports and fitness, and food/nutrition journalism will demonstrate the variety of ways an RDN can be a successful entrepreneur. The course will culminate in student teams working to develop a Business Model Canvas, detailing an actual nutrition business plan. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program or approval of Program director.

NUTR 601 - Practicum in Community Nutrition I

This course provides students with academic and experiential applications of nutritional principles to populations and communities, with an emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention.  Students utilize assessment skills to determine health and nutritional needs of individuals and groups in community settings. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students participate in nutrition counseling sessions and educational programs in their field placements with local community nutrition organizations. Coursework includes lecture, group discussion, journaling, assigned readings, research papers, project work, and practical field experiences. The course consists of two hours of lecture, eight to twelve hours of practicum. 

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

NUTR 602 - Practicum Community Nutrition II

This course provides students with academic and experiential applications of nutritional principles to populations and communities, with an emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. Students will utilize assessment skills to determine health and nutritional needs of individuals and groups in community settings. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students will participate in nutrition counseling and educational programs in their field placements with local community nutrition organizations. Practicum coursework will include lecture, group discussion, journaling, assigned readings, research papers, project work, and practical field experiences (8 -12 hours per week).

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admittance into the Coordinated Program in Dietetics required and completion of Nutrition 601 with a grade of B or above.

NUTR 605 - Practicum in Food Service Management

This course provides practical experience in quantity food planning, preparation, and management in hospitals, nursing homes, school food service, and commercial cafeterias. Students will participate in the daily operations and management functions of food service systems, including sanitation, food safety, equipment selection and operation, food purchasing, receiving and storage, personnel and fiscal management, and quality control. The course will consist of lecture, assigned readings, group discussion, journaling, and project management with an average of 3–4 hours per week of classroom experiences and up to 32 hours per week of practicum for 10 weeks.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program and NUTR 601 and 602 with grade B or above.

NUTR 608 - Practicum in Clinical Nutrition I

The course covers the application of nutrition knowledge and the Nutrition Care Process in the solution of problems related to disease. Students assess nutritional status (including medical record review, patient and family interviews, and input from other team members), identify nutritional needs, formulate nutrition diagnoses, and develop care plans for individuals in acute and/or long-term care environments. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students carry out basic nutrition interventions, monitoring, and evaluation. The course consists of assigned readings, discussions, problem-based learning, simulations, and practical experiences in hospitals, medical centers, and/or long-term care facilities.  It consists of two hours of lecture, 24 hours per week of practicum.   

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics; NUTR 512, 514, NUTR 601, 602, and 605 with grade of B or above.

NUTR 609 - Practicum in Clinical Nutrition II

This course covers the application of nutrition knowledge in the solution of problems related to disease. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students utilize the Nutrition Care Process in the care of assigned patients in acute, ambulatory, and/or long-term care settings. Continued emphasis is placed on the development of assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring/evaluation skills, culminating in students’ ability to assume nutritional care responsibilities for adults and children with medical needs (e.g. inborn errors of metabolism, trauma, immune dysfunction, endocrine, hepatic, pancreatic, oncology), obesity, and malnutrition. The course consists of assigned readings, discussions, problem-based learning, simulations, and practical experiences in hospitals, medical centers, and/or long-term care facilities. Two hours of lecture, 24 hours of practicum. 

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics; NUTR 608 with a grade of B or above.

PHLT 489 - Race, Ethnicity, And Public Health

This course provides students with an understanding of racial and ethnic influences on health status and the societal factors that shape them. During the course, students examine the concepts of race and ethnicity, and distinguish between categories of biological and social constructionist perspectives. Students define and describe racial and ethnic health inequities, discuss mechanisms underlying inequities, and think critically about existing health research on health inequities.  Students will explore theoretical frameworks for interpreting inequities in health and examine approaches for elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

Nutrition – Didactic Program

Program Description

The Didactic Program in Nutrition leads to the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition degree, which prepares students for a wide variety of careers in areas such as health care, public health, business, food service management, and research. This program is also a pathway to the 5 year BS/MS Coordinated Program in Dietetics, which when completed qualifies students to sit for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist exam.  Select students may be admitted directly into the 5 year program upon acceptance into La Salle's Nutrition program.

The Didactic Program also offers students who possess a non-nutrition degree the opportunity to achieve eligibility for the Master's Coordinated Program or other accredited internship.  Students may transfer in up to 70 credits toward the required course work of the BS in Nutrition, then complete the remaining required courses to earn a second degree in Nutrition.  Students who wish to attend part-time may complete required courses through a non-degree post-baccalaureate program.

Accreditation

La Salle University’s Didactic Program in Nutrition and Coordinated Program in Dietetics are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312.899.0040, x5400.

Description

The Didactic Program in Nutrition prepares students for post-baccalaureate dietetic internships leading to the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist or RDN credential, or to take the exam leading to the Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered credential. Course work meets all Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics academic requirements and offers opportunities for focused electives or for a minor area of study to match a student’s interests or career goals. Electives may also be used to take additional courses to prepare for graduate study in other health sciences, such as medicine, physician’s assistant, physical therapy, and others (students may be required to take different science coursework as well to prepare for these other careers).

Graduates work to promote health and wellness within communities and have employment opportunities in public health agencies (government and private), food service facilities, and businesses.  Details can be found in the Student Handbook:  https://www.lasalle.edu/nutrition/files/2017/08/DPD-Program-2017-18-Student-Handbook-final.pdf

The Mission of the La Salle University Didactic Program in Nutrition/Bachelor of Science in Nutrition is to educate baccalaureate students in nutrition and health science, promote health and wellness, prevent nutrition-related disease, integrate research into practice, and enable graduates to assume careers in nutrition and food related careers or pursue careers as Registered Dietitians (RD)/Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDN).*

*Note: Students who wish to pursue the RD/RDN Credential must complete an accredited coordinated program or dietetic internship program in addition to or concurrent with completion of the Didactic Program and a Master's degree. Further information on eligibility requirements for becoming a RD/RDN can be obtained at the Commission on Dietetic Registration web site at www.cdrnet.org.

Program Goals

Goal 1: The Didactic Program will educate graduates to prepare them for careers as Nutrition and Dietetic Technicians, Registered (NDTR), and entry-level positions in nutrition and food related fields.

Outcomes:

  1. Over a five year period, at least 80% of full-time DP students will complete program/degree requirements within 6 years (150% of program length).
  2. Over a five year period, at least 80% of verification-only DP students will complete verification course requirements within 4 years of beginning junior level DP course work.
  3. Over a five year period, at least 90% of program graduates will “agree” or “strongly agree” that DP program director and faculty provided sufficient and accurate guidance about Didactic Program requirements.
  4. Over a five year period, at least 90% of program graduates will “agree” or “strongly agree” that they are satisfied with the quality of the education they received in the Didactic Program.
  5. Over a 5 year period, at least 90% of program graduates will “agree” or “strongly agree” that they received accurate and helpful career information, advising, and guidance that made them aware of career options and opportunities they can pursue after completing their studies
  6. Over a five year period, at least 80% of DP graduates who sought employment upon graduating will be employed within 12 months of graduation.

Goal 2:  The Didactic Program will prepare graduates to obtain and successfully complete supervised practice programs and/or graduate degree programs.

Outcomes:

  1. Over a five year period, at least 60% of DP graduates will apply for admission to supervised practice or graduate degree programs prior to or within 12 months of graduation.
  2. Over a five year period, at least 60% of those DP students applying to supervised practice programs will be admitted within 12 months of graduation.
  3. Over a five year period, at least 80% of DP graduates admitted into supervised practice will “agree or strongly agree” that the DP prepared them to perform effectively as dietetic interns.
  4. Over a five year period, the pass rate for DP graduates taking the CDR credentialing examination for dietitian nutritionists within one year of their first attempt will be at least 80%.

 

 

Why take this major?

Students who choose this major will be prepared to enter a wide variety of careers in the growing field of nutrition and wellness.  Course work meets eligibility requirements for the Diet Technician, Registered credential and for application to the supervised practice programs that qualify the student for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential, including the La Salle BS/MS Coordinated Program in Dietetics.  Graduates also find careers in community nutrition, food and culinary service, hospitality and fitness settings, or continue on to graduate programs in health professions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Didactic Program Student Learning Outcomes and Objectives

Upon successful completion of the program the student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Locate, interpret, evaluate and use nutrition information, applying critical thinking and scientific reasoning skills.
  2. Use current information technologies to locate and apply evidence—based guidelines and protocols.
  3. Provide nutrition education to individuals, groups, and communities throughout the lifespan, using effective and professional communication skills.
  4. Utilize professional skills and the Nutrition Care Process to provide and effectively document nutrition services in multidisciplinary, inter-professional settings.
  5. Assess the impact of policies and strategies for food access, procurement, preparation, and safety for individuals, families and communities.
  6. Apply theories and knowledge to provision of quality food management functions in business, healthcare, community and institutional arenas.
  7. Provide culturally competent, ethical nutrition services for individuals and communities.
  8. Describe the governance and scope of professional dietetics practice, including mentoring and precepting others.
  9. Utilize knowledge from the physical and biological sciences as a basis for understanding the role of food and nutrients in health and disease processes.

Program Contact Information

Laura B. Frank, PhD, MEd, MPH, RDN, LDN 

Director, Didactic Program in Nutrition 

Room 3004 St. Benilde Tower                                

frankl@lasalle.edu

215-991-3617

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 28

Total: 39

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 91

Total: 121

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHEM 161 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217 - Statistics for Health Sciences

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 - Health Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 - Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

POL 151 - Principles of American Government OR ECON 150 - Macroeconomics

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 39 courses in total in order to graduate. 28 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Major Requirements

NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition
NUTR 200 - Life Cycle Nutrition
NUTR 230 - Food Science
NUTR 300 - Community Nutrition
NUTR 310 - Management in Nutrition and Dietetics
NUTR 320 - Quantity Food Preparation and Management
NUTR 340 - Professional Practice in Nutrition
NUTR 341 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I
NUTR 342 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II
NUTR 420 - Nutrition Education and Counseling
NUTR 440 - Capstone in Nutrition

NUTR441 - Food and Culture
NUTR 450 - Sustainable Food Systems and Food Justice
NUTR 470-475 - Special Topics in Nutrition

Support Courses

BIO 161 - Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 162 - Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology
PSY 155 - Introduction to Psychology
 CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences
CHM 263 - Biochemistry for Life Sciences
PHLT 408 - Research Methods

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Required for a minor in Nutrition:

Completion of college chemistry with laboratory, preferably CHM 161, and either BIO 161 & 162 or BIO 210, with a grade of "C" or better is a pre-requisite for the nutrition minor.

Required courses (all courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better):

Recommended Course Sequence

Model Roster 2018-19

FALL

SPRING

   

Freshman Year

 

ENG 110 College Writing I

COM 150 Presentation Skills

NUTR 165 Principles of Nutrition

CHM 161 Chemistry for Life Sciences

BIO 161 Anatomy and Physiology I

BIO 162 Anatomy and Physiology II

CSC 154 Health Informatics

PSY 155 Introduction to Psychology

REL 100 Religion Matters

FYS Course*

   

Sophomore Year

 

CHM 262 Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences

CHM 263 Biochemistry for Life Sciences

NUTR 200 Life Cycle Nutrition

NUTR 300 Community Nutrition

NUTR 230 Food Science

NUTR 340 Professional Practice in Nutr

ENG 210 College Writing II

ECN 150 Introductory Macroeconomics 

ILO 9, 10 or 11**

or POL 151 American Government

   BIO 163 Clinical Microbiology

Junior Year

 

NUTR 310 Management in Nutrition and Dietetics

NUTR 320 Quantity Food Prep/Management

NUTR 341 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

NUTR 342 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

NUTR 441 Food and Culture

HSC 217 Statistics for Health Sciences

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

   
   

Senior Year

 

NUTR 472 Special Topics in Nutrition

NUTR 440 Capstone in Nutrition

NUTR 420 Nutrition Education/Counseling

NUTR 450 Sustainable Food Sys/Justice

PHLT 408 Research Methods for Public Health

NUTR 460 Externship (or elective)

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

NUTR 474 NDTR and/or elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

*Recommended Courses to Meet FYS:  Diverse Perspectives in Poverty: An Inter-professional Exploration; Of Feast and Famine: The Historical Importance of Food in Our Culture; Power, Justice, and Community; The Evolution of Human Communication; The Health and Well-Being of Children in Philadelphia

**Recommended Courses to meet ILO 9 Creative and Artistic Expression:  COM 204 Media Criticism;
ENG 204 Intro to Creative Writing; ART 150 Introduction to Art History 
Recommended Courses to meet ILO 10 Ethical Understanding and Reasoning:  COM 300 Communication Ethics; ENG 303 Writing for Business; SWK 360 Working with Children and Families; PHL 152 Ethics and the Good Life; ENG 302 Language and Prejudice
Recommended Courses to meet ILO 11 Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity:  SPN 103 Spanish for Nursing and Health Science: SOC 262 Dynamics of Race and Ethnicity; COM 220 Intercultural Communication; ENG 351 Gender and Ethnicity; HIS 255 20th Century Globalism

Course Descriptions

NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition

Topics for this course include basic knowledge of food nutrients; functions, interactions, and balance of carbohydrates proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and water in normal human physiology; nutrient deficiency diseases; energy metabolism; nutrition and fitness. It consists of three hours of lecture and is required for all subsequent nutrition courses.

Number of Credits: 3

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

NUTR 200 - Life Cycle Nutrition

This course examines human nutritional needs and U.S. dietary guidance for health maintenance and disease prevention during infancy, early and middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood as well as pregnancy and lactation. The course consists of three hours of lecture. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, BIO 161

Corequisites: BIO 162

NUTR 230 - Food Science

This course examines chemical and physical proprieties of food, principles of food selection, consumer trends, use of established food guides in meal planning, methods and techniques of food preparation, sensory evaluation of food, food safety, and government regulation of food. The course consists of three hours of lecture, and two hours of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Non-nutrition majors must obtain permission of the Director to register for this course.

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, CHM 161

NUTR 300 - Community Nutrition

This course illustrates the role of nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention through an examination of health and nutrition policy, programs, and population data. Emphasis is placed on the information and skills necessary to solve nutrition problems in local, state, and national communities. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200

NUTR 310 - Management in Nutrition and Dietetics

The course focuses on dietetic management principles including systems theory, leadership, quality management and methodology, cost-effectiveness, human resources, labor law, financial management, budgeting, and marketing. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165

NUTR 320 - Quantity Food Preparation and Management

The course looks at management systems and procedures used in quantity food production; menu planning; recipe standardization; purchase, receipt, and storage of food and supplies; facility design, equipment, and materials; financial management; and food safety and sanitation.  The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 230, NUTR 310, BIO 163

NUTR 340 - Professional Practice in Nutrition

The course explores the various roles of nutrition professionals within the broader health-care system including inter-professional collaboration for comprehensive care. The course provides an overview of nutrition careers in clinical, community, foodservice management, and business settings and emphasizes historical, legal, and ethical considerations for professional practice. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition Majors Only

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200

NUTR 341 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I

The course focuses on the pathophysiology of nutrition-related disease; normal and therapeutic diets in the prevention and treatment of disease; the Nutrition Care Process: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation; documentation of nutrition care; and drug-nutrient interactions. Course materials will cover disorders of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, and skeletal systems as well as energy imbalance. The course consists of three hours of lecture and one hour of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students are permitted to re-take this course once to seek to improve their grade

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, BIO 161, BIO 162, CHM 161, CHM 262, and CHM 263

NUTR 342 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II

This course is a continuation of Medical Nutrition Therapy I that focuses on the pathophysiology of nutrition-related disease; normal and therapeutic diets in the prevention and treatment of disease; the Nutrition Care Process: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation; documentation of nutrition care; and drug-nutrient interactions. Course materials will cover disorders of the gastrointestinal, hepatic, and renal systems; food allergy and intolerance; genetics in nutrition; enteral and parenteral nutrition support. The course consists of three hours of lecture and one hour of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students are permitted to re-take this course once to seek to improve their grade

Prerequisites: NUTR 341

NUTR 420 - Nutrition Education and Counseling

This course focuses on communication strategies for effective health behavior change. Topics include food behavior; verbal and non-verbal communication; interviewing skills; cultural competency; health literacy; counseling theories and the counseling process; learning theories and educational principles; and educational methods and tools. Three hours of lecture.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, PSY 155

NUTR 440 - Capstone in Nutrition

Emphasizes the integration of nutrition knowledge and the interpretation and application of nutrition-oriented research including evidence-based practice. Students identify a research question or hypothesis, design a research plan, collect and analyze data, and write a research paper utilizing peer-reviewed scientific literature and other appropriate sources.  Students also create and orally present a poster representing their work. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition Majors Only

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, NUTR 340, NUTR 420, PHLT 408 and HSC 217.

NUTR 441 - Food and Culture

This course examines the cultural and culinary traditions that shape an individual's eating habits, including the activities by which people produce, prepare, present, and consume food. Aspects of food culture including religion, health beliefs, geographic and historical/traditional factors in global cultures and within regions of the United States are explored. The course focuses on the development of cultural competency and cultural humility in nutrition practice.  Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 230, NUTR 300

NUTR 450 - Sustainable Food Systems and Food Justice

Encompasses current issues involving food agriculture, activities, people and resources involved in getting food from field to plate. Current food practices and marketing are investigated in terms of the cost/benefit to the individual, and society.  Three hours of lecture. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300.

NUTR 460 - Nutrition Externship

Students experience field work under the supervision of a nutrition professional and faculty member. Permission of the Director is required. Hours to be arranged with five hours minimum field work per week (minimum of 50 hours per semester) required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition majors only unless approved by the Director

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300

NUTR 470-475 - Special Topics in Nutrition

The course provides an in-depth examination of a current topic in the field of nutrition. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200.

NUTR 474 - Special Topics: Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered Careers and Credential

This course will help prepare the student to take the credentialing examination to become a Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered (NDTR).  Roles and responsibilities of the NDTR as well as career paths are explored. 

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Student must be a senior in the Didactic Program in Nutrition to register for this course.

NUTR 510 - Nutrition Communications

This course focuses on the development of effective written and oral communication skills for the nutrition professional.  Students will learn how to tailor communication to a variety of audiences using a wide range of communication platforms.  Special focus is placed on designing materials that are culturally and age appropriate, and meet the literacy level of the audience. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program or approval of Program director.

NUTR 512 - Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism

This course will include application of basic sciences to the science of Nutrition, with emphasis on macronutrients and micronutrients in health and disease.  Students will apply in-depth knowledge of the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients in clinical scenarios

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program or approval of Program director.

NUTR 514 - Cases in Clinical Nutrition

This course provides an application of the Nutrition Care Process to a variety of disease states.  Students will gain experience with assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation of nutrition problems using a case based and simulation approach.  Students will gain competence in the application of medical terminology and standardized language for the Nutrition Care Process

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 512

NUTR 517 - Nutrition Entrepreneurship

This course, in cooperation with La Salle’s Entrepreneurial Center, will include the basics of entrepreneurship; the essentials of starting a nutrition consulting business or private practice; insurance and reimbursement; coding and billing practices; and HIPAA concerns. Guest speakers with businesses in corporate wellness, sports and fitness, and food/nutrition journalism will demonstrate the variety of ways an RDN can be a successful entrepreneur. The course will culminate in student teams working to develop a Business Model Canvas, detailing an actual nutrition business plan. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program or approval of Program director.

NUTR 601 - Practicum in Community Nutrition I

This course provides students with academic and experiential applications of nutritional principles to populations and communities, with an emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention.  Students utilize assessment skills to determine health and nutritional needs of individuals and groups in community settings. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students participate in nutrition counseling sessions and educational programs in their field placements with local community nutrition organizations. Coursework includes lecture, group discussion, journaling, assigned readings, research papers, project work, and practical field experiences. The course consists of two hours of lecture, eight to twelve hours of practicum. 

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

NUTR 602 - Practicum Community Nutrition II

This course provides students with academic and experiential applications of nutritional principles to populations and communities, with an emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. Students will utilize assessment skills to determine health and nutritional needs of individuals and groups in community settings. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students will participate in nutrition counseling and educational programs in their field placements with local community nutrition organizations. Practicum coursework will include lecture, group discussion, journaling, assigned readings, research papers, project work, and practical field experiences (8 -12 hours per week).

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admittance into the Coordinated Program in Dietetics required and completion of Nutrition 601 with a grade of B or above.

NUTR 605 - Practicum in Food Service Management

This course provides practical experience in quantity food planning, preparation, and management in hospitals, nursing homes, school food service, and commercial cafeterias. Students will participate in the daily operations and management functions of food service systems, including sanitation, food safety, equipment selection and operation, food purchasing, receiving and storage, personnel and fiscal management, and quality control. The course will consist of lecture, assigned readings, group discussion, journaling, and project management with an average of 3–4 hours per week of classroom experiences and up to 32 hours per week of practicum for 10 weeks.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program and NUTR 601 and 602 with grade B or above.

NUTR 608 - Practicum in Clinical Nutrition I

The course covers the application of nutrition knowledge and the Nutrition Care Process in the solution of problems related to disease. Students assess nutritional status (including medical record review, patient and family interviews, and input from other team members), identify nutritional needs, formulate nutrition diagnoses, and develop care plans for individuals in acute and/or long-term care environments. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students carry out basic nutrition interventions, monitoring, and evaluation. The course consists of assigned readings, discussions, problem-based learning, simulations, and practical experiences in hospitals, medical centers, and/or long-term care facilities.  It consists of two hours of lecture, 24 hours per week of practicum.   

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics; NUTR 512, 514, NUTR 601, 602, and 605 with grade of B or above.

NUTR 609 - Practicum in Clinical Nutrition II

This course covers the application of nutrition knowledge in the solution of problems related to disease. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students utilize the Nutrition Care Process in the care of assigned patients in acute, ambulatory, and/or long-term care settings. Continued emphasis is placed on the development of assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring/evaluation skills, culminating in students’ ability to assume nutritional care responsibilities for adults and children with medical needs (e.g. inborn errors of metabolism, trauma, immune dysfunction, endocrine, hepatic, pancreatic, oncology), obesity, and malnutrition. The course consists of assigned readings, discussions, problem-based learning, simulations, and practical experiences in hospitals, medical centers, and/or long-term care facilities. Two hours of lecture, 24 hours of practicum. 

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics; NUTR 608 with a grade of B or above.

PHLT 489 - Race, Ethnicity, And Public Health

This course provides students with an understanding of racial and ethnic influences on health status and the societal factors that shape them. During the course, students examine the concepts of race and ethnicity, and distinguish between categories of biological and social constructionist perspectives. Students define and describe racial and ethnic health inequities, discuss mechanisms underlying inequities, and think critically about existing health research on health inequities.  Students will explore theoretical frameworks for interpreting inequities in health and examine approaches for elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

Public Health

Program Description

The mission of the Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) program, which is rooted in the larger University mission, is to educate students from diverse disciplines and backgrounds in core public health knowledge areas so that they are equipped to help prevent disease and promote physical and mental health and social well-being through public health practice, leadership, and research.

Program Values

The Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) program’s core values stem from the broader University’s values, including teaching excellence, the importance of community, service to the poor, and education that fosters spiritual development. Specifically, the program’s core values include the following:

Accreditation

La Salle University is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health

Requirements to Progress to Graduation

All students in the Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) Program must meet specific academic standards for continued progression in the major. Students must maintain an overall and major GPA of 2.5 at the end of each semester in order to progress. Students not meeting the required GPA will be given one (1) additional semester to achieve the GPA of 2.5. If they are not able to meet the required GPA of 2.5 after this additional semester, the student will no longer be permitted to progress in the Undergraduate Public Health Program and will be advised to choose another major.

Continuation in the Public Health Program requires that a student majoring in Public Health receive a final grade of C or better in all Public Health courses (effective Fall 2016). A student is permitted to take a course a maximum of two times to achieve a grade of C or better.

A student must have an overall GPA of 2.5 and a GPA of 2.5 in Public Health to graduate with the BSPH degree.

Why take this major?

La Salle University’s Bachelor of Science in Public Health Program educates individuals for interdisciplinary, collaborative health care practice in local, regional, national, and global environments. Graduates plan, implement, and evaluate health programs to improve the health of vulnerable and diverse groups, with a focus on urban populations, social justice, and health education. We are committed to educating students from diverse disciplines and backgrounds in core public health knowledge areas so that they are equipped to help prevent disease and promote physical and mental health and social well-being through public health practice, leadership, and research. Graduates of the public health program are prepared for graduate study in a variety of health professional fields and for public health practice jobs.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the B.S. in Public Health program, graduates will be able to do the following:

Health Education Specific Competencies:

Note: Learning Goals adapted from the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH [Recommended Critical Component Elements of an Undergraduate Major in Public Health]) and the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC [Responsibilities and Competencies for Health Education Specialists]).

The B.S. in Public Health curriculum includes general education requirements, science courses, and major courses ranging from basic concepts of public health to informatics; epidemiology; health education; behavioral health; violence prevention; race, ethnicity, and public health; health policy; community health; and a capstone in health education and program planning.

Program Contact Information

Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH
St. Benilde Tower – Office 3333
215-951-5032
robertsonjames@lasalle.edu

Degree Earned

B.S. in Public Health

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 24

Total: 41

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 63

Total: 123

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.5 GPA

Cumulative: 2.5 GPA

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHEM 161- Chemistry for the Life Sciences

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217- Statistics for Health Science Professionals

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154- Healthcare Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150- Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 41 courses in total in order to graduate. 24 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

NUTR 165: Principles of Nutrition
PHLT 101: Essentials of Public Health
BIO 161: Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 162: Anatomy and Physiology II
PHLT 265: Public Health Nutrition
PHLT 319: Epidemiology for Health Educators
PHLT 301: Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education
PHLT 352: Program Planning and Health Education
PHLT 314: Unhealthy Urban Environments
PHLT 420: Public Health Leadership and Management
PHLT 315: Violence Prevention and Control
PHLT 356: Reproductive Health for Practitioners
PHLT 410: Public Health Education Capstone I
PHLT 411: Public Health Education Capstone II
PHLT 451: Introduction to Public Health Policy
PHLT 408: Research Methods in Public Health
PHLT 489: Race and Ethnicity in Public Health

6 Approved Public Health Supporting Courses

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Students who choose to minor in Public Health MUST take the following courses:

Students may choose any TWO of the following seven courses (Additional Public Health Courses may be selected upon approval):

Recommended Course Sequence

Year

Fall

Spring

 

Freshman

FYS 130- First Year Academic Seminar (ILO 1)

NUTR 165: Principles of Nutrition

REL 100: Religion Matters (ILO 2)

ILO 4 (Critical Analysis and Reasoning)

ENG 110: College Writing I: Persuasion (ILO 8)

PHLT 101: Essentials of Public Health

CSC 154: Healthcare Informatics (ILO 6)

HSC 217: Statistics for Health Science Professionals (ILO 3-M)

CHM 161: Chemistry for the Life Sciences (ILO 3-Sci)

COM 150: Presentation Skills (ILO 8/12)

 

Sophomore

BIO 161: Anatomy and Physiology I

BIO 162: Anatomy and Physiology II

ENG 210: College Writing II: Research (ILO 5)

ILO 9 (Creative and Artistic Expression)

PHLT 319: Epidemiology for Health Educators

ILO 10 (Ethical Understanding and Reasoning)

ILO 11 (Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity)

PHLT 301: Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education

General elective

Supporting elective

 

Junior

PHLT 352: Program Planning and Health Education

PHLT 314: Unhealthy Urban Environments

PHLT 265: Public Health Nutrition

PHLT 420: Public Health Leadership and Management

Supporting elective

PHLT 315: Violence Prevention and Control

Supporting elective

PHLT 356: Reproductive Health for Practitioners

General elective

Supporting elective

 

Senior

PHLT 410: Public Health Capstone I

PHLT 411: Public Health Capstone II

PHLT 451: Introduction to Public Health Policy

PHLT 408: Research Methods in Public Health

PHLT 489: Race and Ethnicity in Public Health

General elective

General elective

General elective

Supporting elective

Supporting elective

Course Descriptions

PHLT 101 - Essentials of Public Health

This course provides a basic introduction to public health concepts and practice by examining the philosophy, purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities, and the results of public health practice at the national, state, and local levels. Healthy People 2020 is reviewed. The impact of the Affordable Care Act on health disparities in urban communities is discussed. The function of the Bureau of Health Professions of the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) is studied. The course aims to stimulate interactions among students around important problems and issues facing the health of the nation and the world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 200 - Community Nutrition

This course allows students to explore and begin to understand how complex and multifaceted public health nutrition programs enhance the health and nutrition of the U.S. population through education, emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention, integrated community efforts and government leadership. Emphasis is placed on policymaking, assessment and intervention methods, special populations, food security and program management. Students will gain understanding of course concepts and ideas presented in the classroom through readings, written assignments, presentations, class discussions, case studies and exams.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUT 165

PHLT 250 - Global Health

This course explores world health issues and policies by examining selected threats to global health. Students ascertain the global interconnectedness of humanity and investigate the effect of economic globalization on health issues. Global warming, cross border pollution, the spread of infectious diseases, and international crime are considered. Current health threats, global health indicators, ethical considerations of global initiatives, and solutions are evaluated.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

PHLT 270 - Special Topics in Public Health Nutrition

This course allows students to explore and begin to understand how complex and multifaceted public health nutrition programs enhance the health and nutrition of the U.S. population through education, emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention, integrated community efforts and government leadership. Emphasis is placed on policymaking, assessment and intervention methods, special populations, food security and program management. Students will gain understanding of course concepts and ideas presented in the classroom through readings, written assignments, presentations, class discussions, case studies and exams.  

PHLT 301 - Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education

Students analyze the contribution of social factors to health and illness status, including risk behavior and health inequities. Health behavior programs and interventions are explored. Theories of health promotion, health behavioral change, and health education are examined and applied to a health promotion project focusing on health disparities in urban communities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 314 - Unhealthy Urban Environments: Healthy Solutions

This course integrates earth sciences, geology, environmental sciences, and health initiatives in the urban communities aimed at identifying, managing, and eliminating environmental threats to health. Environmental problems, including lead poisoning of children, radon, asbestos exposure, urban brown fields, toxic waste, urban pollution, and other environmental hazards, are examined through the lens of social justice and health equity. Students explore urban environments identified as high risk for disease and illness from environmental pollutants and geographic or climactic problems. The impact of natural disasters on public health is also examined.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 315 - Violence Prevention and Control

Students review theories of violence causation and epidemiologic patterns of violence in urban settings. An ecological framework is used to guide critical thinking about risk and protective factors regarding violence. Students explore secondary data sources important to public health practitioners working in the area of violence prevention and control. Programs aimed at preventing violence and injury in urban settings will be examined and critically evaluated.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 319 - Epidemiology for Health Educators

This course introduces basic concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics applied to public health problems. The principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation, summaries and displays of data, and the use of statistical approaches for describing the health of populations are emphasized. Various epidemiologic designs for investigating associations between risk factors and disease outcomes are also introduced. The importance of ethics in epidemiologic research underpins the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: HSC 217, PHLT 101

PHLT 350 - Health Education: Principles and Practice

This course provides a comprehensive overview of health education strategies for urban community health settings. This course will focus on: instructional planning, behavior change interventions and methods, unit plan development, the use of technology and media, health disparities, special challenges and controversial topics. The topics covered in this course are aligned with the most recent competencies identified by the Health Educator Job Analysis Project conducted by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 352 - Program Planning and Health Education

This course provides a comprehensive overview of health education strategies for urban community health settings. This course focuses on: needs assessment and program planning, health education delivery, behavior change interventions and methods, and health disparities. Students will evaluate and compare evidence-based programs as they develop health promotion programs for vulnerable populations. Strategies to conduct individual-level and group-level needs assessments are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 355 - Needs Assessment and Program Planning

In this course, students explore needs assessment and program planning processes used to address public health problems faced by vulnerable populations. They investigate strategies to involve stakeholders in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion programs. Students evaluate and compare evidence-based programs as they develop health promotion programs for vulnerable populations. Strategies to conduct individual-level and group-level needs assessments are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 356 - Reproductive Health for The Public Health Practitioner

Course content emphasizes theories of reproductive health, sexual development and factors influencing sexual behavior within the continuum of health and illness. Common sexual practices and reproductive health issues of people are studied within the context of lifestyle and situational life crises. Concepts of normal sexual function and dysfunction are examined. Contemporary sexual health and reproductive issues, obstetrical care in the United States and abroad, gender based violence, maternal morbidity and mortality, family planning, and reproductive health policy are explored. Theoretical foundations of the medical, psychological, socio-cultural, political, and biological determinants of human sexual behavior and reproductive health are examined. Issues of biology related to sex, gender identity, social sex role, and sexual orientation are discussed. Contemporary issues of sexual risk behaviors, sexually transmitted infections and safer sex practices will be investigated in addition to those issues of chronic illness, disability, and sexual coercion.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 357 - Women, Gender, And Public Health

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions people ask about, and explanations and interventions they offer for societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrates ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples. In all cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being. This course is an elective and is not offered every year, based on demand. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

PHLT 358 - Adolescent Health: Public Health Issues, Programs, And Policies

This course focuses on the major public health issues of adolescents in the United States and the programs and policies that improve the health and well-being of this population. The students examine the prevalence and etiology of health and wellness indicators for youth and explore a variety of aspects of adolescence and adolescent health. They will analyze adolescent health concerns through conceptual frameworks and recommend effective solutions through interventions. This course is an elective and is not offered every year, based on demand. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 408 - Research Methods for Public Health

This course investigates research methods and multidisciplinary research applied to health care systems.  An overview of research designs and reporting is presented.  Quantitative data analysis is explored using data analysis software.  Qualitative methods, including the use of focus groups, are also explored.  Evidence-based public health practice is emphasized.  The importance of ethics in public health research is woven throughout the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health and/or Nutrition majors only

Prerequisites: HSC 217

PHLT 410 - Public Health Education Capstone I

Part one of this two-part course allows students to begin to link public health concepts and ideas presented in the classroom to real world experiences in the public health practice setting. Emphasis is placed on needs assessment, data collection and program planning. Students discuss actual case studies illustrating the practical challenges of data collection and program development.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health majors only

Prerequisites: PHLT 101, 301, 319, 350 and 355

PHLT 411 - Public Health Education Capstone II

Part two of this two-part course allows students to continue to link public health concepts and ideas presented in the classroom to real world experiences in the public health practice setting. Emphasis is placed on program implementation and program evaluation. Students discuss actual case studies illustrating the practical challenges of program implementation and evaluation. As one of the final courses of the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program, students focus on public health workforce development, leadership, professional development, and preparation for entry into the public health education workforce.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health majors only

Prerequisites: PHLT 101, 301, 319, 350, 355, 410 and 451

Corequisites: PHLT 408 and 420

PHLT 420 - Public Health Leadership and Health Education

In this course, one of the final courses taken in the Bachelor of Science in Public Health curriculum, students explore the leadership role of public health professionals, especially leaders working in urban public health and health education. Public health leadership concepts addressed in this course include: principles of leadership and management, team building, ethics and professionalism, strategic planning, networking, budgeting and finance, and continued professional development.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health majors only

Prerequisites: PHLT 101, 319, 350, 355

PHLT 451 - Introduction to Public Health Policy

Students explore key health policy issues in the United States health care system and the outcomes of policies for public, private, and not-for-profit settings. They examine steps of policy analysis and apply these strategies to evaluate health issues and health care. The legislative process and the structure and financing of the health care system in the United States are investigated as are influences of politics and interest groups on health policy formulation. The effect of health policy on the health of urban communities is analyzed along with the interplay of policy on infectious diseases, bioethical issues, and globalization. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 454 - Public Health, Aids, And Society

This course provides an in-depth study of the most critical public health issue facing society. Topics include current HIV/AIDS information and an exploration of issues including the history of HIV, transmission and risk factors for infection, local and global disparities in HIV infection, trends in research programs, international/political implications of research and prevention efforts, and the experiences of people living with HIV/AIDS. This class is typically offered as a 1-week winter intersession class before the spring semester. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 489 - Race, Ethnicity, And Public Health

This course provides students with an understanding of racial and ethnic influences on health status and the societal factors that shape them. During the course, students examine the concepts of race and ethnicity, and distinguish between categories of biological and social constructionist perspectives. Students define and describe racial and ethnic health inequities, discuss mechanisms underlying inequities, and think critically about existing health research on health inequities.  Students will explore theoretical frameworks for interpreting inequities in health and examine approaches for elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

Public Health B.S.P.H./M.P.H (5-year)

Program Description

Mission

The mission of the La Salle University Public Health Five-Year Program, which is rooted in the larger University mission, is to educate professionals from diverse disciplines and backgrounds in core public health knowledge areas so that they are equipped to help prevent disease and promote physical and mental health and social well-being through public health practice, leadership, research, and service. After completing requirements, students enrolled in the five-year program will earn a Bachelor of Science in Public Health. Students will earn a Master of Public Health degree after completing their fifth year of study.

To apply to the Public Health Five-Year Program, students must meet the following criteria:

In addition, students will submit the following application items to the Public Health Department:

Program Values

The Public Health Five-Year program’s core values stem from the broader University’s values, including teaching excellence, the importance of community, service to the poor, and education that fosters spiritual development. Specifically, the program’s core values include the following:

Accreditation

La Salle University is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health

Requirements to Progress to Graduation

All students in the Public Health Five-Year Program must meet specific academic standards for continued progression in the major. Students must maintain a major GPA of 2.5 in order to graduate with a BSPH degree and an overall GPA of 3.00 at the end of each semester in order to progress into the graduate (MPH) program. An overall GPA of 3.00 is required to continue in the Master’s Program. Students not meeting the required overall and major GPA will earn a Bachelor of Science in Public Health if all requirements are met, but will not progress on to the Master’s Program.

 

Why take this major?

The Public Health Five Year Program combines the strengths of the BSPH in Public Health and Master of Public Health Programs and allows eligible students to complete both their undergraduate and graduate degrees in five years. The first year of the MPH program will be completed in the senior year of undergraduate study. Students will then complete the remaining coursework required for the MPH in an additional year. BSPH students will apply to the Five-Year Program either at the end of their sophomore year or in the first semester of their junior year. During the hybrid senior year in the undergraduate program, Five Year students maintain undergraduate status.   

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Public Health Five-Year program, graduates will be able to do the following:

Health Education Specific Competencies:

Note: Learning Goals adapted from the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH [Recommended Critical Component Elements of an Undergraduate Major in Public Health]) and the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC [Responsibilities and Competencies for Health Education Specialists]).

The Public Health Five-Year curriculum includes general education requirements, science courses, and major courses ranging from basic concepts of public health to informatics; epidemiology; health education; behavioral health; violence prevention; race, ethnicity, and public health; health policy; community health; and a capstone in health education and program planning.

Program Contact Information

Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH
Assistant Professor, Chair of Department of Urban Public Health and Nutrition 
Department of Urban Public Health and Nutrition 
Benilde- Room 3333

robertsonjames@lasalle.edu

Degree Earned

B.S. in Public Health

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 24

Total: 41

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 63

Total: 123

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.5 GPA

Cumulative: 3.0 GPA

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHEM 161- Chemistry for the Life Sciences

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217- Statistics for Health Science Professionals

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154- Healthcare Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150- Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 41 courses in total in order to graduate. 24 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

NUT 165: Principles of Nutrition
PHLT 101: Essentials of Public Health
BIO 161: Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 162: Anatomy and Physiology II
PHLT 265: Public Health Nutrition
PHLT 319: Epidemiology for Health Educators
PHLT 301: Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education
PHLT 352: Program Planning and Health Education
PHLT 314: Unhealthy Urban Environments
PHLT 420: Public Health Leadership and Management
PHLT 315 or 615: Violence Prevention and Control
PHLT 356 or 556: Reproductive Health for Practitioners
PHLT 410: Public Health Education Capstone I
PHLT 411: Public Health Education Capstone II
PHLT 451 or 635: Introduction to Public Health Policy
PHLT 408: Research Methods in Public Health
PHLT 489 or 639: Race and Ethnicity in Public Health

PHLT 635: Health Policy (Other grad course if PHLT 635 was taken already)

6 Approved Public Health Supporting Courses

PHLT 513: GIS

PHLT 540: Intro to Public Health:Concepts of Health and Disease

PHLT 637: Epidemiology

PHLT 704: Statistics and Biostatistics

PHLT 705: Frameworks in Public Health Practice

1 PHLT Graduate Level Elective

Additional General or Supporting Public Health Elective

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major. 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Students who choose to minor in Public Health MUST take the following courses:

Students may choose any TWO of the following seven courses (Additional Public Health Courses may be selected upon approval):

Recommended Course Sequence

All courses are 3 credits except those noted with an asterisk – those courses are 4 credits

Year

Fall

Spring

 

Freshman

FYS 130- First Year Academic Seminar (ILO 1)

NUT 165: Principles of Nutrition

REL 100: Religion Matters (ILO 2)

ILO 4 (Critical Analysis and Reasoning)

ENG 110: College Writing I: Persuasion (ILO 8)

PHLT 101: Essentials of Public Health

CSC 154: Healthcare Informatics (ILO 6)

HSC 217: Statistics for Health Science Professionals (ILO 3-M)

*CHM 161: Chemistry for the Life Sciences (ILO 3-Sci)

COM 150: Presentation Skills (ILO 8/12)

 

Sophomore

*BIO 161: Anatomy and Physiology I

*BIO 162: Anatomy and Physiology II

ENG 210: College Writing II: Research (ILO 5)

ILO 9 (Creative and Artistic Expression)

PHLT 319: Epidemiology for Health Educators

ILO 10 (Ethical Understanding and Reasoning)

ILO 11 (Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity)

PHLT 301: Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education

General elective

Supporting elective

 

Junior

PHLT 352: Program Planning and Health Education

PHLT 314: Unhealthy Urban Environments

PHLT 265: Public Health Nutrition

PHLT 420: Public Health Leadership and Management

General elective

PHLT 315/615: Violence Prevention and Control (PHLT 615 could be used as MPH elective)

PHLT 451/635: Introduction to Public Health Policy

PHLT 356/556: Reproductive Health for Practitioners (PHLT 556 could be used as MPH elective)

General elective

PHLT 408: Research Methods in Public Health

 

Senior

PHLT 410: Public Health Capstone I

PHLT 411: Public Health Capstone II

PHLT 489/ 639: Race and Ethnicity in Public Health (PHLT 639 could be used as an MPH elective)

Supporting elective (MPH Course - PHLT 513: GIS)

Supporting elective (MPH Course - PHLT 540: Intro to Public Health: Concepts of Health & Disease)

Supporting elective (MPH Course - PHLT 704: Statistics and Biostatistics)

Supporting elective (PHLT 637: Epidemiology)

General elective

Supporting elective (MPH Course - PHLT 705: Frameworks in Public Health Practice)

Supporting elective (MPH Course - PHLT 635: Health Policy - if not previously taken otherwise another supporting/general elective is required)

Course Descriptions

PHLT 101 - Essentials of Public Health

This course provides a basic introduction to public health concepts and practice by examining the philosophy, purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities, and the results of public health practice at the national, state, and local levels. Healthy People 2020 is reviewed. The impact of the Affordable Care Act on health disparities in urban communities is discussed. The function of the Bureau of Health Professions of the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) is studied. The course aims to stimulate interactions among students around important problems and issues facing the health of the nation and the world.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 200 - Community Nutrition

This course allows students to explore and begin to understand how complex and multifaceted public health nutrition programs enhance the health and nutrition of the U.S. population through education, emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention, integrated community efforts and government leadership. Emphasis is placed on policymaking, assessment and intervention methods, special populations, food security and program management. Students will gain understanding of course concepts and ideas presented in the classroom through readings, written assignments, presentations, class discussions, case studies and exams.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUT 165

PHLT 250 - Global Health

This course explores world health issues and policies by examining selected threats to global health. Students ascertain the global interconnectedness of humanity and investigate the effect of economic globalization on health issues. Global warming, cross border pollution, the spread of infectious diseases, and international crime are considered. Current health threats, global health indicators, ethical considerations of global initiatives, and solutions are evaluated.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

ILO Met: ILO 11.1 - Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

PHLT 270 - Special Topics in Public Health Nutrition

This course allows students to explore and begin to understand how complex and multifaceted public health nutrition programs enhance the health and nutrition of the U.S. population through education, emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention, integrated community efforts and government leadership. Emphasis is placed on policymaking, assessment and intervention methods, special populations, food security and program management. Students will gain understanding of course concepts and ideas presented in the classroom through readings, written assignments, presentations, class discussions, case studies and exams.  

PHLT 301 - Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education

Students analyze the contribution of social factors to health and illness status, including risk behavior and health inequities. Health behavior programs and interventions are explored. Theories of health promotion, health behavioral change, and health education are examined and applied to a health promotion project focusing on health disparities in urban communities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 314 - Unhealthy Urban Environments: Healthy Solutions

This course integrates earth sciences, geology, environmental sciences, and health initiatives in the urban communities aimed at identifying, managing, and eliminating environmental threats to health. Environmental problems, including lead poisoning of children, radon, asbestos exposure, urban brown fields, toxic waste, urban pollution, and other environmental hazards, are examined through the lens of social justice and health equity. Students explore urban environments identified as high risk for disease and illness from environmental pollutants and geographic or climactic problems. The impact of natural disasters on public health is also examined.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 315 - Violence Prevention and Control

Students review theories of violence causation and epidemiologic patterns of violence in urban settings. An ecological framework is used to guide critical thinking about risk and protective factors regarding violence. Students explore secondary data sources important to public health practitioners working in the area of violence prevention and control. Programs aimed at preventing violence and injury in urban settings will be examined and critically evaluated.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 319 - Epidemiology for Health Educators

This course introduces basic concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics applied to public health problems. The principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation, summaries and displays of data, and the use of statistical approaches for describing the health of populations are emphasized. Various epidemiologic designs for investigating associations between risk factors and disease outcomes are also introduced. The importance of ethics in epidemiologic research underpins the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: HSC 217, PHLT 101

PHLT 350 - Health Education: Principles and Practice

This course provides a comprehensive overview of health education strategies for urban community health settings. This course will focus on: instructional planning, behavior change interventions and methods, unit plan development, the use of technology and media, health disparities, special challenges and controversial topics. The topics covered in this course are aligned with the most recent competencies identified by the Health Educator Job Analysis Project conducted by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 352 - Program Planning and Health Education

This course provides a comprehensive overview of health education strategies for urban community health settings. This course focuses on: needs assessment and program planning, health education delivery, behavior change interventions and methods, and health disparities. Students will evaluate and compare evidence-based programs as they develop health promotion programs for vulnerable populations. Strategies to conduct individual-level and group-level needs assessments are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 355 - Needs Assessment and Program Planning

In this course, students explore needs assessment and program planning processes used to address public health problems faced by vulnerable populations. They investigate strategies to involve stakeholders in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion programs. Students evaluate and compare evidence-based programs as they develop health promotion programs for vulnerable populations. Strategies to conduct individual-level and group-level needs assessments are explored.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 356 - Reproductive Health for The Public Health Practitioner

Course content emphasizes theories of reproductive health, sexual development and factors influencing sexual behavior within the continuum of health and illness. Common sexual practices and reproductive health issues of people are studied within the context of lifestyle and situational life crises. Concepts of normal sexual function and dysfunction are examined. Contemporary sexual health and reproductive issues, obstetrical care in the United States and abroad, gender based violence, maternal morbidity and mortality, family planning, and reproductive health policy are explored. Theoretical foundations of the medical, psychological, socio-cultural, political, and biological determinants of human sexual behavior and reproductive health are examined. Issues of biology related to sex, gender identity, social sex role, and sexual orientation are discussed. Contemporary issues of sexual risk behaviors, sexually transmitted infections and safer sex practices will be investigated in addition to those issues of chronic illness, disability, and sexual coercion.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 357 - Women, Gender, And Public Health

This course will focus on constructions of gender and sex and their implications for understanding determinants of population health and creating healthy public policy. It will consider how different frameworks of addressing gender and biological sex shape questions people ask about, and explanations and interventions they offer for societal patterns of health, disease, and well-being. The course will demonstrates ways of conceptualizing gender in relation to biology and health using case examples. In all cases, issues of gender will be related to other social determinants of health, including social class, racism, and other forms of inequality. Implications of diverse approaches will be debated, as part of developing useful strategies for improving physical, mental, and social well-being. This course is an elective and is not offered every year, based on demand. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Hybrid

PHLT 358 - Adolescent Health: Public Health Issues, Programs, And Policies

This course focuses on the major public health issues of adolescents in the United States and the programs and policies that improve the health and well-being of this population. The students examine the prevalence and etiology of health and wellness indicators for youth and explore a variety of aspects of adolescence and adolescent health. They will analyze adolescent health concerns through conceptual frameworks and recommend effective solutions through interventions. This course is an elective and is not offered every year, based on demand. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 408 - Research Methods for Public Health

This course investigates research methods and multidisciplinary research applied to health care systems.  An overview of research designs and reporting is presented.  Quantitative data analysis is explored using data analysis software.  Qualitative methods, including the use of focus groups, are also explored.  Evidence-based public health practice is emphasized.  The importance of ethics in public health research is woven throughout the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health and/or Nutrition majors only

Prerequisites: HSC 217

PHLT 410 - Public Health Education Capstone I

Part one of this two-part course allows students to begin to link public health concepts and ideas presented in the classroom to real world experiences in the public health practice setting. Emphasis is placed on needs assessment, data collection and program planning. Students discuss actual case studies illustrating the practical challenges of data collection and program development.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health majors only

Prerequisites: PHLT 101, 301, 319, 350 and 355

PHLT 411 - Public Health Education Capstone II

Part two of this two-part course allows students to continue to link public health concepts and ideas presented in the classroom to real world experiences in the public health practice setting. Emphasis is placed on program implementation and program evaluation. Students discuss actual case studies illustrating the practical challenges of program implementation and evaluation. As one of the final courses of the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program, students focus on public health workforce development, leadership, professional development, and preparation for entry into the public health education workforce.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health majors only

Prerequisites: PHLT 101, 301, 319, 350, 355, 410 and 451

Corequisites: PHLT 408 and 420

PHLT 420 - Public Health Leadership and Health Education

In this course, one of the final courses taken in the Bachelor of Science in Public Health curriculum, students explore the leadership role of public health professionals, especially leaders working in urban public health and health education. Public health leadership concepts addressed in this course include: principles of leadership and management, team building, ethics and professionalism, strategic planning, networking, budgeting and finance, and continued professional development.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Public health majors only

Prerequisites: PHLT 101, 319, 350, 355

PHLT 451 - Introduction to Public Health Policy

Students explore key health policy issues in the United States health care system and the outcomes of policies for public, private, and not-for-profit settings. They examine steps of policy analysis and apply these strategies to evaluate health issues and health care. The legislative process and the structure and financing of the health care system in the United States are investigated as are influences of politics and interest groups on health policy formulation. The effect of health policy on the health of urban communities is analyzed along with the interplay of policy on infectious diseases, bioethical issues, and globalization. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PHLT 101

PHLT 454 - Public Health, Aids, And Society

This course provides an in-depth study of the most critical public health issue facing society. Topics include current HIV/AIDS information and an exploration of issues including the history of HIV, transmission and risk factors for infection, local and global disparities in HIV infection, trends in research programs, international/political implications of research and prevention efforts, and the experiences of people living with HIV/AIDS. This class is typically offered as a 1-week winter intersession class before the spring semester. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PHLT 489 - Race, Ethnicity, And Public Health

This course provides students with an understanding of racial and ethnic influences on health status and the societal factors that shape them. During the course, students examine the concepts of race and ethnicity, and distinguish between categories of biological and social constructionist perspectives. Students define and describe racial and ethnic health inequities, discuss mechanisms underlying inequities, and think critically about existing health research on health inequities.  Students will explore theoretical frameworks for interpreting inequities in health and examine approaches for elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

Prerequisites: PHLT 101


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