Economics and International Studies

Program Description

The Economics Department is committed to providing students with a rigorous and relevant economic education necessary for informed citizenship. The Department is committed to teaching and research, believing that research informs what is taught and how it is taught. For its majors, the Department seeks to develop a deep understanding of how markets and economies work and do not work. Further, the Department seeks to assure that majors and minors are capable of applying the tools of economic reasoning to consider questions of policy, efficiency, and equity.

The ECI major includes the core economics courses, a foreign language, and other internationally-focused courses.

Why take this major?

Like the Economics major, the Economics and International Studies major provides students analytical tools to improve decision making and address real-world problems. This major offers room for double-majoring or multiple minors, as well as great flexibility for careers. With a language requirement and courses with an international focus, students learn to analyze both domestic and global issues such as those pertaining to trade policies, economic integration, and capital mobility. Emphasis is also placed on considering what policies and actions are consistent with social justice. Some students go on to corporate and non-profit positions. Others go on to graduate programs in law, international relations, public policy, applied economics, and PhD programs in economics.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Students will possess the basic knowledge and skills in micro and macro-economic analysis.
  • Students will possess the basic quantitative knowledge and skills (statistics and linear regression).
  • Students will be able to design a research project to address a particular question and explain the project's relevance.
  • Students will be able to develop theoretical expectations in answer to their research question.
  • Students will select a research method consistent with the question they seek to answer in their senior seminar research project.
  • Students will provide and present a critical review the literature relevant to their research topic.
  • Students will present a conclusion appropriate to the project and specify appropriate limitations of those conclusions.
  • Students will present a well-organized and well-written research paper containing all the elements mentioned in Learning Goals 4 through 8.
  • Students will demonstrate reasonable proficiency in a foreign language

Program Contact Information

Dr. David Robison

Professor and Chair, Department of Economics

Olney 265

robison@lasalle.edu

215-951-1184

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 17

Total: 38

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 55

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 114 or MTH 120

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 150

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38 courses in total in order to graduate. 17 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

Fulfilled within major

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

Fulfilled within major

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

Fulfilled within major

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

Fulfilled within major

All Other Required Courses

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I
ECN 201 - Principles of Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I
ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science
ECN 314 - Econometrics
ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II
ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II
ECN 331 - International Economics
A second international ECN course
ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies
MTH 114 or MTH 120
Three courses in a single foreign language
Two internationally-focused HIS courses
Two other internationally-focused courses in any discipline as approved by advisor

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

The guide below is merely a suggestion. Because many students double major or change majors and become ECI majors as sophomores, the suggested order and timing is not common among students.

Freshman Year:

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Global Economy I

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: The Business Firm and Market Analysis I

MTH 114 or MTH 120 A calculus-based math course

Language course 1

Language course 2

Sophomore Year

ECN 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

ECN 314 - Econometrics

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: The Business Firm & Market Analysis II

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. In the Globla Economy II

Language course 3

Junior Year

ECN 331

Second internationally-focused ECN course

Two internationally-focused History Courses

One other internationally-focused course

Senior Year

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

One other internationally-focused course

Course Descriptions

ECN 150 - Introductory Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy I

After introducing students to the what and how of economic thinking, the course explores the causes of national economic prosperity and economic problems such as unemployment and inflation. It also discusses the role of fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international economic relations among the U.S. and other countries.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 4.1 - Critical Analysis and Reasoning

ECN 201 - Introductory Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis I

This course explores many issues pertaining to the operation of businesses and the markets in which they operate. Among these are the behavior of consumers, the determinants of prices and production levels, and the efficiency of market outcomes. As time allows, the course applies economic thinking to issues like economic inequality, environmental concerns, international trade, and firms with monopoly power.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 221 - Intermediate Microeconomics: Business Firm and Market Analysis II

This course studies how business firms interact with consumers and one another in product and resource markets. Besides distilling profit-maximizing criteria for different firms in different markets, the course also evaluates how the operation of firms impacts the welfare of society in general.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 201; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 222 - Intermediate Macroeconomics: The U.S. in the Global Economy II

This course analyzes the factors behind countries' long-term growth and also those responsible for short-term fluctuations in their levels of output and prices. It also demonstrates how economic booms and busts have prompted economists to search for explanations and possible policies for addressing these instabilities. Finally, the course compares and contrasts U.S. historical experience with that of other nations.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150; MTH 114 or 120 or equivalent

ECN 270, 370, 470 - Special Topics in Economics

Topics include Labor Markets, Employment and Wages; Women in the Economy; European Union; Economics of Sports; Economics of Entertainment; and Law and Economics.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

ECN 287, 288 - Economics Internship

Working approximately 10 to 15 hours per week under professional supervision, students learn experientially the linkages between their formal studies and the demands of particular positions. Under faculty supervision, students complete informal and formal written assignments and an oral presentation that describe their duties and interpret their intern experience.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 201, at least sophomore standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 314 - Econometrics

This course introduces the student to advanced statistical techniques used by economists, other social scientists, and people in business and law to test theories, predict future events, and provide empirical support for various types of hypotheses. The course emphasizes the applied nature of econometrics. As such, the student will construct, estimate, and evaluate well-specified regression models through computer application-based exercises using SAS statistical software.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 213 or BUS 202 or permission of Chair

ECN 331 - International Economics

This course involves an introduction to the theory of international trade. Topics include specialization and the gains from trade, tariffs, and protectionist policies, trade imbalances, the role of international institutions, foreign exchange markets, and monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 332 - Political Economy of Africa

This course examines the political and economic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa and provides a historical perspective on these conditions. Issues examined include the political and economic consequences of colonialism, post-independence political forces and economic policies, and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 334 - The Political Economy of Latin America

This course begins by examining aspects of the indigenous societies prior to the arrival of Europeans in what has come to be called "Latin America." Throughout, it considers issues such as colonialism, militarism, race, gender relations, and religion that have shaped the societies, polities, and economies of nations from Mexico and the Caribbean to those of the Southern Cone. The goal of the course is to afford class members the opportunity to better understand Latin America's history as a basis for comprehending its likely future. Cross-listed with HIS334 and POL 334.

Number of Credits: 3

ECN 335 - International Trade and Trade Wars

This course provides an overview of the U.S. in the global economy and the history of the World Trade Organization (WTO), an examination of the WTO's dispute settlement mechanism, and an examination of major trade disputes that involve the U.S. The course ultimately explores how international trade laws, politics, diplomacy, and multi-national corporations in pursuit of profits interact.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Summer

How Offered: Online

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 337 - Political Economy of Eastern Europe

This course first explores the structure and outcomes of a centrally-planned economic system in contrast to a market-based economic system. Second, it examines how the transition from planned to market took place (or is still under way) in Eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union. Lastly, it considers a wide range of contemporary political and economic challenges facing countries across the region, from building democratic institutions and strengthening the rule of law to establishing competitive markets and addressing social and economic injustices.

 

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 340 - American Economic History

This course describes and analyzes long-term economic growth and development since colonization. It stresses changes in demographic, technological, and institutional factors as they interact with the market system. Basic economic concepts and theories of growth are applied to significant historical questions.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 351 - Environmental Economics

Provides an introduction to the trade-offs (costs versus benefits) associated with environmental issues. Evaluating trade-offs requires an examination of the magnitude or current environmental problems and some consideration of how to measure the costs and benefits of regulatory changes. Approximately half the course will be devoted to examining the current regulations, how the regulatory process works, and the economic implications of the regulations.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 or permission of Chair

ECN 354 - Economics of the Entertainment Industry

The course surveys the economics of the entertainment industry with an emphasis on the importance of market structure (perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, monopoly) in determining behaviors and profitability. In this course, we will apply many microeconomic, and a few macroeconomic, concepts to evaluate structure, workings, and profitability of various segments in the entertainment industry, ranging from movies to music, TV, radio, publishing, casinos, and theme parks. Case studies will be used to highlight the issues facing particular firms.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 356 - Healthcare Economics

This course explores the economics of health and health care. It introduces students to different economic perspectives on the determinants of health, how health insurance markets are organized, and the challenges facing the U.S. health care system. The course also examines how health care services are financed and delivered in other countries. Special attention is paid to recent health care reforms, including the Affordable Care Act.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150

ECN 385, 386 - Cooperative Education

This experience will be a full-time paid employment in a cooperating firm such as a bank, economics forecasting company, or public utility; a nonprofit company such as a Community Development Corporation; or a government agency such as a county planning department or a statistical analysis office. Under faculty supervision, students also complete job-related learning assignments that involve oral and written presentations.

Number of Credits: 3 or 6

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: ECN 214; ECN 221; and junior standing or senior standing, and permission of Department Chair

ECN 441 - History of Economic Thought

The course details the development of economics as a coherent analytical discipline through a historical study of its main schools and contributors, including the Physiocrats; the Classical Economists (especially Jevons, Walras, and Clark), Marshall, and Keynes. Lesser figures are treated as time allows. Attention throughout is given to the changing philosophical and cultural background of economic thought.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 201

ECN 455 - Public Finance

This course involves an analysis of the revenue and expenditure activity of government with particular emphasis on the rationale of federal government activity. Also considered are the issues of distribution, efficiency, equity, and stability in the economy.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: ECN 150; ECN 201

ECN 481 - Seminar in Economics

This course is intended to be a capstone course for economics majors, one that aids the student in integrating the material from diverse economics courses. It stresses techniques for the preparation of written research reports. Students will ordinarily deliver to the seminar an oral presentation of their research results.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN 485 - Seminar in Economics and International Studies

This capstone course for Economics and International Studies majors aims to assist students to research, integrate, and communicate information about the global economy. Specifically, students will learn to conduct research on economic problems and policies of countries and regions of the world not native to them. Students will compose a 250 to 300 word abstract of their seminar papers in two languages, English and a second language. Further, students will be expected to demonstrate at least one of the following competencies: a) to write, in a non-native language, summaries of research in sources written in non-native language; b) to write the seminar paper in a non-native language; or c) to present research results orally in a non-native language.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: Senior standing in ECN 213, ECN 221 or ECN 222

ECN/POL 213 - Statistics for Economics and Political Science

This course focuses on basic statistical methods used in the analysis of economic and political phenomena and decision-making. Emphasis is on the application of statistical techniques and the sound interpretation of statistical results. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing, simple regression, and correlation.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face