Environmental Science

Program Description

The Environmental Science Program offers a specialized, integrated approach to global issues surronding sustainability, the use of natureal resources, how human activity impacts ecosystems, how such activity can cause degradation, and what can be done to mitigate this impact.

Why take this major?

Our program is designed to place graduates into positions in industry, energy and environmental, governmental and private, as well as in graduate programs (science or policy/management), and service institutions and agencies (Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, etc). Students (have been) and will be qualified to work in fields such as oil, gas and coal, alternative energy, environmental management, resource management, land-use planning, environmental policy, and environmental law (upon completion of law school). The Environmental Science program can also serve as a pre-teaching opportunity that prepares students for certification in education. We also understand the need to enhance critical thinking skills and have designed the environmental science curricula to meet this challenge by requiring an eclectic array of courses from many non-science related departments.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Students should be able to think critically about problems in environmental sciences.
  • Students should understand human actions that advance environmental stability as well as those actions that cause environmental degradation.
  • Students should be familiar with the biological, chemical and geological processes related to environmental science.
  • Students should be able to interpret scientific data in our sciences.
  • Students should be able to use a variety of instruments commonly used to collect data in the field and the software  that displays that information.
  • Students should be able to communicate both orally and in writing concepts that are essential to the understanding of environmental science.

Program Contact Information

Florence Ling

Assistant Professor

Holroyd Hall 043

ling@lasalle.edu

(215) 951-1848

Degree Earned

B.S.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 18

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 62

Total: 120 minimum

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

ENV 153 - Introduction to Enviromental Science

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 120 - Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

CSC 152 - Introduction to Computing: Mathematics/Science Applications

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 18 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

BIO 210 - Cellular Biology and Genetics
BIO 230 - Diversity, Evolution and Ecology
BIO 320 - Biostatistics

CHM 111 - General Chemistry I
CHM 112 - General Chemistry II
CHM 262 - Organic Chemistry for Life Science

ENV 202 -Earth Materials
ENV 305 -Environmental Chemistry

ENV 310 -Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
ENV 401 -Fundamentals of Soil Science
ENV 402 - Environmental Air Quality

ENV 450 - Capstone
POL 316 - Environmental Law and Policy

Required Electives

Choose three courses from the following:

BIO 303 -Microbiology

BIO 319 - Plant Kingdom

BIO 400 -Marine Biology

BIO 403 - Principles of Ecology

BIO 404 - Field Ecology

ENV 306 - Hydrology

ENV 460 - Cooperative Education/Internship

ENV 480 - Research

CHM 311 - Instrumental Analysis

PHY 105 - Physics I

PHY 106 - Physics II

ECN 351 - Environmental Economics

ISBT 321 - Fundamentals of Energy and Natural Resources

ISBT 322 - Role of Energy and Natural Resources in Modern Society

ISBT 421 - Nature Resource Management

ISBT 422 - Sustainable Energy Development

ISBT 431 - Regulatory Affairs

PHL 306 - Environmental Philosophy

PHLT 314 - Unhealthy Urban Environments:  Healthy Solutions

 

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Dual Major Requirements

To be determined by Program Director and Chair of other major department.

Minor Requirements

ENV 153

Plus five courses chosen in consultation with Program Director

Year

Fall

Spring

 

Freshman

ENV 153

ENV 202

CHM 111

CHM 112

   
   
   

 

Sophomore

BIO 210

BIO 230

MTH 120

BIO 320

CHM 262

 
   
   

 

Junior

ENV 305

ENV 310

POL 316

ENV 401

 

ENV 401

   
   

 

Senior

ENV 450

ENV elective

ENV elective

ENV elective

 

 

Course Descriptions

ENV 153 - Introduction to Environmental Science

This course is an introduction to the field of environmental science, including the historical development of the subject, the current state of knowledge, and the development of humans and the impact they have had on our environment. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory a week. The course includes mandatory field trips.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

ENV 202 - Earth Materials

This course is an introduction to the materials that make up the earth and their composition, structure, classification and formation. Students will study earth resources and the environmental impact of resource usage. Topics include mineralogy, petrology (the study of rocks), energy, metals, fertilizers, construction/building materials, water and soil. Three hours lecture and three hours lab.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 305 - Environmental Chemisty

This course focuses on geochemical processes that occur at or near the surface of the earth which are of particular importance to environmental quality and therefore to humans and ecological systems.  Students will explore the foundational concepts required to understand water and soil chemistry,  Other topics include the study and use of analytical tools used to determine contamination in sediments, soils and water and the remediation techniques available to cleanup such pollution. Three hours of lecture and three lab hours. 

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, CHM 112, ENV 153

ENV 306 - Hydrology

Hydrology deals with the physical principles governing the flow of groundwater and surface water.  Emphasis will be on well hydraulics and flow system analysis.  Topics include water budgets, floods and flood frequency analysis, groundwater supply, steady state and non-steady state flow, hydro-geologic regimes, and introductory groundwater chemistry.  Three hours of lecture per week.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information. Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data. Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology. This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 310 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

This introductory course provides an overview of the basic concepts and uses of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology.  As part of the toolkit for many fields, ArcGIS provides a means to explore data on a spatial level and communicate this information to a broader audience.  Students explore GIS tools and learn to manipulate, analyze, visualize, and illustrate geographic data.  Students examine relationships, trends and patterns using GIS technology.  This course is structured to be a hands-on laboratory that covers both conceptual and technical topics.  Three hours of lecture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 6.1 - Technological Competency

ENV 401 - Fundamentals of Soil Science

An overview of soil science, covering the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils.  Students will gain an understanding of soil formation, the classification of soils, and the chemical/biological reactions that occur in soils.  In the laboratory, students will learn methods of soil analysis, including chemical and mineralogical analyses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, ENV 153, MTH 113 or MTH 120

ENV 402 - Environmental Air Quality

This course introduces the causes and effects of air pollutants on humans.  The source of pollutants, their physical and chemical behavior in the atmosphere, and strategies to mitigate air pollution will be discussed.  Students will also be introduced to systems modeling to understand the flow of sources and sinks of atmospheric pollutants. Three hours of lecture per week.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: CHM 111, ENV 153, MTH 113 or MTH 120 or permission of instructor

ENV 450 - Capstone

To be determined.  

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Senior Level Status

ENV 460 - Cooperative Education/Internship

This is normally a full-time, paid employment at a cooperating institution/company to provide on-the-job training (part-time positions may qualify).  It involves appropriate job-related learning assignments under faculty supervision.  Position must be approved by the Program Director.  Consult the Associate Director for Experiential Education in the La Salle University Career Center before registering for the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ENV 480 - Research

This research is for election by qualified students contemplating advanced studies. It is intended to provide actual research experience under staff supervision.  Students are required to present a seminar on their work and to prepare a poster.  Permission of the Program Director is required.  Hours to be arranged.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Restrictions: Junior or Senior Level Status

NOTE: - Requires courses from other disciplines.

A list of all courses may be found online at Undergraduate > Courses: A-Z.