Student Guide to Resources, Rights and Responsibilities

I. A. President’s Welcome

Dear Student,

Welcome to La Salle! We are so glad to have you in our community. You’ll find that La Salle is much more than a learning institution—we’re a community that shares deep respect for each individual here. This core value is central to the educational tradition of La Salle, which carries on the legacy St. John Baptist de La Salle and the Christian Brothers teaching order he founded in 17th century France.

We’re committed to your development not just as a student, but as a whole person. La Salle is especially designed to help you actively engage with your education, in the classroom and beyond our campus. You’ll find enriching experiences through the University’s clubs, sports, organizations, internships, and community service, as well as the surrounding city of Philadelphia.

As you connect with life at La Salle, you’ll likely learn a lot about yourself, your talents, and your abilities. It is our hope that you’ll flourish in new ways as you stretch and challenge yourself in your studies.

If you want to develop the skills to make a lasting impact on contemporary social, political, professional, and moral challenges, you’ve come to the right place. Embracing La Salle’s community prepares you for a lifetime of world-changing opportunities.

Use the resources in this handbook to make the most of connecting and growing with our community.

With warm wishes and confidence in your exciting new journey,

Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D.
President

 

I. B. Division of Student Affairs Leadership Team Welcome

Division of Student Affairs
Leadership Team

Dear Lasallian,

No factor plays a stronger role in student learning than the active involvement of the learner in the educational enterprise. A student’s surest routes to achieving active involvement flow from the establishment and maintenance of strong, lasting, and positive associations with members of the faculty, staff, and administration and with fellow students.

This book is your guide to establishing those associations.

We believe you will find in our Lasallian community, as we have, individuals and groups from and with whom you will actively learn and whose learning you will enhance, as well. We welcome you, we look forward to many years of association, and we ask God and St. John Baptist de La Salle to bless and guide you and all in our learning community.

Best regards and have a wonderful year at La Salle!

Dawn Meza Soufleris, Ph.D.
Vice President for Student Affairs

Anna Melnyk Allen
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Campus Life

Kate Ward-Gaus
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Student Wellness Services

Amanda Guthorn, D.A..
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/La Salle Public Safety

Br. Robert J. Kinzler, FSC
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/University Ministry, Service and Support

Alan B. Wendell
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Residence Life and Community Development

For more information regarding the Division of Student Affairs and available resources and services, please visit the above links.

II. A. Academics

II. B. Directories

II. C. Have A Question?

II. D. Student Organizations

  • Student Organizations Information

    La Salle recognizes that student activities are an integral part of the educational program for students. Participating in one or more of the following student organizations will promote the development of social and leadership skills, provide the opportunity to meet many people from a wide variety of backgrounds, and overall, enhance your collegiate experience.

    The Community Development Office can provide information on joining organizations. Additionally, most student organizations do in-person recruiting of new members at the start of the academic year especially at the annual Activities Fair. The Collegian, WEXP, signs, and posters announce individual recruiting periods. Stop by La Salle Union 303 or call ext. 1916 for more information and consult the Student Organizations section of the Division of Student Affairs website or the links below.

  • Student Organizations Listings

    Student Organizations Listings web site

  • Information Manual for Student Organizations

    Information Manual for Student Organizations

II. E. Division of Student Affairs

II. F. Procedures for Dealing with Acts of Discrimination

  • Introduction

    Bigotry and intolerance have no place in the Lasallian tradition or the Lasallian community. As stated in the La Salle University Student Guide to Rights and Responsibilities, “physical or verbal abuse or harassment of any person on University premises, at University sponsored functions, or between any members of the University community off University premises” is subject to disciplinary action. This category of behavior includes, of course, harassment of individuals or groups based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, sexual orientation, marital status, or handicap or disability. Following are brief guidelines for dealing with incidents of this nature. For complete policies regarding discrimination and harassment, please see the Harassment & Discrimination (III.D) section.

    For further information or discussion, please contact the Division of Student Affairs, in care of the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, La Salle Union 123.

  • Graffiti or other forms of physical damage and/or desecration that violate the University’s anti-discrimination policy.

    • Contact the Supervisor on duty for the Security and Safety Office or the Resident Coordinator on duty.
    • A photo should be taken if possible and submitted to the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students.
    • Remove the graffiti as soon as possible. (If supplies are available, Security and Safety or the Community Development staff should do so at that time. If supplies are not available, Physical Facilities should be notified to take care of the problem as soon as the next shift begins.)
    • A written report should be forwarded to the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students within 24 hours of the incident. Investigation and, if warranted and possible, disciplinary action will proceed in accordance with all relevant University procedures.
  • Discriminatory acts (including harassment) toward any member of the University community

    • Retain any physical evidence of the act(s), such as harassing notes or letters, tapes of harassing messages left on answering machines, and so forth.
    • Contact the Supervisor on duty for the Security and Safety Office or the Resident Coordinator on duty.
    • Notify the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students immediately.
    • The Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students will contact the harassed individual directly to assess the situation and decide on a course of action and/or advise the individual of the right to file a complaint under the University’s grievance procedure.
    • Security and Safety staff or Community Development staff will respond administratively by tracing phone calls, confronting the harassers, etc.
    • The Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students will consult appropriately with other members of the University community. Investigation and, if warranted and possible, disciplinary action will proceed in accordance with all relevant University procedures.
  • Community Responses in the Residence Halls

    When there is a need for a community response in a student residence, the Community Development Supervisory Staff should work with the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students to develop it, making use of the expertise of appropriate persons on campus.

II. G. Sexual Misconduct

III. A. The Affirmation

III. B. University Governance

  • Introduction

    With more than 5,400 students in day and evening classes, some 451 full and part-time faculty, 246 administrators, and alumni numbering over 38.000, a certain number of administrative arrangements and operational procedures are needed. Students should understand these processes to enhance their experiences and also to assume their significant role in the governance of the University.

  • Student participation in Governance

    An organizational structure has been developed which recognizes that the three primary constituencies of the University – students, faculty, and administration – all play major roles in governing the University, thus creating a formal communication system which is essential for effective operation.

    The University has established a system of decision making by which final decisions are made at the lowest level of administration consistent with the concept of interested representation and collegiality. It is through this system that students play a role in governing the University.

  • The President

    The Board of Trustees has final legal authority for all University business. However, it is the President who, as Executive Officer of the Board, carries final authority for day-to-day operational policies and decisions. The President is the chief officer of the entire institution, the official representative of the University to its various publics, and the administrator who has overall responsibility for planning, supervising, managing, and evaluating the work of the University.

  • University Council

    In formulating University policy and in making major operational decisions such as on budget matters, the President enjoys the collaborative assistance of University Council. The University Council is a body composed of three student representatives appointed by the Students’ Government Association; four faculty members appointed by the Faculty Senate; the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students; the Academic Deans; the Executive Assistant to the President; the Vice President of the Corporation; the Provost; and the three Vice Presidents. The guiding concept behind this collaborative arrangement at La Salle is referred to as “President-in-Council.” The President has final authority for approving new policies and for changing old policies; however, such actions can be taken only after review with Council.

  • Provost and Vice Presidents

    The University is organized into four areas, headed by the Provost and three Vice Presidents. These officers report directly to the President. The responsibility of each area is reflective of its name: Academic and Student Affairs, Business Affairs, University Advancement, and Enrollment Services.

    The Provost is responsible for the University’s central mission of teaching and learning. he is assisted in these responsibilities by the Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, the Dean of the School of Business Administration, the Dean of the College of Continuing and Professional Studies, the Dean of the School of Nursing, and by the Directors of the various academic services such as the Registrar, the Library, and Information Technology. The Deans are in turn assisted by the Academic Department Chairs and Directors within their respective Schools or Divisions.

    The Vice President for Business Affairs is responsible for administering fiscal programs, security, food service, and the physical plant. The Vice President is assisted by a Comptroller and the Directors of the Campus Store, Food Services, Printing and Mail Services, Human Resources, Purchasing, Physical Facilities, and Security and Safety.

    The Vice President for University Advancement is charged with directing the University’s fund raising programs and for communicating its policies and goals to its many publics. This area includes the Assistant Vice Presidents for Alumni, Marketing and Communication, Government and Community Relations, and their staffs.

    The Vice President for Enrollment Services is directly responsible for developing and implementing enrollment management (student recruitment and retention) strategies and activities. The Vice President is assisted by the Dean of Admissions, the Director of Student Financial Services, the Registrar, and the Director of Institutional Research.

  • University Committees

    Committees have been established in each administrative area to assure the participation of all three constituencies; accordingly, provision is made on all standing committees of the University to reflect the views of students, faculty, and administration. Except for those committees whose chairs are designated ex-officio, committees select a chair from among faculty and administration members at the beginning of each academic year.

    The Students’ Government Association appoints the students who sit on all standing University committees (with the exception of the Community Development Advisory Board).

    The following is a partial list of the major standing committees of primary concern to students:

    • Academic Affairs Committee:

      In its monthly meeting, the Academic Affairs Committee deals with problems referred to it by any of its members or by members of the faculty which arise in carrying out existing academic policies. Thus, it considers, for example, revisions of the academic calendar, the rules of academic standing, the grading system, special programs, new programs and departments, and so forth. It also suggests actions to the University Council in matters of wider scope or of an essentially policy making nature.

      The Academic Affairs Committee is composed of the Provost as ex officio chairperson; the Academic Deans and the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students as ex officio members; five voting faculty members representing each of the Schools with two of the five from the school of Arts and Sciences and some of the five regularly teaching in graduate programs; a non-voting faculty member from the Faculty Senate; three student representatives; and the Assistant Provost for Administration as a non-voting member.

    • Academic Department Boards:

      Students are offered the opportunity to participate in decisions regarding academic life through membership in academic department boards. Although each academic department may organize its board accordingly, typically these boards items such as curriculum revision, teacher evaluation, tenure and advancement in rank, and general academic concerns.

    • Activities Funding Board:

      The Activities Funding Board has been established to assist the Division of Student Affairs in administering student organization accounts.

      The duties of the Board include reviewing budgets of all student organizations requesting or receiving institutional funding, hearing the funding requests of new student organizations, annually recommending and submitting budget appropriations for regularly funded organizations, hearing requests of student organizations desiring funds which exceed their annual budget allotment and providing financial assistance for new programs, arbitrating disputes related to student organization accounts, and recommending to appropriate University authorities modifications or additions to the way in which funds are secured for student organizations.

      The membership includes two faculty members appointed by the Faculty Senate, two student affairs administrators, eight students appointed by the Students’ Government Association, and a faculty or staff member (ex-officio and chair) appointed by the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students.

    • Athletics Committee:

      The Athletics Committee (AC) advises the Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation (DIAR), and the President as the AC deems timely and proper on current and proposed policies and practices relating to the intercollegiate and recreational sports programs.

      The AC meets regularly with and informs the DIAR on all matters which deserve his/her attention, or to consider issues on which he/she seeks advice.

      The AC will also meet at the beginning of each academic year with the University President to discuss plans for the upcoming year.

      The AC may also meet periodically with coaches, athletics administrators, and student/athletes to review their experiences in an effort to promote the enhancement of the University’s intercollegiate and recreational sports programs.

      The AC will receive the Annual report from the DIAR and Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR).

      AC members are expected to communicate routinely with and serve as a liaison between their respective groups and the AC and the DIAR.

      • Committee Membership

        The membership shall consist of the following:

        • Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation (as an ex officio member)\
        • Faculty Athletics Representative (as a standing member)
        • Six (6) Faculty Members (as appointed by Faculty Senate)
        • Three (3) Alumni Representatives (as designated by Alumni Association) – 2 votes
        • One (1) Explorer Club Representative (as designated by Explorer Club Board of Directors)
        • Two (2) Student Athletes (as designated by Athletics Relations Council) – 1 vote
        • Two (2) Students (as designated by Students’ Government Association) – 1 vote
      • Term of Appointment
        • Five-year term for Faculty Athletics Representative
        • Three-year terms for Faculty Members, Alumni, Explorer Club, and Student Affairs Representatives
        • Student Members to be designated on an annual basis, with strong consideration of underclass appointments to gain experience and be in a position to serve and contribute over several years.
    • Curriculum Committee:

      The Curriculum Committee is charged with a continuing review of the general and specialized education provided by the University’s curriculum. The Committee is essentially concerned with the integrity of the curriculum in terms of the University’s philosophy and objectives. It is responsible for the curriculum as a whole and for individual departmental curriculum proposals. Part of the responsibility includes reviewing and making recommendations on new course proposals. The Committee is also concerned with any major rearrangements of the academic year which affect the basic pattern of the curriculum.

      The Curriculum Committee has the Provost as Chairperson as is composed of the Deans of the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, and Nursing; the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students; nine faculty members; and three students. The Director of the Connelly Library and the Registrar are non-voting members of the Committee. The Curriculum Committee is an advisory group responsible to the Provost.

    • Food Services Committee:

      The Food Services Committee is advisory to the Director of Food Services for the purpose of maintaining a formal communication link between the Food Services Administration and the various constituencies which it serves. It shall provide the Director of Food Services with a forum to receive advisory information to aid in formulating departmental policy and operating procedures.

      The committee shall be comprised of the Director of Food Services, who will serve as chair; the Assistant Director of Food Services or one of the Food Services managers, appointed by the Director of Food Services; a Community Development staff member, appointed by the Senior Associate Dean of Students; a University Life staff member, appointed by the Assistant Dean of Students; one faculty representative, appointed by the Faculty Senate; one Day Division student (preferably a commuter), appointed by the Students’ Government Association; one Continuing Studies student, appointed by the Continuing Studies Student Council; and two students appointed by the Resident Student Association. Should the Continuing Studies Student Council fail to appoint a representative, the position will revert to the Students’ Government Association for appointment.

    • Health Advisory Committee:

      The Health Advisory Committee is an advisory board to the Associate Dean of Students for Counseling and Health Services, the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students and the Provost. The Committee assists with the development and review of student health policies, services and education programs and advises the Alcohol and Other Drug Program Coordinator on issues and policies related to the use of alcohol and drugs at La Salle University. The committee also functions in an advisory capacity on health issues that effect the University as a whole such as a smoking policy, handicapped accessibility and possible disease outbreaks.

      The Health Advisory Committee has the following responsibilities regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS): to develop and monitor educational programs in order to increase awareness of AIDS and HIV infection and to prevent the transmission of AIDS within the University community; to serve in a consultative capacity when requested regarding individual cases of HIV infection; serve in an advisory capacity to University administrators regarding the institutional response to AIDS; and, to review and update the University guidelines and protocols by considering changes in the available knowledge regarding AIDS and in national, state and University policies.

      The Committee is composed of three academic and student affairs administrators appointed by the Provost and Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, three faculty members appointed by the Faculty Senate, three students appointed by the Student Government Association (one being a student athlete, if possible), and one staff member each from Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation, Food Services and Human Resources. The Associate Dean of Students for Counseling and Health Services and the Director of the Student Health Center will serve as co-chairs of this committee.

    • Judicial Board:

      The purpose of the Judicial Board is to adjudicate cases involving violation of the University’s rules and regulations. Membership includes six faculty members and eighteen students. A panel of four students and one faculty member is drawn from the available board members to hear a case. The eighteen student members of the board are appointed by the Students’ Government Association after consultation with the current board members. The six faculty members of the board are appointed by the Faculty Senate.

    • The Community Development Advisory Board:

      The Community Development Advisory Board advises the Division of Student Affairs on matters related to residence hall living. It is the appropriate group for students, faculty, and staff interested in becoming involved in making decisions about the nature and quality of resident life. The Board meets regularly to discuss issues and topics of concern and interest.

      The Community Development Advisory Board is comprised of two Community Development student staff members; two students at large, appointed by the Resident Student Association; the President of the Resident Student Association; three Community Development staff members; two Student Affairs Administrators, including one from University Life; one Food Services staff member; one faculty member; and a faculty or staff member (ex-officio and chair) appointed by the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students.

    • Security and Safety Advisory Committee:

      The Security and Safety Advisory Committee advises the Director of Security and Safety and the Vice President for Business Affairs on matters related to safety and security and provides an avenue of communication for concerns and suggestions from all areas of the University. In carrying out its charge the committee shall concern itself with matters relating to delivering appropriate security services to the University community. It shall also be concerned with recommending and coordinating matters relating to campus safety which shall include issues of job safety and compliance with all federal, state, and local rules and regulations effecting safety in the work place. The committee shall review accident/injury reports, monitor trends, and recommend corrective action plans. The Committee shall be comprised of the Director of Security and Safety and the Director of Human Resources, or his or her representative, who shall serve as co-chairpersons; one faculty representative appointed by the Faculty Senate; three students (one each appointed by the Resident Student Association, Students’ Government Association, and the Adult Student Council, respectively); a representative of the Athletic Department appointed by the Director of Athletics, the Associate Dean of Students for Counseling and Health Services, or his or her designate, a representative of the Food Services Department, appointed by the Director of Food Services; a representative of the Physical Facilities Department, appointed by the Director of Physical Facilities, and at the discretion of the Provost and each vice president a representative staff person from his or her area, if not otherwise represented, a representative of the Office of Continuing Studies faculty or staff as appointed by the Director of the Office of Continuing Studies.

    • Student Affairs Committee:

      The Student Affairs Committee is an advisory board to the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students and the Provost and is primarily concerned with the formulation and review of major policies governing student life outside the classroom. The committee meets regularly to acquaint the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students with its views on matters within the Student Affairs area which require attention and/or to consider questions on which the Dean seeks its advice or aid in the discharge of his or her decision-making responsibilities. In addition to policy review and formulation, the committee has authority to review and make recommendations concerning all student affairs services, activities, and regulations. Introduction of new policies and changes in old policies in the Student Handbook require prior consultation with the Student Affairs Committee. The Student Affairs Committee also may suggest actions to University Council on student life matters.

      The committee is comprised of three student affairs administrators, three faculty members, six students, and the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students (ex-officio and chair).

    • Student Press Committee:

      The Student Press Committee has been established to create and maintain an environment in which the high quality student newspapers, radio station, and other media forms, including electronic, most effectively benefit the entire University community. The committee formulates general policies as needed for the Collegian, WEXP, etc., and advises the Provost and the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students on related matters.

      The Student Press Committee will be composed of the following 13 voting members: Collegian Editor, WEXP station manager, two at-large student members, neither of whom should be a member of any publication/station whose editors/manager sit on this committee, two non-senior, non-voting student members, one from the Collegian staff and one from the WEXP staff, three faculty members to be appointed by the Faculty Senate, one administrator to be appointed by the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, the Collegian Advisor, the WEXP Advisor, and the Channel 56 Station Manager.

III. C. Student Conduct Process (For Non-Academic Conduct)

  • Purpose and Scope

    • Purpose

      An environment that encourages freedom of expression and inquiry is essential to achieving the educational mission of La Salle University. It is the responsibility of all students, faculty, staff and administrators to work towards the achievement of this educational mission through appropriate actions or behaviors. When these actions or behaviors are inappropriate, or when these actions or behaviors lead to conflicts, it is the responsibility of La Salle University to provide a process that informs and educates the community about appropriate behaviors and provides a fair and reasonable manner for the resolution of conflicts. It is in this spirit that La Salle has developed a set of regulations governing student conduct and has established a student conduct system through which violations are adjudicated by members of the campus community. This Student Code of Conduct provides that process for cases involving students.

    • Scope

      The standards set forth in this process apply to conduct by or against a La Salle University student or recognized student organization from the time of acceptance of admission. This includes conduct which occurs while students are on a leave of absence, studying abroad, or at an internship or co-op. It also includes conduct which occurs when students are not officially enrolled during a particular term as long as they have a continuing relationship with the university. This process will apply regardless of whether a student withdraws or graduates, or if the behavior occurred off the La Salle University campus. For purposes of this guideline, the location of the off-campus behavior will not affect its applicability.

  • Definitions

    Terms not defined elsewhere in this guideline are defined below.

    • Respondent

      A respondent is an individual whose alleged conduct is being investigated to determine if it is in violation of this process. For ease of reference, the term “respondent” is also used throughout this guideline to refer generally to an individual who allegedly engaged in prohibited conduct as defined by the La Salle University Code of Conduct.

    • Complainant

      A complainant is usually an individual filing a complaint of a violation of this Policy. For the purpose of this definition, the term “complainant” is also used throughout this process to refer generally to an individual who was allegedly subjected to prohibited conduct as defined in this Process.

    • Business Day

      means Monday through Friday and does not include official La Salle University holidays.

    • Code of Conduct

      means La Salle University’s Student Code of Conduct.

    • Complaint

      means the written charges filed against a student or student organization by a Student Conduct Officer for alleged violation(s) of the Student Code of Conduct.

    • Report of Misconduct

      means any allegation of a violation of the Student Code of Conduct. Anyone may file an incident report against a student or student organization.

    • La Salle University Community

      means La Salle administrators, faculty, staff, students and student organizations.

    • Responses for Code of Conduct Violations

      means all assigned sanctions and conditions to hold students accountable and to support student reflection and learning from their behaviors.

    • Student

      means undergraduate, graduate, non-degree seeking, students in not-for-credit programs, and all persons taking courses at La Salle University as well as students on internships or co-ops and students not officially enrolled during a particular term, but who have a continuing relationship with the university.

    • Student Organization

      means any La Salle University recognized student group including fraternities and sororities, athletic teams, clubs, or other student groups recognized on campus.

    • Student Conduct Officer or Conduct Officer

      means any trained administrator designated by the Director of Student Conduct who is authorized to conduct hearings and to impose the full range of university statuses and conditions. Residence Life professional staff members have the authority to conduct informal hearings and can impose the full range of university statuses and conditions, excluding removal from housing and separation from the university.

    • University Appeals Board Chair

      An Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs who coordinates all University Appeals Board Hearings.

    • Incident Report

      A complaint of an alleged violation of the La Salle University Student Code of Conduct. The report can be filed electronically and will be reviewed by the Director of Student Conduct or their designee. La Salle Public Safety can also file an Incident Report with the Office of Student Conduct after completion of an investigation for an alleged violation.

    • Disciplinary Hold

      A restriction placed upon a student’s academic record, usually applied for failure to complete a sanction imposed via the La Salle University Office of Student Conduct. A Disciplinary Hold will result in the student being unable to register for classes, receive grades, receive transcripts and/or receive other services normally provided through the Registrar’s Office.

  • Procedure

    • La Salle University Student Code of Conduct

      Students and student organizations are expected to conduct themselves in ways that support the university’s mission. The behaviors outlined in these standards are
      prohibited and do not support the university’s mission. They are listed below to provide students with information about the university’s expectations for community behavior.

      Students engaging in inappropriate behaviors, including but not limited to those behaviors listed below, will be afforded the opportunity to participate in the process outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.

      • Endangering Behavior. Behavior that threatens or endangers the health and/or safety of oneself or others. Endangering behavior may include physical, verbal, or electronic abuse, intimidation, harassment, coercion, property damage to life safety equipment, behavior that is contrary to the mission of the university and/or other conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person.
      • Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy. Behavior that involves substances including alcohol and other drugs will be adjudicated under La Salle University’s Student Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy.
      • Harassment. Abuse, threats, intimidation, assault, coercion and/or conduct, by physical, verbal, signed, written, photographic or digital means, including social media, which unreasonably interferes with, threatens or endangers any person on the La Salle University premises or at university sponsored or supervised functions. Any incident raising concerns of harassment and/or discrimination based on race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, age, disability, veteran status or any other legally protected class status and/or any violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, including sexual misconduct of any nature, gender-based discrimination, retaliation, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault where a student (from the time of acceptance of admission) is identified as a potential respondent will be adjudicated under La Salle University’s Policy On Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination.
      • Discrimination. The treatment of an individual based on that individual’s group, class, or category. Group, class, or category includes, but is not limited to, race, religion, age, citizenship, color, faith, culture, actual or perceived disabilities, marital status, ethnic or national origin, political affiliation or preference, military or veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, or genetic predisposition. Any incident raising concerns of harassment and/or discrimination based on race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, age, disability, veteran status or any other legally protected class status and/or any violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, including sexual misconduct of any nature, gender-based discrimination, retaliation, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault where a student (from the time of acceptance of admission) is identified as a potential respondent will be adjudicated under La Salle University’s Policy On Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination.
      • Retaliation. Any adverse action intended to intimidate or punish another individual from reporting misconduct or participating in any university process or activity.
      • Disruptive/Disorderly Behavior. Behaviors that are disruptive on or off campus or conduct that infringes upon the rights of others.
      • Theft. Attempted or actual theft of, or unauthorized possession of university, personal, or public property.
      • Property Damage. Attempted or actual damage, destruction, vandalism or alteration of university, personal, or public property.
      • Refusal to Comply. Refusal to comply with, defiance of or disrespectful behavior towards any university representative in the performance of their official duties.
      • Hazing/Failure to Report Hazing. Behavior, regardless of intent, which endangers the emotional or physical health and safety of a student for the purpose of membership, affiliation with, or maintaining membership in, a group or student organization. Hazing includes any level of participation, such as being in the presence, having awareness of hazing, or failing to report hazing. Examples of hazing include, but are not limited to, beating or branding, sleep deprivation or causing excessive fatigue, threats of harm, forcing or coercing consumption of food, water, alcohol or other drugs or other substances, verbal abuse, embarrassing, humiliating, or degrading acts, or activities that induce, cause or require the Student to perform a duty or task which is not consistent with fraternal law, ritual or policy or involves a violation of local, state or federal laws, or the La Salle University Student Code of Conduct.
      • Fire/Fire Safety. Behavior that results in a fire, a false fire alarm, or a fire safety hazard.
      • Unauthorized Access. Unauthorized entry to or presence in any university building or property. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of a university key, ID, or access card.
      • Violation of Law. Violation of federal, state or local law on university premises or at university sponsored or supervised activities.
      • Weapon Possession. No student or visitor may keep, possess, display, transport, or use any offensive weapons; firearms; ammunition; gunpowder; gas or air powered rifles, guns, or pistols; fireworks; explosives; or other dangerous articles and substances in University buildings, on University property, or at University functions in off-campus settings. Realistic facsimiles of these items are also prohibited, with reasonable exceptions made, in consultation with the Vice President for Student Affairs, for theatrical productions and similar circumstances. “Offensive weapon” is defined as any bomb, grenade, machine gun, sawed-off shotgun with a barrel less than 18 inches, firearm specially made or specially adapted for concealment or silent discharge, any blackjack, sandbag, metal knuckles, dagger, knife, razor or cutting instrument, the blade of which is exposed in an automatic way by switch, push-button, spring mechanism or otherwise, or other implement for the infliction of serious bodily injury which serves no common lawful purpose. “Firearms” include any weapon which is designed to or may readily be converted to expel any projectile by the action of an explosive, or the frame or receiver of any such weapon. Normal laboratory materials are excluded from this policy when used in an academic laboratory setting to fulfill course requirements or conduct research authorized and supervised by faculty. Members of the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) are authorized to store, transport, and use firearms when performing functions associated with their official duties. Active public law enforcement officers are authorized to store, transport, and use firearms when performing functions associated with their official duties or when attending class.
      • Failure to be a Responsible Host. Failure to ensure that the behavior of a non-university member complies with university policies.
      • Dishonest Behavior. Any act of dishonesty, including misrepresenting, omitting, altering, or falsifying information to university officials or on university documents, IDs, or records.
      • Violation of La Salle University Policies. Violation of published La Salle University policies, rules, and regulations including, but not limited to: Residential Community Standards, Off Campus Community Standards, Parking Policies, Library Policies, and Academic Integrity Policy, and behaviors related to the misuse of La Salle University’s computing, network, and information resources, including copyright infringement.
    • General Provisions of the Student Conduct Process

      The university will take reasonable steps to prevent conduct prohibited by this policy. Any incident raising concerns of harassment and/or discrimination based on race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, age, disability, veteran status or any other legally protected class status and/or any violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, including sexual misconduct of any nature, gender-based discrimination, retaliation, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault where a student (from the time of acceptance of admission) is identified as a potential respondent will be adjudicated La Salle University’s Policy On Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination. Any conduct hearings or appeals that may be commenced under this process will be conducted in an impartial manner by an impartial decision maker(s).

      The university has adopted the following principles to govern its internal Student Conduct Process for responding to student misconduct:

      • Students are adults who are responsible for the consequences of their actions. An academic institution can and should hold a student accountable for violating institutional policies and rules, particularly when the student’s conduct interferes with the safety or rights of other members of the institutional community (including fellow students, faculty, staff and visitors to the campus).
      • The university is not a microcosm of the general community; it is a special purpose community and only activities related to the achievement of its educational purposes are proper to the community.
      • Academic institutions are neither law-enforcement agencies nor sanctuaries from the law. Criminal and civil laws still apply within the academic community. In addition, the university has the authority to establish further policies to educate and hold students accountable for violating these policies. Where the interests of the academic institution and the members of the university community are involved, the special authority of the university will be asserted.
      • Except for violations of civil or criminal laws, the internal affairs of the university are best handled by the university itself without resort to outside intervention. There can be no guarantee that outside agencies will not choose to intervene on their own or that a victim of a crime will not request the involvement of outside law enforcement.
      • The University utilizes a “preponderance of evidence” standard of review for all student conduct cases. This standard means that, in light of all the evidence, it is “more likely than not” that the alleged misconduct occurred. University student conduct processes and procedures are not criminal proceedings, and the standard of evidence used in criminal proceedings (“beyond a reasonable doubt”) does not apply.
    • Violations of Criminal or Civil Laws
      • The Vice President for Student Affairs or designee will determine if the university will refer violations of criminal law to the appropriate law enforcement agencies.
      • A proceeding under the Student Conduct Process may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings. Statuses and conditions may be imposed before the outcome of any civil or criminal proceeding.
      • The university will cooperate fully with law enforcement and other agencies in the enforcement of criminal law on campus and in the conditions imposed by criminal courts for accountability of student violators.
    • Filing an Incident Report

      Anyone may file an Incident Report against any student or student organization for violation of the Student Code of Conduct.

      • An Incident Report concerning academic conduct matters can be made to the dean of the school (or designee) responsible for the academic program in which the alleged misconduct occurred.
      • An Incident Report concerning non-academic conduct matters can be made to La Salle Public Safety, a Residence Life or Community Development staff member, the Director of Student Conduct or via the web.
    • Investigating an Incident Report

      Upon receipt of an Incident Report, regardless of type, the Director of Student Conduct or their designee will review the Incident Report and determine if a student conduct review is warranted. La Salle University Public Safety may conduct an investigation of a violation reported directly to them, or if a case is referred to them by the Director of Student Conduct or the Vice President for Student Affairs. Generally, the investigation will be concluded expediently and the investigative report transferred to the Office of Student Conduct. If warranted, the Director of Student Conduct will determine the appropriate action to be taken in accordance with the provisions of the Student Conduct Process, including but not limited to, whether the case will be heard informally by a Residence Life or Community Development administrator or be adjudicated in a formal student conduct hearing process with a Student Conduct Officer. Generally, the appropriate action will be determined within thirty (30) Business Days from the conclusion of the investigation. This time frame may be expanded based on the facts and circumstances of the specific allegation(s) and/or the availability of witnesses only with the approval of the Director of Student Conduct.

    • Retaliation

      La Salle University prohibits retaliation against anyone filing an Incident Report alleging a violation of the Student Code of Conduct, participating in the procedures described in the Student Conduct Process, or opposing any practice in violation of the Student Code of Conduct or applicable federal, state, or local laws.

    • Student Rights

      All students can expect the Student Conduct Process to be administered in a caring, sensitive and supportive manner, and to be treated with dignity and respect by all persons involved in the conduct process. The Student Conduct Process will allow those community members filing an Incident Report to utilize the Student Conduct Process unimpeded, free from intimidation and harassment, while maintaining the rights of all students involved.

      All students have the following rights as members of the La Salle University community:

      • Basic due process in student conduct proceedings;
      • Privacy (in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) regarding access to and disclosure of student records; and
      • Freedom of association.
      • Freedom of inquiry and expression.
      • Access to and information pertaining to available student counseling assistance.
      • Access to assistance throughout the student conduct process, including the ability to utilize an advocate during the student conduct process.
      • Access to all information presented during any hearing held in accordance with the provisions of the Student Conduct Process, including information and statements from witnesses.
      • Informed, in writing, the results of any student conduct hearing held in accordance with the provisions of the student conduct process.
    • Procedures Requiring a Hearing for Resolving Violations of the Student Code of Conduct
      • Notification Process:

        The Respondent will be sent an electronic notice of the allegations brought forth in the Incident Report.  The notice will include:

        • A request for the Respondent to contact the Office of Student Conduct;
        • A description of the conduct in which the student was allegedly involved;
        • A list of possible university policies, rules or regulations allegedly violated;
        • The offices that will be represented at the hearing;
        • A link to the website explaining the La Salle University Student Conduct Process.
      • Student Conduct Process:

        The Director of Student Conduct, or designee, will determine which hearing type is most appropriate for the incident. There are three hearing types, including:

        • An informal hearing with a Residence Life or Community Development staff member.
          • These hearings are for cases involving incidents in or around La Salle University housing, and are not recorded. Residence Life or Community Development staff are authorized to issue the full range of sanctions and conditions up to, but not including, removal from campus and separation from the university.
        • An informal hearing with a Community Development staff member.
          • These hearings are for cases involving incidents in or around La Salle University housing, and are not recorded. Residence Life or Community Development staff are authorized to issue the full range of sanctions and conditions up to, but not including, removal from campus and separation from the university.
        • A formal hearing with a Student Conduct Officer.
          • These hearings are for cases that are of a more serious nature or if the Respondent has been found responsible for previous violations of the Student Code of Conduct. Student Conduct Officers have the authority to impose a full range of statuses and conditions including removal from university housing, suspension and expulsion.
      • Hearing Participants:
        • Advocates. The Respondent will be informed that they have the right to bring a La Salle University Advocate or any La Salle University faculty or staff member to the hearing. A list of trained advocates will be provided by the Office of Student Conduct.
        • Advisors of Choice. In hearings where the Respondent is charged with a violation of a Policy On Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination, both the Respondent and the Complainant may also bring an advisor of choice.
        • Parents/Guardians. Parents/guardians are not permitted to participate in or be present during any La Salle University student conduct hearing or appeal, unless the Respondent is under the age of eighteen (18). In those instances, the parent/guardian can observe the student conduct hearing process or appeal presentation and give the student quiet counsel.
        • Witnesses. The Student Conduct Officer determines and permits witnesses for the Respondent. Witnesses must be members of the La Salle University community in order to be present for the hearing. Other witnesses can make statements through La Salle Public Safety, which statements will be read during the hearing at the discretion of the Student Conduct Officer. Witnesses must have direct information regarding the incident; character witnesses are not permitted.
        • University Representatives. Other persons who may be present at a formal student conduct hearing include:
          • La Salle Public Safety administrator or officer
          • Other appropriate university personnel (e.g. from Residence Life or Community Development)
      • Recording of Hearing:
        • All formal student conduct hearings with Student Conduct Officers are audio recorded. The participants in the formal student conduct hearing will be informed upon entry into the hearing location of the recording. The recording of the formal student conduct hearing is a university business record and the property of the university.
        • The Respondent (and the Complainant in cases involving Policy On Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination.) may request access to the recording by submitting an electronic request to the Director of Student Conduct after an appeal has been filed with the University Appeals Board Chair prior to the University Appeals Board Hearing.
      • Formal Student Conduct Hearing Procedures for Resolving Violations of the Student Code of Conduct
        • All formal student conduct hearings will be conducted in private.
        • The Student Conduct Officer will inform the Respondent that the formal student conduct hearing is being recorded.
        • The Student Conduct Officer will review all the materials or evidence that has been submitted. The materials may consist of, but are not limited to, a summary of the case as written by La Salle Public Safety, statements from witnesses, or statements from other persons involved in the situation.
        • After the submitted materials and evidence have been read, the Respondent will have an opportunity to refute or explain the materials or evidence and add information. The Student Conduct Officer and other university representatives present may ask the Respondent questions and discuss the case. The Respondent may choose to remain silent (not answer any questions or make statements), or the Respondent (and their University-designated advocate if applicable) may participate in the discussion.
        • The Respondent, and the Complainant in cases where there is a charge of a Policy On Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination violation, and the Student Conduct Officer are permitted to bring witnesses and question the witnesses of others.
        • The La Salle University Student Conduct Process is not a court of law and legal rules of evidence and procedure do not apply. The Student Conduct Officer will determine in the officer’s sole discretion the range of testimony permitted by witnesses and items of information which may be considered.
        • If the Student Conduct Officer determines that a witness may be emotionally harmed by giving evidence in the presence of the Respondent, the Student Conduct Officer may make other arrangements (such as use of a wall partition or video conferencing) to allow the testimony while not depriving the Respondent of access to the evidence.
        • All procedural questions will be decided solely by the Student Conduct Officer.
        • In cases where the Respondent fails to answer the charges or appear at the formal student conduct hearing, the proceeding may still take place. A determination will be made and an outcome decided on the evidence submitted at the formal student conduct hearing. The Respondent’s failure to answer charges or appear at the conduct hearing cannot be the sole basis for a responsible finding under this process. In addition, the Respondent may be put on a student conduct status for failure to attend a conduct hearing after receiving a written or electronic request to appear at the formal student conduct hearing.
        • Once all evidence has been submitted and discussed, and at the sole discretion of the Student Conduct Officer, the Respondent (and University-designated advocate, if applicable) will leave the room. The Student Conduct Officer will deliberate and determine the appropriate resolution of the case including appropriate statuses and conditions.
        • Upon conclusion of the deliberation and discussion, the Respondent (and University- designated advocate, if applicable) will then be asked to rejoin the formal student conduct hearing and be informed by the Student Conduct Officer of the determination. If the determination is that the Respondent violated the policies, rules, or regulations of the university, the Student Conduct Officer will discuss with the Respondent the rationale for the finding of responsibility. The formal student conduct hearing is concluded when the Student Conduct Officer provides their determination.
        • Upon conclusion of the formal student conduct hearing, the Respondent will be sent an electronic Notice of Outcome and any status imposed within three (3) Business Days. This electronic notice will include the process by which the Respondent can appeal.
        • The Respondent must file an appeal to the University Appeals Board Chair within three(3) Business Days from the date of the electronic mailing of the formal student conduct hearing outcome letter.
        • Once the outcome is final (i.e., after the decision of an appeal or after the three (3)-day time to appeal has passed), the Respondent is required to complete all the required conditions.
        • There will be a single record of the formal student conduct hearing and this record will be the property of the university. The record will be maintained in accordance with the university records management policy.
      • Responses to Violations of the Student Code of Conduct

        An important component of the student conduct process is education. Student Conduct Officers may assign or design responses to allow for education and reflection on a particular incident, while promoting a safe and respectful community. Responses, which include sanctions and conditions, emphasize accountability, emotional growth, conflict resolution, restorative values and community safety. A refusal to comply with an assigned condition will result in further action, including a hold on a Respondent’s student account, a new hearing, or suspension from the university.

        • Sanctions. A sanction is meant to allow respondents to reflect on their behavior and the decisions they made that led to the finding of responsibility. A sanction indicates the Respondent’s student conduct standing with the university. Some sanctions may exclude a Respondent from participating in various university activities.

          • Referral to a University Navigator: During the first 6 weeks of fall semester, new students may be referred to a trained University Navigator for a conference regarding their behavior if the alleged violation is minor in nature. The outcome of the Navigator conference will not be a documented conduct sanction, but instead an educational conversation regarding the expectations La Salle University has for their students. Students are only referred once to a University Navigator during their tenure at La Salle.
          • Warning. Written notice to a Respondent or student organization that continued or further violations of any university policy, rule, or regulation within a specific period of time (not to exceed one calendar year) may result in an additional response from the university. Warnings may require specific conditions to be completed.
          • Probation. Probationary periods indicate that a Respondent or student organization is no longer in good standing with the university and that further violations during the probation (not to exceed two calendar years) may result in extension of the probationary period, additional conditions, suspension or expulsion. During the period of probation, specific conditions may be assigned. All assigned conditions are required to be completed before their deadlines. If a student organization with a national affiliation (e.g., a Greek-letter organization) is found responsible for misconduct and is placed on a status of Probation, La Salle University will inform the national office of the decision.
          • Suspension. Suspension is the immediate removal of the Respondent’s affiliation with the university for a specific period of time, which includes exclusion from classes, university housing, and all other university activities. Suspended Students are not allowed to be on campus for any reason during the period of suspension and may be arrested for trespassing if found on university property. Suspension from the university will not exceed 2 academic years.

            Students returning from suspension have an initial restriction from living in campus housing and are placed in indefinite probation for the remainder of their time at La Salle University. Suspended student organizations may lose certain privileges, such as use of campus facilities, participation in university activities, use of allocated funds, recruitment, or new member education activities. If a student organization with a national affiliation (e.g., a Greek-letter organization) is found responsible for misconduct and is placed on a status of Suspension, La Salle University will inform the national office of the decision. Specific conditions will be required to be completed prior to the Respondent or student organization’s return. Once the terms and the conditions of a suspension are complete, it is the responsibility of the Respondent to contact their academic program regarding returning as a student.

          • Expulsion. Expulsion is a permanent involuntary separation of a Respondent from the university. Readmission is not possible.
          • Additional Statuses for Student Organizations. While student organizations may be placed on a status similar to individual Respondents, including Warning, Probation, and Suspension, several other statuses apply solely to student organizations:
            • Social Probation. A student organization on Social Probation is not permitted to hold any organized social functions (e.g., parties) for a specified period of time.
            • Disaffiliation. Disaffiliation is a permanent involuntary process to revoke recognition of a university organization that has a charter.
        • Conditions. A condition is a response to provide the Respondent or student organization with experiences from which to learn. Any condition may be required of a Respondent or student organization, and may include the following (but not limited to):
          • Removal from University Housing. Living within university housing is considered a privilege and not a right. Respondents who have repeatedly violated expectations within university housing, or have disrupted the experience of other students within university housing, will be asked to vacate university housing. The Student Conduct Officer will determine how expediently a Respondent will need to vacate university housing, and if returning to university housing in the future will be an option and under what circumstances.
          • Restitution
          • Reparation
          • Substance abuse education and/or evaluation
          • Referral to the Student Counseling Center
          • University program attendance
          • Research or reflection paper
        • Interim Suspension or Restrictions. This action assigned by the Director of Student Conduct, or designee, is a temporary suspension of certain rights or privileges during the conduct process. An interim suspension may be broad and all-inclusive or may be specific to a location and/or function to ensure the physical or emotional safety and well-being of members of the university community, the Respondent’s own physical or emotional safety and well-being, or the preservation of university property, or safety and order on university premises. An interim suspension, interim removal from university housing, or other interim restriction, may be imposed before, during, or after the commencement of a conduct hearing, or during the appeal process. A Respondent or student organization subject to interim suspension or other restrictions will receive written or electronic notice of the suspension or restrictions imposed, as well as the notice of the process for resolving the interim restrictions. The interim suspension or restrictions will remain in effect until the conduct process is resolved.
        • Hold on Student Account. A hold may be placed on a Respondent’s account as a response to a refusal to comply with the student conduct process, or in other appropriate circumstances. It may be applied in situations where there is a need to resolve a pending student conduct charge, even in the case of an Respondent who was, but is not now, currently a student.
      • University Appeals Process
        • Formal Student Conduct Hearings. Unless otherwise noted in this process, the University Appeals Boards (UAB) will hear appeals of determinations of responsibility made under the Student Code of Conduct.
          • Warnings. Warnings may not be appealed.
          • Probation, Suspension or Expulsion. Appeals of probation, suspension or expulsion from Student Conduct Officers may be appealed to the University Appeals Board.
          • Policy on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination. Any outcome following a formal hearing involving violations of Policy On Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination be appealed by either Respondent or Complainant to the University Appeals Board.
        • Informal Student Conduct Hearings (originating from Residence Life or Community Development). For informal student conduct hearings, the follow is applicable:
          • Within three (3) business days, the Respondent intending to appeal must submit the basis of the appeal in writing to the Director of Student Conduct.
          • The appeal letter will be assigned to an Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs or designee.
          • All relevant information will be reviewed and a determination will be made by Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs. This decision is final and cannot be appealed further.
        • Grounds for Appeals
          • All appeal submissions and appeals will be considered and heard by a three (3) member University Appeals Board (“UAB”). One member of the UAB shall be an Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, who shall also chair the UAB and select the other two members from a pool of trained faculty and staff.
          • In order for an appeal to be heard, the Respondent must demonstrate to the University Appeals Board through the written appeal submission one or more of the following:
            • Information that was not available at the time of the investigation is now available, and could reasonably be expected to have altered the outcome of the case; or
            • The University student conduct procedures were violated in a way that is more likely than not to have adversely affected the outcome of the case.
          • The Respondent shall have three (3) business days from the date the Notice of Outcome is sent to submit, in writing, an appeal on one or more of the grounds listed above and include specific details as to why an appeal should be granted. This letter is to be submitted to the Chair of the UAB.\
          • Once an appeal is filed, the Respondent involved will receive electronic notification of such filing. This notice will state that the case is under appeal consideration and if deemed by the UAB to meet the above standards, will be scheduled in most cases for an appeal hearing within five (5) business days. The Respondent must attend the scheduled hearing or forfeit the right to appeal.
          • Except as required to explain the basis of new evidence, the UAB will limit its review to the process and outcome of the initial hearing (if applicable), together with any supporting documents. Witnesses will not be permitted to appear on appeal except to the extent that witnesses may provide testimony related solely to new evidence or information that the Respondent demonstrates was not known or available for the original hearing.
          • The Respondent will appear for the scheduled hearing in front of the UAB and present the basis for the appeal. There will be a time limit of twenty (20) minutes for each and any student presentation at the scheduled hearing. The Respondent has the right to bring either a University-designated advocate, subject to the rules regarding advisors stated herein.
          • The Student Conduct Office will be available to respond to the appeal and give the rationale for the determination made at the original hearing.
          • After presentation of the appeal and before the Respondent (and University- designated advocate if applicable) are dismissed, the UAB may, at its discretion, ask questions of the parties present. A hearing is considered closed after all testimony and evidence has been submitted by the parties and the chair of the University Appeals Board has concluded the appeal.
          • Following the close of the hearing, the University Appeals Board may:
            • Reverse, reduce, dismiss, uphold, or otherwise modify the original determination and/or status and conditions imposed; or,
            • Remand the case for rehearing for resolving any procedural processes that the University Appeals Board determines was more likely than not to have impacted the outcome of the original hearing.
          • The decision of the UAB will be sent electronically to the parties within three (3) business days of the hearing in most cases. The determination rendered by the University Appeals Board is final and may not be appealed further in any forum, although the University reserves the right to modify an appeal or hearing decision as appropriate and at its discretion.
          • All written notices to the Respondent referred to herein may be delivered at the University’s discretion to any e-mail or mailing address on file with the University. All electronic notices will be deemed received when sent.
  • Parent/Guardian Notification Policy

    Due to the fact that the vast majority of La Salle undergraduates are legal dependents of their parents or legal guardians, the University reserves the right, in accordance with applicable law, to contact parents or legal guardians when sanctions of suspension from the residence halls, suspension from the University or dismissal from the University are imminent and/or when the University has knowledge that a student has been arrested by Philadelphia Police or other law enforcement agencies. Independent students should contact the Senior Associate Dean of Students to notify the University of their Independent Status.

  • Sharing of Information About an Employee/Student

    The University desires to treat individuals who are both enrolled as a student of the University and employed in any capacity by the University (defined for the purposes of this policy only as an “employee/student”) in the same manner as other University employees with respect to whom it may not have access to information concerning employees’ activities and whereabouts outside of the workplace. As an employee/student has a presence on campus unrelated to their employment and are subject to student discipline, the University as a whole has access to information about an employee/student’s conduct that may not be relevant to the individual’s role as an employee of the University and vice versa.

    The University, however, has legal obligations under federal and state laws to take measures to promote the safety of its students, employees, and visitors on campus, including under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and the Jeanne Clery Act.

    In order to achieve a balance between the competing interests of employee/students and the University with respect to the dissemination of information regarding the conduct of employee/students, Student Affairs and Human Resources shall share information that may subject an employee/student to discipline both as an employee and a student only when the information relates to an act of physical violence against persons or property. These circumstances include, but are not limited to, forcible sex offenses, robbery, burglary, assault, battery, arson, and motor vehicle theft. Student Affairs and Human Resources also shall share the fact of an employee/student’s exclusion from campus as a result of any campus disciplinary process.

III. D. Policy on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination

  • Purpose/Policy Statement

    This Policy on Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, and Discrimination (“Policy”), including all principles, and processes contained herein, shall exclusively govern any incident raising concerns of harassment and/or discrimination based on race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, creed, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, age, disability, veteran status or any other legally protected class status and/or any violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, including sexual misconduct of any nature, gender-based discrimination, retaliation, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual assault where a student (from the time of acceptance of admission) is identified as a potential respondent. This Policy governs conduct both on and off La Salle University’s campus, and also governs conduct that occurs while students are on a leave of absence or studying abroad. It also includes conduct that occurs when students are not officially enrolled during a particular term as long as they have a continuing relationship with the University. This Policy will apply to a student’s behavior even if the student withdraws or graduates from the University while a disciplinary matter is pending. La Salle University reserves the right to investigate and adjudicate complaints under this Policy irrespective of actions taken (or not taken) by other institutions.

    The procedures set forth in this Policy do not apply to faculty and staff. Any faculty and/or staff accused of violating the standards set forth in this Policy shall be subject to the procedures set forth in the University’s Equal Opportunity and Anti-Harassment policy. If a student worker is accused of violating this Policy, the University will determine whether the alleged conduct occurred primarily in the student’s capacity as a student or as a staff member, and proceed under the appropriate policy at LaSalle University’s sole discretion. Non-La Salle University community members may report violations of this Policy and the report will be addressed in accordance with the procedures below. However, a non-La Salle University community member’s role in the University’s investigatory and disciplinary procedures may be limited. La Salle University’s support resources are available only to members of the La Salle University community. If an individual’s status with the University (i.e., student, staff, faculty member, non-community member) has changed from the time of the alleged policy violation to the time of complaint, the University will determine which policies will apply.

    To the extent this Policy conflicts with any another University policy, principle, and/or process, this Policy shall govern.

  • Definitions

    • Sexual Misconduct

      Sexual misconduct is an action or course of actions that violate the rights of others, and demonstrate flagrant disregard for the principles of this community. La Salle University seeks to prevent all forms of sexual misconduct, and desires to establish and maintain a safe and healthy environment for all members of the community through sexual misconduct prevention, education, support, and a fair adjudication process. The use of alcohol and/or other drugs does not minimize or excuse a person’s responsibility for conduct that violates this Policy. Sexual misconduct may include sexual assault, sexual exploitation, or both. The definitions below are intended to provide clarity, and do not suggest that one behavior is more severe or violating than the other.

    • Sexual Assault

      Sexual assault may be rape, fondling without consent, incest, statutory rape, or an attempt at any of them, as defined in the Clery Act and below:

      • Rape is the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
      • Fondling is the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent (as defined below) of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of their temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
      • Incest is sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law in the applicable jurisdiction.
      • Statutory rape is sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent in the applicable jurisdiction.

      Sexual assault can be committed by any person against any other person, regardless of gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, or past or current relationship status. Sexual assault may occur with or without physical resistance or violence.

    • Sexual Exploitation

      Sexual exploitation occurs when a person takes sexual advantage of another person for the benefit of anyone other than that other person without that other person’s consent. Examples of behavior that could constitute sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to the following:

      • Intentional non-consensual contact with the private body parts of another person that does not meet the definition of behaviors prohibited under the definition of “Sexual Assault,” above;
      • Prostituting another person;
      • Recording or capturing through any means images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nudity without that person’s consent;
      • Distributing images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nudity, if the individual distributing the images or audio knows or should have known that the person(s) depicted in the images or audio did not consent to such disclosure and object(s) or would object to such disclosure; and/or
      • Viewing another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nudity in a place where that person would have a reasonable expectation of privacy, without that person’s consent, if the individual viewing the other person’s or persons’ sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nudity in such a place knows or should have known that the person(s) being viewed would object to that.
    • Coercion

      Coercion is defined as compelling someone to act by applying pressure, harassment, threats, intimidation, or other actions a reasonable person would consider to be coercive.

    • Consent means words or actions, freely and actively given by each party, which a reasonable person would interpret as a willingness to participate in agreed-upon sexual conduct. Consent is not present or valid when a person is incapable of giving consent because they are incapacitated by drugs and/or alcohol; when intimidation, threats, physical force, or other actions that a reasonable person in that person’s circumstances would consider coercive are applied; when that person is placed in fear that any person will suffer imminent bodily injury; when a physical or mental condition is present such that the person cannot knowingly or voluntarily give consent; or when a person is under the age of 16. Silence, non-communication, or a lack of resistance does not necessarily imply consent. Previous relationships or consent do not imply consent to future sexual conduct. Consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent can be rescinded at any time.

      The use of alcohol and/or drugs does not minimize or excuse a person’s responsibility for committing sexual misconduct, or that person’s responsibility for determining whether another is capable of giving consent.

      An objective standard will be used in determining whether a person is incapable of giving consent due to the person’s incapacitation by the use or consumption of drugs and/or alcohol, or if a physical or mental condition as described above is present. That is, consent is not present or valid when:

      • From the standpoint of a reasonable person, the respondent knew, or reasonably should have known, that the person was incapable of giving consent because the person was incapacitated by the person’s use or consumption of drugs and/or alcohol such that the person could not understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual situation, or that the person’s physical or mental condition would prevent knowing and voluntary consent; and
      • The person was, in fact, incapable of giving consent because the person was incapacitated by the person’s use or consumption of drugs and/or alcohol such that the person could not understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual situation, or the person was incapable of providing knowing or voluntary consent due to a physical or mental condition.
    • Dating Violence

      Dating violence is violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the person subjected to the violence. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

      For the purposes of this definition, dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse, if involving individuals who are or have been dating as defined here.

      For the purposes of this definition, violence means conduct that involves the use or threatened use of physical force against a person, or creates a reasonable belief that physical force may be used against a person in the course of the conduct.

      Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence stated below.

    • Discrimination

      Discrimination is adverse conduct directed at an individual based on race, creed, color, place of birth, ancestry, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, genetic information, disability and/or any other status or characteristic protected by applicable law.

    • Domestic Violence

      Domestic violence is violence committed by:

      • a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the person subjected to the violence;
      • a person with whom the person subjected to the violence shares a child in common;
      • a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the person subjected to the violence as a spouse or intimate partner;
      • a person similarly situated to a spouse of the person subjected to the violence under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the violence occurred; or,
      • any other person against an adult or youth who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the violence occurred.

      For the purposes of this definition, domestic violence includes but is not limited to sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse, if involving individuals who are or have been in a domestic relationship as defined here.

      For the purposes of this definition, violence means conduct that involves the use or threatened use of physical force against a person, or creates a reasonable belief that physical force may be used against a person in the course of the conduct.

    • Harassment

      Harassment is verbal, written, visual, or physical conduct based on or motivated by an individual’s actual or perceived sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, race, creed, color, place of birth, ancestry, ethnicity, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, or other characteristics as defined and protected by law that has the purpose or effect, from the point of view of a reasonable person, of objectively and substantially: (a) undermining and detracting from or interfering with an individual’s educational or work performance or access to University resources; or (b) creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational, work, or living environment. Harassment may include repeated slurs, or taunts in the guise of jokes, or disparaging references to others, use of epithets, stereotypes, comments, gestures, threats, graffiti, display or circulation of written or visual materials, taunts on manner of speech, and negative reference to customs when such conduct is based on or motivated by one or more of the protected characteristics identified above, or other characteristics protected by applicable law.

    • Stalking

      Stalking is defined as engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or suffer substantial emotional distress.

      For the purposes of this definition:

      • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the alleged stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
      • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the person subjected to the stalking.
      • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
      • Examples of stalking behaviors or activities include, but are not limited to the following, if they occur in the context of stalking as defined above:
        • Non-consensual communication, including face-to-face communication, telephone calls, voice messages, e-mails, text messages, written letters, gifts, or any other communications that are unwelcome.
        • Use of online, electronic or digital technologies in connection with such communication, including but not limited to:
          • Posting of pictures or text in chat rooms or on websites;
          • Sending unwanted/unsolicited e-mail or talk requests;
          • Posting private or public messages on Internet sites, social networks, and/or school bulletin boards;
          • Installing spyware on a person’s computer;
          • Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) or similar technology to monitor a person;         
          • Pursuing, following, waiting for, or showing up uninvited at or near a residence, workplace, classroom, or other places frequented by the person;
          • Surveillance or other types of observation including staring or “voyeurism”;
          • Trespassing;
          • Vandalism;
          • Non-consensual touching;
          • Direct verbal or physical threats;
          • Gathering information about an individual from friends, family, or co-workers;
          • Accessing private information through unauthorized means
          • Threats to harm self or others;
          • Defamation and/or lying to others about the person; or
          • Using a third party or parties to accomplish any of the above.
    • Complainant

      A complainant is usually an individual filing a complaint of a violation of this Policy. In some cases (such as, e.g., cases in which a person involved in an incident of alleged sexual misconduct, domestic or dating violence or misconduct, stalking, or related retaliation does not wish to participate in the process but La Salle University decides that the alleged misconduct needs to be investigated), La Salle University may pursue an investigation and adjudication under this Policy without a designated complainant. In these cases, La Salle University may extend some or all of the rights of a complainant as defined in this Policy to affected parties as deemed appropriate by the Title IX Coordinator.

      For the purpose of this definition, the term “complainant” is also used throughout this Policy to refer generally to an individual who was allegedly subjected to prohibited conduct as defined in this Policy.

    • Respondent

      A respondent is an individual whose alleged conduct is being investigated to determine if it is in violation of this Policy. For ease of reference, the term “respondent” is also used throughout this Policy to refer generally to an individual who allegedly engaged in prohibited conduct as defined in this Policy.

    • No Contact Order

      When a violation of this Policy has been reported, or when otherwise deemed appropriate under the circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator or appropriate supervisory authority may issue No Contact Orders to the persons involved, whether or not disciplinary action is taken. A No Contact Order is used to restrict encounters and communications between individuals. While a No Contact Order in and of itself does not constitute discipline and will not appear in a student’s disciplinary record, refusal to adhere to the order after written or verbal notification of its terms is prohibited and may result in disciplinary action.

    • No Trespass/Persona Non-Grata Notice

      A No Trespass Notice prohibits the presence of an individual on La Salle property, or other properties on which La Salle University programs are occurring. Violating a No Trespass Notice is considered to be a violation of University policy. As No Trespass Notices are legally enforceable, a violation may lead to arrest and prosecution.

    • Title IX Coordinator

      The Title IX Coordinator, as used in this Policy, refers to Rose Lee Pauline, La Salle’s Title IX Coordinator, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Dr. Dawn Soufleris, or to either’s designee. The Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator, where appropriate in their discretion, may designate another university official to perform one or more Title IX-related functions.

  • Policy Procedure/General Principles

    • Reporting Options
      • Confidential Reporting Option

        There are options for individuals to confidentially report incidents reasonably believed to be in violation of this Policy. Confidential reporting options will not disclose any details of the report with anyone. At La Salle University, these confidential reporting options are: the Student Counseling Center; the Student Health Center; the Substance Abuse and Violence Education Center (SAVE); designated individuals in Ministry, Service, and Support; a designated Title IX Advocate/Educator (Confidential Resource); and a designated Respondent Advocate (Confidential Resource). Reports can also be made via the La Salle University Whistleblower Policy.

        Sharing information with a Confidential Resource will not result in a report to La Salle University or investigatory or disciplinary action against a respondent. Statistical information about confidentially-reported incidents may still be included in the University’s annual Clery Act reporting, but such statistical information will not include any identifying information about any student.

      • Reporting to a Responsible Employee

        All La Salle University faculty and staff who are not listed above as Confidential Resources are Responsible Employees and are required by federal law to report information received relating to violations of this Policy (“Responsible Employees”). Faculty and staff receive annual notification and training regarding their duty and obligation to report knowledge of sexual misconduct involving a member(s) of the campus community and are instructed to report any such acts to the Title IX Coordinator, who has been specifically trained to receive and respond to allegations of violations of this Policy. Students who have experienced a violation of this Policy and would like La Salle University to respond by offering resources and/or investigating the incident should immediately notify the Title IX Coordinator, who can be reached as follows:

        • Rose Lee Pauline
          Title IX Coordinator
          1900 West Olney Avenue
          Philadelphia, Pennsylvania PA 19141-1199
          215.951.1014
          pauline@lasalle.edu
        • Dr. Dawn Soufleris
          Vice President for Student Affairs
          1900 West Olney Avenue
          Philadelphia, Pennsylvania PA 19141-1199
          215.951.1018
          soufleris@lasalle.edu
      • Confidentiality and Privacy

        Only Confidential Resources can offer confidentiality. However, even non-Confidential Resources (such as Responsible Employees) will maintain privacy to the greatest extent possible. Privacy is not confidentiality; if reported to a non-Confidential Resource, confidentiality cannot be guaranteed and there may be circumstances in which the University may need to investigate a report of a violation of this Policy and take appropriate actions to fulfill its legal obligations, even if the complainant wishes to maintain confidentiality or to not pursue an investigation and adjudication of an incident violating this Policy.  The determination of when to proceed with an investigation or adjudication against the complainant’s wishes shall be at the discretion of the University based on the facts and circumstances of the case, including, but not limited to, the health and safety of the complainant, the health and safety of others, the safety of the campus community, and the rights of the parties.

        The information provided to a Responsible Employee will be shared only as necessary for an investigation and/or to seek resolution. To the extent practicable, Responsible Employees will inform a potential complainant of their responsibility to report any case of a potential violation of this Policy and the options for confidential reporting on campus. At that time, the potential complainant can decide to move forward and share the information with the Responsible Employee or choose to access a Confidential Resource.

    • Timeliness of Report or Complaint

      The University will take prompt and appropriate steps to respond to complaints of a violation of this Policy.While there is no time limit for reporting a violation of this Policy, the complainant and other reporting individuals are encouraged to report any violation as soon as possible in order to maximize the University’s ability to respond and investigate promptly and effectively.

    • Timeliness of Investigations

      The investigation generally will take no longer than 60 days; however, complex cases, the availability of witnesses and other exceptional circumstances may require additional time and/or the modification of the timeframes described herein. If there are delays in the investigation, the Title IX Coordinator or other appropriate individual will notify the parties of the delays and explain the circumstances causing the delays.

      La Salle University will not wait for the conclusion of a criminal investigation or proceeding to begin its own investigation and resolve complaints under this Policy. The University will, however, comply with valid requests by law enforcement in a criminal investigation. As such, La Salle University may need to delay temporarily an investigation under this Policy while law enforcement is in the process of gathering evidence. Once law enforcement has completed its gathering of evidence, the University will promptly resume and complete its investigation.

    • Standard of Proof

      La Salle University addresses reports of a violation of this Policy using a preponderance of the evidence standard, meaning that the outcome will be based on a conclusion of what was more likely to have occurred than not. Formal rules of evidence do not apply to investigations or adjudications under this Policy.

    • Prior Sexual History

      The complainant’s or respondent’s past sexual history generally may not be referenced throughout the process described herein, except that either party (complainant or respondent) may reference a prior sexual relationship between the complainant and the respondent. Sexual history that relates to past complaints or findings of responsibility under this Policy may be considered when determining an appropriate sanction if a respondent if found responsible.

    • Role of Alcohol and Other Drug Use

      La Salle University’s primary concern is ensuring that individuals feel comfortable reporting a complaint. The health and safety of every student at La Salle University is of the utmost importance. La Salle University recognizes that students who have been drinking and/or using drugs (whether such use is voluntary or involuntary) at the time that an alleged violation of this Policy occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to fear of potential consequences for their own conduct. The University strongly encourages students to report an alleged violation of this Policy to the appropriate La Salle University official. A bystander or a reporting individual acting in good faith that discloses any incident of an alleged violation of this Policy to a responsible employee or law enforcement will not be subject to La Salle University’s code of conduct for violations of alcohol and/or drug policies (see Alcohol & Other Drugs Policy) occurring at or near the time of the commission of the alleged violation of this Policy.

      The consumption of alcohol and/or use of other drugs, in and of itself, is not an excuse for a violation of this Policy, but may be considered as a factor in the adjudication of matters under this Policy.

    • Equal Rights and Opportunities

      To the extent permitted by law, the complainant and respondent will be afforded the same rights and opportunities throughout the investigation and adjudication process, including the opportunity to recommend witnesses, submit evidence, and appeal the outcome of any formal University disciplinary process.

    • Cooperation of Parties

      The parties to a complaint and/or investigation conducted under this Policy are expected to cooperate fully with the resolution of the complaint and/or investigation by providing complete, accurate, and truthful information and any potentially relevant documentation in any format. In the event that the complainant chooses not to cooperate, the University may be obligated to continue with an investigation and adjudication. If the respondent chooses not to cooperate with the investigation or adjudication, the adjudication of the complaint will proceed without input or involvement from the respondent. The University will also cooperate with other colleges or universities if the respondent or complainant is from a university other than La Salle University.

    • Cooperation of Witnesses

      All witnesses interviewed or contacted in the investigation are required to cooperate fully by providing complete, accurate, and truthful information. They may also be expected to sign statements or other materials documenting the information they provide, and may be asked to keep the substance of the interview confidential. In the event the witness cannot meet in person, the witness will be offered the option to either participate electronically via technology or submit a written statement containing all evidence relevant to the investigation of which the witness is aware. Failure to cooperate fully with the investigation may subject a witness to disciplinary action up to and including possible suspension or expulsion. Failure to cooperate includes, but is not limited to, providing false, misleading, or incomplete information, failure to provide requested documentation, whether in paper or electronic format, or intentional destruction of relevant or requested evidence.

    • Retaliation

      Retaliating directly or indirectly against a person who has in good faith made a report under this Policy or participated in an investigation is prohibited. Retaliation includes but is not limited to ostracizing the person, pressuring the person to drop or not support the complaint or to provide false or misleading information, engaging in conduct that may reasonably be perceived to affect adversely that person’s educational, living, or work environment, threatening, intimidating or coercing the person, or otherwise discriminating against any person for exercising their rights or responsibilities under this Policy. Depending on the circumstances, retaliation may also be unlawful. Retaliation under this Policy may be found whether or not the underlying complaint is ultimately found to have merit. In the event an individual believes that he or she has been retaliated against, an investigation will be conducted and appropriate disciplinary action will be taken, if warranted. That investigation may be independent of or may be combined with the existing investigation, as determined by the Title IX Coordinator.

    • In cases where multiple allegations and/or multiple accused respondents or complainants arise out of the same event or series of related events, the University shall have the discretion to direct that a single investigation be conducted under procedures set forth in this Policy.

    • Effect of Withdrawal, Transfer, or Degree Conferral While Investigation or Adjudication Pending

      In the event that a respondent withdraws or seeks to transfer while an investigation is pending but unresolved, the University may elect to proceed with the investigation in the respondent’s absence. In addition, in the University’s sole discretion, an academic and/or financial hold may be placed on the respondent’s account during the pendency of an investigation, with no degrees to be awarded or official transcripts to be provided until the investigation has resolved.

    • Role of Advisors and Advocates
      • Advisors

        Both the complainant and the respondent may each be accompanied at any point in this process, including at a hearing or appeal, by one advisor of their choice (witnesses at the hearing may not be utilized as an advisor). Hearings will not be postponed due to the unavailability of the student’s advisor of choice.

        The complainant and the respondent are responsible for presenting their own information and therefore an advisor is limited to a supportive, non-participatory role and may not speak, write, record, or otherwise communicate on behalf of the complainant or the respondent at any point during this process, including by formulating questions for the party during proceedings. An advisor who fails to comply with these requirements, hinders this process or is otherwise disruptive, may be asked to leave during this process. In cases where the complainant or respondent have chosen legal counsel as advisors, the University reserves the right to have University counsel present as well. The University reserves the right to impose additional parameters on an advisor’s role and acceptable conduct throughout this process at its discretion.

      • Advocates

        Should they so desire, the complainant and respondent may select a University-designated advocate to assist them through this process. All advocates are members of the University community who have been approved by the University to serve in their role as an advocate. The advocates will be available to meet with the complainant or respondent before and after a hearing, and will also assist in preparation. Advocates, as opposed to advisors, may assist the complainant or respondent during the formal hearing.

    • Interim Measures
      • General

        At any time during the process described in this Policy, the University may take interim steps to provide for the safety of the complainant, the campus community, and the rights of the respondent. These may include, but are not limited to, interim suspension from the University and/or interim removal from housing, adjustments to academic classes or University residence assignments for the complainant or the respondent, access to University facilities, the issuance of no-contact orders, etc. Interim measures may be modified throughout this process, and may in some instances last beyond the investigation and adjudication of a complaint. Students wishing to access such services during or after the investigation should contact the Title IX Coordinator.

      • No Contact Order

        When a violation of this Policy has been alleged, or when otherwise deemed appropriate under the circumstances, the University may issue No Contact Orders to the students involved, whether or not disciplinary action is taken. No-Contact Orders may also be issued as an interim measure while alleged violations of the Code of Conduct are investigated and adjudicated. A No Contact Order is used to restrict encounters and communications between individuals. While a No Contact Order in and of itself does not constitute discipline and will not appear on a student’s disciplinary record, refusal to adhere to the order after written or verbal notification of its terms is prohibited and may result in disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion. The University may also initiate a no-trespass/ persona non-grata (PNG) status, indicating that an individual is not welcome on University property and could face criminal arrest for trespassing.

    • Making a Criminal Complaint to Law Enforcement

      Initiating the University’s student conduct process does not preclude reporting the incident to the police. Students have the opportunity at all times, but are not required, to file criminal complaints and student conduct complaints simultaneously. Students who wish to make a police report may contact the Philadelphia Police directly, or may also contact La Salle University Public Safety or a designated University advocate to assist in making such a report.

    • False Reports or Complaints

      The intentional reporting of false reports or complaints will not be tolerated and may subject the individual making the false report or complaint to disciplinary action and potential criminal and/or civil liability. A finding of not responsible in and of itself does not constitute a false complaint or report.

    • Investigation and Adjudication of Reported Cases
      • Initial Assessment
        • In most cases, within five (5) business days of receiving the report of a violation of this Policy, the Title IX Coordinator will contact the complainant to set up a meeting to gather preliminary information about the report or complaint, inform the complainant of the contents of this Policy, provide information about on- and off-campus resources, discuss potential interim measures, provide the complainant with a link to this Policy, review the conduct process and other relevant procedures (including the University’s prohibition against retaliation), provide a referral to the Complainant Advocate should the complainant so desire, and instruct complainant to refrain from any and all contact with respondent, including through third parties, excepting University officials, as a part of the process.
        • As soon as practicable after the Title IX Coordinator’s meeting with the complainant, the Title IX Coordinator shall make an initial assessment of whether, if the complainant’s allegations are true, the allegations would constitute a violation of this Policy. If the complainant’s allegations, even if true, would not constitute a violation of this Policy, then the Title IX Coordinator shall inform the Complainant of that decision and no formal or informal process will move forward. The complainant shall still be offered campus resources and may also be entitled to interim measures. Any doubt as to whether an investigation is warranted should be resolved in favor of proceeding with an investigation.
        • If the Title IX Coordinator determines that interim measures are appropriate, the Title IX Coordinator will impose interim measures.
        • If the Title IX Coordinator determines that an investigation is warranted, then following the initial meeting with the complainant, the Title IX Coordinator will meet with the respondent as soon as practicable to gather preliminary information, review the contents of this Policy, provide information about on- and off-campus resources, discuss the interim measures as applicable, provide the respondent with a link to this Policy, review the conduct process and other relevant procedures (including the University’s prohibition against retaliation), provide a referral to the Respondent Advocate should the respondent so desire, and instruct the respondent to refrain from any and all contact with complainant, including through third parties, excepting University officials, as a part of the process.
      • Determination of Informal or Formal Process
        • Following the initial assessment meetings with the complainant and respondent, the Title IX Coordinator will prepare a written Preliminary Investigatory Report, which will include the name of the respondent, if available, a preliminary summary of the alleged violation, and a list of potential witnesses.
        • Following the preparation of the Preliminary Investigatory Report, the Title IX Coordinator in his/her discretion will determine whether an informal resolution process is an option under the circumstances presented by the complaint. The informal resolution processes will not be used to investigate or resolve reports of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and/or sexual misconduct. Informal resolutions will generally not be appropriate for allegations that present significant disputed issues of fact or circumstances, or where the alleged conduct is of a nature that may warrant the imposition of a sanction of suspension or expulsion. Informal resolutions are not appealable.
        • If it is determined that the informal resolution process may be used, the Title IX Coordinator will assign a trained staff member from the Division of Student Affairs to discuss the option of an informal resolution with the complainant. If the complainant agrees to move forward with an informal resolution, the staff member will attempt to facilitate an informal resolution with the respondent. An informal resolution will not be used unless both parties agree, and a party will not be required to meet face-to-face with the other party at any time in connection with the process of reaching an informal resolution unless both parties agree.
        • If the Title IX Coordinator determines that a formal investigation should be conducted, or if either party requests a formal investigation and the Title IX Coordinator determines that a formal investigation is appropriate, the investigation and adjudication thereof shall be conducted pursuant to the process described immediately below.
      • Formal Investigation
        • The University’s investigation and adjudication process under this Policy is not a legal proceeding. The University’s investigation and adjudication process provides a fundamentally fair process as defined and described by the procedures set forth below. This process does not provide for direct contact (including cross-examination) between the parties, but, as described below, does allow the parties to provide information that they consider relevant to the case.
        • If the Title IX Coordinator determines a formal investigation is to be conducted, an investigator will be selected by the Title IX Coordinator to conduct the formal investigation either on his/her own or in conjunction with the Title IX Coordinator (the “Investigator(s)”). In the event that the alleged conduct involves the Title IX Coordinator, the Title IX Coordinator is deemed to have a material conflict with investigating the case, or the Title IX Coordinator is otherwise unavailable to participate in the formal investigation, the Vice President for Student Affairs will select the Investigator(s) to conduct the formal investigation.
        • Following the appointment of the Investigator(s), the complainant will be contacted to schedule a meeting with the Investigator(s). The Investigator(s) will also schedule an appointment to meet with the respondent.
        • At their respective meetings, the Investigator(s) will notify the complainant and the respondent that they may each submit a written statement to the Investigator(s), addressing the allegations presented in the Preliminary Investigatory Report and provide a list of potential witnesses that each party would like the Investigator(s) to interview. The complainant and the respondent may also provide the Investigator(s) with any other relevant evidence they would like the Investigator(s) to consider and may provide the Investigator(s) with lists of specific questions to be asked of the witnesses and/or each another. It is within the sole discretion of the Investigator(s) to determine the evidence to consider and the witnesses to interview; the Investigator(s) is not required to consider the evidence identified by the parties or to interview any particular witness, even if identified by one of the parties, nor to ask any or all of the questions provided by either party.
        • At any time during the investigation, at his/her discretion, the Investigator(s) may contact those witnesses the Investigator(s) believe may possess relevant evidence. The selected individuals may or may not be those witnesses identified on the lists provided by the complainant and the respondent.
        • Within a reasonable amount of time following the above steps, the Investigator(s) shall generate a Draft Final Investigatory Report. While copies of the Draft Final Investigatory Report will not be provided, both complainant and respondent will be afforded the opportunity to make an appointment with the Investigator(s) to review the Draft Final Investigatory Report within approximately five (5) business days of its completion. The Draft Final Investigatory Report should contain: (1) a summary of the factual allegations against the respondent; (2) the policy provision the alleged conduct, if true, would violate; (3) summaries of the information obtained by the Investigator(s) from the parties and witnesses; and (4) copies of other relevant information obtained by the Investigator(s). Where, in his/her discretion, a summary of material points in agreement and points of disagreement would be of assistance to the fact finder, the Investigator(s) may also include such a summary in the Draft Investigative Report. The complainant and the respondent shall have seventy-two (72) hours after reviewing the Draft Final Investigatory Report to provide their written responses, if any.
        • The Investigator(s) will review the complainant’s and the respondent’s written responses, if any, and determine, within his/her sole discretion, if any additional investigation is warranted and/or whether revisions to the Draft Final Investigatory Report are warranted based on information provided in the parties’ responses.
        • Once the Draft Final Report has been finalized by the Investigator(s) following the parties’ written responses, the Final Investigatory Report, along with all other relevant evidence shall be forwarded to the Director of Student Conduct and made available to the complainant and the respondent consistent with all applicable federal and state regulations and La Salle policies.
      • Formal Adjudication Procedure
        • Following receipt of the Final Investigatory Report, the Director of Student Conduct shall provide notice to the complainant and respondent referencing the specific provision of this Policy alleged to have been violated and the possible outcomes, as well as the date, time, and location of the scheduled hearing.
        • The hearing shall be presided over by the Director of Student Conduct and an additional one or two co-hearers (selected from a pool of trained hearing officers). In the event that a material conflict of interest is deemed to exist, the Vice President for Student Affairs shall designate an alternate(s) to preside over the hearing.
        • Both the complainant and the respondent shall have an opportunity to present evidence and testimony during the hearing. A list of potential witnesses, as well as any additional information either party plans to present, must be submitted to the Director of Student Conduct no less than five (5) business days in advance of the hearing. Whether a proposed witness is permitted to present evidence at the hearing is in the sole discretion of the Director of Student Conduct. It is the responsibility of the parties to inform their witnesses of the date and time of the hearing. The Director of Student Conduct may elect to rely upon the statements of witnesses contained in the Final Investigatory Report if such witnesses are unavailable to attend the hearing.
        • The hearing will be private and audio recorded.
        • The complainant and respondent do not have to be in the same room at the same time if they do not wish to be. The Director of Student Conduct may make other arrangements (such as use of a wall partition or phone/video conferencing) to allow the testimony while not depriving either party of access to the evidence and participation in the hearing.
        • Only the Director of Student Conduct and the co-hearer(s) may question the individual parties and any witnesses. Both the complainant and respondent may submit a list of questions to the Director of Student Conduct in advance of the hearing that they would like the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) to consider asking the other party. These questions will be asked at the discretion of the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s), who may choose in their sole discretion to reframe questions or omit questions that are deemed to be irrelevant or redundant. The Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) may also permit additional questions to be asked during the course of the hearing. If the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) determine that unresolved issues exist that would be clarified by the presentation of additional information and/or speaking to any party, the Director of Student Conduct may postpone the hearing and reconvene it in a timely manner to receive such additional information.
        • Both the complainant and the respondent shall have the option not to participate in the hearing; however, the exercise of that option will not preclude the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) from proceeding and making final determinations with respect to the complaint on the basis of the Final Investigatory Report and other available information.
        • Both the complainant and the respondent shall have the opportunity to make an impact statement prior to the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s)’s determination of the hearing outcome and corresponding sanction if applicable.
        • The Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) will then make a decision as to whether by a preponderance of the evidence that this Policy was violated. The decision will be communicated to both the complainant and the respondent in written, electronic notification concurrently, within five (5) business days after the hearing has concluded, barring any exigent circumstances that may cause reasonable delays. To the extent permitted by law, the Notice of Outcome will include:
          • The name of the respondent;
          • The alleged violation(s) of the Code of Conduct and the finding of responsibility;
          • The sanction(s) imposed, if any;
          • The factual findings supporting the determination; and,
          • Information regarding the appeal process.
        • Both the complainant and the respondent will be informed of the outcome of the hearing and the outcome of any appeal without a commitment to protect the confidentiality of the information. It shall be the decision of the complainant or the respondent to disclose or discuss the outcome of the hearing.
        • If a finding of responsibility is made, the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) will consider, as part of their deliberations, whether a sanction will:
          • Bring an end to the violation in question;
          • Reasonably prevent a recurrence of a similar violation; and
          • Remedy the effects of the violation on the complainant and La Salle University Community.
        • In determining an appropriate sanction, the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) may consider any record of past violations of the Code of Conduct, as well as the nature and severity of such past violation(s). Any sanction imposed will be explained and supported by factual findings in the written rationale of the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s).
        • The range of sanctions that may be imposed for a violation of this Policy include reprimand, probationary status, letter of official discipline, suspension or expulsion, or any additional sanction deemed appropriate by the Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s).
        • In cases when a respondent is found responsible for committing sexual assault, suspension or expulsion is the likely outcome. If suspension is assigned, its duration will be determined in part by the complainant’s needs, and reinstatement or readmission criteria may include but are not limited to evidence of satisfactory progress by the respondent on relevant educational components to the sanction, such as counseling and training.
        • The conditions of reinstatement or readmission will be communicated to both parties. If the respondent’s return will coincide with the complainant’s presence at La Salle University, additional accommodations for the complainant and/or conditions on the respondent to preserve the right of the complainant to a safe environment may be assigned, including but not limited to room assignment consideration, class changes, No Contact Order adjustments, and/or building or extracurricular activity restrictions.
        • Long-term remedies may also be offered or provided to the complainant following sanctioning, which may include: providing an escort on campus; assistance with academics including rescheduling exams and assignments; facilitating a classroom change; housing assignment relocation; restriction of campus access for the respondent (restricted from specific buildings, areas, etc.); no-contact orders; campus employment reassignment; and counseling referrals.
      • Appeals
        • Upon the conclusion of the hearing, both the complainant and the respondent shall have access to the recording of the hearing by scheduling a time to listen to the hearing by contacting the Director of Student Conduct. The audio recording is the property of La Salle University. No transcripts will be made of the hearing, nor any copies of the audio recording be provided to the complainant or respondent.
        • All appeal submissions and appeals will be considered and heard by a three (3) member University Appeals Board (“University Appeals Board”). One member of the University Appeals Board shall be the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, who shall also chair the University Appeals Board and select the other two members.
        • In order for an appeal to be heard the complainant or respondent must demonstrate to the University Appeals Board through his/her written appeal submission one or more of the following:
          • Information that was not available at the time of the hearing is now available, and could reasonably be expected to have altered the outcome of the case; or
          • The University disciplinary procedures were violated in a way that is more likely than not to have adversely affected the outcome of the case.
        • The complainant and the respondent shall have three (3) business days from the date the Notice of Outcome is sent to submit, in writing, an appeal on one or more of the grounds as listed above and include specific details as to why an appeal should be granted. This letter is to be submitted to the Chair of the University Appeals Board.
        • Once an appeal is filed, the parties involved will receive written, electronic notification of such filing. This notice will state that the case is under appeal consideration and if deemed by the University Appeals Board to potentially meet the above standards, will be scheduled in most cases for an appeals hearing within five (5) business days. If the University Appeals Board deems that the written appeal could not satisfy the above standards, written notice of the appeal denial shall be sent to both complainant and respondent following such determination.
        • The party who appeals (“Appealing Party”) must attend the scheduled hearing or forfeit the right to appeal.
        • Except as required to explain the basis of new evidence, the University Appeals Board will limit its review to the process and outcome of the initial hearing (if applicable), together with any supporting documents. Witnesses will not be permitted to appear on appeal except to the extent that witnesses may provide testimony related solely to new evidence or information that the Appealing Party demonstrates was not known or available for the original hearing.
        • The Appealing Party will appear for the scheduled hearing in front of the University Appeals Board and present the basis for the appeal. The counterparty student who did not file the appeal (“Appellee Party”) will have the option to either appear at the appeal hearing or submit a written response for the University Appeals Board’s consideration. There will be a time limit of twenty (20) minutes for each and any student presentation at the scheduled hearing. The Appealing Party and Appellee Party have the right to bring either an advisor of choice or a University-designated advocate, subject to the rules regarding advisors stated herein.
        • The Director of Student Conduct and co-hearer(s) will be available to respond to the appeal and give the rationale for the determination made at the original hearing.
        • After presentation of the appeal and before the parties are dismissed, the University Appeals Board may, at its discretion, ask questions of the parties present. A hearing is considered closed after all testimony and evidence has been submitted by the parties and the chair of the University Appeals Board has concluded the appeal.
        • Following the close of the hearing, the University Appeals Board may:
          • Reverse, reduce, dismiss, uphold, or otherwise modify the original determination and/or status and conditions imposed; or,
          • Remand the case for rehearing for resolving any procedural processes that the University Appeals Board determines was more likely than not to have impacted the outcome of the original hearing.
        • The decision of the University Appeals Board will be sent electronically to the parties within three (3) business days of the hearing in most cases. The determination rendered by the University Appeals Board is final and may not be appealed further in any forum, although the University reserves the right to modify an appeal or hearing decision as appropriate and at its discretion.
      • All written notices to the complainant or respondent referred to herein may be delivered at the University’s discretion to any e-mail or mailing address on file with the University. All written notices will be deemed received when sent.
  • Designations

    Whenever an official University title or office is named throughout this Policy, the official’s or office’s designee may act in the official’s or office’s role.

  • University Resources

    • Campus Confidential Resources

      Title IX Advocate/Educator
      215.951.1387

      Respondent Advocate
      215.951.1470

      Student Counseling Center
      215.951.1355

      Student Health Center
      215.951.1565

      Alcohol and Other Drug Education Center
      215.951.1357

      Ordained Priest in Ministry, Service and Support
      215.951.1976

    • Additional Campus Resources

      Residence Life and Community Development
      215.951.1916

      La Salle Public Safety
      215.951.1300 or 215.991.2111

    • Off Campus Resources
      • Medical Concerns/Treatments

        PA Sexual Assault Response Center: SVU
        300 E. Hunting Park Ave., Philadelphia, PA
        Call Public Safety (215.951.1300) for free transport.
        215.685.3251

        Abington Hospital
        1200 Old York Road
        Abington, PA 1900
        215.481.2000

      • 24 Hour Hotlines

        Women Organized Against Rape (WOAR)
        215.985.3333

        Philadelphia Domestic Violence Hotline (Women Against Abuse)
        1.866.723.3014

        AIDS Hotline
        215.985.AIDS

        Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN)
        1.800.656.4673

      • Spanish/Bilingual Services

        Congreso de Latinos Unidos
        1.866.723.3014

        Bilingual Domestic Violence Project (24-hour bilingual domestic violence hotline)
        215.763.8870 x1300

      • Services for Lesbian and Bisexual Women

        Women in Transition Hotline
        215.751.1111

      • State Resources for Sexual Assault

        Pennsylvania Commission on Human Relations
        215.560.2496

      • Criminal Prosecution

        Philadelphia Special Victims Unit
        215.685.3251

      • Resources for Respondents (Male or Female)

        Men’s Resource Center
        215.564.0488

        Menergy
        215.242.2235

        John J. Peter’s Institute
        215.701.1560

    Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX may be referred to the applicable Deputy Title IX Coordinator(s), the Title IX Coordinator, or to the United States Department of Education Office for Civil Rights, Philadelphia Office, U.S. Department of Education, The Wanamaker Building, 100 Penn Square East, Suite 515, Philadelphia, PA 19107-3323, Telephone 215.656.8541, Fax 215.656.8605, Email

III. E. Student Alcohol and Other Drug University Expectations

  • Purpose

    La Salle University is a community that believes the best environment for learning occurs when the community promotes and supports healthy and responsible behavior among its members. Students make their own choices and are ultimately responsible for their behavior. The purpose of the Student Alcohol and Other Drug University Expectations is to promote individual responsibility and advance the goals and expectations central to the university mission. The Student Alcohol and Other Drug University Expectations applies to all student members of the university community and their guests.

    La Salle University follows all local, state, and federal laws. Students and student organizations are subject to local, state and federal laws regarding alcohol and drug use, and the university will not protect individuals or groups from law enforcement with respect to drugs and alcohol use or abuse.

    In order to avoid the dangerous and possibly fatal effects of alcohol poisoning or overdosing from other drugs, an individual who has passed out or shows other signs of serious effects from alcohol or other drug consumption should immediately be brought to the attention of La Salle Public Safety, Residence Life, Community Development or some other person able to assist or to get assistance. Seeking such help is encouraged by La Salle and the Amnesty Process is included in the expectations listed below.

    Federal, State, and City Sanctions Related to the Use, Possession, and Distribution of Alcohol and Drugs

    • Alcohol
      • Under Pennsylvania law and the Pennsylvania Crimes and Liquor Codes, a person under 21 years of age commits a summary offense if they attempt to or in actuality (1) purchase, (2) consume, (3) possess, or (4) transport alcohol. Police must notify the parents of a minor charged with violating this law. If convicted, the minor’s driver’s license will be suspended. A second offense will yield a fine of up to $500.
      • In addition, any person who intentionally provides alcohol to a minor will be convicted of a misdemeanor in the third degree, for which the fine will be at least $1,000 for the first offense, and $2,500 for any subsequent violations.
      • The City of Philadelphia prohibits the consumption, carrying, or possession of an open container of alcoholic beverages in the public right-of-way or on private property without the expressed permission of the landowner or tenant. A person who commits a violation may be subject to a fine up to $300, as well as imprisonment for up to ten (10) days, if the fine together with costs, are not paid within ten (10) days.
    • Drugs
      • Federal and state laws prohibit the possession, use, and distribution of illegal drugs. Also, under federal law, anyone who is at least 18 years old and who distributes drugs to anyone under 21 will be imprisoned and/or fined up to twice what is otherwise provided by law, with a minimum prison sentence of one year.
    • Procedures

      La Salle University Expectations Regarding Student Alcohol and Other Drugs

      Students who are found to be in potential violation of the following university expectations will be referred to the University Student Conduct Process and subject to university disciplinary action.

      • Alcohol
        • No person less than twenty-one (21) years of age shall purchase, consume, possess, be in the presence of, transport or attempt to purchase, consume, possess, or transport any alcohol, liquor, or malt or brewed beverages on University property or at any University sponsored events.
        • No student shall transfer or possess a registration card or other form of identification for the purpose of falsifying age to secure any alcohol, liquor, or malt or brewed beverages.
        • No student shall sell, furnish, allow to possess, or give any alcohol, liquor, or malt or brewed beverages, or permit any alcohol, liquor, or malt or brewed beverage to be sold, furnished, allowed to be possessed, or given to any person under twenty-one (21) years of age.
        • Behavior that results in intoxication, disorderliness, or offensive behavior resulting from the use of alcohol is prohibited, regardless of the student’s age.
        • The use of alcohol is prohibited in the academic buildings, or in the public areas of residence halls or university-owned apartments, in the La Salle Union or other University facilities, or at University sponsored functions on or off campus unless it is authorized by the University.
        • Students who are twenty-one (21) years of age or older are permitted to consume alcohol on campus only when such consumption does not interfere with the rights and privileges of other community members.
        • Students who are twenty-one (21) years of age or older are permitted to drink alcohol only at registered events or in the privacy of residence hall rooms, apartments, or townhouses.
        • No bulk quantities of alcohol (i.e. kegs), grain alcohol or alcohol over 100 proof is permitted in residence hall rooms, apartments, or townhouses.
        • Students, regardless of age, may not brew or distill any alcoholic beverages in residence hall rooms, apartments or townhouses.
        • La Salle students will be responsible at all times for the behavior of their guests.
        • Students under twenty-one (21) years of age may not possess empty containers of alcohol in any university residence hall room, apartment or townhouse.
        • If alcohol is present for students who are twenty-one (21) years of age or older, the following occupancy numbers must be followed:
        • Residents and guests may not exceed a total of eight (8) in a residence hall room.
        • Residents and guests may not exceed a total of twelve (12) in an apartment/townhouse.
        • Off-campus incidents that involve alcohol consumption by students who are under twenty-one (21) years of age, result in behavior that includes intoxication, disorderliness, or offensive behavior resulting from the use of alcohol is prohibited, regardless of the student’s age and will be subject to the university’s student conduct process.
        • Students are prohibited from advertising parties where alcohol is to be served. Fliers, public social media posts or mass electronic invitations are not permitted.
      • Drugs

        • Students are prohibited from illegally using, possessing, manufacturing or distributing drugs. Distribution includes selling or providing drugs to persons of any age.
        • Sharing or distributing prescription medicine or other legal drugs, with or without the exchange of money, is prohibited.
        • Students are prohibited from possessing drug paraphernalia on university property.
  • Additional Notes

    La Salle University Alcohol and Other Drug Amnesty Process

    Student health and safety is a primary concern for the La Salle University community. Students are expected to contact La Salle Public Safety, Residence Life or Community Development when it is believed an individual needs medical attention due to the abuse of alcohol or other drugs including illegal, prescription, over the counter substances. The Alcohol and Other Drug Amnesty Process is designed to provide education rather than discipline when a student voluntarily contacts university personnel (e.g., La Salle Public Safety, an RA/CC or professional staff member in Residence Life or Community Development) or outside emergency services for medical assistance related to alcohol or other drugs. Individuals covered by the Alcohol and Other Drug Amnesty Process are the caller, the person in need of assistance, the host student organization, and any witnesses named in the incident report.

    • The Director of Student Conduct or their designee will determine whether or not the Alcohol and Other Drug Amnesty Process is applicable for each incident.
    • Incidents involving sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking shall be covered by the Alcohol and Other Drug Amnesty Process for those students reporting or intervening to prevent harm to a particular student.
    • Incidents involving other violence or serious student conduct code violations will not apply.
    • A professional from the Division of Student Affairs will contact the student or the student organization involved in the incident to arrange for a meeting.
    • There will be no official student conduct process from the university through the Alcohol and Other Drug Amnesty Process.
    • The person who made the call to university personnel may also be asked to attend a meeting with a professional from the Division of Student Affairs.
    • At the meeting, the incident will be reviewed with the student or student organization to determine an appropriate educational response, which could include participation in an educational group or class, program presentations, counseling intake session, or substance abuse education and/or evaluation. A response may also include parental/ guardian notification of the incident.
    • If a student or student organization fails to attend the meeting with the professional from the Division of Student Affairs or complete the educational responses following the meeting, the incident will be referred to the Student Conduct Process.

    COVID-19 Amnesty Protocol

    Student health and safety remains a primary concern for the La Salle University community. As such, students who come forward with information relating to contact tracing (as it relates to positive cases of COVID-19) and/or violations of the Student expectations for COVID-19 section of the Return to Campus Plan will not face disciplinary charges for bringing information to University personnel.

    Examples of information students may share with the University include:

    • Sharing information regarding a positive COVID-19 test result or exposure to an individual who tested positive for COVID-19
    • Participating in conversations where information is shared that is considered necessary for contact tracing
    • Obtaining medical evaluation or care for themselves or others related to COVID-19 and/or medical issues arising from the use of alcohol or other drugs

    In recognition of the fact that students may be hesitant to share this information with the University, the COVID amnesty policy has been created. La Salle University expects that students will be honest and forthcoming with any information they have as it relates to contact tracing (related to possible exposure to COVID-19).

    Students should be aware that conversations with University staff members who coordinate contact tracing procedures and quarantine/isolation recommendations remain private and will not be shared with the Office of Student Conduct.  However, it should be noted that if an incident report is received by the Office of Student Conduct for Student Code of Conduct violations (which may include COVID-19 violations),the student will be required to go through the student conduct process. Furthermore, students are required to follow quarantine and isolation protocols. Failure to follow said protocols will result in disciplinary action through the student conduct process.

    Similar to what is stated within the Alcohol and Other Drugs Amnesty Process, incidents involving serious student conduct code violations will not apply to the amnesty process. Students should not hesitate to bring forward information that is pertinent to contact tracing or safety in general, even in instances where violations of the Student Code of Conduct may have occurred, including physical violence, sexual violence, threats, bias incidents, hazing, or other dangerous behaviors. Students are required to inform the university of all violations of the Student Code of Conduct, even if the incidents occurred in a setting that was not compliant with the university’s Student Expectations for COVID-19. Reporting of this types of incidents remains of utmost importance to continue to keep our campus community safe.

III. F. General Student Policies

  • Rights

    • Individual Rights, Disclosure of Information
      • Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
        • Each and every registered student of the University (hereafter “a student”) has the right to review his or her own educational records in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The following materials may not be reviewed: private notations in the sole possession of one person, parents’ confidential statements, and psychiatric and other medical records. However, psychiatric and other medical records may be reviewed by a physician or other appropriate professional of the student’s choice.
        • A student has the right to place in his or her own educational records materials of an explanatory nature concerning any item held therein. Any such material shall bear a notation that it was placed in the file at the student’s request.
        • A student has the right to waive his or her right of access to any materials in his or her own educational records. No such waiver shall be effective unless it is made in writing. All materials collected during the time that such a waiver was in effect shall be exempt from access by the student during any future examination.
        • A student has the right to refuse access to his or her own educational records, or to any item contained therein, to any person or agency not authorized under the Act. Those who are authorized under the Act include school officials and faculty who have a legitimate educational interest, officials of other schools in which a student seeks to enroll, and certain federal and state educational agencies.
        • A student has the right to request that his or her own educational records be amended if they are inaccurate, misleading, or violate his or her privacy or other rights. If the request is denied, the student is entitled to a hearing according to established University procedures.
        • A complete text of the Act, as well as those Federal Regulations issued under the Act, is available for inspection in the office of the Registrar.
      • Student Right-To-Know Act

        In compliance with Title I – Section 103 of the Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act, as amended by the Higher Education Technical Amendments of 1991, the one-year persistence rate for first-time degree seeking students who entered La Salle University in Fall 2001 on a full-time basis was 89 percent. Inquiries pertaining to this information should be directed to the Office of the Registrar.

    • Curricular Standards
      • A student shall have the right to pursue any course of study available within the University, providing he or she can be accommodated within the program, meet the requirements for entering, and continue to meet the requirements in the program.
      • A student shall have the right to know at the beginning of each semester, ordinarily during the first week of class, the criteria to be used by the instructor in determining grades in each course.
      • A student shall have the right to see his or her own tests and other written material after grading, and the instructor shall have the duty to make this material available within a reasonable time.
      • Upon request, a student shall have the right to have his or her grade on such written material explained by the instructor. A request for such explanation must be made within one week after the written material, as graded, is made available to the student.
      • Final Grades. If a student believes that his or her final grade was based on an arbitrary or capricious action or some other inappropriate criteria not linked to academic performance the student must follow the procedure described in this subsection.

        The purpose of this policy is to outline the mechanism by which students may appeal assigned grades. The procedure is initiated by the student utilizing the Grade Appeal Form found on the student portal. It applies only to assignment of consequential or summative grades. This procedure does not apply to smaller coursework assignments (e.g., quizzes, brief writing assignments). A grade can be overturned, changed or modified only if it is found arbitrary or capricious, or based on inappropriate criteria not linked to academic performance, demonstration of skills or professionalism (“inappropriate criteria”).

        If a student believes that his or her grade is arbitrary or capricious action or based on some other inappropriate criteria, the student must follow the procedure described in this policy to formally appeal the grade.

        There is a presumption that assigned grades are based on performance and authoritative. Thus, a student seeking a grade appeal bears the burden of proving during the appeals procedure that the grade is arbitrary or capricious, or based on inappropriate criteria. Overturning an assigned grade requires proof that the alleged grade was actually based on an arbitrary or capricious action or some other inappropriate criteria.

        Within the University, the structures of programs may vary, and the involved Faculty Member may be represented in multiple roles. The appeal process for each student will depend upon the structure of the program and the parties involved, but the order of appeal shall be directed through three stages, if needed, as described herein. The Stage 1 appeal are directed to the faculty member who issued the grade (“Faculty Member”). Stage 2 appeals must be directed to the Program Director and/or Department Chairperson. Stage 3 appeals must be directed to the appropriate Dean.

        The appeals process must be followed in the order explained below.
        The time limits provided must be followed; however all parties are encouraged to be expeditious in moving through the appeal. Delivery of documents and forms may be completed in accordance with this Policy through the University e-mail system. Documents and/or forms are considered delivered when mailed.

        • Stage 1: Appealing to the Faculty Member Issuing the Grade
          • The Student must initiate the grade appeal process by delivering a complete and factually detailed written explanation of his/her complaint to the Faculty Member using the Grade Appeal Form within 14 days of the grade in question being posted or otherwise made available. If the Student fails to initiate the grade appeal in the prescribed manner and/or time period, there shall be no opportunity for an appeal of the grade.
          • The Faculty Member who issued the grade must respond to the student, in writing, within 14 days of the delivery of the appeal. The Faculty Member’s response must include a clear indication as to whether the grade should stand (as originally assigned) or an explanation of how the grade will be revised.
          • After receiving the written response from the Faculty Member, the student may accept the decision and end the appeal or continue to Stage 2 of the appeal procedure.
        • Stage 2: Appealing to the Program Director and Department Chairperson
          • The student’s appeal at Stage 2 shall be initiated by delivering, within 14 days of the Faculty Member’s response in Stage 1, a new Grade Appeal Form, along with the Stage 1 appeal documents (Grade Appeal Form and Faculty Response) to the Program Director. If there is no Program Director, the appeal shall be delivered to the Department Chairperson. If the disputed grade was issued by a Faculty Member who also serves as a Program Director or Department Chairperson, that Faculty Member must recuse his or herself from Stage 2. If there is no Program Director and the grade was issued by the Department Chairperson, then the Stage 2 appeal will be skipped, and the appeal should move to Stage 3.
          • In the Stage 2 appeal, the Program Director and/or Department Chairperson will review and consider the written appeal documents and render an opinion as to whether the originally assigned grade is justifiable (not arbitrary or capricious or based on inappropriate criteria) or if it was unjustifiable (arbitrary or capricious or based on inappropriate criteria). The Program Director and Department Chairperson may, but are not required to, review the appeal documents from Stage 1. If the Stage 2 review involves both a Program Director and a Program Chairperson, and if their opinions differ, the student shall be so notified and all relevant appeal material and their written opinions will be forwarded automatically to a Stage 3 appeal. If the Program Director and/or the Department Chairperson agree that the originally assigned grade is justifiable or unjustifiable, a written response explaining the reasons will be sent to the Student. If the Stage 2 appeal results in a finding that the assigned grade was arbitrary or capricious, or otherwise based on inappropriate criteria, the Program Director and/or Department Chairperson will consult with the Faculty Member who issued the grade, direct an appropriate change, and ensure that the change is enacted. The student will receive a written notice of the decisions and actions from the Program Director and/or the Department Chairperson.
          • After receiving the written decision from the Stage 2 appeal, the student may accept the decision and end the appeal or continue to the Stage 3 appeal to the Academic Dean of the relevant school (Arts and Sciences, Business, or Nursing and Health Sciences).
        • Stage 3: Appealing to the Academic Dean
          • A Stage 3 appeal is made to the Academic Dean and must be made in writing and received within 14 days of the Student’s receipt of the Stage 2 decision. If the Dean was the Faculty Member who originally assigned the grade, the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs will assume the role and duties outlined for the Stage 3 appeal.
          • All of the documents from the Stage 1 and Stage 2 appeals (from the Faculty Member issuing the grade, Program Director and/or Department Chairperson) must be forwarded to the Dean within 7 days of request from the Dean.
          • The Dean will request a written response from the Faculty Member who issued the disputed grade. This should be requested by the Dean and received within 21 days of having received the student’s Stage 3 appeal when possible. If the Faculty Member cannot be reached or does not respond, the appeal shall move forward based on the reasoning provided by the Faculty Member in the Stage 1 response documents.
          • The Dean will submit the grade appeal documentation and any other relevant materials to the Grade Appeal Panel for a review and recommendation. For grade appeals presented by a graduate student, the Grade Appeal Panel will include at least one faculty representative from that graduate program. Members of the Academic and Faculty Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate from the department/program where the appeal originates should recuse themselves from service on the Grade Appeal Panel.
          • The Grade Appeal Panel’s review and recommendation will be based exclusively on documentation furnished by the Dean or from other available resources as the Grade Appeal Panel deems necessary to complete a full and fair review. If the Panel feels it necessary to speak to members of the appropriate department as resources, it may do so. The Grade Appeal Panel may convene its members in person or permit individual review of the record in making its recommendation. All Grade Appeal Panel members must review the same information and data.
          • Within 30 days of receiving the grade appeal documentation, the Grade Appeal Panel will issue a written recommendation to the Dean stating whether the challenged grade was justifiable or unjustifiable based on academic performance.
          • If the majority of the Grade Appeal Panel finds that the grade given was justifiable, the recommendation should be that the appeal shall be denied. If the majority of the Grade Appeal Panel finds that the grade given was unjustifiable, the recommendation shall be a referral to the appropriate academic administrator for a decision or other appropriate corrective action.
          • The Dean will review the record, the recommendation of the Panel, and then adopt the Panel’s recommendation unless there are compelling reasons not to do so. If the recommendation is adopted, the decision of the Dean is final. If the decision requires a grade change, the Dean will initiate the grade change with the Registrar. The Dean will inform the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs of the final decision in writing. If the Dean declines to adopt the majority opinion and recommendations of the panel, the Dean will send the appeal file to the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs, who will then make the final grade determination based upon the entire appeals record, including any written comments from the Dean. If the decision of the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs requires a grade change, the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs will initiate the grade change with the Registrar.
          • Prior to issuing that final decision, the Dean or Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs will notify the Faculty Member of the proposed decision. If there is a recommendation to change the grade, the Faculty Member will have an opportunity to change the grade. If the Faculty Member declines to change the grade, the Dean or Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs will do so with the Registrar.
          • The Student and the Faculty Member will receive a written final grade determination.
          • The Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs may extend any of the specified time requirements, due to extenuating circumstances upon written request. At the completion of Stage 3, there is no further appeal.

        This process will be completed in strict confidence. All records related to the grade appeal process will be maintained in accordance with La Salle University record keeping policies.

      • A student shall be promptly informed if he or she is placed on any form of academic censure.
    • Speech and Expression of Opinion
      • No student shall be penalized for the reasonable expression of any view which is relevant to the classroom discussion or written material.
      • A student participates in student organizations and activities in his or her own time, and by his or her own decision. No student shall be penalized for any such participation, but neither shall any student claim indulgence from academic obligations by virtue of such participation
    • Collective Rights
      • Students shall have the right, through their representatives, to participate with full privileges, together with faculty and administration, in the development of both University and departmental curricula through University Council and Academic and Department Committees and Boards.
      • Students shall have the right to express an opinion in decisions regarding the evaluation, tenure, and promotion of faculty and department heads. The University promises to listen to such opinion, if rendered in good faith. However, the University will not be bound by student opinion in such decisions nor will failure to secure such opinion constitute a ground for complaint by a faculty member who has not been rehired, promoted, given tenure, or made department head.
      • The University shall establish and adhere to nondiscriminatory policies of equal opportunity to all academic facets of the University.
  • Academic Responsibilities of Registered Students

    • University Regulations

      Students are responsible for acquainting themselves with the academic regulations of the University as outlined in the Student Guide to Resources, Rights, and Responsibilities and the University Bulletins. Ignorance of the regulations does not excuse any student from their application.

    • Provision of Information

      Students are responsible for supplying standard information, when required by the University, on their own personal background and academic history, in a clear, complete, and accurate manner. Misrepresentation in this respect is a serious matter.

    • Curricular Standards
      • Students are responsible for meeting the requirements of class attendance, test dates, and assignment deadlines, and for proper behavior during classes.
      • Students are responsible for the integrity of their academic work. In this regard plagiarism is a serious violation. Plagiarism is defined as the presentation of the ideas of another as one’s own. Any use of another’s ideas without proper acknowledgment is plagiarism.
    • Speech and Expression

      In exercising the rights of freedom speech and expression, students should respect the sensitivities and the corresponding rights of others.

    • Collective Responsibilities

      Students are responsible for honoring the obligation they assume when accepting positions on collegiate committees and boards.

  • Academic Integrity Policy

    • Purpose and mission (abstracted from the La Salle University mission statement):

      The central academic mission of La Salle University’s undergraduate programs is to maintain, as a foundation of all learning, a common, comprehensive liberal arts core which will challenge all students with courses that address the analytic process (philosophical and/or scientific); the communication process (oral and written; emitted and received); and, the historical, intellectual and creative growth of humanity. The purpose of graduate study at La Salle University is to enhance both practical and theoretical knowledge in order to augment and enrich professional competencies. All programs are designed to prepare students for informed service and progressive leadership in their chosen fields.

      The mission of La Salle University underscores the importance of providing students with a values- based education that occurs in the context of an inter-faith educational community. As its basic purpose, the University promotes free search for truth by teaching students basic skills, knowledge and values that they will need to lead a life of dignity. Thus, it is through active engagement in learning that students’ personal, social, and religious values may take root and foster mature, value-driven attitudes and behavior. All students and faculty who choose to become part of the La Salle University community also have a moral or ethical obligation to pursue all forms of learning with integrity, dignity, and responsibility towards others.

    • What is academic integrity?

      Integrity is defined as “adherence to moral and ethical principles; uprightness, honesty, and sincerity.” The key to academic integrity is setting personal standards for oneself and living up to those standards each day. Routinely displaying honesty, responsibility, respect for others, and fairness will serve as a model of integrity to others, the campus community, region, state, and world. One who has integrity follows moral and ethical standards even when circumstances arise that challenge those standards.

      Trust is an essential trait of integrity. A lapse of trust negatively impacts our relationships with others. Who can trust someone who is dishonest or unfair? The act of learning is not a solitary venture and thus requires the scaffolding of a competent instructor or peer. Group work is rooted in trust. Team members must be able to trust that each person’s contributions will enhance the group effort and instructors must trust that each student is contributing his or her fair share.

      Thus, by becoming a member of La Salle University’s community the individual enters an academic world where distinguished faculty, dedicated staff, and students of great potential work collaboratively to achieve and learn from one another. It is only through a strong commitment to La Salle’s learning community that the student can live the moral and ethical principles that are supported and maintained by its mission. The faculty has a special responsibility to model appropriate academic integrity and to ensure that these policies are communicated, understood, and maintained at all times.

      Sources used
    • Why have an Academic Integrity Policy?

      All too frequently academic integrity and plagiarism policies are regarded as disciplinary tools employed to ferret out misconduct. It is important, then, to recognize the positive implications of such a policy for students, faculty, and the campus as a whole.

      • Fairness

        A policy that applies to all students and faculty can provide the reassurance that everyone on campus is held to the same ethical standards. Students can be confident that their attempts to present honest work are not undermined by the dishonest work of others. Faculty may find comfort in the knowledge that they are not alone in aggressively responding to instances of academic dishonesty. Rather, they are a part of a community endeavor to maintain high standards of integrity.

      • Benefits for students

        This policy provides a forum through which students can be educated about the nature of academic integrity. By discouraging “passive” methods of learning and research, the policy can create an atmosphere that promotes active understanding and engagement, thus encouraging students to develop intellectually.

      • Benefits for faculty

        The policy creates an optimal learning environment because it encourages mutual respect and high standards among all members of the classroom learning community. This enables faculty to fulfill course goals without the need for establishing individual academic integrity policies.

      • Benefits for the La Salle Community

        By promoting academic integrity and ethical behavior in the classroom, the policy helps to ensure an environment that fosters trust, mutual respect, and love of learning.

      • Sources used
        • La Salle University English Department Policy on Plagiarism and Academic Honesty.
        • La Salle University Graduate Psychology student handbook.
  • Academic Dishonesty

    • “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.” -Isaac Newton

      Often, when we develop ideas, they are not free of the effects and influences of others’ previous findings, claims, and analyses. This suggests that much of the thinking that we do in a university setting is motivated, shaped, and focused in response to work that may have been published or stated by others. Usually, our ideas evolve in response to reading others’ writings. We base research on earlier scholarship and communication with others (Citing Sources and Avoiding Plagiarism – Duke University). We give credit where credit is due. Therefore, we cite the intellectual contributions of others.

      Academic Dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following:

      • Cheating

        Cheating is the act of wrongly using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, study aids, or the ideas or work of another. This includes giving or receiving unauthorized aid in the completion of such things as written assignments, quizzes, or tests. Submitting the same written work for two different courses qualifies as another form of cheating.

      • Plagiarism

        Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of other people’s ideas, both written and unwritten (Avoiding Plagiarism – National Louis University). Scholarly authors generously acknowledge their debts to predecessors by carefully giving credit to each source. Whenever one draws on another’s work, one must specify what has been borrowed – whether facts, opinions, or quotations – and its source. Using another person’s ideas or expressions in writing without acknowledging the source constitutes plagiarism. Derived from the Latin plagiarius (“kidnapper”), plagiarism refers to a form of intellectual theft. In short, to plagiarize is to give the impression that the author wrote or thought something that in fact was borrowed from someone else, and to do so is a violation of professional ethics. (Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 2nd ed., New York: MLA, 1998: 151).

        • Avoiding Plagiarism

          Since plagiarism can be a temptation for those students who are facing an imminent deadline, students can use the following procedures that may help to ensure a project is properly documented.

          • Make sure you understand the material you are using before incorporating it into your work.
          • Avoid relying too heavily on the ideas of others.
          • Make sure you know how to cite correctly. This includes Internet-based sources as well as traditional
            scholarly works.
          • Talk to a librarian and attend library instruction workshops.
          • Do not use Internet “paper mills.”
        • This is what must be referenced:

          • Direct quotes.
          • Paraphrasing.
          • Ideas acquired via reading, conversation, or correspondence.
          • Statistics and data that are not yours.
      • Cooperative or Group Learning

        When group projects or cooperative learning activities require collaboration, students must understand clearly what is proper and improper cooperation and collaboration and how individuals are expected to contribute to the project (Strategies for Avoiding Plagiarism – Westmont College). If a group member plagiarizes, the entire group may be held accountable. Concern about copying must be dealt with as soon as plagiarism is suspected. Related to plagiarism is the fact that some students may over-rely on other group members to do the majority of the work while they all receive the same mark (Designing Assessment Tasks to Minimize Plagiarism – University of Wollongong, Australia). To ensure fairness, faculty should develop a system of communication whereby students have an opportunity to express their concerns.

  • Academic Integrity Violation Procedures

    • Step 1

      When a faculty member suspects an academic integrity violation, the faculty member must discuss the suspected violation with the student within one calendar week. This discussion must take place through face-to-face, telephone, or electronic (e.g., Skype) means. Email is not an appropriate medium through which to discuss an alleged academic integrity violation.

    • Step 2

      If, after the discussion with the student, the faculty member believes there to be an academic integrity violation, the faculty member will file a written Academic Dishonesty Report (ADR) within one calendar week of the discussion with the student. The ADR prepared by the faculty member must contain the following:

      • Date of the ADR, name of instructor, instructor’s department/school, name of student accused of committing the academic integrity violation, student’s major/school, date of the violation, and place of the violation.
      • A written summary of the incident, fully detailing the academic integrity violation.
      • Evidence of the academic integrity violation. In the case where other students have reported the academic violation to the instructor, the instructor will summarize these accusations and evidence gathered. In the case where the instructor has physical evidence of the violation, the evidence should be attached to the ADR.

      The ADR will be mailed to the student to his/her home address and campus address (if any). Email in this instance is not an appropriate form of transmittal. A copy of the ADR also must be sent by the faculty member to the Assistant Provost for Academic Affairs, to the faculty member’s Department Chair, and to the Director of the Program in which the violation occurred.

    • Step 3

      The student who has been accused of the academic integrity violation has one calendar week from the date that the faculty member’s ADR is received to send a rebuttal to the faculty member making the accusation.

    • Step 4

      After receipt of the student’s rebuttal, the faculty member has one calendar week to make a final judgment as to whether an academic integrity violation has occurred. In making a final judgment, the faculty should prepare a written response to the student’s rebuttal. If the faculty member continues to believe an academic integrity violation occurred, the faculty member may choose to impose one or more of the following sanctions on the student. The choice of sanction(s) will necessarily be matched to the number of previous violations and to the level of the infraction in the faculty member’s judgment.

      • A reduction in grade recorded for the assignment/test.
      • A zero recorded for the assignment/test.
      • An “F” grade assigned for the course.
      • In some Programs, a sanction for an academic integrity violation might result in dismissal from the Program and from the University. The student should consult program information in the catalog, Program Handbook, and course syllabus for more details.

      If the faculty member recommends a sanction other than one of those specified in Step 4 (i-iii), each of the stages (i.e., 1 through 5) described below in Step 5 must be followed.

      In determining the sanction(s), the faculty member will contact the Assistant Provost to ascertain whether prior ADRs have been filed on this student.

      The faculty member’s final judgment and sanction(s) will be communicated to the student in writing within one calendar week of the final decision through a hard copy letter and via email with a delivered receipt and a read receipt. The faculty member’s ADR, the student’s rebuttal, and the faculty member’s response to the rebuttal will be sent by the faculty member within one calendar week to the office of the Dean of the School in which the academic integrity violation occurred, the office of the department Chair in which the academic integrity violation occurred, the student’s academic advisor, and the Assistant Provost.

    • Step 5

      Students accused of academic integrity violations are protected by certain rights and privileges described below.

      Individual Rights: Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, every registered student has the right to review his or her educational records, which in this case, include records pertaining to academic integrity violations. After reviewing his or her records, the student has a right to attach an explanatory note to academic integrity ADRs that are contained in that file. The student also has a right to request that his/her records be amended if they are inaccurate, misleading, or violate personal privacy or other rights. If the student’s request is denied, the student is entitled to a hearing according to established University procedures.

      If the student believes that the charge of academic dishonesty or the sanctions imposed as a result of an alleged academic integrity violation are unfounded, unfair, or based on instructor bias, whimsy, or caprice, the student may appeal the faculty member’s decision within two weeks of the date of the faculty member’s final judgment and sanction(s) following the steps outlined below.

      • If dissatisfied with the instructor’s decision, the student may appeal to the department Chair of the relevant department who has assigned the faculty member to the course in which the violation occurred. The Chair will consider the evidence presented in the ADR, the student’s written appeal, and the instructor’s written response to the appeal. The Chair may confer with the student accused of having committed an academic integrity violation and the member of the faculty who brought the charge. The department Chair will respond in writing to the student and instructor within two weeks of receiving all the evidence in the case and forward a copy of her/his response to the Dean’s office in which the violation occurred.
      • If dissatisfied with the department Chair’s decision, the student may appeal within two weeks of the Chair’s decision to the Dean of the School in which the academic integrity violation occurred. The Dean will consider the evidence presented in the ADR, the student’s written appeal, the instructor’s written response to the appeal, and the Chair’s response. The Dean may confer with the student accused of having committed an academic integrity violation, the faculty member who brought the charge, and/or the Chair. The Dean will respond in writing to the department Chair, student, and instructor within two weeks of receiving all the evidence in the case and forward a copy of that ADR, reports from the Instructor and Chair, and her/his response to the Assistant Provost.
      • If dissatisfied with the decision of the Dean, the student may appeal to the Provost within two weeks of the Dean’s decision. The Provost will consider the evidence presented in the ADR, the student’s written appeal, the instructor’s written response to the appeal, the Chair’s response, and the Dean’s response. The Provost may confer with the student accused of having committed an academic integrity violation, the faculty member who brought the charge, the Chair, and/or the Dean. Recommendations for further action will be made by the Provost. The Provost will respond in writing to the Dean, department Chair, faculty member, and student within two weeks of receiving all the evidence in the case. The Provost represents the final appeal in the process.
      • The only exception to Steps i-iii immediately above is if the faculty member, Chair, or Dean recommends a sanction of suspension or dismissal. If suspension or dismissal is recommended, the violation will be appealed to the University Academic Integrity Violation Appeals Committee prior to consideration by the Provost.

      • The Appeals Committee is convened only for a recommendation other than that specified in Step 4 (i-iii). The Appeals Committee will be convened by the Provost. The Appeals Committee will be composed of six faculty members and/or academic administrators, all chosen by the Provost. Of the six members of the Appeals Committee, there will be at least one member from each of the three Schools. Additionally, of the six members, three will be members of the faculty. The following individuals will be excluded from membership on the Appeals Committee: the faculty member who made the accusation of the academic integrity violation, the Chair associated with the student’s program of study/major, the Chair in which the violation occurred, and the Dean of the School in which the violation occurred. Once convened, the members will choose a chair. The Chair of the Appeals Committee, typically a member of the faculty, will be charged with convening the group and presenting both sides of the case. The Chair of the Appeals Committee is to confer with the student accused of having committed an academic integrity violation and the member of the faculty who brought the charge and may confer with the relevant department Chair and/or Dean. The Chair of the Appeals Committee will gather information from the student, faculty member, and other relevant sources for the purpose of reporting this information to the Appeals Committee. The Chair of the Appeals Committee will also provide an overview of information gathered from meetings with the student charged with the academic integrity violation, the faculty member who made the charge, and other relevant sources. Copies of the original ADR prepared by the faculty member, the student’s response, and the subsequent responses from the faculty member, department Chair, and Dean will be reviewed by Appeals Committee members during this meeting. The Appeals Committee meeting will convene within a reasonable amount of time (depending on circumstances, three or four weeks) after receiving notice. If necessary, the chair of the Appeals Committee may request an extension from the Provost. Recommendations for further action will be made by the Appeals Committee by majority vote. The Chair of the Appeals Committee will respond in writing to the Dean, department Chair, faculty member, student, and Provost within two weeks of receiving all the evidence in the case.
      • Once the Provost receives the report from the Appeals Committee, s/he will confer with the student accused of having committed an academic integrity