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September 27, 2017

The University was also named to the tenth annual FORBES Top Colleges 2017 ranking

WSJ-THE Ranking

 

Out of more than 1,000 U.S. colleges and universities, The Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education have once again ranked La Salle University in the Top 300 in its second annual College Rankings. The ranking is based on the results of the Times Higher Education U.S. Student Survey, which examines responses from more than 100,000 current college students on a range of key issues, including engagement with their studies, interactions with their professors, and overall satisfaction with their experiences. The full methodology explores four key areas: outcomes, resources, engagement, and environment.

“La Salle University continues to stand out because of the transformational experience provided to each and every student,” said President Colleen M. Hanycz. “The Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education have once again recognized what makes a La Salle education so unique: our students join a diverse community of learners and embark on a rigorous educational experience designed to foster theoretical and practical knowledge, deepen ethical sensibilities, and prepare for a lifetime of success. We position our graduates to achieve more and to enter the world with certainty and purpose as confident, impactful, and productive global citizens.”

“The WSJ/THE College Rankings, now in its second year, has received critical acclaim for its pioneering new approach to ranking U.S. colleges and universities that puts student success and learning at its heart,” writes Phil Baty, editor of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. “The partnership between The Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education brings together two powerhouses–the preeminent source of global business and financial news, alongside a global higher education data and analysis business that started reporting on global higher education almost five decades ago. These rankings will provide students and institutions with access to a comprehensive list of over 1,000 institutions evaluated on their educational impact and the lifetime benefit to students.”

La Salle University has consistently been recognized for excellence and value. The University was named to the FORBES Top Colleges 2017 ranking, its tenth annual report. Announced just weeks ago, the 2018 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Colleges” guidebook ranked the La Salle as 34th overall in the North Region; it earned a place on Forbes’s “America’s Best Value College” list; was included in The Economist’s “Top 100 Schools in the U.S. for Value;” and was ranked fifth by Money magazine’s 2016 list of “50 Colleges That Add the Most Value.” Notably, in a study issued by The New York Times, La Salle graduates were in the top six percent for median income by age 34 ($58,700). Additionally, according to a new data study from U.S. News and World Report, the School of Business’s MBA program has the fourth highest employment rate in the nation; it was named to The Princeton Review’s Best 294 Business Schools 2017; and its Part-Time Hybrid MBA was included in U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 edition of “Best Graduate Schools.”

To view the full list of ranked U.S. colleges and universities, click here.

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September 14, 2017

Br. Ernest Miller, Maureen O'Connell, and Colleen Hanycz

La Salle University’s mission is, simply, “To help students gain theoretical and practical knowledge, deepen their ethical sensibilities, and prepare for a lifetime of continuous learning, professional success, and dedicated service.” The Distinguished Lasallian Educator Award provides the University an opportunity to recognize a person from within the community who represents unwavering dedication to this mission. As such, Maureen O’Connell, Ph.D., associate professor of religion, is the recipient of the 2017 Distinguished Lasallian Educator Award.

“I have come to learn that this La Salle community is one of pilgrims, because pilgrims don’t make their way alone. They journey in community as individuals walking their own path, but oriented towards the same good,” O’Connell said. “What I’ve also learned is that teaching is really a vocation of the heart. When we say, ‘Live Jesus in our hearts forever,’ it’s not a statement of belief, it’s an invocation that says, please allow the values of Jesus to animate the work that I do. I am very grateful for having learned that, because it has transformed my own sense of who I am trying to be as an educator.”

Recipients who best exhibit the University’s values and mission in their daily lives are nominated and chosen by a panel of faculty and staff. Brother Ernest Miller, D. Min., La Salle’s Vice President for Mission, presented O’Connell with the award during the University’s Opening Meeting by saying, “Maureen’s vigorous and resolute commitment to achieving the aims of Catholic higher education in a Lasallian key is unmistakable. She gives witness to building a vibrant, participatory, inclusive community at La Salle. We see this in countless ways: As a convener of the Ferguson and Beyond cohort; a coordinator of the Imagining the Beloved Community Teach-In; a member of the University’s Community Building Team through which she has established genuine relationships with our Belfield and Germantown neighbors.”

After eight years in the Theology Department at Fordham University, Maureen O’Connell returned to her native city of Philadelphia in 2013 to Chair the Department of Religion at La Salle University, where she is also an Associate Professor of Christian Ethics. She holds a bachelor’s degree in History from Saint Joseph’s University and a Ph.D. in Theological Ethics from Boston College.

She authored Compassion: Loving Our Neighbor in an Age of Globalization (Orbis Books, 2009) and If These Walls Could Talk: Community Muralism and the Beauty of Justice (The Liturgical Press, 2012), which won the College Theology Book of the Year Award in 2012 and the Catholic Press Association’s first place for books in theology in 2012. Her current research project explores the interplay of being Catholic and “becoming white” across five generations of her family’s history in the City of Philadelphia, as well as racial identity formation in Catholic higher education. She serves on the boards of the Society for the Arts in Religious and Theological Studies, and Rosemont College.

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September 13, 2017

Dorothy Day_Kate Hennessy

La Salle University welcomes author Kate Hennessy as part of its Lectures on Religion and Culture series, Wednesday, September 20, at 7 PM in Founders’ Hall. Hennessy is the youngest grandchild of social activist Dorothy Day, and has recently released Dorothy Day: The World Will Be Saved by Beauty, a biography of her late grandmother. Day founded the Catholic Worker movement and is now a candidate for sainthood.

“We are used to thinking of saints as ancient, remote, and superhuman. Dorothy Day presents us with a remarkably accessible contemporary model of holiness, and her heroic Christian commitment to justice is well-documented—even cited by Pope Francis during his 2015 speech before U.S. Congress,” said Jack Downey, Ph.D., assistant professor of religion and theology at La Salle University. “Kate Hennessy will present us a precious and rare glimpse into the private life of, as described by historian David J. O’Brien, ‘the most significant, interesting, and influential person in the history of American Catholicism.’”

Hennessey’s book has been received with great critical acclaim. The New York Times calls the memoir “intimate, revealing and sometimes wrenching,” and The Christian Science Monitor says, “Dorothy Day is not the measure of a human, it is her story, and Day’s story is epic.”

This lecture is free and open to the public and will be held in Founders’ Hall, home of La Salle University’s School of Business (located at the corner of Chew Avenue & North Wister Street). Free parking can be found at the Shoppes at La Salle, with additional paid parking in Lot J on La Salle’s campus.

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September 12, 2017

US News

The 2018 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Colleges” guidebook has ranked La Salle University as 34th overall in the North Region, which includes nearly 200 universities across 11 states in the Northeast and District of Columbia. The ranking is based on graduation and retention rates, peer assessment of excellence, financial resources, student selectivity, graduation rate, and alumni giving.

“I am pleased that La Salle continues to be recognized as one of the top universities in the Northeast,” said University President Colleen Hanycz, Ph.D. “Our five-year strategic plan, Momentum: 2022, serves as a blueprint for even greater impact. There is intense focus on exceptional student outcomes resulting from deeply engaged, integrated, innovative, high-impact teaching and learning. This includes a new core curriculum and 15 institutional learning outcomes that will help graduates succeed in their professional and personal lives regardless of their degree program.”

La Salle University’s 3,171 undergraduates hail from around the globe, including 31 U.S. states and 36 countries. Thirty-one percent of La Salle undergrads are the first in their families to go to college. The University also maintains a long-standing commitment to college affordability, most significantly resetting its undergraduate tuition to $28,800 from $40,400 for the 2017-18 school year. The initiative, known as An Affordable Path for All, makes achieving a bachelor’s degree more affordable and accessible. Its message resonated deeply with prospective students and their families, and, along with the comprehensive Explorers are Never Lost brand campaign, helped to drive the largest La Salle University freshmen class in the last 25 years.

In recent years, La Salle has been recognized for excellence and value: the University earned a place on Forbes’s “America’s Best Value College” list, was included in The Economist’s “Top 100 Schools in the U.S. for Value,” and was ranked fifth by Money magazine’s 2016 list of “50 Colleges That Add the Most Value.” The University has received additional value and excellence citations from the Brookings Institute and The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education. Notably, in a study issued by The New York Times, La Salle graduates were in the top six percent for median income by age 34 ($58,700). Additionally, according to a new data study from U.S. News and World Report, the School of Business’s MBA program has the fourth highest employment rate in the nation; it was named to The Princeton Review’s Best 294 Business Schools 2017; and its Part-Time Hybrid MBA was included in U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 edition of “Best Graduate Schools.”

To view the full list of ranked U.S. colleges and universities, click here.

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August 28, 2017

business-school-building-20160727-09

The Master of Business Administration program at La Salle University’s School of Business has the fourth highest employment rate in the nation, according to a new report from U.S. News and World Report. Among the 131 MBA programs considered for the study, La Salle’s employment rate for graduates three months after graduation is 96.4 percent, compared to an average of 88.3 percent among full-time MBAs.

“La Salle’s signature has long been a highly-personalized education,” according to MarySheila E. McDonald, J.D., Dean of La Salle’s School of Business. “Our full-time MBA program’s impressive placement success is a direct result of an intentionally-curated approach to business education which integrates current business theory with the development of indispensable skills which today’s employers seek, including the ability to work in and build strong teams, critical and creative thinking, problem solving, respect for diverse perspectives, and adaptability.  When you combine this approach with our powerful employer network, many of whom are also La Salle alumni, the impact on students is extraordinary.”

La Salle University’s School of Business was named to The Princeton Review’s Best 294 Business Schools 2017, and its Part-Time Hybrid MBA was included in U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 edition of Best Graduate Schools. The School of Business is internationally recognized for being accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The AACSB accreditation standards challenge post-secondary educators to pursue excellence and continuous improvement throughout their business programs. Fewer than 5 percent of business schools worldwide have earned this prestigious accreditation.

La Salle University has consistently been recognized for providing a great value to its students, by Money magazine (fifth on the 2016 list of “50 Colleges That Add the Most Value”), Forbes (“America’s Best Value College” list), and The Economist (“Top 100 Schools in the U.S. for Value”). The University has received additional value and excellence citations from the Brookings Institute, The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education, and The New York Times.

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August 1, 2017

La Salle University’s Public Health Programs of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences have been accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). The Council is an independent agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education to accredit schools of public health and public health programs across the country. Accreditation certifies that La Salle’s programs meet the standards of public health education to equip students with competencies required to be an effective public health practitioner.

“What accreditation means for La Salle students is the confidence that their degree is from a program that is nationally recognized as one that is comprehensive and academically rigorous,” said Zupenda Davis-Shine, DrPH, MPH, MCHES, director and assistant professor of the Bachelor of Science in Public Health Program. “It also makes our students eligible to participate in public health internships and fellowships sponsored by various federal agencies. Additionally, there are career opportunities that are only open for graduates of accredited programs.”

“With several public health programs in the area, the accreditation status recognizes La Salle’s programs as competitive and high quality,” said Candace Robertson-James, DrPH, MPH, director and assistant professor of the Master of Public Health Program at La Salle University. “Our MPH program focuses on urban health disparities and seeks to promote social justice as we address the needs of underserved, vulnerable, and marginalized populations.”

With this recognition, all of La Salle University’s programs under the School of Nursing and Health Sciences are accredited. The initial accreditation date is February 22, 2014, meaning that any student who graduated after this date can state that they graduated from an accredited program in public health.

La Salle’s Masters of Public Health Program was founded in 2010 and the Bachelor of Science in Public Health Program in 2013. La Salle has graduated 43 students from the MPH Program and 65 from the BSPH Program.

The accreditation process took three years to complete. Once the University’s application was accepted and approved, program directors prepared a full self-study that outlined criteria on structure and governance; resources; diversity; degree offerings; research, service, and workforce development; faculty qualifications; student recruitment and admissions; and advising and career counseling. Upon submission of the self-study, La Salle hosted an on-site visit which allowed CEPH to meet with program directors, faculty, and administrators of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences as well as the Provost, President, preceptors, alumni, advisory board members, students and community members.

The CEPH acknowledgement is one of the most sought after accreditations for schools and programs in public health. Schools that wish to become CEPH accredited must meet the proper criteria, including a high level of academic excellence and the ability to prepare students for careers after graduation.

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