The Lasallian Difference

The Lasallian difference is personal. When you become a La Salle student, you join a community that includes teachers, scholars, and mentors who truly care about you—your academic and professional success, your intellectual and spiritual growth, and your potential to make a difference in the world.

La Salle is one of six colleges or universities in the United States founded in the tradition of St. John Baptist de La Salle, the patron saint of teachers and founder of the Christian Brothers. At La Salle, you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to succeed after you leave campus, and the values and traditions that will stay with you when you do.

A Lasallian education has had an impact on the lives of more than 48,000 current La Salle alumni. Read some of their stories:

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Cheryl Reeve, ’88, MBA ’90

Head coach of the WNBA’s Minnesota Lynx

  • For most people, getting a call from President Barack Obama is a funny dream you tell to your friends. But for Cheryl Reeve, ’88, MBA ’90, it was a reality. The President was calling to her on being named WMBA’s Coach of the Year and for leading her team, the Minnesota Lynx, to win the national championship (they’ve since won their second championship under Reeve’s leadership).

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William J. Burns, ’78

Deputy U.S. Secretary of State

  • Amidst the revolutionary events of Arab Spring, William J. Burns, ’78, was officially sworn in as U.S. Deputy Secretary of State on Sept. 8, 2011. It’s fitting because Middle Eastern relations have always played a prominent role in his education and career. Two decades ago, he helped organize a groundbreaking event in Middle Eastern negotiations—the […]

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Richard Mshomba, Ph.D., ’85

La Salle University professor of economics

  • He acknowledges that he is known as a tough professor in the classroom. “My professors challenged and supported me when I was an undergraduate. I want to do the same,” he said. “I have an understanding of the value of an education that others may not have. Higher education options are so limited world-wide—I want my students to realize how fortunate they are, and not to take their education for granted.”

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