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Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty and Staff

Kristin Lammers

Kristin Lammers, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

lammers@lasalle.edu

215.951.1199

Holroyd 327

After receiving her bachelor’s degree in biology, Kristin decided to pursue a masters and doctoral degree in chemistry.  During this time, she had spent many years teaching various science classes as a graduate student and as an adjunct at local community colleges. After graduate school, she took a postdoctoral research position in California at Lawrence Livermore National lab working on high-temperature high-pressure geochemical systems.

Kristin’s research interests span analytical and environmental chemistry. Her main focus of research is CO2 sequestration, by mineral carbonation.  Kristin is also interested in geochemical processes relevant to reducing climate change. 

Areas of Expertise

  • Analytical chemistry
  • Environmental chemistry 
  • Geochemistry

Education

  • Postdoctoral; Lawrene Livermore National Laboratory
  • PhD; Chemistry, Temple University
  • MS; Chemistry, Rutgers University
  • BA; Biology, Rutgers University

Teaching

  • General Chemistry 1 and II (lecture and lab)
  • General Biology I and II (lecture and lab)
  • College algebra 
  • Instrumental Analysis

Representative Publications

  • Lammers, K. Smith, M.M, Carroll, S.A. (2017). Muscovite dissolution kinetics as a function of pH at elevated temperatures. Chemical Geology. 466, 149-158.
  • Lammers, K., Murphy, R., Riendeau, A., Smirnov, A., Schoonen, M.A.A., Strongin, D.R.. (2011). CO2sequestration trhough mineral carbonation of iron oxides. Environmental Science and Technology. 45 (24), 10422-10428. 
  • Lammers, K. Dighton, J., Arbuckle-Keil, G. (2009). FT-IR study of the changes in carbohydrate chemistry of three New Jersey pine barrens leaf litters during simulated control burning. Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 41 (2): 340-347.