Psychology

Program Description

The Department of Psychology offers the Bachelor of Arts in Day and Evening Programs on Main Campus. Our curriculum was designed for several purposes.  First, to prepare students for graduate study in Psychology, both research and applied.  Second, preparation for professional school (e.g., medicine, law, business).  Third, the curriculum provides skills and knowledge that prepare for entry directly into the workforce.  The Psychology major requires 13 courses, none of which may be taken Pass/Fail.

Why take this major?

Psychology is a science that seeks to understand and describe human behavior and relationships. Students in this major will continuously build their awareness of the needs of our diverse society, the role that research plays in enriching our understanding of life, and the ways in which the profession of psychology serves to improve the human condition through ethical research and practice.

A major in Psychology offers a number of desirable skills.  First, you receive a sophisticated understanding of the complexities of human behavior and thinking.  Second, you develop quantitative and research skills that allow you to appreciate and undertake the study of human behavior and thinking.  Third, through group projects and research teams, you gain interpersonal skills that are useful well beyond the classroom.  Fourth, you become part of a community of scholars that includes faculty, graduate students, and fellow undergraduate students.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Students will attain a knowledge base in Psychology. Students will demonstrate and apply their knowledge of Psychology, including its concepts, vocabulary, principles, methodologies, theories, and subspecialties.
  • Students will demonstrate ability to apply academic skills to field of psychology. In addition to demonstrating literacy in psychology as described above, students will achieve proficiency in communicating in writing and orally about psychological issues in an effective and organized manner.
  • Students will develop skills in scientific inquiry and critical thinking. Students will use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena. They will demonstrate proficiency in problems solving and creative, integrative, and critical thinking.  Students will be able to apply ethical principles and incorporate sociocultural factors in their interpretation of psychological research.
  • Students will show enhanced personal development. Students will behave in an ethical and socially responsible manner across settings, and be knowledgeable and sensitive to issues related to diversity. Students will achieve greater self-awareness, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and associated coping skills. They will apply psychological knowledge to enhance their relationships. Students will develop enthusiasm and curiosity about the human condition and their place in it.
  • Students will advance their professional development. Students will apply acquired skills and psychological knowledge to settings outside of academe. They will participate in a psychology-related organization, and engage in at least one career-related experience to hone workplace skills. Students will draft a career plan based on knowledge of educational and career options for psychology majors.

Program Contact Information

Kelly McClure, Chair

mcclure@lasalle.edu

Wister Hall, Mezzanine Level

(215) 951-1270

Degree Earned

B.A.

Number of Courses Required for Graduation

Major: 13

Total: 38-40

Number of Credits Required for Graduation

Major: 40

Total: 120

GPA Required for Graduation

Major: 2.0

Cumulative: 2.0

Progress Chart

Level One - Core Courses

12 courses and 2 modules required

Universal Required Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete the following 4 courses.

ILO 8.1: Written Communication

ENG 110 - College Writing I: Persuasion

ILO 5.1: Information Literacy

ENG 210 - College Writing II: Research

ILO 1.1: Understanding Diverse Perspectives

FYS 130 - First-Year Academic Seminar **

NOTE. The following students use Level 2 Capstone Experience in Major instead of FYS 130: Honors, BUSCA, Core-to-Core, Transfer, and Non-Traditional/Evening.

ILO 2.1: Reflective Thinking and Valuing

REL 100 - Religion Matters

Elective Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs.

ILO 3.1a: Scientific Reasoning

PSY 155

ILO 3.1b: Quantitative Reasoning

PSY 310

ILO 6.1: Technological Competency

Choose course within ILO

ILO 8.1a/12.1: Oral Communication/ Collaborative Engagement

Choose course within ILO

Distinct Discipline Core Courses (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course in each of the following 4 ILOs. Each course must be from a different discipline. (A "discipline" is represented by the 3- or 4-letter prefix attached to each course.)

ILO 4.1: Critical Analysis and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 9.1: Creative and Artistic Expression

Choose course within ILO

ILO 10.1: Ethical Understanding and Reasoning

Choose course within ILO

ILO 11.1: Cultural and Global Awareness and Sensitivity

Choose course within ILO

Universal Required Modules (2 Courses)

Students must complete the following 2 non-credit modules.
The Modules are not required for Transfer Students, Core-to-Core Students, or BUSCA Students. BUSCA students are required to take modules if/when they pursue a bachelor’s degree.

ILO 7.1a

Health Literacy Module

ILO 7.1b

Financial Literacy Module

Major Requirements

Major requirements include 4 Level Two ILO requirements, fulfilled through the major.

Students in this major must complete 38-40 courses in total in order to graduate. 13 courses will be from this major program.

Level Two (4 Courses)

Students must complete 1 course/learning experience in each of the 4 commitments.

ILO 2.2: Broader Identity (Capstone Course/Experience)

PSY 331 OR PSY 495 OR PSY 496

Choose one ILO from 3.2a, 3.2b, 4.2, 5.2, 6.2, 7.2a, or 7.2b: Expanded Literacies

PSY 330

ILO 8.2b: Effective Expression (Writing-Intensive Course)

PSY 311

Choose on ILO from 10.2, 11.2, or 12.2: Active Responsibility

PSY 331 OR PSY 495 OR PSY 496

All Other Required Courses

MTH 150 Mathematics Myths and Realities
PSY 155 Introduction to Psychology
PSY 310 Statistics I
PSY 311 Statistics II
PSY 330 Research Design I
One of the following: PSY 331 Research Design II OR PSY 495 Internship (Fall) OR PSY 496 Internship (Spring)
Seven electives in psychology, including three of the following: PSY 410 Theories of Learning, 415 Cognitive Psychology, 420 Biological Psychology, 425 Theories of Personality, 430 History and Systems of Psychology, or PSY 405 Emotions

Free Electives

In addition to the requirements listed above, students must take enough courses to the fulfill graduation credit requirements for their School and major.

Minor Requirements

PSY 155 plus five electives, two of which must be at the 300 or 400 level

We strongly recommend that students consult with their academic advisors in planning their course sequence in the math, statistics, and research design courses.

Course Descriptions

PSY 155 - Introduction to Psychology

This course provides a general introduction to the discipline of psychology. Emphasis is given to the methods, theories, and findings of psychological research. Areas covered may include biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, abnormality, and social behavior.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.a - Scientific Reasoning

PSY 210 - Developmental Psychology

This course provides a study of the theories and research relevant to understanding human development from conception through adulthood, with special emphasis on childhood and adolescence. Biological, cognitive, and socioemotional processes are examined.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

PSY 215 - Adult Development and Aging

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of adulthood, with a special emphasis on gerontology. Focuses on the theories, principles, and research related to cognitive change and on social development, particularly in the context of intergenerational relationships.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 220 - Psychopathology

This is an introductory course surveying the principal forms of mental disorders, with emphasis on causes, symptoms, and treatment. An analysis of the problem of maladaptive behavior and the study of certain personality and behavior patterns.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

PSY 225 - Social Psychology

This course provides a study of the research findings and theories dealing with the phenomena of social behavior. Focuses on individual behavior as it affects and is affected by the behavior of others.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

PSY 230 - Industrial and Organizational Psychology

This course offers a study of the application of psychological principles and theories to organizational settings. Topics examined include research methodology, employee selection and assessment, leadership, motivation, job satisfaction, and characteristics of the workplace that affect employee and organizational well-being.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring, Summer

How Offered: Face-to-Face, Online

PSY 242 - Introduction to Language and Communication

This course is an introduction to the study of the grammar and sound systems of natural language with an emphasis on English. Historical and present-day controversies on linguistic theories and the nature of language are emphasized. This class is cross-listed with COSD 100.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 245 - Forensic Psychology

This course addresses selected topics in the area of forensic psychology. The focus of the course will center on the theory, science, applications, and practices of psychology in the criminal justice system. Topics will include police and investigative psychology, family forensic psychology, psychology of crime and delinquency, legal psychology, expert witness testimony, and issues related to corrections.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 250 - Human Sexuality

This course is a survey of the theory, research, and issues related to sexuality from a psychological perspective. Topics will include the biological, psychological, and social foundations of human sexuality, human reproduction, cross-cultural perspectives on social behavior and contemporary society, gender roles and stereotypes, the expression of human sexuality, sexual deviancy, and violence.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 255 - Psychology of Women

This course provides an overview of psychological theory and research related to the study of women, including research on gender, gender socialization, and sex differences. It will evaluate traditional views and feminist perspectives. Students will learn how gender and sexism interact with ethnicity, class, and age across the lifespan to influence women's lives and understandings.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 260 - Sport Psychology

Students will be introduced to concepts in sport psychology. Issues of individual athletes, athletic teams, and sport psychology interventions are discussed. Students are introduced to conceptualizing and presenting sport psychology issues and interventions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

PSY 310 - Statistics I

This course is the first semester of a two semester sequence in statistics covering descriptive and inferential statistics and the logic of hypothesis testing. Emphasis in this course is on understanding the statistical technique and its meaning in making research decisions.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

ILO Met: ILO 3.1.b - Quantitative Reasoning

PSY 311 - Statistics II

This course is the second part of a two semester sequence in statistics focusing on the use of SPSS as a tool to assist in describing data, hypothesis testing, and making data supported decisions. Emphasis in this course is on the analysis of data and the communication of statistically supported findings.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 310

PSY 330 - Research Design I

This laboratory course focuses on introducing students to the techniques and methods of descriptive and inferential research as they are applied to psychological science. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155, 311

PSY 331 - Research Design II

This course offers lectures and discussions on modern psychological science. For laboratory work, the student plans, designs, and performs an original research experiment. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory.

Number of Credits: 4

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 330

PSY 340 - Psychological Assessment

This course examines the selection, administration, and interpretation of psychological tests used in the measurement of aptitudes, achievement, interest, and personality.

Number of Credits: 3

Prerequisites: PSY 155 and 310

PSY 342 - Speech and Language Development

This course explores the specific nature, sequence, and patterns of language development from birth through adolescence and its relation to other aspects of child development. Conditions that place infants and children at risk for speech and language disorders are explored. Patterns of normal language development are discussed as guide for the evaluation and treatment of children with developmental language disorders.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: COSD 100 or PSY 242, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed with COSD 203

PSY 350 - Counseling Theories and Principles

This course addresses the theories and principles of the counseling process. The dynamics of human change. The objectives, work, and continuing problems of counseling.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 360 - Health Psychology

This course is an overview of key topics, theories, and issues in Health Psychology. Topics include stress, eating, exercise, coping, and the effect of individual traits and psychological/social processes on health. Previously, this special topics course focused exclusively on stress. It has been extended to reflect trends in the fields of psychology and managed care. The intent is to help students become more prepared for entry into graduate school, medical school, or a professional setting.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 405 - Emotions

This course about emotion will cover basic theoretical perspectives, including biological foundations, and essential emotion processes such as emotion regulation. Individual emotions such as happy, sad, angry, etc. will be discussed. The course will culminate with brief discussion of emotion-related constructs such as empathy and positive psychology.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 410 - Theories of Learning

This course is an analysis of the principal theories of learning in light of recent experiments in animal and human learning.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 415 - Cognitive Psychology

How do we acquire, store, retrieve, and use knowledge? This course investigates how we make sense of our experience by examining classic and contemporary theory and research in human information processing, the representation and organization of knowledge, and the use of higher cognitive skills. Topics may include attention, perception, memory, imagery, language, problem solving, creativity, reasoning, and decision making.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 420 - Biological Psychology

This course is an introduction to the neurological and endocrinological bases of behavior. Consideration is given to sensory and motor processes, motivation and emotion, and learning and memory.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 425 - Theories of Personality

This course is a systematic study of the principal theories of personality with particular emphasis on recent trends, research methodology, and personality measurement.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 430 - History and Systems of Psychology

This course examines the beginnings and development of psychology as a science and profession; psychology's historical roots in philosophy, biology, and national culture.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Spring

How Offered: Face-to-Face

Prerequisites: PSY 155

PSY 480-481 - Seminar

This course provides readings, discussion, and analysis of contemporary psychological theories and research; individual student research and presentation of paper.

Number of Credits: 6

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing as psychology major

PSY 490-491 - Psychological Research

This course provides the student with an opportunity to do research with a faculty member. The student and the faculty member must agree on the research project before the student signs up for the course.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing as a psychology major. May be taken either or both terms

PSY 495-496 - Internship

This course provides students with off-campus opportunities to work in clinics, schools, businesses, or the criminal justice system. It may be taken either or both semesters.

Number of Credits: 3

When Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing as a psychology major