Spring Semester classes end

 

Spring Semester classes begin

 

Men’s Basketball vs. Penn

 
December 5, 2014

Not a Problem: La Salle University Students Win Computing Contest

 

La Salle University computer science students Candice Schumann and Howard Stickley recently won a problem-solving competition at the Consortium for Computing Sciences in College-Eastern Region (CCSC-E) conference at York College of Pennsylvania.

Teams from 10 colleges had three and one-half hours to solve five problems. Schumann, a senior, and Stickley, a junior, were the only competitors to solve four problems. They received Amazon gift cards for placing first.

“It was a crazy experience! I have never been on a team that solved more than three problems before,” Schumann said. “Since it was my last competition at La Salle, I pushed myself to try to get through as many problems as fast as possible. There were other teams in a different room, so we didn’t know how we were doing in comparison.”

Stickley said, “It was the best experience I have personally had at a competition. Our team has done well in the past, but I don’t remember us ever having solved more than three problems. The experience was made even more memorable because this was Candice’s last programming contest, so this was the last time we would have a chance to work as a team.”

They practiced 16 hours to prepare for the latest CCSC-E competition.

Schumann said she and Stickley tried to solve the easiest problems first, then the harder ones. Schumann has competed at five CCSC-E competitions, and Stickley has competed at four. A second La Salle team, with students Kane Sebesky and Jefferson Lima, also participated, and completed two of the problems.

Schumann has received three grants from the National Science Foundation to attend special programs on advanced mathematics. La Salle University Mathematics and Computer Science Department Chair Jonathon Knappenberger, Ph.D., said Schumann came to the University with such a strong background in math that she bypassed freshman-level courses in her first year, and will graduate a semester early in December.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

December 1, 2014

La Salle University Honors Johnson & Johnson’s Mike Rose with Information Technology Leadership Award

 
Provost Joseph Marbach presents the 2014 Information Technology Leadership Award to alum Michael Rose.

Provost Joseph Marbach presents the 2014 Information Technology Leadership Award to alum Michael Rose.

La Salle University honored Michael Rose, a vice president at Johnson and Johnson Health Care Systems Inc. and a La Salle alumnus, with its 11th annual Information Technology Leadership Award.

Rose is Vice President, Supply Chain Visibility, Customer & Logistics Services with the Johnson & Johnson Supply Chain. “My responsibilities include: product identification and traceability, product identification standards and eCommerce strategy,” he said.

Rose was a biology major at La Salle, but it was during course electives that his interest in technology grew.

“I took several extra math and physics classes. My classmates, Jack Powers and Paul Coady, would take Steve Longo’s physics classes because we really liked Steve as a professor, and we knew that any course taught by Steve would be worthwhile,” Rose said. “My only regret is that I dropped (mathematics professor) Sam Wiley’s topology class during the spring semester of my senior year. As fate would have it, to prepare for one of my classes in graduate school, I had to quickly learn topology to be able to complete the course assignments.”

“I was always interested in science and technology, even as a kid,” Rose said. “I had a microscope and collected rocks and minerals. I value the practical application of technology—not necessarily technology for technology’s sake alone—because its use has positive impacts in so many areas: our families, our lives, our culture, as well as creating business opportunities. Johnson and Johnson’s (J&J) use of technology improves the lives of our patients that use our innovative products. From a supply chain perspective, we use technology to combat counterfeit products and help ensure that our customers receive genuine products. Through the business application of technology, J&J continually improves their efficiency and effectiveness.”

Margaret McCoey, Director of La Salle’s Graduate Programs in Computer Information Science and Information Technology Leadership said, “I actually remember Mike’s student days and his tutoring of math students—I was one—along with his participation and membership in the computer science advisory board.”

“One specific instance I recall involved a student who missed an opportunity to apply for the J&J Leadership Program. Mike heard about the student and intervened on her behalf. The intervention was positive for the student, who is still a current J&J employee,” McCoey said. “Whenever we have asked Mike for help, either on curriculum reviews, classroom visits, or panel discussions, the answer is always the same. I am pleased we are able to honor Mike with this award and proud to be associated with him professionally and as a member of the La Salle community.”

Rose and his wife, Donna, have been married for 35 years and they have two sons. They reside in Fountainville, Pa.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

 

 

November 21, 2014

La Salle University Economics and Finance Major Matthew Accardi Interning with the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia

 

La Salle University senior Matthew Accardi is interning this semester with the Federal Reserve Bank (FRB) of Philadelphia.

An economics and finance double major, Accardi is working with the FRB’s Business Outlook Survey. “It surveys regional manufacturing firms and asks basic economic questions. This survey is widely read and moves markets when it is released. I get to work in every step of the survey’s development and processing,” said Accardi, who is from Stone Harbor, N.J., and a graduate of Wildwood Catholic High School.

Accardi began La Salle undecided on a major, but, after taking introductory courses on economics he decided to concentrate in the field.

“I enjoy the intuitive approach necessary in studying and succeeding in the field of economics,” Accardi said. “Economics is constantly evolving and new, exciting opportunities seem to be constantly arising.”

Mike E. Trebing, senior economic analyst at FRB, said Accardi is, “very organized.  A good listener.  He takes good notes and utilizes them to remember tasks performed up to six months ago. This is very important in developing effective research skills and in the learning process.”

“He also said he had very little, if any, programming experience, but picked up on that as well,” Trebing added. “Most importantly, I think he took the sage advice of Federal Reserve President Charles Plosser, who, during the welcoming of our interns, said  that they should add value and make good recommendations to improve the way we do things.”

According to the FRB, more than 3,500 students applied for 35 intern spots this semester.

Recently, Accardi was inducted into La Salle’s Alpha Epsilon Honor Society, which recognized high scholarship and community service. He volunteers at Cristo Rey High School in Philadelphia and at the Crest Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center inCape May Courthouse, N.J.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

November 19, 2014

La Salle University Presents Signum Fidei Medal to Fred’s Footsteps for its Mission of Helping Families Care for Seriously Ill Children

 
Christine DiBona Lobley, Executive Director of Fred’s Footsteps (right) with the Signum Fidei Award, presented by Beth Harper Briglia (left). Between them is La Salle student Derek Marshall, whose family was helped by Fred’s Foosteps.

Christine DiBona Lobley, Executive Director of Fred’s Footsteps (right) with the Signum Fidei Award, presented by Beth Harper Briglia (left).

 

The La Salle University Alumni Association will present its Signum Fidei Medal to Fred’s Footsteps, an organization providing financial assistance to families of children experiencing serious health issues, on Nov. 14.

The Signum Fidei Medal derives its name from the motto of the Brothers of the Christian Schools—“Sign of Faith.” It is given to recognize personal achievements in harmony with the established aims of La Salle University and the objectives of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, and it is awarded annually to a person who has made “most noteworthy contributions to the advancement of humanitarian principles in keeping with the Christian/Judeo tradition.”

Fred’s Footsteps was created in memory of Fred DiBona Jr., who was President and CEO of Independence Blue Cross, one month after his death in 2005.

“On behalf of Fred’s Footsteps, it is a great honor to receive this award from La Salle University and to be recognized for our work in the region to provide relief to middle-class families who find themselves struggling to stay afloat while caring for a critically or chronically ill child,” said Christine DiBona Lobley, Executive Director of Fred’s Footsteps and Fred DiBona’s daughter. “We share with La Salle many of the same values, primary of which is community. We believe that when a child is sick, their family’s first concern should be how to love and care for them. Fred’s Footsteps provides a financial bridge, not just momentary help, to families in the Philadelphia region.”

According to the organization’s website, “We are the only program in the region that provides this type of bridge – not just momentary help – to families during their time of need.” It serves families in 19 counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

AmyLynn Flood, Vice President of the Alumni Association and Chair of the Awards Committee, said, “The Alumni Association is proud to award the 2014 Signum Fidei Award to Fred’s Footsteps. For over 10 years, this nonprofit has been a true sign of faith for local families facing the greatest challenge of their lives—a child’s serious illness/injury. Fred’s Footsteps has demonstrated Lasallian values of faith, service, and community in their work and good deeds; and continues to pay tribute to Fred DiBona’s spirit of giving.”

Also speaking will be La Salle student Derrick Marshall, whose family benefitted from Fred’s Footsteps.

“In high school, I suffered a hemorrhage on my brain stem…my body gradually deteriorated, and I lost the ability to speak, I was also paralyzed on the left side of my body,” said Marshall. “I underwent brain surgery which left me visually and hearing impaired.  The doctors informed my mom that there was only a three percent survival rate.”

“My mom was visiting the hospital every day and … she had a very difficult time paying all of the bills for the house and my care.  That is when Fred’s Footsteps came into our lives, and my family was able to secure the necessary bridge funding to maintain our household,” said Marshall, who hopes to enter medical school and said, “My long term goal and dream is to start a pediatric health care network.”

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

 

November 19, 2014

La Salle University Presents Its John J. Finley, ’24, Award to Alum William Markmann, M.D., for Outstanding Service to His Alma Mater

 
Dr. William J. Markmann, M.D., ’70, receives the John J. Finley Award from AmyLynn Flood, ’95, Vice President of the Alumni Association and Chair of the Awards Committee.

Dr. William J. Markmann, M.D., ’70, receives the John J. Finley Award from AmyLynn Flood, ’95, Vice President of the Alumni Association and Chair of the Awards Committee.

 

For his considerable and constant support of his alma mater, William Markmann, M.D., will receive the John J. Finley, ’24, Award, given by the La Salle Alumni Association to a graduate who has provided great service to the University.

“La Salle has been part of my family since before I was born. My father was a professor at La Salle for more than 40 years,” said Markmann, a 1970 graduate. “The influence of the Christian Brothers and their mission has played a major role in my development. I have seen how they have affected my life and the lives of so many other students. My strongest impression was the commitment of the Brothers, as well as lay faculty, to treat each student as an individual and be available for each student’s needs.”

Markmann said he was “completely shocked” when he learned about the award. “There are so many alums that do so much for the University who should really receive it,” he said.

The Finley Award is named for John J. Finley, a 1924 graduate. Finley held the position of President, Vice President, and, at the time of his death in 1961, Treasurer of the Alumni Association. To his contemporaries, he was known as “Mr. La Salle” for his dedication to La Salle.

Markmann’s father, Joseph, was a legendary figure in La Salle’s Accounting Department and was instrumental in its growth. “My father was an example to us all about what was important in life, and what was important for education, and being involved in giving back,” William Markmann said.

When he came to La Salle as a freshman, Markmann said he wasn’t sure about a career. “I asked what the best programs were, and I was told accounting and pre-med. My father was Chair of the Accounting Department, so I chose pre-med,” he said. Markmann added that his mother being a nurse was also a factor in his decision.

After graduating from La Salle with a degree in biology, Markmann entered Temple University’s School of Medicine with the idea of becoming a pediatrician, but, he said, “I met a physician named John Lachman, who was Chair of Orthopedics at Temple, and I decided I wanted to be like him. I found my mentor. He was very intelligent, committed to taking care of patients. He used his talents to help people.”

In 2005, Markmann became a member of La Salle’s Board of Trustees. “Being a member of the Board has given me the opportunity to interact with members of the administration and other Board members, all of whom are totally committed to ensuring that a Lasallian education is available for so many students,” he said.

Markmann and his wife, Margaret Mary “Candy” Markmann, Ph.D., who is an adjunct faculty member in La Salle’s History Department, live in Huntingdon Valley, Pa., and have five children; three graduated from La Salle and two followed their father into the health care field: Denise is a pediatrician, and Joseph is pursuing a Ph.D. in health policy with a focus on health economics.

An educational community shaped by traditional Catholic and Lasallian values, La Salle University was established in 1863 through the legacy of St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order. Money magazine named La Salle University a “Value All-Star,” ranking it the eighth-best college nationwide for adding the most value for a college education. Globally, the Lasallian educational network includes 1,000 schools (60 of which are institutions of higher education) serving 940,000 students in 80 countries.

 


Diplomat in Residence Program

 

Diplomat in Residence Program

 
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