Nutrition – Didactic Program

Program Description

The Bachelor of Science in Nutrition prepares students for a wide variety of careers in areas such as health care, public health, business, food service management, and research. La Salle offers students two options for the Bachelor of Science: a Didactic Program in Nutrition or a Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

Accreditation

La Salle University’s Didactic Program in Nutrition and Coordinated Program in Dietetics are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312.899.0040, x5400.

Description

The Didactic Program in Nutrition prepares students for post-baccalaureate dietetic internships leading to the Registered Dietitian-Nutritionist or RDN credential, or to take the exam leading to the Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered credential. Course work meets all Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics academic requirements and offers opportunities for focused electives or for a minor area of study to match a student’s interests or career goals. Electives may also be used to take additional courses to prepare for graduate study in other health sciences, such as medicine, physician’s assistant, physical therapy, and others (students may be required to take different science coursework as well to prepare for these other careers).

Graduates work to promote health and wellness within communities and have employment opportunities in public health agencies (government and private), food service facilities, and businesses.  Details can be found in the Student Handbook:  https://www.lasalle.edu/nutrition/files/2017/08/DPD-Program-2017-18-Student-Handbook-final.pdf

The Mission of the La Salle University Didactic Program in Nutrition/Bachelor of Science in Nutrition is to educate baccalaureate students in nutrition and health science, promote health and wellness, prevent nutrition-related disease, integrate research into practice, and enable graduates to assume careers in nutrition and food related careers or pursue careers as Registered Dietitians (RD)/Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDN).*

*Note: Students who wish to pursue the RD/RDN Credential must complete an accredited coordinated program or dietetic internship program in addition to or concurrent with completion of the Didactic Program and a Baccalaureate degree. Further information on eligibility requirements for becoming a RD/RDN can be obtained at the Commission on Dietetic Registration web site at www.cdrnet.org.

Program Goals

Goal 1: The Didactic Program will educate graduates to prepare them for careers as Nutrition and Dietetic Technicians, Registered (NDTR), and entry-level positions in nutrition and food related fields.

Outcomes:

  1. Over a five year period, at least 80% of full-time DP students will complete program/degree requirements within 6 years (150% of program length).
  2. Over a five year period, at least 80% of verification-only DP students will complete verification course requirements within 4 years of beginning junior level DP course work.
  3. Over a five year period, at least 90% of program graduates will “agree” or “strongly agree” that DP program director and faculty provided sufficient and accurate guidance about Didactic Program requirements.
  4. Over a five year period, at least 90% of program graduates will “agree” or “strongly agree” that they are satisfied with the quality of the education they received in the Didactic Program.
  5. Over a 5 year period, at least 90% of program graduates will “agree” or “strongly agree” that they received accurate and helpful career information, advising, and guidance that made them aware of career options and opportunities they can pursue after completing their studies
  6. Over a five year period, at least 80% of DP graduates who sought employment upon graduating will be employed within 12 months of graduation.

Goal 2:  The Didactic Program will prepare graduates to obtain and successfully complete supervised practice programs and/or graduate degree programs.

Outcomes:

  1. Over a five year period, at least 60% of DP graduates will apply for admission to supervised practice or graduate degree programs prior to or within 12 months of graduation.
  2. Over a five year period, at least 60% of those DP students applying to supervised practice programs will be admitted within 12 months of graduation.
  3. Over a five year period, at least 80% of DP graduates admitted into supervised practice will “agree or strongly agree” that the DP prepared them to perform effectively as dietetic interns.
  4. Over a five year period, the pass rate for DP graduates taking the CDR credentialing examination for dietitian nutritionists within one year of their first attempt will be at least 80%.

 

 

Why take this major?

Students who choose this major will be prepared to enter a wide variety of careers in the growing field of nutrition and wellness.  Course work meets eligibility requirements for the Diet Technician, Registered credential and for application to the supervised practice programs that qualify the student for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential, including the La Salle Coordinated Program in Dietetics.  Graduates also find careers in community nutrition, food and culinary service, hospitality and fitness settings, or continue on to graduate programs in health professions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Didactic Program Student Learning Outcomes and Objectives

Upon successful completion of the program the student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Locate, interpret, evaluate and use nutrition information, applying critical thinking and scientific reasoning skills.
  2. Use current information technologies to locate and apply evidence—based guidelines and protocols.
  3. Provide nutrition education to individuals, groups, and communities throughout the lifespan, using effective and professional communication skills.
  4. Utilize professional skills and the Nutrition Care Process to provide and effectively document nutrition services in multidisciplinary, interprofessional settings.
  5. Assess the impact of policies and strategies for food access, procurement, preparation, and safety for individuals, families and communities.
  6. Apply theories and knowledge to provision of quality food management functions in business, healthcare, community and institutional arenas.
  7. Provide culturally competent, ethical nutrition services for individuals and communities.
  8. Describe the governance and scope of professional dietetics practice, including mentoring and precepting others.
  9. Utilize knowledge from the physical and biological sciences as a basis for understanding the role of food and nutrients in health and disease processes.

Program Contact Information

Laura B. Frank, PhD, MPH, RD, LDN 

Director, Didactic Program in Nutrition 

Room 3004 St. Benilde Tower                                

frankl@lasalle.edu

215-991-3617

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 33

Total: 40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 106

Total: 122

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

CHEM 161 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

HSC 217 - Statistics for Health Sciences

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 154 - Health Informatics

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

COM 150 - Presentation Skills

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

POL 151 - Principles of American Government OR ECON 150 - Macroeconomics

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 40 courses in total in order to graduate. 33 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

Major Requirements

NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition
NUTR 200 - Life Cycle Nutrition
NUTR 230 - Food Science
NUTR 300 - Community Nutrition
NUTR 310 - Management in Nutrition and Dietetics
NUTR 320 - Quantity Food Preparation and Management
NUTR 340 - Professional Practice in Nutrition
NUTR 341 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I
NUTR 342 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II
NUTR 420 - Nutrition Education and Counseling
NUTR 440 - Capstone in Nutrition

NUTR441 - Food and Culture
NUTR 450 - Sustainable Food Systems and Food Justice
NUTR 470-475 - Special Topics in Nutrition

Support Courses

BIO 161 - Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 162 - Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 163 - Clinical Microbiology
PSY 155 - Introduction to Psychology
 CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences
CHM 263 - Biochemistry for Life Sciences
PHLT 408 - Research Methods

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

Required for a minor in Nutrition:

Completion of college chemistry with laboratory, preferably CHM 161, with a grade of "C" or better is a pre-requisite for the nutrition minor.

Required courses (all courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better):

  • BIO 161 and 162 OR BIO 210
  • NUTR 165
  • NUTR 200
  • Three additional courses from the 300/400 level, selected from the following courses:  NUTR 300; NUTR 310; NUTR 420; NUTR 441; NUTR 450; NUTR 460; NUTR 470-475.  Other courses may be considered at the discretion of the Program Director

Model Roster 2018-19

FALL

SPRING

   

Freshman Year

 

ENG 110 College Writing I

COM 150 Presentation Skills

NUTR 165 Principles of Nutrition

CHM 161 Chem for Life Sciences

BIO 161 Anatomy and Physiology I

BIO 162 Anatomy and Physiology II

CSC 154 Health Informatics

PSY 155 Introduction to Psychology

REL 100 Religion Matters

FYS Course*

   

Sophomore Year

 

CHM 262 Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences

CHM 263 Biochemistry for Life Sciences

NUTR 200 Life Cycle Nutrition

NUTR 300 Community Nutrition

NUTR 230 Food Science

NUTR 340 Professional Practice in Nutr

ENG 210 College Writing II

ECN 150 Introductory Macroeconomics 

ILO 9, 10 or 11**

or POL 151 American Government

   BIO 163 Clinical Microbiology

Junior Year

 

NUTR 310 Management in Nutrition and Dietetics

NUTR 320 Quantity Food Prep/Mgmt

NUTR 341 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

NUTR 342 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

NUTR 420 Nutrition Education/Counsel

HSC 217 Statistics for Health Sciences

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

   
   

Senior Year

 

NUTR 472 Special Topics in Nutrition

NUTR 440 Capstone in Nutrition

NUTR 441 Food and Culture

NUTR 450 Sustainable Food Sys/Justice

PHLT 408 Research Methods for Public Health

NUTR 460 Externship (or elective)

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

NUTR 474 NDTR and/or elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

ILO 9, 10 or 11** or Elective

*Recommended Courses to Meet FYS:  Diverse Perspectives in Poverty: An Interprofessional Exploration; Of Feast and Famine: The Historical Importance of Food in Our Culture; Power, Justice, and Community; The Evolution of Human Communication; The Health and Well-Being of Children in Philadelphia

**Recommended Courses to meet ILO 9 Creative and Artistic Expression:  COM 204 Media Criticism;
ENG 204 Intro to Creative Writing; ART 150 Introduction to Art History 
Recommended Courses to meet ILO 10 Ethical Understanding and Reasoning:  COM 300 Communication Ethics; ENG 303 Writing for Business; SWK 360 Working with Children and Families; PHL 152 Ethics and the Good Life; ENG 302 Language and Prejudice
Recommended Courses to meet ILO 11 Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity:  SPN 103 Spanish for Nursing and Health Science: SOC 262 Dynamics of Race and Ethnicity; COM 220 Intercultural Communication; ENG 351 Gender and Ethnicity; HIS 255 20th Century Globalism

Course Descriptions

NUTR 165 - Principles of Nutrition

Topics for this course include basic knowledge of food nutrients; functions, interactions, and balance of carbohydrates proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and water in normal human physiology; nutrient deficiency diseases; energy metabolism; nutrition and fitness. It consists of three hours of lecture and is required for all subsequent nutrition courses.

Number of Credits: 3

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

NUTR 200 - Life Cycle Nutrition

This course examines human nutritional needs and U.S. dietary guidance for health maintenance and disease prevention during infancy, early and middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood as well as pregnancy and lactation. The course, which consists of three hours of lecture, includes a service learning project on the topic of hunger and food insecurity throughout the lifecycle.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, BIO 161

Corequisites: BIO 162

NUTR 230 - Food Science

This course examines chemical and physical proprieties of food, principles of food selection, consumer trends, use of established food guides in meal planning, methods and techniques of food preparation, sensory evaluation of food, food safety, and government regulation of food. The course consists of three hours of lecture, and two hours of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Non-nutrition majors must obtain permission of the Director to register for this course.

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, CHM 161

NUTR 300 - Community Nutrition

This course illustrates the role of nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention through an examination of health and nutrition policy, programs, and population data. Emphasis is placed on the information and skills necessary to solve nutrition problems in local, state, and national communities. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200

NUTR 310 - Management in Nutrition and Dietetics

The course focuses on dietetic management principles including systems theory, leadership, quality management and methodology, cost-effectiveness, human resources, labor law, financial management, budgeting, and marketing. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165

NUTR 320 - Quantity Food Preparation and Management

The course looks at management systems and procedures used in quantity food production; menu planning; recipe standardization; purchase, receipt, and storage of food and supplies; facility design, equipment, and materials; financial management; and food safety and sanitation.  The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 230, NUTR 310, BIO 163

NUTR 340 - Professional Practice in Nutrition

The course explores the various roles of nutrition professionals within the broader health-care system including inter-professional collaboration for comprehensive care. The course provides an overview of nutrition careers in clinical, community, foodservice management, and business settings and emphasizes historical, legal, and ethical considerations for professional practice. The course consists of three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition Majors Only

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200

NUTR 341 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I

The course focuses on the pathophysiology of nutrition-related disease; normal and therapeutic diets in the prevention and treatment of disease; the Nutrition Care Process: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation; documentation of nutrition care; and drug-nutrient interactions. Course materials will cover disorders of the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, and skeletal systems as well as energy imbalance. The course consists of three hours of lecture and one hour of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students are permitted to re-take this course once to seek to improve their grade

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, BIO 161, BIO 162, CHM 161, CHM 262, and CHM 263

NUTR 342 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II

This course is a continuation of Medical Nutrition Therapy I that focuses on the pathophysiology of nutrition-related disease; normal and therapeutic diets in the prevention and treatment of disease; the Nutrition Care Process: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, and evaluation; documentation of nutrition care; and drug-nutrient interactions. Course materials will cover disorders of the gastrointestinal, hepatic, and renal systems; food allergy and intolerance; genetics in nutrition; enteral and parenteral nutrition support. The course consists of three hours of lecture and one hour of lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Students are permitted to re-take this course once to seek to improve their grade

Prerequisites: NUTR 341

NUTR 420 - Nutrition Education and Counseling

This course focuses on communication strategies for effective health behavior change. Topics include food behavior; verbal and non-verbal communication; interviewing skills; cultural competency; health literacy; counseling theories and the counseling process; learning theories and educational principles; and educational methods and tools. Three hours of lecture.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, PSY 155

NUTR 440 - Capstone in Nutrition

Emphasizes the integration of nutrition knowledge and the interpretation and application of nutrition-oriented research including evidence-based practice. Students write a scientific research paper and create and orally present a poster, utilizing peer-reviewed scientific literature and other appropriate sources. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition Majors Only

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300, NUTR 340, NUTR 420, and HSC 217.

NUTR 441 - Food and Culture

This course examines the cultural/culinary traditions that shape an individual's eating habits, including exploration of the activities by which people produce, prepare, present, and consume food. The cultural aspects of food including religion, health beliefs, and historical/traditional factors within regional and ethnic groups common in the United States are identified. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200; recommended NUTR 230.

NUTR 450 - Sustainable Food Systems and Food Justice

Encompasses current issues involving food agriculture, activities, people and resources involved in getting food from field to plate. Current food practices and marketing are investigated in terms of the cost/benefit to the individual, and society.  Three hours of lecture. 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300.

NUTR 460 - Nutrition Externship

Students experience field work under the supervision of a nutrition professional and faculty member. Permission of the Director is required. Hours to be arranged with five hours minimum field work per week (minimum of 50 hours per semester) required.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Nutrition majors only unless approved by the Director

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200, NUTR 300

NUTR 470-475 - Special Topics in Nutrition

The course provides an in-depth examination of a current topic in the field of nutrition. Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: NUTR 165, NUTR 200.

NUTR 474 - Special Topics: Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered Careers and Credential

This course will help prepare the student to take the credentialing examination to become a Nutrition and Dietetics Technician, Registered (NDTR).  Roles and responsibilities of the NDTR are explored. 

Number of Credits: 1

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Student must be a senior in the Didactic Program in Nutrition to register for this course.

NUTR 601 - Practicum in Community Nutrition I

This course provides students with academic and experiential applications of nutritional principles to populations and communities, with an emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention.  Students utilize assessment skills to determine health and nutritional needs of individuals and groups in community settings. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students participate in nutrition counseling sessions and educational programs in their field placements with local community nutrition organizations. Coursework includes lecture, group discussion, journaling, assigned readings, research papers, project work, and practical field experiences. The course consists of two hours of lecture, eight to twelve hours of practicum. 

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

NUTR 602 - Practicum Community Nutrition II

This course provides students with academic and experiential applications of nutritional principles to populations and communities, with an emphasis on health promotion and disease prevention. Students will utilize assessment skills to determine health and nutritional needs of individuals and groups in community settings. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students will participate in nutrition counseling and educational programs in their field placements with local community nutrition organizations. Practicum coursework will include lecture, group discussion, journaling, assigned readings, research papers, project work, and practical field experiences (8 -12 hours per week).

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admittance into the Coordinated Program in Dietetics required and completion of Nutrition 601 with a grade of B or above.

NUTR 605 - Practicum in Food Service Management

This course provides practical experience in quantity food planning, preparation, and management in hospitals, nursing homes, school food service, and commercial cafeterias. Students will participate in the daily operations and management functions of food service systems, including sanitation, food safety, equipment selection and operation, food purchasing, receiving and storage, personnel and fiscal management, and quality control. The course will consist of lecture, assigned readings, group discussion, journaling, and project management with an average of 3–4 hours per week of classroom experiences and up to 32 hours per week of practicum for 10 weeks.

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program and NUTR 601 and 602 with grade B or above.

NUTR 608 - Practicum in Medical Nutrition Therapy I

The course covers the application of nutrition knowledge and the Nutrition Care Process in the solution of problems related to disease. Students assess nutritional status (including medical record review, patient and family interviews, and input from other team members), identify nutritional needs, formulate nutrition diagnoses, and develop care plans for individuals in acute and/or long-term care environments. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students carry out basic nutrition interventions, monitoring, and evaluation. The course consists of assigned readings, discussions, problem-based learning, simulations, and practical experiences in hospitals, medical centers, and/or long-term care facilities.  It consists of two hours of lecture, 24 hours per week of practicum.   

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics; NUTR 512, 514, NUTR 601, 602, and 605 with grade of B or above.

NUTR 609 - Practicum in Medical Nutrition Therapy II

This course covers the application of nutrition knowledge in the solution of problems related to disease. Under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian, students utilize the Nutrition Care Process in the care of assigned patients in acute, ambulatory, and/or long-term care settings. Continued emphasis is placed on the development of assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring/evaluation skills, culminating in students’ ability to assume nutritional care responsibilities for adults and children with medical needs (e.g. inborn errors of metabolism, trauma, immune dysfunction, endocrine, hepatic, pancreatic, oncology), obesity, and malnutrition. The course consists of assigned readings, discussions, problem-based learning, simulations, and practical experiences in hospitals, medical centers, and/or long-term care facilities. Two hours of lecture, 24 hours of practicum. 

Number of Credits: 6

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics; NUTR 608 with a grade of B or above.